Alignment: Overall Summary

The Wit and Wisdom materials meet the expectations of alignment to the standards to support students' growing skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The program is built on engaging and high quality texts and present strong multimedia options alongside printed texts. The materials provide strong opportunities for students to hone their writing, speaking, and listening skills throughout the content while demonstrating their growing content knowledge.
See Rating Scale Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
17
32
36
36
32-36
Meets Expectations
18-31
Partially Meets Expectations
0-17
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
32
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
34
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

Texts included with these materials are of high quality, appropriately complex, and include opportunities to apply reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills across a variety of tasks designed to grow students’ literacy skills over the course of the year.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
20/20

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for core texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading and considering a range of student interests.

Core texts cover a range of topics of interest to Grade 8 students. Many of the core texts are written by award-winning authors, and many of the texts themselves have also won awards.

Examples of central texts that are worthy of careful reading include the following:

  • Module 1:
    • The Crossover, by Kwame Alexander (John Newbery Award)
  • Module 2:
    • All Quiet on the Western Front, by Erich Maria Remarque
  • Module 3:
    • A Midsummer Night’s Dream, by William Shakespeare
  • Module 4:
    • Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice, by Phillip Hoose (John Newbery Award)

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. The materials contain a balance of both informational and literary texts. There is also a variety of text types, including multimedia, novels, poetry, paintings, videos, articles, photos, music, and drama.

Examples of core texts and supplemental texts from the module are listed below:

Literary

  • The Crossover, by Kwame Alexander (novel)
  • All Quiet on the Western Front, by Erich Maria Remarque (translator, A.W. Wheen) (novel)
  • In Flanders Fields, by John McCrae (poem)
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream, by William Shakespeare (drama)
  • EPICAC, by Kurt Vonnegut (short story)

Informational

  • Filthy McNasty, by Horace Silver (musical selection)
  • The Block, by Romare Bearden (painting)
  • Slam, Dunk, & Hook, by Yusef Komunyakaa (video)
  • The War to End All Wars, by Shari Lyn Zuber [Cobblestone article] (historial account)
  • Gassed, by John Singer Sargent (painting)
  • What is Love? Five Theories on the Greatest Emotion of All, by Jim Al-Khalili, Philippa Perry, Julian Baggini, Jojo Moyes, and Catherine Wybourne (opinion piece)
  • In the Brain, Romantic Love Is Basically an Addiction, by Helen Fisher (scientific account)
  • Small Change, by Malcolm Gladwell (article)
  • Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice, by Phillip Hoose (historical account)

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 8 meet the expectations that the majority of texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task.

Though some texts fall outside the recommended Lexile range, the materials are accompanied by a qualitative analysis that provides a rationale for use of each text. Texts in the lower end of the Lexile range are typically used to foster student interest or supplement knowledge or evidence needed to complete more demanding tasks. For example, in Module 1 students read the text, The Crossover, by Kwame Alexander. The text has a quantitative measure of 750L. While the narrative is straightforward, it provides a complex account of a young boy’s experience of conflict, loss, and familial relationships. The structure of the text will be unfamiliar to students. The novel-in-verse is built as a single narrative divided into discrete poems that are further sectioned into four quarters, like the four quarters of a basketball game. There is heavy use of descriptive, figurative, and sensory language. The cultural knowledge could present a challenge for students not familiar with professional basketball, and the novel also often alludes to rap, hip-hop, and jazz musicians. However, lessons, questions, and tasks throughout Module 1 as well as the Focus Questions and class discussions allow this text to be accessible to Grade 8 students.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 8 meet the expectations that materials support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. Each module builds in rigor over the course of the school year, providing students opportunities to learn and demonstrate literacy skills at grade level by the end of the school year. Series of texts have a variety of complexity levels and are accompanied by tasks that provide opportunity to practice increasingly rigorous skills. Using the Appendix A- Text Complexity found in the Appendices of each module gives teachers access to the quantitative and qualitative features of each Core Text, including the knowledge, structure, and language use within the texts.

Modules 1-4 provide ample opportunities to increase students' literacy skills throughout the school year. Each of the anchor texts are sufficiently complex, with qualitative factors that are diverse and authentic. While the quantitative scores of the anchor texts span from 750L-1170L, the supplementary texts provided in each module give students balanced reading opportunities, both for the development of skills as well as knowledge and vocabulary. The Module Assessments show increasing complexity of student thinking and provide students opportunities to demonstrate their reading and thinking skills. Teachers are supported in measuring student growth with multiple assessment exemplars located in each module.

The knowledge, structure, and language use within the texts expands through the modules. Though some of the Lexile levels fall below the recommended grade band range for 6-8, these texts are qualitatively complex. Evidence of this expanding rigor is found in the following examples:

  • Module 2: All Quiet on the Western Front (830L): The text conforms to the conventions of a novel set in first person. At the outset of the text there are many flashbacks, which could be a bit disorienting, but the only major structural shift occurs on the last page of the novel. There are references to military equipment and groups (such as billets, CO, CB), German culture (such as one mark, twenty pfennig, Prussians), historical events, and medical terminology (such as carbolic).
  • Module 4: Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice (1170L): Hoose structures his account of Claudette’s story linearly. The text is divided between narration and direct transcripts of interviews with Claudette Colvin. There are also frequent text features, such as photos and text boxes, that provide additional background information for students. Overall, the language in the text is grade appropriate and accessible with the exception of specific legal language and terms. The text is very engaging and accessible and offers frequent asides and rich text features designed to build content knowledge of key issues of the time, but some additional background knowledge may be needed with regards to the Civil Rights Movement and its major figures.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 8 meet the criteria for providing information to the teacher about the text complexity and features of the anchor texts. Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis. A rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level is included.

Each text is accompanied by a text complexity rubric found within the Teacher Edition in Appendix A of each module. The text complexity rubric provides the quantitative, qualitative and reader/task considerations. There is a rationale for each selection presented under the title and author's name, along with a key learning objective. The information provided includes a list of Common Core standards that are met within the piece. The rubric also offers a detailed explanation of the qualitative areas such as meaning/purpose, structure, language, and knowledge demands. On this same page, the quantitative Lexile measure is stated.

Materials also include a rationale for placement, which is located in the Module Summary section that states in a few sentences why most texts are applicable to the student. For example, the Module 1 Summary is found below:

  • “In this module, students examine storytelling as a personal, social, and cultural form of expression that we use to make sense of ourselves and our worlds. As we create narratives from our experiences, we produce our identities, our beliefs, and our views of the world. Exemplifying a seamless combination of exact words and expansive ideas, personal voice and collective values, narrative has a distinctive significance in our lives. In this module, students build an understanding of the power that stories and storytelling hold. They learn the social power of stories, with their potential to help humans navigate complex social situations, become more empathetic to others, and integrate different world views. In addition, students discern the imaginative power of stories, ultimately understanding storytelling as essential to our humanity.” (GM, Grade 8, Module 1, Module Summary)

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for core texts and supporting materials providing opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade-level reading.

