Alignment: Overall Summary

The Wit & Wisdom materials meet the expectations of alignment to the standards to support students' growing skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The program is built on engaging and high quality texts and present strong multimedia options alongside printed texts. The materials provide strong opportunities for students to hone their writing, speaking, and listening skills throughout the content while demonstrating their growing content knowledge.

**The materials reviewed do not include a formal foundational skills component and instead recommend pairing the materials with a high-quality foundational skills program.

See Rating Scale Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
17
32
36
36
32-36
Meets Expectations
18-31
Partially Meets Expectations
0-17
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
30
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
34
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The Wit & Wisdom materials include high-quality, increasingly rigorous texts which encompass a wide variety of genres, including a balance of literary and informational texts, digital media (including songs and video), and visual art. Texts are appropriately complex for the grade level and a text complexity analysis is included. The anchor and supplementary texts provide a volume of reading for each student.

Text-dependent focus questions, content-framing questions, and craft questions connected to the essential question of the unit unify activities and tasks across each module building to an End-of-Module Task. Students frequently engage in text-based discussions with peers, utilizing protocols to frame the discussions and to encourage the incorporation of academic vocabulary.

Frequent and varied evidence-based writing opportunities, including on-demand and process writing aligned with the standards are found in each lesson.

Explicit instruction for grammar and conventions that address the language standards appear in each module.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading.
20/20
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The Wit & Wisdom materials for Grade 1 include texts of high-quality which provide a strong foundation for the materials. Texts include a variety of genres, including a balance of literary and informational texts, digital media (including songs and video), and visual art. Texts are at the appropriate level of complexity and are accompanied by a text complexity analysis which demonstrates the factors for placement within the program, including, where appropriate, the reader and task demands.

Over the course of the year, students have the opportunity to read increasingly rigorous texts which serve to grow their literacy skills. The anchor and supplementary texts provide a volume of reading for each student.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and include a mix of informational texts and literature. The included texts have been previously published and are worthy of careful reading. The texts address a range of interests, including real-world topics, picture books, and folktales/folklore, while also integrating science and social studies topics. Anchor texts encompass multiple themes and integrate content areas. Texts are examined multiple times for multiple purposes and are used to expand big ideas and build academic vocabulary. Most texts are engaging, build knowledge, and facilitate access to future text while building towards independent grade-level reading.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

Module 1: A World of Books

  • Museum ABC by The Metropolitan Museum of Art introduces the alphabet with unique colorful picture book. Academic vocabulary includes landscape, portrait, still-life
  • My Librarian is a Camel by Margriet Ruurs contains photographs of children representing different cultures. Academic vocabulary includes granted, passionate, remote, mobile. This text received the following awards: Booklist Editors' Choice, Reading Association’s Notable Book for Global Awareness.
  • Tomas and the Library Lady by Pat Mora and Raul Colon is written with rhythm and rhyme and contains bright illustrations. This text is also a Common Core Exemplar Text. Academic vocabulary includes character, storyteller, borrow, eager, setting, problem, resolution, imagination, migrant, value, encouraged. This text has received the following awards: Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature Commended Title, Notable Books for Children, Smithsonian, Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Award, Teachers' Choices Award from the International Reading Association, Skipping Stones Multicultural Book Award, Texas Bluebonnet Master List Title, Nebraska Golden Sower Nominee.

Module 2: Creature Features

  •  Me … Jane by Patrick McDonnell is a picture book biography and contains anecdotes take directly from Jane Goodall’s autobiography. Academic vocabulary includes observed, curious, cherish, impossible. This text has received the following awards: 2012 Caldecott Honor Book, Charlotte Zolotow Award Winner, Horn Book Fanfare Book, New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Book, New York Times Notable Children's Book, Booklist Editor's Choice Book, Kirkus Reviews Best Book, Kids' Indie Next List Book, 2011 Bank Street College Children's Book Committee Outstanding Book, University of Wisconsin-Madison CCBC 2012 Children's Choices Book, Parents' Choice Silver Honor Book, National Parenting Publications Awards Gold Winner, Booklinks Lasting Connections Book.
  •  What Do You Do With a Tail Like This? By Steve Jenkins and Robin Pate is illustrated in cut-paper collage and is an interactive guessing book. Academic vocabulary includes unique, mammal, texture, webbed, poisonous, sensitive, sunburned, opposable, manipulate, utensils, majestic. This text has received the Caldecott Honor.
  • Seven Blind Mice by Ed Young is a classic Indian tale. Academic vocabulary includes collage, portray, abstract art, complementary colors, color wheel, portrait, tale, moral, wisdom. This text has received the Caldecott Honor.

Module 3: Powerful Forces

  • Feel the Wind by Arthur Dorros is a procedural text- how to make a weather vane and contains playful illustrations. Academic vocabulary includes force, powerful, confused, sources, similar, soar, essential. This text has received the following awards: Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children, ALA Booklist “Top 10 First Novels”.
  • Brave Irene by William Steig is set in the past and contains vivid illustrations. Academic vocabulary includes squinting, brave, persistent, waltz, flounce, resentful, wicked, determination. This text has received the following awards: Horn Book Magazine Fanfare List, New York Times Book Review, Best Illustrated Books of the Year, Publishers Weekly Best Children's Books of the Year, NYT Best Illustrated BOTY, Publishers, Weekly Best Books of the Year, Booklist Editors' Choice.
  • The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer is a biography and autobiography set in Malawi. Academic vocabulary includes scorched, reappeared, primary colors, rearrange, harnessed, produce, gusting, gale, science, magic, scanned, rumbled, threading, horizon line, horizontal, vertical.

Module 4: Cinderella Stories

  • Cendrillon: A Caribbean Cinderella by Robert D. San Souci and Illustrations by Brian Pinkney is a West Indian version of the classic Cinderella story. Academic vocabulary includes French Creole words with a glossary at the end for students to use to define unfamiliar vocabulary. 
  • The Rough-Face Girl by Rafe Martin and Illustrations by David Shannon is a Algonquin Cinderella story supported by detailed illustrations. 
  • Cinderella by Marcia Brown is a classic fairy tale with a sequential story line and clear problem and solution. This text received the Caldecott Medal.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations that the materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Literary texts include realistic fiction, historical fiction, fantasy, and fables. In addition, the supplemental materials include articles, poems, and songs which add to the variety of text types. 

Texts representing the balance of text types and genres include: 

Module 1 Core Texts

  • Museum ABC, The New York Metropolitan Museum of Art (Alphabet Book)
  • Tomas and the Library Lady, Pat Mora (Literary)
  • Waiting for the Biblioburro, Monica Brown (LIterary)
  • That Book Woman, Heather Henson & David Small (Literary)
  • My Librarian is a Camel, Margriet Ruurs (Informational) 
  • Green Eggs and Ham, Dr. Seuss (Literary)

Module 1 Supplementary Texts

  • The Old Farmer's Almanac (Almanac)
  • CNN Heroes: Luis Soriano,” CNN (Video)
  • “Pack Horse Librarians,” SLIS Storytelling (Video)
  • "ASL Sign for: yes," American Sign Language Dictionary (Website)
  • "ASL Sign for: no," American Sign Language Dictionary (Website)
  • "ASL Sign for: same," American Sign Language Dictionary (Website)

Module 2 Core Texts

  •  Me … Jane, Patrick McDonald (Informational)
  • Seahorse: Shyest Fish in the Sea, Chris Butterworth & John Lawrence (Informational)
  • What Do You Do With a Tail Like This?, Steve Jenkins (Informational)
  • Never Smile at a Monkey, Steve Jenkins (Informational)
  • Seven Blind Mice, Ed Young (Literary)

 Module 2 Supplementary Texts

  • “The Hare & the Tortoise,” Aesop’s Fables (Fable)
  • “The Ants & the Grasshopper,” Aesop’s Fables (Fable)
  • “Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage,” Deep Look (2014) (Video)
  • “Young Hare”, Albrecht Dürer (1502) (Visual Art)
  • “The Snail”, Henri Matisse (1953) (Visual Art)

Module 3 Core Texts

  • The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, William Kamkwamba (Informational)
  • Brave Irene, William Steig (Literary)
  • Owl at Home, Arnold Lobel (Literary)
  • Gilberto and the Wind, Marie Hall Ets (Literary)
  • Feel the Wind, Arthur Dorros (Informational)

Module 3 Supplementary Texts

  • “The Wind,” James Reeves (Poetry)
  • “It Fell in the City,” Eve Merriam (Poetry)
  • “This Windmill,” Amy Ludwig VanDerwater (Poetry)
  • “William and the Windmill,” Toronto Star (Video)
  • "Soaring Bird MVI 0902," SanfordAr (Audio)
  • "Hummingbird Wing Sounds," MyBackyardBirding (Audio)
  • “The Red Mill”, Piet Mondrian (1911) (Painting)
  • “Oostzijdse Mill with Extended Blue, Yellow and Purple Sky”, Piet Mondrian (1907) (Painting)
  • “Windmill in the Gein”, Piet Mondrian (1906–07) (Painting)
  • “Wind at Work,” Amy Tao (Article)
  • “What Makes the Wind?” Amy Tao (Article)
  • “Owl and the Moon,” Arnold Lobel (Literary Excerpt)