Each module includes lessons with supplementary texts of varying lengths. These texts are read in groups, independently, aloud, and silently, offering multiple opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading. Materials also offer multiple novels across the year. Teachers read aloud the back cover of a novel, the first chapter of a novel, and sample sentences to highlight the structure of the text or specific vocabulary terms pertinent to the text. Students then take responsibility for group or independent reading. Opportunities for teacher read alouds and small group work are also available during the scaffolding options component. Students engage with the the majority of content reading independently as homework.

The list below demonstrate the range and volume of reading across all 4 modules and include additional independent reading from the “Parent Tip Sheet.” Examples of texts include:

  • Module 1
    • 1 novel, 1 journal, 1 literary nonfiction, 1 piece of music, 2 paintings, 3 poems, 2 scientific accounts, 1 speech, 5 videos
    • Books to Read at Home include:
      • Spoon River Anthology, Edgar Lee Masters
      • Inside Out and Back Again, Thanhha Lai
      • Brown Girl Dreaming, Jacqueline Woodson
      • Witness, Karen Hesse
      • The Red Pencil, Andrea Davis Pinkney
  • Module 2
    • 1 novel, 4 films, 5 historical accounts, 1 journal, 2 paintings, 2 poems
  • Module 3
    • 1 drama, 1 opinion piece, 2 paintings, 1 scientific account, 1 short story
    • Books to Read at Home include:
      • Tuck Everlasting, Natalie Babbit
      • Emma, Jane Austen
      • Who Was William Shakespeare?, Celeste Mannis
  • Module 4
    • 1 historical account, 2 articles, 1 sculpture, 1 video, 1 speech

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectation that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the texts. Questions draw the reader back into the text and support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year. Reading and writing (and speaking and listening) are done in a cohesive learning environment. Students read and reread to write and discuss. The materials provide opportunities for evidence-based discussions and writing. Examples of student directions include: “Cite evidence as you participate in Socratic Seminar," “Please remember to include proper citations for your textual evidence,” and "A writing rubric requires students to use textual evidence that develops your idea.”

Below are examples of text-dependent/specific questions included in each module:

  • Module 1, Lesson 3:
    • “What action or experience is being captured in this poem?”
    • “What do you notice about how the writer uses descriptive and sensory language in this poem?”
  • Module 2, Lesson 22:
    • “What is the passage saying about annihilation? What does the choice of the word annihilation reveal about the novel’s attitude towards war?”
    • “What techniques does the filmmaker use to convey the idea of annihilation?”
  • Module 3, Lesson 9:
    • “As they stop to rest, what is Hermia telling Lysander to do?”
    • “What is Lysander’s pun with the words lying and lie in 2.2.58?”
  • Module 4, Lesson 18:
    • “What might Wired’s motivations be for publishing an article about social media? What implicit bias might they have?”
    • “How does examining the publication that published Gustin’s article help you understand his purpose?

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectation that they should contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to a culminating task that integrates skills to demonstrate understanding. Each module begins with an Essential Question; each module also contains multiple Focusing Questions that deal with the core text. Each of the daily lessons work toward answering the Focusing Questions while building the skills and knowledge needed to complete the End-of-Module Task. Supplementary texts help to build knowledge while integrating skills such as speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

For example, in Module 3 the Core Text is A Midsummer Night’s Dream, by William Shakespeare. The Essential Question is, “What is love?” The End-of-Module Task is, “Write an argument essay that argues whether the outcome of a romantic relationship between one of the four lovers is directed by agency or fate.” During the Module lessons student read, discuss, and write to build knowledge through various activities and routines. Students work towards understanding the Focusing Questions to build knowledge and complete the culminating task.

Focusing Questions for Module 3 include:

  • Focusing Question 1: How do the characters in A Midsummer Night’s Dream understand love?
  • Focusing Question 2: What defines the experience of love?
  • Focusing Question 3: What makes love complicated?
  • Focusing Question 5: Is love in A Midsummer Night’s Dream a result of agency or fate?

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations providing students frequent opportunities to practice academic vocabulary and syntax in their evidence-based discussions. Each module gives the students ample opportunity to hold evidence-based discussions with Think-Pair-Share, Socratic Seminars, Jigsaw discussions. Gallery Walk/follow-up discussions, etc. The materials offer scaffolds to help students hold academic conversations, including evidence to support students’ claims. Scaffolds include sentence starters, evidence graphic organizers, and teacher-facilitated discussions.

Academic vocabulary instruction is found throughout the modules. Teachers use multiple strategies in introducing, discussing, and using new vocabulary. Each module contains Appendix B, entitled Vocabulary, which clarifies the category in which each word is listed. The materials vocabulary is presented in three categories: Content Vocabulary, Academic Vocabulary, and Text-Critical Vocabulary. Students create vocabulary journals and also participate in Vocabulary Deep Dives and Style and Conventions Deep Dives.

Examples of how students have opportunities for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary include:

Module 1:

  • Students engage in a Socratic Seminar in which they will evaluate multiple meanings of the word crossover in The Crossover, especially as they develop the novel’s themes and structure.

Module 2:

  • In Lesson 10, after reading pages 59-64 of All Quiet on the Western Front, students will engage in a Think-Pair-Share, answering given discussion questions.

Module 3:

  • In Lesson 32, students participate in a Socratic Seminar on the reality of love by addressing the question: Is love real?

Module 4:

  • In Lesson 9, students participate in a Socratic Seminar to debate Claudette Colvin’s motivation to create change.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

Speaking and listening work requires students to gather evidence from texts and sources. Opportunities to ask questions and hold discussions with peers and teachers about research, strategies, and ideas are present throughout the year.

Within this curriculum there are multiple opportunities for speaking and listening that include whole group discussions and small group discussions. In addition, through the lessons there are instructions for the teacher and tips on facilitating whole group, small group, and partner speaking and listening. Students specifically practice these skills in every module in Socratic Seminars. Materials include speaking and listening rubrics, as well as the Socratic Seminars. There is a tracking form that helps the teacher track students’ ability to perform skills with speaking, listening, and reading (citing evidence).

Module 1, Lesson 3:

  • Students offer observations about shared characteristics, based on their observations from Lessons 1 and 2 as well as their reading homework. The teacher records student responses on the "Characteristics Poems Share" anchor chart.

Module 2, Lesson 10:

  • After the teacher reads aloud pages 59–64 of All Quiet on the Western Front (from “At regular intervals we ram in the iron stakes” to “vilest baseness to use horses in war,” s/he instructs students to Think-Pair-Share in response to specific text-dependent questions. The teacher facilitates a brief whole-group discussion after each question to ensure student understanding. Students record short answers and notes from the discussion in their response journals.