Module 4 Core Texts

  • Cinderella, Marcia Brown (Literary)
  • Adelita, Tomi dePaola (Literary)
  • Korean Cinderella, Shirley Climo & Ruth Heller (Literary)
  • Bigfoot Cinderrrrrrella, Tony Johnston & James Warhola (Literary)
  •  Cendrillon: A Caribbean Cinderella, Robert D. San Souci & Brian Pinkney (Literary)
  • The Rough-Faced Girl, Rafe Martin & David Shannon (Literary)
  • Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal, Paul Fleischman & Julie Paschkis (Literary)

Module 4 Supplementary Texts

  • “900 Cinderellas,” Marcia Amidon Lusted and Judith C. Greenfield (Informational Article)
  • “Kudhinda Screen Printing” (Video)
  • “The Process of Making Batik–Artisans at Work” (Video)
  • “Wycinanka/Paper Cutout” (Video)
  • “Around the World,” TIME for Kids (Website)
  • “Talking Textiles,” The Children’s University of Manchester (Website)

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

Anchor texts are at the appropriate level of rigor and complexity for Grade 1. In Module 1, texts have a quantitative Lexile range of 30-920. In Module 2, texts range from 350-930 Lexile. Overall, these are all appropriate for the grade level when the reader and task is considered.  Many of the shared and interactive reading texts are at the high end of the range or appropriate for higher grade levels, but planned scaffolding described in the lesson plans outlined in the teacher materials make these an excellent choice. These texts will build knowledge at a variety of complexity levels and on a range of topics. For the selections at the low end of the Lexile range, when the reader and task are considered are appropriately complex. Wit and Wisdom has evaluated each core module text using nationally-recognized measures for quantitative and qualitative criteria as outlined in Appendix A in the Common Core State Standards. These evaluations can be found in Appendix A of each Wit and Wisdom Module.

The associated tasks described in the lesson plans that support the use of these readings include the following:

  • An Essential Question that guides the overall work of the module
  • A Focusing Question for each set of lessons associated with the anchor text selections and is aligned to the expectations for the End-of-Module Task and the Essential Question
  • A Content Framing Question that guides each lesson 
  • A Vocabulary Deep Dive lesson that focuses on the complex vocabulary of the anchor text

Examples include: 

  • In Module 1, students listen to My Librarian is a Camel; How Books are Brought to Children Around the World by Margriet Ruurs with a Lexile of 700L (Literary). This text includes a small map and information about each country, captions, sidebar, challenging vocabulary and country related terms, knowledge of geography, countries, and characteristics of library systems.
  • In Module 2, students listen to Me...Jane by Patrick McDonnell with a Lexile of 740L (Biography). This text has a narrative structure, layers of meaning around fulfilling dreams, textured illustrations real sketches, puzzles, photographs, author entries and entries from Jane Goodall. 
  • In Module 3, students listen to The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba with a Lexile of 850L. This text is a chronological biographical story with vivid illustrations. Vocabulary demands are supported by context and illustrations. Students can connect to the theme of determination. 
  • In Module 4, students listen to Cinderella by Marcia Brown with a Lexile of 840L (Literary). This text is a sequential fairy tale with a clear problem and solution. 
  • In Module 4, students listen to Adelita by Tomie dePaola with a Lexile of 660L (Literary). This text is a sequential fairy tale that includes Mexican culture and rich illustrations. The text also includes Spanish phrases and vocabulary that are defined in context.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations that materials support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year.

Most texts (for both shared and interactive reading) are within the appropriate grade level Lexile band for Grade 2-3, which is appropriate for a Grade 1 read aloud. Texts increase appropriately throughout the school year, with students engaging in increasingly complex and rigorous materials as they grow their literacy skills. Over the course of the school year, students have appropriately rigorous texts read to them in aggregate and across modules, there is broad variance in how they engage with these texts. Some examples that demonstrate this include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, students listen to the picture book, That Book Woman. This text contains many unfamiliar words with heavy use of vocabulary in an Appalachian dialect (a-twixt, britches, ‘course), spelling and diction indicate geographical and economic factors that make it appropriately complex. As a read-aloud, the teacher scaffolds student understanding of this complex text over six lessons. The lesson plans begin with students noticing and generating questions about the text. Students retell the story and participate in a Socratic Seminar to apply what they have learned about how the character changes in the story.
  • In Module 2, students listen to Never Smile at a Money. As a read-aloud, the teacher scaffolds student understanding of this complex text over six lessons. First, students notice details and generate questions about the text. Students then identify the author’s point, record evidence and examine conclusions drawn from the text. Text features and illustrations are closely studied to determine how they contribute to the author’s point. A series of text-dependent questions are answered to help students formulate essential meaning from the text.
  • In Module 3, students listen to Gilberto and the Wind. Students begin to work on their understanding of the term, respond, in order to work towards answering the focusing question: "How do characters respond to the powerful force of the wind?" Students also gain an understanding of story elements in order to write a retelling. 
  • In Module 4, students listen to Adelita. Students use this text for seven lessons in this module. Students continue adding to their Elements of Cinderella Chart and with scaffolded support, students use their Venn Diagrams to compare and contrast Adelita and Ella from Bigfoot Cinderrrrrella.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation that anchor texts and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level. 

Each module core text is evaluated using quantitative and qualitative criteria as outlined Appendix A while supporting text as referenced in Appendix E. Quantitative metrics are provided for each anchor text according to Lexile level. Qualitative measures are provided for each anchor text in four categories: meaning/purpose, structure, language, and knowledge demands. Metrics provided for qualitative measures are in narrative form. Reader and Task considerations are sometimes included in the appendices within the description of the text. This information can be found in the Appendix A: Text Complexity. Within each module, the texts are focused on a theme/topic, which provides some rationale as to why the text was chosen.

For example, the following contains the Text Complexity analysis and rationale found in Appendix A of Module 1:

Title and Author:  Tomás and the Library Lady, Pat Mora, Raul Colón

Description of Text: An inspiring, true story of a young migrant worker and a kind librarian who introduces him to books—encouraging a love for learning and opening his imagination.

Complexity Ratings: 

  • Quantitative: 440L
  • Qualitative: 
    • Meaning/Purpose: While the narrative has a straightforward story with a clear theme, it also has more than one level of meaning, including the view outside (reality) and inside (imagination) books.
    • Structure: The structure is conventional with a straightforward story line and illustrations that support the text. The author’s note provides additional background on Tomás Rivera.
    • Language: Most of the language in the text is explicit and easy to understand, though there is some unfamiliar vocabulary and some Spanish terms. Sentence structure is mainly simple and compound sentences, with a few complex sentences.
    • Knowledge Demands: The book includes slightly complex references to migrant experiences wherein Tomás’s family has to move regularly so his parents can work. Other knowledge demands include other cultural elements of a Spanish migrant family.

Indicator 1f

Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for supporting materials providing opportunities for students to engage with anchor and supporting texts and to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

Over the course of the year, students engage with anchor texts through read-alouds. Additionally, each Module includes supplementary texts of varying lengths. Students read each selection multiple times and for multiple purposes to build towards grade-level reading proficiency. Instructional materials provide a Volume of Reading Guide located in Appendix D. Materials also provide Volume of Reading Questions that can be used for small group reading or independent reading. Students also Echo Read anchor and supplementary texts. 

Example include:

  • In Module 1, Tomas and the Library Lady by Pat Mora and Raul Colon is read aloud for initial understanding and fluency. Students revisit the text multiple times and participate in Echo Reading, which allows students to practice reading the text. Students reread the text using Story Stones to identify narrative elements. The lower level Lexile text, Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss, is included in the text for students to read text independently. Use of supporting materials, such as visual art and videos help to build background knowledge to enhance the deeper understanding of the text. 
  • In Module 2, students listen to a variety of texts about the topic, Creature Features. Read-aloud texts include Me … Jane, What Do You Do With a Tail Like This? and Seven Blind Mice. Students also listen to a variety of supplementary texts that include the fables, “The Hare & the Tortoise” and “The Ants & the Grasshopper”, to build their knowledge and comprehension about the topic.  

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Each module includes text-dependent focus questions, content-framing questions, and craft questions that connect with the overarching essential question of the unit. These questions, rooted in the standards, are tied to activities and tasks throughout the module and build upon one another across the module, leading to an End-of-Module Task. Protocols and opportunities for students to engage in discussions with peers focused on the texts and topics under study are available in most lessons. Throughout the discussions, students are encouraged to use academic vocabulary as they discuss, ask questions, and return to the texts to support their responses.

The materials included a variety of writing types, including on-demand and process writing that align with the requirements in the standards. Evidence-based writing instruction and opportunities appear throughout most lessons.