Module 3, Lesson 28:

  • Groups perform Readers’ Theater pieces one at a time, using well-chosen oral strategies, gestures, and visual pieces, such as costumes and props.

Module 4 Lesson 9

  • Students participate in a Socratic Seminar to debate Claudette Colvin’s motivation to create change.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects. Students write both "on demand" and "over extended periods" throughout every nine-week module. Materials include short and longer writing tasks and projects. Writing tasks and projects are aligned to the grade level standards being reviewed. Evidence from two modules demonstrates the variety of writing tasks.

  • Module 2: .Writing Focus: Explanatory Writing

Students study the use of well-chosen evidence as they begin their work with explanatory writing, focusing especially on incorporating different types of evidence (such as statistics or first-person accounts) to develop a specific purpose. Students then use this understanding of evidence in a module-long craft progression in narrative and explanatory writing that focuses on using broad conceptual categories, rather than plot or character, as an organizing structure in writing. Students also explore the use of a conclusion that states the larger significance of a piece of writing. Especially in their EOM explanatory essay, students apply what they have learned about well-chosen evidence, categories, thesis statements, and conclusions in order to write a clear, logical essay that examines the nuances of a psychological effect of war in literature.

  • In Module 2, students write two explanatory paragraphs that identify and explain the British and American reasons for joining World War I.
  • In Module 2, students write a one-page letter from the point of view of a character from All Quiet on the Western Front that demonstrates an understanding of the conditions of the front and their effects on a soldier.
  • In Module 2, students return to their notice and wonderings about the novel’s preface from Lesson 6 and write a one sentence response to the following question: “How do your questions and observations about the start of the novel compare with what you know after reading chapter 11?”
  • Module 4: Writing Focus: Informative Writing with Research

In this final module, students engage in independent research about a social issue and teen change agent of their choice. Students are first introduced to new research skills as a whole class, before practicing and executing those skills independently. The focus of this instruction includes assessing relevance and credibility of sources, including how to assess credibility of sources found online, and the synthesis of evidence from multiple sources. Students also work with sources in various mediums, which extends their reading skills around different mediums. Finally, students apply their established understanding of informative writing by applying their informative writing skills to a research essay.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Writing opportunities are focused around students’ analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills over the course of the school year.

Examples of writing prompts found throughout the modules that show how the materials meet the expectations of these indicators include:

  • Write a narrative sequence of three poems demonstrating effective use of narrative elements.
  • Write a cover letter explaining the story, the relationship between form and content, and an understanding of the power of storytelling.
  • Write three ToSEEC (i.e., a paragraph containing a Topic Statement, Evidence, Elaboration, and a Concluding Statement) paragraphs that compare and contrast the content and form of two poems from The Crossover.
  • Write two explanatory paragraphs that identify and explain the British and American reasons for joining World War I.
  • Write a one-page letter from the point of view of a character from All Quiet on the Western Front that demonstrates an understanding of the conditions of the front and their effects on a soldier.
  • Write two informative/explanatory paragraphs that explain how the love triangle in Kurt Vonnegut’s EPICAC draws on the complexities of love in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and also makes this pattern of events new.
  • Write an argument essay that argues whether the outcome of a romantic relationship between one of the four lovers is directed by agency or fate.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations that materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing with evidence. Writing opportunities are focused around students' analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills over the course of the school year.

The following examples demonstrate evidence-based writing opportunities across all four modules:

Module 1:

  • Students complete a graphic organizer, citing evidence that supports the claim of the power of storytelling, across three informational texts.

Module 2:

  • Students write a three-paragraph explanatory essay that evaluates how a scene from Lewis Milestone’s 1930 adaptation of All Quiet on the Western Front interprets war’s effect on humanity in comparison to the original novel. They must synthesize evidence in order to effectively analyze a scene in the novel.

Module 3:

  • Students write a one-paragraph argument that is supported with reason, evidence, and elaboration about whether love is strange or true. Students must establish a claim and acknowledge an alternate or opposing claim. They also must elaborate and expand on evidence to support a claim.
  • Students read a new informational article, What is love? Five Theories on the Greatest Emotion of All. Students then write two short-answer responses that explain aspects of arguments in the article. They must identify a claim, including the strongest evidence to support the claim.

Module 4:

  • Students analyze the author’s point-of-view by answering: “Which quotations and facts support the claim, 'The new tools of social media have reinvented social activism?' Which quotations and facts contradict that claim?” Students record their evidence of support and contradiction of the claim on a graphic organizer.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet expectations for explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of the context. Each lesson has a deep dive in either vocabulary or style and conventions for 15 minutes of instruction, allowing students to practice the skills throughout the modules. Writing rubrics include grammar and conventions, and there are checklists at the End-of-Module tasks to assess application of conventions listed in the language standards.

Examples include:

Module 1:

  • Lesson 2: Identify and form verbs in the indicative, imperative, and interrogative moods in pairs.
  • Lesson 8: Correct inappropriate shifts in verb mood and form, and use verbs in the indicative and imperative moods to express understanding of figurative language.
  • Lesson 10: Identify simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences, and describe the effects of each structure.
  • Lesson 14: Use simple and compound sentences to summarize a poem.
  • Lesson 19: Explain the function of a dash and a comma in sentences.
  • Lesson 20: Employ commas and dashes to create pauses for emphasis in poetry.
  • Lesson 25: Create complex and compound-complex sentences and select the sentence that best represents understanding of the Focusing Question.
  • Lesson 28: Revise writing to establish a variety of sentence structures and clarity of ideas.

Module 2:

  • Lesson 15: Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in indicative, imperative, and interrogative verb moods.
  • Lesson 21: Identify active and passive verb voices.
  • Lesson 23: Write sentences in the active and passive verb voices.
  • Lesson 24: Use active and passive verb voices to emphasize the actor or the action.

Module 3:

  • Lesson 3: Use commas with interrupters.
  • Lesson 11: Identify the traits of the conditional verb mood and recognize verbs in the conditional mood.
  • Lesson 23: Create a sentence using the subjunctive verb mood.
  • Lesson 25: Form and use verbs in the subjunctive verb mood to express formal suggestions and ideas contrary to fact.

Module 4:

  • Lesson 1: Explain the function of verbals.
  • Lesson 2: Sort verbals by functions.
  • Lesson 4: Differentiate between past and present participles and explain their functions.
  • Lesson 7: Use past and present participles and explain the function of participles in sentences.
  • Lesson 13: Differentiate between infinitives and prepositional phrases and and explain the function of an infinitive.
  • Lesson 14: Identify infinitives and explain their roles in sentences.
  • Lesson 21: Explain the role of gerunds and identify gerunds in sentences.
  • Lesson 24: Identify verbals and explain their functions in sentences.
  • Lesson 25: Determine and evaluate the effects of the active and passive verb voices.
  • Lesson 30: Determine and evaluate the use of the subjunctive and conditional verb moods to achieve particular effects.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

+
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Gateway Two Details

Materials provide ample opportunities for students to build knowledge through content-rich, integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language experiences.