Explicit instruction for grammar and conventions that address the language standards appear in each module.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations of most questions, tasks, and assignments being text-dependent and requiring students to engage with the text directly.

Each module provides opportunities for students to respond to text-dependent questions and non-text dependent. Non-text dependent questions are used to build knowledge and make connections for students in the readings. Modules begin with an overarching Essential Question. Within each lesson, there are text-dependent focus questions, content framing questions, and craft questions that drive students toward the learning goals and associated tasks tied to the texts and standards. 

Examples of text-dependent question include:

  • In Module 1, the Focusing Question for Lessons 7-12 states: "How does the Biblioburro change life for Ana?"
  • In Module 1, Lesson 11, students answer text-dependent questions: "How does Tomás get books? How is the way Tomás and Ana get books the same and different? How do books change Tomás’s life? How do books change Ana’s life?"
  • In Module 2, the Focusing Question for Lessons 10-14 states: "How did Jane Goodall make discoveries about animals?"
  • In Module 2, Lesson 11, students answer, "What is happening in Me...Jane?" 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 13, students answer, "What is the essential meaning of Me...Jane?"
  • In Module 3, the Focusing Question for Lessons 26-31 is: "How does William use the powerful force of the wind?"
  • In Module 3, Lesson 28, students answer text-dependent questions: "Based on the words you are hearing, what is the image that comes to your mind? What do you think a gusting gale feels like? How did the illustrations add to the descriptions?"
  • In Module 4, the Focusing Question for Lessons 17-27 is: "Why do people admire Adelita and Pear Blossom?"
  • In Module 4, Lesson 24, students answer text-dependent questions: "What trait can you infer from both actions to describe Pear Blossom’s character? Identify one action of Pear Blossom’s. What trait can you infer from that action?"

Examples of text-dependent tasks from Module 2 include:

  • In Module 2, students participate in Think-Pair-Share to answer, "What do you notice about this fable?"
  • In Module 2, students talk about The Hare & the Tortoise and generate questions in small groups using the Question Cube.
  • In Module 2, students participate in Think-Pair-Share about the parts of the hare or rabbit that need to be included in a drawing.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Every module offers an End-of-Module (EOM) Task. The lessons, questions, and tasks leading up to the EOM Task offer support to complete the task.

For example, students include the text from the lessons in Module 1 to write and illustrate a narrative about a character whose life has changed because of books. In Module 2, students use evidence gathered during shared class research to write an informative paragraph about an animal’s unique features. The associated tasks described in the lesson plans and in each module include the following:

  • An Essential Question that guides the overall work of the module
  • A Focusing Question for each set of lessons associated with the anchor text selections and is aligned to the expectations for the End-of-Module Task and the Essential Question
  • A Content Framing Question that guides each lesson 
  • A Vocabulary Deep Dive lesson that focuses on the complex vocabulary of the anchor text
  • A New Read Assessment and a Socratic Seminar that contains elements that support success on EOM Task

Examples include:

  • In Module 2, Creature Features, the Essential Question is, “What can we discover about animals’ unique features?” Focusing questions throughout the module include: "What lessons can we learn through stories about animals? How did Jane Goodall make discoveries about animals? How do seahorses use their unique features? How do animals use the same feature in unique ways? How do animals use their unique features in unexpected ways? What can we discover about animals’ unique features?" At the end of the module, students complete the EOM Task and create a super-sized animal trading card.
  • In Module 4, Cinderella Stories, the Essential Question is, “Why do people around the world admire Cinderella?” Focusing questions throughout the module include: "Why do people admire Perrault’s Cinderella? Why do people admire Rough-Face Girl and Ella? Why do people admire Adelita and Pear Blossom? Why do people around the world admire Cinderella?" At the end of the module, students complete the EOM Task and write an opinion paragraph about the Cinderella character that is most admired using a graphic organizer.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet expectations that materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.  

In the majority of the lessons, there are discussion protocols for turn-and-talks, whole group discussions, and small group discussions. There are opportunities in all of these routines for students to speak and listen about what they read. Collaborative routines are included in the daily lessons along with protocol explanations and discussion structures. This is found in the Implementation Guide: A Guide for Teachers.

Instructional routines are included through lessons for students to Think-Pair-Share which allows students to individually process their thoughts about a question, then collaboratively discuss the question with peers. Question Corners allows students to express their ideas and opinions in response to a question by moving to and standing in an area assigned to a specific response or point of view. Mix and Mingle allows students to circulate around the room. On a cue (e.g., stop music, chant, call out directions), students stand back to back with a partner, listen to the question, think, then turn around and discuss the question. Socratic Seminars allow students to prepare for and participate in a structured, text-based, academic conversation. Students apply the skills of speaking and listening to express what they have learned from their reading and writing. Examples include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 2, during the Vocabulary Deep Dive, students use the Wonder Wheel to wonder and ask questions about vocabulary words in Tomás and the Library Lady. The teacher models asking a question about a vocabulary word. Students Think-Pair-Share about what they think the word means. Students share their thinking using the following sentence frames: "What does _____mean? How does _____work? What is _____?"
  • In Module 1, Lesson 4, pairs take turns orally retelling the story, Tomás and the Library Lady, making sure to include key details about the problem and resolution. 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 4, students read "The Ants and the Grasshopper" and Think-Share-Pair about the question, “What are some key details that might support the lesson 'Plan ahead and work hard'?”
  • In Module 3, Lesson 22, students Think-Share-Pair about the question, “What are sensory words?”. The teacher uses Equity Sticks to call on pairs to share their responses.
  • In Module 4, Lesson 17, the teacher displays the Speaking and Listening Anchor Chart and students Think-Share-Pair about the question, “What did you notice about Adelita?”, and use the anchor chart to guide their conversations. 

Indicator 1j

Materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet expectations that materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and studying/researching with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Each module provides an Essential Question, Focusing Questions, and Content Framing Questions within groups of lessons to guide student understanding and synthesis of the content. Students discuss questions within each daily lesson plan. Additionally, each of the four modules include Socratic Seminars allowing students to prepare for and participate in a structured, text-based, academic conversation. 

In Module 1, Lesson 1, a Speaking and Listening Anchor Chart is developed with students to meet the speaking and listening goals set for the module and align to the CCSS Speaking and Listening Standards. This chart is reviewed and used to give structure to whole group, small group, and partner discussions throughout the course of the year.  Lessons also require students to interact with the text to complete text-dependent activities. 

Examples of discussion questions and tasks include: 

  • In Module 1, students participate in the following Socratic Seminars: 
    • Respond to what others say in a Socratic Seminar on the Focusing Question: How does the packhorse librarian change life for Cal?
    • Respond to what others say in a Socratic Seminar on the Focusing Question: How can books change my life?
    • Respond to what others say in a Socratic Seminar on the Essential Question: How do books change lives around the world?
  • In Module 1, Lesson 1, the teacher is provided with relevant follow-up questions to guide student discussions: “If students respond with irrelevant evidence, read aloud a small section of text that answers the question. Ask more specific questions that relate to the student-generated one. For example, read the first and fourth sentences on page 18 and ask, 'What is Tomás doing? Where is he?'”
  • In Module 2, students participate in the following Socratic Seminars:
    • Respond to what others say in a Socratic Seminar on the following questions: What lessons did you learn from these fables? What do the lessons of fables teach you about your own life?
    • Respond to what others say in a Socratic Seminar on the Focusing Question: In what different ways does the text Sea Horse teach readers about the sea horse’s unique features?
    • Respond to what others say in a Socratic Seminar on the Essential Question: What have we discovered about animals’ unique features?
  • In Module 2, Lesson 8, students Think-Pair-Share about the following questions: “Do you agree with the lesson we came up with as a class or the one in the fable? Which lesson has more key details to support it?” The teacher is also provided follow-up questions: “How are they similar? How are they different?”
  • In Module 3, students participate in the following Socratic Seminars:
    • Ask for more information from a speaker in a Socratic Seminar to answer the question: Is science or magic more important to William?
  • In Module 4, students participate in the following Socratic Seminars: 
    • Evaluate the various characters in Cinderella stories to answer the following question: What do you admire about the characters in the Cinderella stories?
  • In Module 4, Lesson 34, teachers are provided with follow-up question for the Socratic Seminar to support students in their discussions: "What do Cinderella stories around the world have in common? Which letter did I give myself, and why?"

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g., grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet expectations that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Throughout the Modules, students have multiple opportunities for on-demand writing, as well as process writing. Students have opportunities to learn about the writing process through Craft Lessons where students work to revise and edit their drafts. Students use Response Journals to record their writing.  Focusing Question Tasks provide students with opportunities for on-demand writing. 