Criterion 2a - 2h

Materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.
32/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 8 fully meet the expectations of anchor texts organized around appropriate topic(s), and more commonly theme, to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently at grade level. Students read different kinds of texts focused on the same themes and topics, building content knowledge of that topic/theme by the end of each respective unit.

  • Module 1 The Theme is The Power of Storytelling, and the Topic is Native Americans to Contemporary Poets. In this module, students examine storytelling as a personal, social, and cultural form of expression that we use to make sense of ourselves and our world.

Samples from the text selections include:

  • The Crossover, by:Kwame Alexander. Alexander uses narrative in this novel to articulate and navigate the various experiences, personal relationships, sudden changes, and emerging awareness of self that shape—and unsettle—his adolescent life. As students relate to the vivid portrayals of Josh’s identity and struggles, the novel’s accessibility demystifies verse and empowers students to engage with poetry.
  • The Man Made of Words, by N. Scott Momaday is a piece of literary nonfiction that elucidates the fundamental necessity of articulating ourselves through narrative.
  • This Is Your Life (and How You Tell It), by Benedict Carey is a scientific account of how we use narratives of the past to shape our future.
  • Module 3: The Theme is Power of Storytelling, and the Topic is What is Love? In this module, students examine a question that has vexed humans—and the world’s most renowned literary authors—for generations: What is love? Deceptively simple, this question requires students to examine ideas about the roles of individual choice, fate, power, and social status in the development of seemingly personal relations.

Sample of text include:

  • A Midsummer’s Night Dream, by William Shakespeare. This comedy offers a compelling and humorous way for students to think about love. Shakespeare’s characters introduce multiple, conflicting perspectives about love and about its purpose, place, and power. Students see love wax and wane in the play through the action and inaction of those at love’s mercy.
  • EPICAC, by Kurt Vonnegut, is a short story, even though comedic, raises ethical questions about the actions undertaken in the name of love.
  • The Birthday, by Marc Chagall. Painted in 1915, the painting encourages students to analyze how elements such as line and color create very specific and stylized understandings of love.

All modules develop student knowledge through structured learning activities that provide effective scaffolding of content leading to students comprehending texts independently and proficiently.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 8 fully meet the expectations of materials that contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks requiring students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Questions are organized into three categories: Focusing Questions, Content Framing Questions, and Craft Questions. Within the Content Framing and Craft Questions, there are additional categories of questions. The chart below demonstrates the structure of questions.

A representative example of how the program addresses this indicator comes from Module 1, Focusing Question #4: How do stories help us make sense of ourselves and the world?

Content Questions:

  1. Distill: What are the central ideas of Your Brain on Fiction?
  2. Organize: What’s happening in The Man Made of Words?
  3. Reveal: What does a deeper exploration of word choice and phrases reveal about the power of stories in The Man Made of Words?
  4. Know: How does The Danger of a Single Story build my knowledge of the power of stories?
  5. Reveal: What do informational texts reveal about the power of stories?
  6. Know: How do informational texts build my knowledge of the power of stories?

Craft Questions:

  1. Examine and Experiment: How does incorporating textual evidence work?
  2. Examine: How do complex and compound-complex sentences work?
  3. Execute: How do I incorporate textual evidence in my writing?
  4. Execute: How do I use knowledge of sentence structure to make my writing clear and interesting?
  5. Excel: How do I incorporate the strongest evidence into Focusing Question Task 4?
  6. Excel: How do I improve my use of sentence structures to make my writing interesting and clear?

Additional module 1 questions include:

  • Lesson 1: Identify specific language choices that depict Josh Bell’s identity and view of himself.
  • Lesson 9: Analyze how form contributes to meaning in a comparison of The Block and Children’s Games.
  • Lesson 11: Analyze the impact of form on meaning by comparing how an informational article and the poem Fast Break construct accounts of a basketball game.

Module 2 questions include:

  • Lesson 17: Explain how Paul’s encounters with civilians in his hometown reveal conflicting attitudes toward the war.
  • Lesson 20: Interpret the meaning of the transformation depicted in the last passage of Chapter 7, and explain how it conveys an attitude toward the effects of war.
  • Lesson 23: Analyze how Paul’s repeated use of the word comrade in Chapter 9 develops attitudes about the war and its effects.

Module 3 questions include:

  • Lesson 21: Synthesize an understanding of how different points of view can complicate love.
  • Lesson 26: Apply an understanding of central ideas in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and EPICAC, considering how actions taken by characters complicate love, through collaborative conversation with peers.
  • Lesson 30: Analyze how the central idea of love as a fantasy has developed over the course of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for materials containing a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. There are limited questions used to assess reading comprehension and connect the reader to the text in a deeper way. Questions are employed to build students' knowledge.

Each module has a section entitled, “Major Assessments” for the teacher at the beginning of the module that displays all the “Focusing Question Tasks”, the standards involved, and the elements needed to be successful on the “End-of-Module (EOM)” culminating task. Also, each module contains a section entitled “Module Map” that discusses the “Focusing Question Tasks, Central Texts, Content Framing Questions, Craft Questions, and learning goals.” Many questions and tasks do not require students to demonstrate understanding of the text on multiple levels. Many of the questions do prepare students for an upcoming culminating writing task (EOM). In each module, students are presented with opportunities to work across texts.

Module 2:

  • Write a three-paragraph explanatory essay that evaluates how a scene from Lewis Milestone’s 1930 adaptation of All Quiet on the Western Front interprets war’s effect on humanity compares to the novel.

Module 3:

  • Delineate and evaluate an argument about love, and recognize strong evidence and various parts of an argument. Write two informative/explanatory paragraphs that explain and evaluate Helen Fisher’s argument in In the Brain, Romantic Love Is Basically an Addiction.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the complexities of love, and organize evidence clearly and appropriately to demonstrate reasons. Write two informative/explanatory paragraphs that explain how the love triangle in Kurt Vonnegut’s EPICAC draws on the complexities of love in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and also makes this pattern of events new.
  • Identify a claim, include the strongest evidence to support a claim, and analyze different qualities of love. Read a new informational article, What is love? Five Theories on the Greatest Emotion of All. Respond to multiple-choice questions and then write two short-answer responses that explain aspects of arguments in the article.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 8 fully meet the expectations that questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a theme (or, for grades 3-5. a topic) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, and listening). The sets of questions and tasks students are asked to work with and complete support their ability to complete culminating tasks in which they are demonstrating knowledge of topics and/or themes.