For example:

  • In Module 1, the Focusing Question Task 1 prompt states: “Write and draw to retell the story of Tomás and the Library Lady, including character, setting, and problem/resolution.”
  • In Module 1, Lesson 10, students write a sentence in their Response Journals about Ana using student-generated words from the chart.
  • In Module 1, The Focusing Question Task 2 prompt states: “Write and draw to retell the story Waiting for the Biblioburro, including character, setting, and problem/resolution. Use complete sentences and end punctuation.”
  • In Module 1, Lesson 28, students plan for giving and receiving useful peer feedback on writing.
  • In Module 1, Lesson 29, students use Knowledge Journals to record learning in a two-column chart labeled, “What I Know: What did you learn from our lessons on My Librarian Is a Camel? What did you learn about our Essential Question?” and “What I Can Do: What did you learn to do as a writer? What did you learn to do as a reader?”
  • In Module 2, Lesson 5, students use a Topic Sandwich Chart to help them craft an informative paragraph to include sequence of events about “The Hare & the Tortoise.”
  • In Module 2, Lesson 14, students learn how to revise their topic statements using the Informative Writing Anchor Chart. 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 19, students respond to the Focusing  Question, “How do seahorses use their unique features?”
  • In Module 3, Lesson 11, students use the Narrative Writing Checklist to review and revise their writing. 
  • In Module 3, Lesson 25, students respond to the Focusing Question, “How does Irene respond to the powerful force of the wind?” 
  • In Module 4, Lesson 9, students respond to the Focusing Question, “Why do people admire Perrault’s Cinderella?”
  • In Module 4, Lesson 24, students use the Opinion Writing Checklist to revise their opinion paragraphs about which Cinderella characters they most admire. 

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet the expectation that materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. 

A variety of prompts include the distribution of opinion, narrative, and informative/explanatory writings as required by Grade 1 standards. Module materials focus on different text types of writing throughout the year. Focusing Question Tasks require specific writing skills and each of these Focusing Question Tasks scaffolds the level of skill needed to complete the task successfully. These skills culminate and are assessed with the End-of-Module (EOM) Task within each module. 

The primary writing focus of Module 1 is narrative writing. The primary focus of Module 2 is informative writing. The focus of Module 3 is informative and then later moves to narrative. In Module 4, the primary writing focus is opinion writing. In each module, students begin by unpacking prompts and learning to respond, orally and in writing. 

For example, 

  • In Module 1, Focus Question Task 1, students write and draw to retell the story of Tomás and the Library Lady, including character, setting, and problem/resolution.  In the EOM Task, students write and illustrate a narrative about a character whose life has changed because of books.
  • In Module 2, Lesson 9, students write an informative paragraph about the lesson of Seven Blind Mice. They are instructed to include a topic statement that names the text and states the lesson, two or more details from the text that support the lesson, a conclusion, complete sentences that begin with a capital letter and end with a punctuation mark.
  • In Module 3, Lesson 7, students write an informative paragraph for the prompt: “What does the wind do during a Hurricane?” Students are instructed to include all the parts of a Topic Sandwich informative paragraph, research from two or more sources, verbs that match their subjects, and a detailed illustration. In Lesson 13, students learn how to write a problem for their story using a Story Map. 
  • In Module 4, Lesson 6, students use the Opinion Sandwich Chart to learn the structure of an opinion paragraph. In Lesson 9, students use what they have learning about the opinion paragraph structure to write an opinion paragraph about what they admire most about Cinderella. In Lesson 13, students use the Opinion Writing Chart to help guide them in writing a reason that supports their opinion statement with evidence from the text.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for the materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and clear information appropriate for the grade level. 

Over the course of a year, students have multiple opportunities for evidence-based writing during daily lessons. Students use sticky notes to annotate texts, complete graphic organizer, and record knowledge they learned from the text in their Knowledge Journals. Additionally, each lesson utilizes Focusing Question Tasks that build to an End-of-Module (EOM) Task that incorporate written and oral responses to text-based questions/prompts. 

Examples include:

  • In Module 1, students build their understanding of literary texts alongside the skills they need to execute their own retelling of the stories. Through this work of using Sentence Frames for structure, practicing conventions to create complete sentences, and sequencing events, students gain the skills to structure and begin to develop narrative writing. In their EOM original narrative, students apply what they have learned through the sequenced retelling of stories to compose a narrative about how a character’s life is changed by books, set in one of the countries from My Librarian Is a Camel.
  • In Module 1, Focusing Question Task 12, students answer, “Write and draw to retell the story Waiting for the Biblioburro, including character, setting, and problem/resolution. Use complete sentences and end punctuation.”
  • In Module 1, Lesson 4, students use a Story Map to identify characters, setting, problem, and resolution about the text, Tomás and the Library Lady.
  • In Module 2, Focusing Question Task 1, students write an informative paragraph about the lesson of the text, Seven Blind Mice.
  • In Module 2, Focusing Question Task 3, students apply their knowledge learned from Sea Horse: The Shyest Fish in the Sea to write an information paragraph to answer, “How do seahorses use their unique features?”
  • In Module 2, Lesson 25, students record in their knowledge journals and answer, “What new information about animal features did you learn from What Do You Do With A Tail Like This?
  • In Module 3, Lesson 11, students use sticky notes to annotate the text, Feelings, for evidence to support the essential meaning. 
  • In Module 3, Lesson 19, students use sticky notes to annotate “The Guest” for evidence to support the central message.
  • In Module 4, Lesson 3, students complete a Story Map and identify the characters, setting, problem, and resolution in Cinderella. 
  • In Module 4, Lesson 21, students record the knowledge they gained Adelita in their Knowledge Journals.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet expectations that materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in and out of context. 

Language standards are addressed throughout each module in the Deep Dive Style and Conventions portion of module lessons. The instructional strategies of the lessons include teacher modeling, Think Aloud, use of sentence frames, Anchor Charts and Think-Pair-Share. Students are supported in their use of the grammar and convention focus through speaking and writing in their Response Journals. Over the course of the year, students have opportunities to apply grammar and convention skills to context. 

Example include: 

Students have opportunities to print all upper- and lowercase letters. For example: 

  • In Module 4, Lesson 30, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher asks, “What are some resources in the room that help you write letter correctly?” Students share ideas. Students use the alphabet chart to form the letters correctly when they write the title of their favorite Cinderella story.

Students have opportunities to use common, proper and possessive nouns. For example: 

  • In Module 1, Lesson 1, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher explains that nouns tell people, places, things, and objects. The teacher displays the Nouns Chart for common nouns, and students help fill in the categories of people, places, and things.

Students have opportunities to use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences. For example: 

  • In Module 3, Lesson 4, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher displays a T-Chart for singular and plural nouns. Students help fill in the T-Chart. The teacher displays a chart for verbs. Student help fill in the chart. The teacher shows: “Rainstorms blow in the wind.” Students observe the sentence and share noticings. The teacher explains that when a noun ends with an s, the verb does not. Students view two sentences and determine if the verbs agree. 

Students have opportunities to use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns. For example: 

  • In Module 4, Lesson 12, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher shows the Pronoun Chart. The teacher explains that pronouns are words that replace nouns. Students practice replacing nouns for pronouns in the following sentence: “But the prince loved nature best.”
  • In Module 4, Lesson 13, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher shows the Personal Pronoun Chart. The teacher explains that personal pronouns replace people. The teacher shows personal pronouns such as she, he, and me. Students work with a partner to determine personal pronouns to replace nouns in sentences.
  • In Module 4, Lesson 19, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher displays the Indefinite Pronoun Anchor Chart. The teacher explains that indefinite pronouns are words used to talk about people, places, and things without saying who, what, or where they are. Student complete Handout 19B to identify indefinite pronouns. 

Students have opportunities to use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future. For example: 

  • In Module 1, Lesson 7, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher displays the following words on the board: dream, wait, walk, work, read, and write. After a Think-Pair-Share, students learn that the words are actions or things that can be done. Students help fill in a Verb Chart for present verbs.
  • In Module 4, Lesson 5, students determine the meaning of verbs using context clues. Students Think-Pair-Share about the question, “Why are the endings –ing and –ed occasionally added to verbs? For example, jump can be jumping or jumped.” Students then contribute to a Words and Definitions chart using past tense verbs from Cinderella. 

Students have opportunities to use frequently occurring adjectives. For example: 

  • In Module 1, Lesson 17, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher explains that describing words are called adjectives and often tell “what kind.” Students help make a list of adjectives that could complete the sentence, “I see the ____ jewelry.”
  • In Module 1, Lesson 20, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher explains that adjectives tell how something/someone feels. The teacher shows a chart, and students help create a list of adjectives.

Students have opportunities to use frequently occurring conjunctions. For example: 

  • In Module 4, Lesson 2, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher displays the Conjunction Anchor Chart. The teacher displays sentences containing conjunctions. Students listen to the sentences and do a Nonverbal Signal to show if the sentences are glued together. 

Students have opportunities to use determiners. For example: 

  • In Module 2, Lesson 10, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher explains that determine means “to decide something.” The teacher explains that determiners are words used before nouns to help a reader determine which noun is being talked about. Students identify determiners in sentences.

Students have opportunities to use frequently occurring prepositions. For example:

  • In Module 2, Lesson 21, during Style and Conventions, the teacher displays a preposition chart. The teacher puts in prepositions that students already know. The students for prepositions in What Do You Do With a Tail Like This?.

Students have opportunities to produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts. For example: 

  • In Module 1, Lesson 13, the teacher displays the Craft Question: "What makes a declarative sentence complete?" The teacher then displays and reads the Complete Sentence Anchor Chart. The teacher then models creating a complete sentence using a noun and a verb and explains that this is a declarative sentence because it gives someone information. Students work in pairs choosing nouns and verbs from the Nouns and Verbs Chart to create declarative sentences. 
  • In Module 1, Lesson 23, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher displays interrogative sentences. The students observe and identify similar features of interrogative sentences. Students complete Handout 23: Mixed Sentences, and students circle interrogative sentences.
  • In Module 1, Lesson 25, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher posts the following sentences: Eat them! Try them., and You may, I say. Students observe the sentences. Students share what they notice. Students complete Handout 25 and circle the sentences. 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 9, the teacher displays the Craft Question, "How do I improve my writing with end punctuation?". The teacher then displays a Punctuation and Type of Sentence Chart with definitions of declarative, interrogative, and exclamatory punctuation. The teacher then models how to edit a piece of writing for punctuation. Students then apply knowledge and edit their Focusing Question Task for punctuation. 

Students have opportunities to capitalize dates and names of people. For example: 

  • In Module 4, Lesson 20, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher displays the Capitalization Chart. The teacher explains that names of places, people, things, days of the week, and months of the year are capitalized. Students add examples to the chart such as Monday, Sarah, and January.

Students have opportunities to use end punctuation for sentences. For example: 

  • In Module 1, Lesson 10, the teacher shows the following: Ana ran to the village. Using a Think Aloud and the Complete Sentence Anchor Chart, the teacher models checking the sentence. Students write a sentence in their Response Journals about Ana, and students check the sentence with the Complete Sentence Chart. 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 4, during Vocabulary Deep Dive, the teacher asks students: “What are the different types of end punctuation we have learned about?” Students share. Students use the period card from Handout 4A to show when they see a statement that needs a period.

Students have opportunities to use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series. For example:

  • In Module 4, Lesson 6, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher shows three separate sentences about Cinderella. Students learn that compound sentences combine two or more simples sentence into one sentence. Students learn to place a comma in a series of things in a sentence.
  • In Module 4, Lesson 33, students complete a New Read Assessment. The teacher displays a date with no capitalization or a comma and students correctly write the date with capitalization and a comma.

Students have opportunities to use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words. For example: 

  • In Module 4, Lesson 23, during Style and Conventions Deep Dive, the teacher asks students, “What resources do you use to help you spell words?” Students share resources. The teacher displays sentences with spelling errors and has students help identify the spelling errors. 

Students have opportunities to spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions. For example: 

  • In Module 2, Lesson 19, the teacher reads aloud the following question: “How do I use phonetic spelling in my writing?” Students are reminded to use the following spelling strategies: "Say the word. Say the word slowly and count the sounds you hear. Write lines for each sound that you write the letters for the sounds."

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

Texts within the Wit & Wisdom Grade 1 materials are organized around topics to build students’ knowledge and vocabulary. A series of intentionally sequenced questions and tasks support students as they analyze texts and integrate knowledge and ideas within and across texts. Carefully sequenced questions and task frame each module, leading to an End-of-Module task where students demonstrate content knowledge and literacy skills.

Intentional plans for both vocabulary instruction and writing are evident across the year. Students engage in shared research projects across multiple modules.

Opportunities and suggestions for independent reading are available, however there is no mechanism for accountability.

Criterion 2a - 2h

Materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.
30/20
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Criterion Rating Details

Texts are organized around science and social studies topics to build students’ content knowledge and vocabulary. A series of intentionally sequenced questions and tasks build upon one another to support students as they analyze the texts as well as the integration of knowledge and ideas within and across texts. The sequencing of the questions and task that frame each module lead to an End-of-Module task which requires students to demonstrate their content knowledge and literacy skills through writing and speaking.

An intentional plan for vocabulary instruction utilizing both implicit and explicit instruction is embedded in the modules across the year.

A year-long, cohesive plan for writing instruction is evident in the materials, with almost daily opportunities for students to engage in writing which grows their understanding of texts and topics. Students engage in shared research projects across multiple modules.

While there is information about the importance of students engaging in a volume of reading as well as questions designed to support the volume of reading, there is no accountability system to ensure students engage in independent reading.

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

The curriculum has four modules that are all organized around specific science or social studies topics. Module 1 and 4 are social studies topics and Module 2 and 3 are science topics. Module 1 is about reading and books, Module 2 is about different creatures, Module 3 is about forces, and Module 4 is about different versions of Cinderella.  Within each module, there are Essential Questions for a group of lessons that break the big topic into more focused topics. 

In Module 1, students hear several literary and informational texts about books and reading. Students learn how people access books across the world, the purpose of librarians, and the importance of books. Topics and texts include:

  • In Lessons 1-12, students read a variety of texts to learn how books and libraries can impact someone’s life. They hear the literary texts, Tomas and the Library Lady and Waiting for the Biblioburro by Monica Brown.
  • In Lessons 13-16, students learn how people around the world get books by reading My Librarian is a Camel by Margriet Ruurs.
  • In Lessons 17-22, students hear That Book Woman by Heather Henson and David Small and discuss how the librarian changes the life for the main character. 
  • In Lessons 23-27, students reflect on how books can change their lives by reading Museum ABC by the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss.

In Module 2, students hear literary and informational texts about different animals. They begin by discussing lessons in literary books featuring animals, and then learn about Jane Goodall, and how animals use their unique features. Examples of topics and texts include:

  • In Lessons 1-9, students discuss the lessons they learn through stories featuring animals including "The Hare & The Tortoise" and "The Ants & the Grasshopper" by Aesop. 
  • In Lessons 10-14, students learn how Jane Goodall made discoveries about animals by listening to Me... Jane, by Patrick McDonnell. 
  • In Lessons 21-26, students learn how animals use the same feature in unique ways by reading several texts, including What do You Do with a Tail Like This? by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page. 
  • In Lessons 27-32, students learn how animals use their unique features in unexpected ways by reading texts, such as Never Smile at a Monkey by Steve Jenkins. 

In Module 3, students hear literary and informational texts about forces in nature. Specifically they learn about wind in nature as well as the power of emotions. Examples of topics and texts include:

  • In Lessons 1-7, students learn how wind is a powerful force. They read and interact with several texts, including Feel the Wind by Arthur Dorros. 
  • In Lessons 8-12, students learn about feelings through the book, Feelings by Aliki. 
  • In lessons 13-31, students then return to discussing the force of wind by reading the literary texts, Gilberto and the Wind by Marie Hall Ets, Brave Irene by William Steig, and The Boy who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer to explore how characters respond to the powerful force of the wind. 

In Module 4, students read several different versions of Cinderella. Some examples include:

  • In Lessons 1-9, students begin by reading Cinderella by Marcia Brown and Cendrillon: A Caribbean Cinderella by Robert D. San Souci.
  • In Lessons 10-16, students read the Algonquin Cinderella, Rough - Faced Girl by Rafe Martin.
  • In Lessons 17-27, students read Adelita by Tomie dePaola and The Korean Cinderella by Shirley Climo.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

Throughout the program, students answer a variety of coherently sequenced questions and tasks. The questions help students engage with and analyze the complex texts that they hear throughout the year. Questions involving vocabulary require students to analyze the language within the read aloud. Student answer questions about story elements, vocabulary words, and text structure. 

Examples of questions that require students to analyze language include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 19, students learn the word, scholar, after reading That Book Woman by Heather Henson and David Small and are asked how Cal’s attitude changed about being a scholar-boy by the end of the text and if he turned into a scholar-boy. 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 3, students hear Fish by Mary Ann Hoberman, and while learning about the word, move, students are asked which of the words means to move the slowest and which means to move the quickest. 
  • In Module 3, Lesson 2, students hear Feel the Wind by Arthur Dorros, and while learning about the word, powerful, students are asked how the wind is powerful.
  • In Module 4, Lesson 10, students hear and discuss the word invisible. They read the sentence with the word from the story and are asked what clues can help them figure out the meaning, what word parts they see, and what they think it means. 

Examples of questions that require students to analyze key ideas include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 18, students focus on the story elements of That Book Woman by Heather Henson and David Small and are asked questions, such as "What do they notice about where Cal lives? What is the resolution of the story?"
  • In Module 2, Lesson 2, students answer, "What did you learn about the problem from Grasshopper’s interaction with the ants?" in the first three paragraphs of "The Ants & The Grasshopper" by Aesop. 
  • In Module 3, Lesson 23, students read and analyze how the wind impacts the character Irene Brave Irene by William Steig. The teacher reads several different pages, and after each page, the students answer, "What the wind is doing? How Irene feels about it? How the text supports the answer?"
  • In Module 4, Lesson 14, students read Bigfoot Cinderrrrrella by Tony Johnston and analyze the main character: "What can you infer about Ella based on her actions?"