Each module has several Focusing Question Tasks that scaffold the material to aid in the successful completing of the EOM task. The materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to each culminating task. Many tasks are focused on pieces of writing; however, students engage in speaking and listening as well as reading and writing to prepare for tasks, providing learning through integrated skills.

Some examples of culminating tasks that showcase students' demonstration of topics and themes through a combination of skills and print and nonprint texts include the following examples:

Module 3:

  • The culminating task (End of Module-EOM) in Module 3 is as follows: “Write an argument essay that argues whether the outcome of a romantic relationship between two of the four lovers is directed by agency or fate.”
  • This module features argument writing. Students practice in discrete and manageable steps, focusing on aspects such as evidence-based claims, argument structure, and alternate and opposing claims. With published texts and their peers’ works, students explain and evaluate the claims, logic, and validity of arguments. In formal writing assessments, students demonstrate their ability to construct arguments that include clear and persuasive claims, logical reasoning, relevant evidence, elaboration, an effective sequence with transitional language, and a conclusion. Some assignments that lead to the EOM task include: (1) Write four informative/explanatory paragraphs that identify and explain one character’s understanding of love from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. (2) Write two informative/explanatory paragraphs that explain how the love triangle in Kurt Vonnegut’s EPICAC draws on the complexities of love in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and also makes this pattern of events new. (3) Read a new informational article, What is love? Five Theories on the Greatest Emotion of All. Respond to multiple-choice questions, and then write two short-answer responses that explain aspects of arguments in the article.
  • Students build their speaking and listening skills and develop their work with argument writing by listening for a speaker’s logic and posing questions that connect ideas from multiple speakers in Socratic Seminars. One of the tasks is as follows: “Debate connections between love, imagination, and reality in all module texts, and consider whether or not love is something that can be defined as “real.’”
  • Students are also presented with a plethora of print and nonprint texts to assist in successfully completing the EOM task. These texts include but not limited to: a short story: EPICAC by Kurt Vonnegut, a painting: The Birthday, by Marc Chagall, and a drama: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, by William Shakespeare.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Vocabulary is taught both implicitly and explicitly, using words in the core and supplementary texts. As texts are read multiple times, students gain new vocabulary. Explicit vocabulary instruction focuses on Content Specific Vocabulary, Academic Vocabulary, and Text Critical Vocabulary. Materials focus on elements of vocabulary, such as abstract or multiple meanings, connotation, relationships among words, and morphology.

Vocabulary Routines can be found in the Resources section of the Implementation Guide and include routines and instructional examples such as the Frayer Model, Morpheme Matrix, Outside-In, Relationship Mapping, and Word Line. Teachers utilize Word Walls and Vocabulary Journals for students to record newly-acquired words and vocabulary strategies.

Appendix B includes vocabulary support that explains the implicit and explicit vocabulary instruction. For example, Core lessons, 75-min. daily: vocabulary study that is essential to understanding the text at hand. Instructional strategies are explicitly introduced and practiced during vocabulary instruction and put into practice during a reading of the text. Vocabulary Deep Dives: vocabulary instruction and practice that advances students’ knowledge of high-value words and word-solving strategies, focusing on aspects such as abstract or multiple meanings, connotation, relationships across words, and morphology. The appendix also includes a Module Word List and a list of words that would pose a challenge to student comprehension.

Examples include:

Module 2:

  • Lesson 2 - Content Vocabulary: Patriotism and Nationalism
    • Learning Goal: Use the relationship between patriotism and nationalism to better understand the denotation and connotation of each word.
    • End of Lesson Task: Students write one reason from the perspective of a patriot and one from the perspective of a nationalist.
  • Lesson 13 - Academic Vocabulary: Insubordination
    • Learning Goal: Use the relationship between insubordination, tedious, comradeship, bombardment, and wearisome to better understand insubordination.
    • End of Lesson Task: Students write an Exit Ticket in response to the following question: “Pretend you are Paul and must explain why Tjaden committed an act of insubordination.”
  • Lesson 7: Vocabulary Deep Dive (Explore Academic Vocabulary: Beckons, Ostracized)
  • Lesson 16: Vocabulary Deep Dive (Explore Academic Vocabulary: Sensibilities)

Module 3:

  • Lesson 6 - Explore Academic Vocabulary: Aggravate, Obscenely
    • Learning Goal: Use context to predict the meaning of a word, consult a glossary to clarify its precise meaning, and determine the intended word’s meaning by using a dictionary.
    • End of Lesson Task: Students reread, using context clues to predict the meaning of the word obscenely. Then, students use a dictionary to verify the definitions of obscenely and seemly and explain how the mix-up is humorous.
  • Lesson 7: Handout 7B Color, Symbol and Image
    • Complete the tables for the word dissension. Note that a symbol is a single object or representation of an image; however, an image is a snapshot or scene with a setting and action.
  • Lesson 20 - Explore the morpheme “con”
    • Learning Goal: Use knowledge of the prefix con– to determine word meanings and to infer the significance of a key passage.
    • End of Lesson Task: Students complete a Connect-Extend-Challenge Exit Ticket: How does the meaning of con– connect to the passage as a whole? How does your knowledge of con– and the new words extend your understanding of the passage? Which parts of the passage are still challenging?
  • Lesson 21: Vocabulary Deep Dive (Examine Morphemes ver and fall)
  • Lesson 24: Vocabulary Deep Dive (Explore Academic Vocabulary: bluff, spared)

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectation for materials supporting students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Students are supported through the writing process with focusing question tasks in each module that help scaffold the writing process for the final End of Module (EOM) product. Students receive feedback from peers, the teacher, and self-evaluations as well as being provided with writing checklist and rubrics to ensure that their writing skills are increasing throughout the year.

Through explicit learning-to-write instruction, teachers gradually release responsibility for a specific writing strategy through a series of lessons. One or more of the following Craft Stages shapes each lesson. (Implementation Guide)

  • Examine: Students analyze how an exemplar models one or more writing strategies. The exemplar can come from authentic texts, class collaborative writing, or a module resource.
  • Experiment: Students practice applying a target strategy. Scaffolded tasks provide significant support by limiting the volume of writing, providing parts of a writing piece, or focusing on a relatively simple topic.
  • Execute: Students plan or draft a full writing piece, paying particular attention to applying the target strategy to support the purpose of the task.
  • Excel: Students revise, edit, and respond to feedback on the pieces they drafted in the Execute stage, focusing on the target strategy. They reflect on their use of the strategy to refine their thinking about its use in current and future writing.

Students write an average of twenty or more minutes per writing lesson and are given explicit instruction of writing strategies. Students write both on-demand and process writing while accessing complex texts. There are a variety of writing performance tasks. Craft Lessons address 5 features; Structure, Development, Style, Conventions, and Process.

The following are examples of how materials are building students' writing skills across multiple modules:

Module 1:

  • Focusing Question Task 1: Students read The Crossover, then synthesize an understanding of narrative form and Josh’s identity through the writing and analysis of an original list poem, using descriptive and sensory language.
  • Focusing Question Task 2: Students write three ToSEEC (i.e., containing a Topic Statement, Evidence, Elaboration, and a Concluding Statement) paragraphs that compare and contrast the content and form of two poems from The Crossover.
  • End-of-Module Task: Students write a portfolio of three poems that demonstrate an understanding of ideas of the power of stories, the effects of descriptive and sensory language, narrative arc, and the relationship between content and structure. Write a cover letter explaining and analyzing creative choices. Then, they perform the poetry portfolio for an audience, with attention to poetic expression.

Module 2:

  • Students write a one-page letter from the point of view of a character from All Quiet on the Western Front that demonstrates an understanding of the conditions of the front and their effects on a soldier.
  • Students read an excerpt from Chapter 3 of All Quiet on the Western Front. Students write a paragraph using a broad category that analyzes how descriptive and sensory language illustrates the soldiers’ experience on the front.
  • Students participate in a Chalk Talk where they answer questions such as, "How does Paul describe the psychological effects of war?" They write down three pieces of evidence supporting their response.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations that materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area, by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. Modules are divided into Focus Questions that build knowledge of a topic using multiple texts. The focus questions all build to the End-of-Module Task that encompasses a module’s worth of texts and source materials. Students also complete shorter research projects throughout the modules. Teachers are also encouraged to use pausing points to complete student-led research projects. In every grade, at least one EOM Task focuses on a sustained research project. In addition, students conduct a variety of short research projects throughout the year.

Examples include:

  • Module 1: Students will explore how Josh, the protagonist of The Crossover, uses narrative to articulate and navigate the experiences, relationships, changes, and emerging awareness of self that shape his adolescent life. Students get insight into storytelling by examining poetic performances by Bassey Ikpi, Nikki Giovanni, and Yusef Komunyakaa. Students explore these linguistically and stylistically diverse examples of narrative verse to understand the impact of oral expression and the role of poetic form in creating meaning. After producing their own poetic performances, students broaden their focus to examine the large-scale impact of stories. Two informational articles additionally provide students with examples of the fundamental necessity of articulating ourselves through narrative. For their End-of-Module (EOM) Task, students apply their knowledge of contemporary poetry to their contemporary experience. Devising their own narrative-in-verse, they work deeply with form and craft to make meaning of an important experience, creating a story by capturing essential moments with poetic precision and pacing. Framed with an explanatory cover letter, the students’ EOM Task communicates an understanding of their sense of self and the power of storytelling.
  • Module 4: Phillip Hoose’s Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice illuminates and re-evaluates the contributions different people made to the Civil Rights Movement. Students consider Claudette Colvin’s contributions to the Civil Rights Movement in relation to a range of historical events, actors, and ideas. Reading of this core text also launches deeper historical exploration of the Civil Rights Movements, with students gaining insight into the choices of its leadership and deepening their understanding of the network of actions and strategies that challenged segregation in the mid-1950s. Students gain knowledge of how social change occurs through the development of a series of strategies, actions, and responses performed by different people with different roles. This understanding provides context for students’ research on a teen change agent’s actions and impact. For their End-of-Module (EOM) Task, students present the research they have been engaged in throughout the module. Students write an informative essay based on their research and turn that essay into a multimedia presentation.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for materials providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. The majority of lessons require some independent readings of text followed by text-specific questions and tasks that reflect student accountability. Students are asked to annotate texts. Additionally, most homework assignments include independent readings and tasks that require students to produce evidence of reading and to keep an independent reading log.

  • Lesson 7: Students reread Chapter 1 from All Quiet on the Western Front and, in their Response Journals, write two sentences that explain “when” and “where” the novel takes place. Students will work with “why” throughout the module and in subsequent lessons.
  • Lesson 14: Students read pages 123–136 of All Quiet on the Western Front, from “My hands grow cold and my flesh creeps” to “Thirty-two men,” and annotate for incidents and the corresponding emotional responses (or lack of responses) of men in the Second Company.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

Materials are designed to support teachers in providing standards-aligned instruction for all students and are easy for both students and teachers to navigate. The instructional design includes ample opportunities for assessment and support to use data to improve instruction and student learning.

Criterion 3a - 3e

Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials are well-designed and easy to navigate. Alignments to standards are clear and appropriate. Student materials provide appropriate support for the acquisition and practice of key literacy skills.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Each lesson is designed for a 90 minute block. Each module contains from 33-37 lessons. The total minimum number of days to cover every lesson in the module is 139. This pacing allows for unexpected or special school events which may interfere with traditional pacing.

A module overview is found at the beginning of each module which includes: Module Summary, Essential Questions, Suggested Student Understandings, Texts, Module Learning Goals, Module in Context, Standards, Major Assessments, and Module Map.

Materials include detailed lessons plans with supporting materials which include an agenda for the lesson including Welcome, Launch, Learn, Land, Wrap, and a Vocabulary Deep Dive or a Style and Convention Deep Dive. Each section has hyperlinks included for materials needed, such as graphic organizers or articles.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding. Each module provides 32-38 lessons, and each lesson is designed for a 90-minute block. Each of the four modules can be completed in a 9-week grading period. Teachers and students can reasonably complete the content within a 36-week school year as long as their schedule provides a 90 minute block of time for English Language Arts.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet expectations that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).

Students have access to an array of materials that provide ample review and practice resources, such as note catchers, reference charts, anchor charts, new-read assessments, supporting excerpts or texts, close read guides, essay rubrics, reference aids, model writings, vocabulary words list and definitions, and speaking and listening checklists.

Student resources include clear explanation and directions. Activities that are completed with teacher guidance have directions included in the teacher lesson plan notes. Resources that are completed independently or in small groups without direct teacher guidance include clear directions and explanations so that the task can be completed.

Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 11 includes a Text Analysis chart for the students with 3 boxes: Expert Group 1, Expert Group 2, and Expert Group 3. Students are given clear directions on the reading assignment and the questions to be answered in each box.
  • In Module 4, Lesson 8 includes a graphic organizer in the form of a T-chart, the Evidence-Based Claim Organizer that is entitled, “Should Oberon use the flower’s magic?” The student is to choose from these answers: “Oberon should use the flower’s magic.” or “Oberon should not use the flower’s magic." After the student states his/her claim,then a box is provided for evidence to support his/her claim. Directions are clear and concise.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for materials including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

Alignment to the CCSS is documented in multiple places in the curriculum including the following sections: Module Map, Module Learning Goals, Standards, Major Assessments, and Lesson Agenda with the section, ”Standards Addressed.”