Examples of questions that require students to analyze details include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 5, students are asked how page 3 in the beginning of Tomas and the Library Lady by Pat Mora and Raul Colon is similar to and different from the end of the book.
  • In Module 2, Lesson 11, after hearing Me...Jane by Patrick McDonnell, students are asked what Jane does to learn about animals on pages 4-7 and what Jane is curious about and what she does on pages 10-15. 
  • In Module 3, Lesson 14, after hearing Gilberto and the Wind by Marie Hall Ets, students are asked how the events on the last page are similar to and different from the rest of the story. 
  • In Module 4, Lesson 3, after hearing Cinderella by Marcia Brown, students are asked how Cinderella’s stepmother and stepsisters treated Cinderella. 

Examples of questions that require students to analyze craft include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 25, after reading Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss, students analyze the author’s craft by looking at how the author indicators which of the two characters are speaking in the story. 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 18, students hear Seahorse: The Shyest Fish in the Sea by Chris Butterworth, where the size of the font changes. Students analyze this author’s craft and are asked what they learn from the different size fonts and how the type of information is different. 
  • In Module 3, Lesson 9, students hear Feelings by Aliki and learn how the author uses the bird character to reflect his own point. Students are asked what reasons in the text support the author’s point and if the reasons support the author’s point that feelings can be touched by someone. 
  • In Module 4, Lesson 28, after hearing several versions of Cinderella, students are asked what elements have been similar in all of the Cinderella stories that they have read so far. 

Examples of questions that require students to analyze structure include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 28, students read Museums ABC by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and are asked what they know about how the book is organized. 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 23, students hear What Do You Do With a Tail Like This? by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page, learn about text features, and are asked how the text features help them learn about the platypus. 
  • In Module 3, Lesson 27, students hear The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer and work together to make a timeline of the story. 
  • In Module 4, Lesson 23, after hearing The Korean Cinderella by Shirley Climo, students identify story elements and share where in the text they identified the information.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-based questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Throughout the program, students answer a set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require them to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. Throughout the four modules, the students learn about books and libraries around the world, animals, powerful forces, and different Cinderella stories across the world. Students answer questions in individual texts and across multiple texts in order to integrate the knowledge that they have learned.

Examples of questions include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 15, students learn how students across the world get books by reading My Librarian is a Camel by Margriet Ruurs. Students complete a chart during a whole class discussion that identifies the country and where students get books in that country. 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 11, after reading Me...Jane by Patrick McDonnell, students answer, "How Jane interacts with nature? Why? What was Jane’s dream?" 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 20, students compare the text Seahorse: The Shyest Fish in the Sea by Chris Butterworth to the video, “Pygmy Seahorse: Masters of Camouflage."
  • In Module 3, Lesson 4, after reading Feel the Wind by Arthur Dorros, students are asked what are some of the things wind can do and why weather forecasters want to know about the wind. 
  • In Module 4, Lesson 27, students choose one of the Cinderella texts from the module and compare it to the informational article, “900 Cinderellas” by Marcia Amidon. Students read to find what was the same in the article and in the story that they chose.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g., combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

In each module, there are several focusing question tasks that scaffold the materials to aid in the successful completion of the End-of-Module (EOM) Task. The focus tasks come at the end of each topic in the module. The materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to each culminating task. Many of the specific tasks are focused on a piece of writing but are about the text that they listened to the teacher read aloud, which provides learning through integrated skills. Students also rehearse the writing with a partner before writing. 

Examples of the Focus Question Tasks and the EOM Tasks include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 11, students write a retelling of the story Waiting for the Biblioburro. Before writing, students work with a peer to orally retell the story. This helps students complete their own narrative as the EOM Task where they write a narrative story about a character and how books have changed their lives. Before beginning, students use a Mix and Mingle to discuss how authors use story elements when writing stories.
  • In Module 2, Lesson 19, students apply their knowledge of features gathered from reading Seahorse: The Shyest Fish in the Sea. They write a paragraph about how seahorses use their unique features. This supports students in completing the EOM Task where they write what they have discovered about an animal’s unique features. Once students select an animal, students orally rehearse with a partner before writing, which integrates speaking, listening, reading, and writing.
  • In Module 3, Lesson 24, students retell a scene from Brave Irene, in which they orally rehearse their scene with a partner before writing it. The EOM Task requires students to write a narrative story that shows how a character responds to a powerful, windy day. This requires students to integrate knowledge from the texts in this module. The Focus Question Task supports the EOM Task by requiring students to retell a story. 
  • In Module 4, Lesson 24, students complete Focusing Question Task where they write an opinion paragraph about Adelita or Pear Blossom. Before beginning the task, students talk with a peer to discuss which trait they admire most about Adelita or Pear Blossom. Then before beginning to write in Lesson 26, students orally rehearse their paragraph before writing. This supports the EOM Task where students write about which Cinderella they admire the most. Like the Focus Question, students also rehearse their paragraph before they write it. 

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. 

The materials include a year-long vocabulary plan. Vocabulary words are taught both implicitly and explicitly, using words from the texts read aloud. Vocabulary instruction includes a focus on multiple meanings, shades of meaning, concept maps, and morphology. Vocabulary Routines are found in the Resources section of the Implementation Guide and include routines such as Frayer Model, Morpheme Matrix, Outside-In, Relationship Mapping, and Word Line. Teachers also use Word Walls and Vocabulary Journals for students to record newly-acquired words and vocabulary strategies Appendix B includes additional vocabulary support. It explains that vocabulary instructional strategies are explicitly introduced and practiced throughout the program. The appendix also includes a Module Word List and a list of words that would pose a challenge to student comprehension. Vocabulary is assessed through questions in the module vocabulary assessments. 

Examples of explicit vocabulary instruction throughout the program include: 

  • In Module 1, Lesson 8, after reading Waiting for the Biblioburro by Monica Brown and John Parra, students learn the words village, burros, market, and collect. The teacher then gives three sentence stems: "What is ______? What does ______ mean? How does ______ work?" Students place the vocabulary words in the sentence stems. Students then work with the text to find the word to help determine the meaning of the word. The students write the definition and then draw a quick sketch. They do this for each word with a partner. 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 16, students learn how to use a concept map to be able to categorize the words or attributes that they have learned about seahorses after hearing Seahorse: The Shyest Fish in the Sea by Chris Butterworth. As a class, students define what a seahorse is and what it has on its body. Students discuss the answers with a partner before sharing in the whole group and the teacher records it on the concept map. Then partners work together to complete the rest of the concept map. 
  • In Module 3, Lesson 22, the teacher rereads page 11 of Brave Irene and instructs students to listen to words that have the -ing ending. Some of the words on the page are measuring, cutting, pinning, and stitching. Students talk about the root words and the -ing. Then students add one of the words to their Vocabulary Journals, drawing a line to separate the root word from the ending and rewriting the root word. 
  • In Module 4, Lesson 28, students work on sorting words into categories after listening to Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal: A Worldwide Cinderella by Paul Fleischman. The teacher begins by displaying words and asks students what some of the words have in common and how they can group similar words together. The teacher models, and then students work in groups of three to sort the words into the categories of food, clothes, and footwear. 

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts. 

Throughout the materials, students engage in writing lessons almost daily that support them in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts. Students engage in different forms of writing. Students begin the year with narrative writing, move to informative writing, then another narrative writing piece, before opinion writing. Students spend roughly 20 or more minutes of writing per lesson. Students begin the year by learning what makes a complete sentence, before learning how to write paragraphs of the different genres.

They participate in shared writing which enables them to build their understanding of exemplary writing through developing a piece of writing as a class. In addition, while the teacher reads, students participate in Stop and Jot, which allows them to respond to texts. Students draw a quick sketch to represent their response or write. Throughout the program, students also follow a similar protocol for the different genres of writing. For informational writing, students include a topic sentence, sentences with facts and details, and a conclusion. For opinion writing, students state an opinion about the topic, supply reasons that support the opinion, and then a sentence to reinforce their opinion. For narrative writing, students are taught to include characters, setting, problem, events, and a resolution. Writing rubrics are included in the Implementation Guide that are unique to Grade 1.

Specific examples of writing tasks and how they build over the year include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 9, students explore complete sentences. The teacher displays several complete sentences so students can help develop a definition of a complete sentence. The students then think-pair-share to check several sentences against the criteria for complete sentences and identify the subjects and verbs. 
  • In Module 2, Lesson 28, students learn how to include conclusion sentences in their paragraphs. They had previously learned how to write topic sentences and detail sentences. The teacher shows the students two different paragraphs, one with a conclusion and one without, and asks the students what they notice. In the next lesson, the students write their own conclusion sentences for their informative paragraphs. 
  • In Module 3, Lesson 11, students write their second narrative story. In this lesson, students write a problem for their story. Students write a story about the sequenced pictures in “Lost and Found” from the text Feelings on page 24. Students write sentences detailing the problem and then draw a picture of the character’s face as a reminder of how the character might have felt. 
  • In Module 4, Lesson 10, students begin learning how to write opinion pieces. Students review the components of an opinion paragraph and learn some sentence frames to begin opinion statements. The teacher then asks questions about Rough-Face Girl and the students use the sentence frames to answer the questions. Then in the next lesson, students begin creating their own opinion statements. 

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

Throughout the program, students are given ample opportunities to help them develop their research skills by engaging in shared research projects. Beginning in Module 2, there is a research component included in each module that provides students with lifelong research skills. They begin with shared research of an animal in order to independently write an informative paragraph about the animal. Then students complete two more research projects about wind and textiles.

Specific examples of research lessons and tasks include:

  • In Module 2, Lesson 26, students practice researching an animal with a partner.  They begin by using the text What do You Do With a Tail Like This? and then a second supplementary text. Students then choose one piece of evidence to answer the research question and write one sentence about the evidence. The End-of-Module Task requests students to use the gathered evidence during the shared class research to write an informative paragraph about the paragraph. 
  • In Module 3, Lesson 3, students begin to gather facts to write their own informative text about the wind. In this lesson, students read about wind in two different sources and then decide what is the same and what is different between the two sources. Students record information in a graphic organizer. Then in the next few lessons, students continue to research by looking at different sources and analyze the similarities and differences between them. In Lesson 8, students write an informative paragraph to share the research they have collected as a group. 
  • In Module 4, Lesson 20, students explore informative texts on textile designs to gather evidence for a research paragraph. In this lesson, students research and write one sentence about the information on a sentence strip that will be added to the corresponding textile research chart. 

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

In the Instructional Manual, there is information about the importance of volume of reading, including independent reading; however, there is no guidance for teachers on incorporating this into the daily lesson plan nor is there an accountability system for students. Independent reading is not included within the module lessons and all of the texts are read alouds; therefore, not giving students the opportunity to independently read. Students do chorally read and echo read, but small group instruction is also not included to provide additional times for students to regularly engage in a volume of reading. There is minimal home support for independent reading. There are repeated readings of fluency passage and in the Family Letter that goes home, there are questions to ask at home and suggested texts, but no accountability system. In addition, in Appendix D, there is a list of texts that are recommended titles that support the module content or themes. These texts can be used in small group instruction or as part of an independent and/or choice reading program. There are also Volume of Reading Reflection Questions, that allows students to share their knowledge about the content through independent reading; however, there is no system suggested that requires students to complete these questions. 

Examples of the reflection questions and suggested texts include:

  • In Module 1, questions include, "How does the main character’s attitude towards reading change from the beginning of the story to the end of the story? How does the author show us that books can change lives? What new idea about books did you learn from the story?" Text suggestions include, Poppleton by Cynthia Rylant, The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore by William Joyce, and Bats at the Library by Brian Lies. 
  • In Module 2, text suggestions include My First Day by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page, Amazing Animals: Dolphins by Kate Riggs, and Bat Loves the Night by Nicola Davies.
  • In Module 3, questions include, "What does the author tell you about wind in the story? How does the author use sensory details to tell us more of the story? How do the characters in the story tell you more about people’s feelings?" Text suggestions include, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, Twenty-One Elephants and Still Standing by April Jones Prince, and Hurricanes! by Gail Gibbons 
  • In Module 4, questions include, "What are the main ideas of this book? What happened in the story? Did the story teach you a life lesson and if yes, what?" Text suggestions include, Spotlight on South Korea by Bobbie Kalman, Pablo Picasso by Mike Venezia, and The Irish Cinderlad by Shirley Climo.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

Materials are designed to support teachers in providing standards-aligned instruction for all students and are easy for both students and teachers to navigate. The instructional design includes ample opportunities for assessment and support to use data to improve instruction and student learning.

Criterion 3a - 3e

Use and design facilitate student learning: Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials are well-designed and easy to navigate. Alignments to standards are clear and appropriate. Student materials provide appropriate support for the acquisition and practice of key literacy skills.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Each lesson is designed for a 90-minute block. Each module contains from 32-36 lessons. Materials also contain a Module 0 for teachers to begin the school year with an introduction to the format of the daily lessons. 

A module overview is found at the beginning of each module which includes: Module Summary, Essential Questions, Suggested Student Understandings, Texts, Module Learning Goals, Module in Context, Standards, Major Assessments, and Module Map. 

Materials include detailed lessons plans with supporting materials.  The structure within each daily lesson includes the Welcome, Launch, Learn, Land, Wrap, and a Vocabulary Deep Dive or a Style and Convention Deep Dive. Each section has hyperlinks included for materials needed, such as graphic organizers or articles.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed Grade 1 meet the expectations that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

Each module provides 32-36 lessons and each lesson is designed for a 90-minute block. Each of the four modules can be completed within a nine-week grading period. Teachers and students can reasonably complete the content within a 36-week school year as long as their schedule provides a 90-minute block of time for English Language Arts.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).

Students have access to an array of materials that provide ample review and practice resources, such as graphic organizers, sentence frames, reference charts, anchor charts, Word Wall, new-read assessments, supporting excerpts or texts, rubrics, and speaking and listening checklists.

Student resources include clear explanations and directions. Activities that are completed with teacher guidance have directions included in the teacher lesson plan notes. Resources that are completed independently or in small groups without direct teacher guidance include clear directions and explanations so that the task can be completed. 

Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 18 includes a Story Map resource for the students. The directions for the teacher and students are clear and provide guidance on how to complete the Story Map for the text, That Book Woman. 
  • Module 3, Lesson 6 includes a Feel the Wind  Main Topics Chart for the students. Guidance for the teacher and directions on the handout for students are clear and detailed.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for materials including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

Alignment to the CCSS is documented in multiple places in the curriculum including the following sections:  Module Map, Module Learning Goals, Standards, Major Assessments, and Lesson Agenda (section-”Standards Addressed”).  

 For example, in the overview of each module there is a Module Map that includes learning goals and standards addressed in these goals as well as a “Standards” section which includes all Reading (Informational and Literary), Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language standards addressed in each module.  In the Major Assessments section of the Module Overview, each standard is listed for each Focusing Task Question Activity and each End-of-Module Task.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 contain visual design (whether in print or digital) that is not distracting or chaotic but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The digital design is clear and consistent. All modules are comprised of materials that display a simple design and include adequate space. The font, size, margins, and spacing are consistent and readable. All modules include graphic organizers, charts, worksheets, tables, and other activities that are easy to read and understand. There are no distracting images, and the layout of the student consumables is clear and concise. Each handout and/or activity are hyperlinked in each lesson overview and detailed lesson plan.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Teacher planning and learning for success with CCSS: Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials provide strong support for teachers to facilitate planning, use of all parts of the program, alignment to the standards, research of best practices that underpin the program, and information for involving students and their families/caregivers about supporting the student as a learner.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation for materials containing a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. 

The materials contain a Teacher Edition that provides a Module Summary at the beginning of each module, as well as a Focusing Question and Content Framing Question to guide each lesson and module. The lesson overviews also include an At A Glance outline of each lesson as well as Learning Goals and Standards Addressed. The Land/Wrap section has teachers analyze, look at context and alignment, and provide next steps. 

The following are examples which demonstrate how the materials are useful and offer guidance for teachers:

  • Module 1, Lesson 12, Land:
    • Answer the Content Framing Question
    • Knowledge: How does Waiting for the Biblioburro build our knowledge of how books change lives? Possible student answer: "I learned that you can write your own book and share it with others. Ana did this at the end of the story and gave her book to the Biblioburro to share with other kids."
    • Choral Read the Content Framing Question.
    • Students Mix and Mingle: “What did we learn about how books change lives from reading Waiting for the Biblioburro?” Remind students to consider the question, “What part of the text helped you learn that?” Possible student answers: "Books can connect you to the rest of the world. In the text, Ana dreams of the outside world. Then at the end, she writes her book and another kid in a different place in the world gets to read it."
    • Use Equity Sticks to call on students.
  • Module 1, Lesson 12, Teacher Wrap:
    • Context and Alignment: "Students contribute to the Knowledge Journal by discussing how Waiting for the Biblioburro adds to their knowledge of how books change lives. Check students’ oral responses for the following success criteria:
      • Responds accurately to selected questions.
      • Uses relevant text evidence in their responses.
    • Next Steps: "If students had difficulty making connections between the text and how books change peoples’ lives, consider working with small groups and asking specific questions related to the Content Framing Question. For example, read pages 5 and 9–11. Stop at the end of each page and ask: 'What is happening now?' Make connections between why Ana doesn’t have books, how she gets them, and what happens as a result."

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The Implementation Guide provides multiple explanations and charts regarding curriculum terminology. The Implementation Guide also explains at length the research behind each approach in the curriculum. There are also Appendixes that include adult level explanations as well as sample student answers and annotated responses teachers can use to improve their knowledge of what standards being met would look like in a response.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

Materials include an Implementation Guide located within each Module under Wit and Wisdom Resources.  The Implementation Guide provides information on how the curriculum addresses all of the ELA/Literacy standards. Additionally, a Module in Context and a Module Learning Goals document are provided in the Module Overview of each unit. The Module in Context includes an overview of how the materials address the Common Core shifts as well as a detailed account of how the CCSS standards have a role in the curriculum. The Module Learning Goals articulate specific standards as they are addressed in each individual module.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies.