For example, in the overview of each module there is a Module Map that includes learning goals and standards addressed. The standards section includes all Reading (Informational and Literary), Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language standards that are addressed in each module. In the Major Assessments section of the Module Overview, each standard is listed for each Focusing Task Question Activity and each End-of-Module Task.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 contain visual design (whether in print or digital) that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The material design is simple and consistent. All modules are comprised of materials that display a simple design and include adequate space. The font, size, margins, and spacing are consistent and readable. All modules include graphic organizers, charts, worksheets, tables, and other activities that are easy to read and understand. There are no distracting images, and the layout of the student consumables is clear and concise. Each handout and/or activity is hyperlinked in each lesson overview and detailed lesson plan.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials provide strong support for teachers to facilitate planning, use of all parts of the program, alignment to the standards, research of best practices that underpin the program, and information for involving students and their families/caregivers about supporting the student as a learner.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 8 meets the expectation for materials containing a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. There is limited integration of technology and or guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The materials contain a teacher's edition that provides teaching notes for each lesson that provide a Focusing Question, Content Framing Question, as well as a Lesson Summary. The lesson overviews include an “At A Glance” outline of each lesson, as well as Learning Goals and Standards Addressed.



The following are examples which demonstrate how the materials are useful and offer ample guidance for teachers:

Module 1:

  • Lesson 5 Wrap-Up Next Steps: “If students had difficulty with the Jigsaw activity, consider facilitating a whole-group discussion after home groups reconvene in order to ensure student understanding. Also consider reading each poem aloud, or selecting a strong reader from each group to read the poems fluently to support student understanding. For the first CFU, consider including sentence stems and reviewing Josh’s relationship to each family member before the students engage in their Write about a Character activity. If students had difficulty identifying a descriptive word for their metaphor, consider posting a word bank or collaboratively creating a word bank as a whole group before moving on to the small-group activity.”

Module 3:

  • Lesson 8 Next Steps: “If students had difficulty identifying a central idea about love from the quotations provided, consider having students translate each quote in pairs before they begin their analysis. Additionally, consider reviewing student’s previous work with figurative language and modeling how a previous instance of figurative language can illuminate character perspectives, such as Helena’s monologue in Act 1, Scene 1. Note that there is no Deep Dive in this lesson. Use any additional time to support practice of the vocabulary and/or style and conventions skills introduced in the module.”

Module 4:

  • Lesson 9 Teacher Note: “The class can publish the exhibit in a variety of ways. If possible, allow each group to collaborate on electronic devices to produce their placards. This may require advanced booking of a computer lab. Several free websites, such as Google Slides and Padlet, allow students to work simultaneously on the same project. Encourage the class to write an introduction and share the exhibit with other classes and their families. If electronic devices are not available, consider giving students pieces of chart paper or poster board and displaying the exhibit in the hallway or another public area of the school.”

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The Implementation Guide provides multiple explanations and charts regarding curriculum terminology. The implementation Guide also explains at length the research behind each approach in the curriculum. There are Appendices that include adult level explanations as well as sample student answers and annotated responses that teachers can use to improve their knowledge of what standards being met would look like in a response.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet expectations for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

Materials include an extensive Implementation Guide which goes into great depth about how the curriculum as a whole addresses all of the standards. Additionally, a Module in Context and a Module Learning Goals document are provided in the Module Overview of each unit. The Module in Context includes an overview of how the materials address the Common Core shifts as well as a detailed account of how the CCSS standards have a role in the curriculum. The Module Learning Goals articulate specific standards as they are addressed in each individual module.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies. Materials include resources found primarily in the Implementation Guide that provide explanations of the instructional approaches and identify research-based strategies. The Implementation Guide lists what research says, what students need and how Wit and Wisdom materials provide what students need within the curriculum.

Explanations provided include:

Research Says: “Performance on complex texts is the clearest differentiator in reading between students who are likely to be ready for college and those who are not.” (ACT 16-17) “But as expectations of college and career reading have held steady or increased, the complexity of Grades K-12 texts have held steady or increased, the complexity of Grades K-12 texts has declined (Adams 4-5; NGA Center and CCSS) 3). Students need to be able to unlock meaning from complex texts.”

Wit & Wisdom Responds: “Instead of basals, Wit & Wisdom students read complex, grade-level books they love from classics such as The Story of Ferdinand and Animal Farm, to new favorites such as Last Stop on Market Street and The Crossover, to captivating nonfiction such as I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban and An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793. Students use these texts at every turn-to learn, and eventually master, essential reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammar, and vocabulary skills.”

Some Core Practice examples include:

Vocabulary: “The Wit & Wisdom approach to teaching vocabulary thorough knowledge of word meanings is key to understanding any complex text and to learning as a whole (Chall and Jacobs; Anderson and Freebody 77). Vocabulary instruction in Wit & Wisdom is accordingly designed to achieve three key student outcomes:

  • Better comprehension of complex texts
  • Broader and deeper knowledge of words and word parts (including affixes and roots)
  • Increased ability to determine the meanings of unknown words As a text-based curriculum,

Wit & Wisdom teaches vocabulary both implicitly and explicitly using words in the core and supplementary texts. Through repeated readings of complex, knowledge-building texts, students implicitly learn many new words (Feitelson, Kita, and Goldstein 340; Miller and Gildea 96; Nagy and Scott 273). Explicit vocabulary instruction focused on the three student outcomes emphasizes three categories of high-leverage vocabulary words and phrases.”

Questioning: “Students monitor their understanding of the text by recording questions they have about it. During their first encounter of the text, students record questions they have about it. When students return to the text, they continue to monitor their understanding, recording any additional questions that arise while also looking for answers to their original questions. After the first stage of reading, students share, and when possible, answer these text based questions, or problem solve about how to answer the questions. For example, students may return to the text, consult a reference source, or conduct research. This helps students maintain engagement with and focus on the text while reading and monitor their comprehension of what they are reading. This helps teachers formatively assess students to indicate their understanding of the text and learning from previous modules.”

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement. There is a series of Parent Tip Sheets that provide a summary of each module in the curriculum, including a list of module texts, additional books to read at home, sample questions, and activities to extend thinking and learning. There are also several resources available, such as blogs about learning, on the greatmind.org website to help parents better understand how to support their child.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials offer regular opportunities for systematic and strategic data collection to inform instruction and describe student progress and performance.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for materials regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Each module incorporates a series of checkpoints in the form of Focusing Question Tasks that help students demonstrate the knowledge and standards they are learning throughout the module. These tasks build to an End of Module (EOM) Task which is labeled in the materials as Major Assessments. Teachers can monitor student progress throughout the module to ensure that students are prepared to complete the summative task (EOM).

As formative assessments, the materials provide several New Read Assessments per module in which students demonstrate their understanding of the standards covered at that point in the module. Students independently do a cold read of an informational or literary text and then complete various questions (multiple choice, open-ended, short response, multi-select, etc). After answering questions, students also complete a short writing task accompanied by a graphic organizer to capture their thinking.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed clearly denote which standards are being emphasized. Standards are found in multiple places and times during the module. Each lesson includes Learning Goals which are connected to and labeled with a standard. In each module, there is a tab labeled Module Overview. A chart is provided that lists all of the standards for New Read Assessments, Socratic Seminar, and EOM (End-of-Module) Assessments. All standards assessed are labeled clearly.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations of assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Appendices include Answer Keys, Rubrics, and Sample Responses as well as rubrics for all writing types tasks.

Materials regularly provide:

  • Sample answers and recommended scripts to share with students
  • Suggestions for differentiation
  • Next steps, if students had difficulty. ‘Consider reviewing handout…. and re-watching ……”
  • Rubrics for scoring student tasks

Guidance for Interpreting Student Performance and suggestions for follow up can be found in the teacher’s notes and in the wrap section of each lesson.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectation for including routines and guidance that provide opportunities to monitor student progress.

All modules of Wit and Wisdom follow the same format and elements for student performance. The New Read Assessments are routine and help teachers monitor students progress towards standards mastery. The Focus Questioning Tasks routinely and regularly build to the End of the Module (EOM) Assessment and monitors student progress. Checklists are provided with tasks so that students are prepared for the EOM Assessment.

A variety of resources are available in Appendix C to assist teachers in monitoring progress. Some examples include:

  • Self, peer and teacher evaluations
  • Checklists for poetry performances and Socratic Seminars.
  • Speaking and Listening Rubrics

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 8 indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.In each module, Appendix D contains a curated Volume of Reading text list, which includes texts that add to the module and offer students choices at varying levels of complexity. Based on the Content Framing Questions, a set of Volume of Reading Reflection Questions appears in the Student Edition of each module, giving students guidance and structure to apply the Content Framing Questions independently to books of their choice. Time for Volume of Reading is not included within the ninety-minute module lessons, but it is noted that it should be a high priority and is included in the sample daily schedules in the Getting Started Section of the Implementation Guide.

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials provide multiple strategies for supporting all learners throughout the program, including strategies for students.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

Examples of strategies listed in the Implementation Guide and found throughout the program include:

  • Focusing Question Tasks - These tasks may also come with a recommendation for differentiation, depending on student performance or ability.
  • Scaffolding or Extension boxes are located within lesson materials in the Teacher’s Edition. There are also recommendations for teachers to review, re-watch, or re-read materials, depending on how students performed on lesson tasks.
  • The Next steps in the “Land/Wrap” section of the end of each lesson will also give recommendations for teachers to support students who didn’t understand portions of the lesson.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed meet the expectations that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards. Materials include explicit vocabulary and grammar instruction, text-dependent questions that focus all students on key terms, phrases, and passages for rereading and repeated exploration, partner work that includes oral practice of written responses, and multiple authentic opportunities to use academic language with support, such as explicit teaching about speaking and listening, sentence frames, and vocabulary support.

Examples of materials for supporting below grade level students include:

  • In each lesson, there is a section titled Land/Wrap. Teachers are given strategies to assist struggling students with the complex text or task in the Next Steps section (located at the conclusion of every lesson).
  • For example: In Module 2, Lesson 14, “If students had difficulty composing a poem, consider modeling the steps involved to creating evocative images: identifying a detail, listing adjectives, and creating an image. Additionally, in Module 1 consider directing students back to their work with creating images and drafting poems.

An example of an Extension Activity is as follows:

  • Module 3, Lesson 3: Teachers are provided with an extension activity for students who have finished the original task and need to be challenged. They are to locate additional character quotes in the text and analyze these quotes that give details about characters’ relationships.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet requirements for regularly including extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level. Extension activities are provided throughout materials. These are included in boxes in the Teacher’s Edition lesson plans.

  • For example, in Module 2, Lesson 19, a set of extension activities is included in the lesson plan focusing on oral expression in poetry. Students are encouraged to deepen their understanding by analyzing tone and volume. There is added emphasis on the reading of other poems related to a similar topic. This will result in developing students’ work analyzing oral expression.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed meet the expectations of providing ample opportunities for teachers to use grouping strategies during lessons. Lessons indicate where pairs, whole group, small group, or individual groupings are utilized for instruction. Each lesson provides students opportunities to work through more than one type of grouping. Teachers are also provided suggestions for how to assign roles or divide groups. For example, Socratic Seminars are used frequently, and teachers are given detailed instructions on how to model the strategy and assign groups and responsibilities. Other routines that provide opportunities for grouping include anchor charts, boxes and buttons, categorization, chalk talk, choral reading, echo reading, fishbowl, gallery walk, give one-get one-move on, graffiti wall, grammar safari, graphic organizers, jigsaw, link up, literary dominoes, mix and mingle, outside-in, partner reading, praise/question/suggestion, question corners, quick write, quiz-quiz-trade, reader’s theater, and response techniques.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials work well on all technology platforms and are easy to access. They are easily customizable for local use. Supports for teachers to use technology as a part of the learning process with students is available. Adaptive technology is not offered with this program.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Accessibility was tested on Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, an Android phone, an iPhone, and an iPad. All access was successful.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. Technology is used throughout modules and lessons to enhance student learning and draw attention to evidence and texts.

  • In Module 1 Lesson 12 students use the following website to read an article in the New York Times. After reading the article, students answer evidence-based questions, such as, “In paragraph 14, Carey defines a life story as a retrospective reconstruction. What evidence in paragraph 14 can you find to help you make meaning of retrospective? What does the word retrospective mean?”
  • In Module 4, Lesson 3 the teacher displays The Racial Dot Map and allows students a few minutes to silently observe the map. The teacher then has students record their first impressions, noticings, and wonderings about the map. The teacher then clicks on Add Map Labels, has students assist in locating Montgomery, Alabama on the map, and zooms in on the town.
  • In most lessons, a document camera is used to display student work, show examples, and direct student’s attention to evidence and tests.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials do not meet expectations that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. Adaptive or other technological innovations are not included in the instructional materials. The only digital instructional materials provided are documents which teachers can edit themselves.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials can be easily customized for local use. The Implementation Guide states, “When observing teachers, school leaders should keep in mind that Wit & Wisdom is not a scripted program, and Wit & Wisdom instruction will vary from classroom to classroom. While the lessons can be implemented as written, teachers will study the modules and come to know them as deeply as the educators who wrote them. Teachers should use their knowledge of the modules and of their students to customize lessons when needed.” However, all handouts and lessons can only be downloaded in pdf form and can not be edited.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials do not include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate.

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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 06/08/2017

Report Edition: 2016

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

Math High School

ELA K-2

ELA 3-5

ELA 6-8


ELA High School

Science Middle School

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