Materials include resources found primarily in the Implementation Guide that provide explanations of the instructional approaches and identify research-based strategies. The Implementation Guide lists what research says, what students need, and how Wit and Wisdom materials provide what students need within the curriculum. Explanations provided include:

  • Research Says: “Performance on complex texts is the clearest differentiator in reading between students who are likely to be ready for college and those who are not.” (ACT 16-17) “But as expectations of college and career reading have held steady or increased, the complexity of Grades K-12 texts have held steady or increased, the complexity of Grades K-12 texts has declined (Adams 4-5; NGA Center and CCSS) 3). Students need to be able to unlock meaning from complex texts.”
  • Wit & Wisdom Responds: “Instead of basals, Wit & Wisdom students read complex, grade-level books they love from classics such as The Story of Ferdinand and Animal Farm, to new favorites such as Last Stop on Market Street and The Crossover, to captivating nonfiction such as I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban and An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793. Students use these texts at every turn-to learn, and eventually master, essential reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammar, and vocabulary skills.”

Some Core Practice examples include:

  • Vocabulary: “The Wit & Wisdom approach to teaching vocabulary thorough knowledge of word meanings is key to understanding any complex text and to learning as a whole (Chall and Jacobs; Anderson and Freebody 77). Vocabulary instruction in Wit & Wisdom is accordingly designed to achieve three key student outcomes: better comprehension of complex texts, broader and deeper knowledge of words and word parts (including affixes and roots), increased ability to determine the meanings of unknown words As a text-based curriculum. Wit & Wisdom teaches vocabulary both implicitly and explicitly, using words in the core and supplementary texts. Through repeated readings of complex, knowledge-building texts, students implicitly learn many new words (Feitelson, Kita, and Goldstein 340; Miller and Gildea 96; Nagy and Scott 273). Explicit vocabulary instruction focused on the three student outcomes emphasizes three categories of high-leverage vocabulary words and phrases.”
  • Questioning: “Students monitor their understanding of the text by recording questions they have about it. During their first encounter of the text, students record questions they have about it. When students return to the text, they continue to monitor their understanding, recording any additional questions that arise while also looking for answers to their original questions. After the first stage of reading, students share, and when possible, answer these text based questions, or problem solve about how to answer the questions. For example, students may return to the text, consult a reference source, or conduct research. This helps students maintain engagement with and focus on the text while reading and monitor their comprehension of what they are reading. This helps teachers formatively assess students to indicate their understanding of the text and learning from previous modules.”

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

There is a series of Parent Tip Sheets that provide a summary of each module in the curriculum, including a list of module texts, additional books to read at home, sample questions, and activities to extend thinking and learning. There are also several resources available, such as blogs about learning, on the greatmind.org website to help parents better understand how to support their child.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Assessment: Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials offer regular opportunities for systematic and strategic data collection to inform instruction and describe student progress and performance.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for materials regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

Each lesson includes a check for understanding question. Throughout the modules there are Focusing Questions and Content Framing Questions that the teachers use to help students maintain focus during the reads and to assure they are working toward the lesson’s objectives. There are also New-Read Assessments where students independently do a cold read of an informational or literary text and then complete various question (multiple choice, open-ended, short response, multi-select, etc). After answering questions, students also complete a short writing task accompanied by a graphic organizer to capture their thinking. Students also participate in two Socratic Seminars per module, and each of these tasks builds to the End-of-Module Task.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

Standards are found in multiple places and times during the module. Each lesson includes Learning Goals which are connected to and labeled with a standard. In each module, there is a tab labeled Module Overview. A chart is provided that lists all of the standards for New Read Assessments, Socratic Seminar, and End-of-Module Tasks. All standards assessed are labeled clearly.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations of assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

Appendixes include Answer Keys, Rubrics, and Sample Responses, as well as rubrics for all writing tasks. Materials regularly provide:

  • Sample answers and recommended scripts to share with students
  • Suggestions for differentiation
  • Next steps, if students had difficulty: "Consider reviewing handout…. and re-watching ……”
  • Rubrics for scoring student tasks
  • Guidance for Interpreting Student Performance and suggestions for follow up can be found in the teacher’s notes and in the wrap section of each lesson.

For example in Module 2, Lesson 11 in the Land and Wrap section, the teacher guide suggests: "If a student has difficulty identifying key details and the main topic of a section of the text, break this task down by first identifying key details for her so that she can focus solely on identifying the main topic."

Indicator 3m

Materials include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation for including routines and guidance that provide opportunities to monitor student progress.

All modules follow the same format and elements for student performance. The New Read Assessments are routine and help teachers monitor students progress towards standards mastery. The Focus Questioning Tasks routinely and regularly build to the End-of-Module (EOM) Task and monitors student progress. Checklists are provided with tasks so that students are prepared for the EOM Task. A variety of resources are available in Appendix C to assist teachers in monitoring progress. Some examples include:

  • Self, peer and teacher evaluations
  • Checklists for poetry performances and Socratic Seminars
  • Speaking and Listening Rubrics

Indicator 3n

Indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

In each module, Appendix D contains a curated Volume of Reading text list, which includes texts that add to the module and offer students choices at varying levels of complexity. Based on the Content Framing Questions, a set of Volume of Reading Reflection Questions appears in the Student Edition of each module, giving students guidance and structure to apply the Content Framing Questions independently to books of their choice. Time for Volume of Reading is not included within the 90-minute module lessons, but it is noted that it should be a high priority and is included in the sample daily schedules in the Getting Started Section of the Implementation Guide.

Criterion 3o - 3r

Differentiated instruction: Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials provide multiple strategies for supporting all learners throughout the program, including strategies for students.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

Examples of strategies listed in the Implementation Guide and found throughout the program include:

  • Deliberate sequencing: Students build knowledge of each module topic by reading texts in a purposeful sequence. Students complete each module study with knowledge and skills that they can use to access grade level text.
  • Predictability of structures: The predictability of the recurring Content Stages helps students develop habits of mind and provides a scaffold for reading challenging texts. Students use the Content Framing Question as an entry point to difficult texts.
  • Reading scaffolds: Organizing ideas from informational and literary texts establishes student understanding of the main ideas and plot points prior to the consideration of deeper ideas.
  • Focus on vocabulary and syntax: Students learn to read closely and discuss important passages, with particular emphasis on learning the meanings of essential content words and academic vocabulary, studying roots and affixes to grow capacity to discern word meaning independently, and dissecting phrases to reveal how syntax conveys meaning.
  • Exploration of content in multiple forms: Students explore print texts, visual art, videos, audio recordings, photographs, and maps to access module concepts and information.
  • Reliance on strong models: Students examine models of strong writing to understand how to craft effective sentences, paragraphs, and essays.
  • Frequent feedback: Students receive ongoing and explicit feedback from peers and teachers.
  • Scaffolds: At key moments, lessons include specific suggestions for how to scaffold instruction. These scaffolds empower teachers to seamlessly integrate remediation suggestions into instruction. For students who may be challenged by the lesson’s rigor, scaffolds provide another path to the learning goal, rather than minimize or change the learning goal.
  • Extensions and differentiation suggestions: Lessons often offer suggestions for how to vary learning tasks for those who already have well-developed skills, or to extend learning for students who seek an additional challenge.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed meet the expectations that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Materials include explicit vocabulary and grammar instruction, text-dependent questions that focus all students on key terms, phrases, and passages for rereading and repeated exploration, partner work that includes oral practice of written responses, and multiple authentic opportunities to use academic language with support, such as explicit teaching about speaking and listening, sentence frames, and vocabulary support.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet requirements for regularly including extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Extension activities are provided throughout materials. These are included in boxes in the Teacher Edition lesson plans. Extension activities include:

  • In Module 2, Lesson 28, students are working with the teacher to gather and record evidence from close reading. As an extension activity, the students learn about the section of the book referred to as “back matter.” The teacher demonstrates how additional information can sometimes be obtained from this section and demonstrates by reading information and having students use nonverbal signals to indicate when to share information they heard.
  • In Module 4, Lesson 11, after reading Rough Face Girl and discussing details in the story, an option extension is to have student pairs “analyze the illustrations on pages 23 and 24–25 and discuss the questions: ‘What elements of nature do you see?’ and ‘What do you think the Rough-Face Girl sees?’”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed meet the expectations of providing ample opportunities for teachers to use grouping strategies during lessons.

Lessons indicate where pairs, whole group, small group, or individual groupings are utilized for instruction. Each lesson provides students opportunities to work through more than one type of grouping. Teachers are also provided suggestions for how to assign roles or divide groups. For example, Socratic Seminars are used frequently, and teachers are given detailed instructions on how to model the strategy and assign groups and responsibilities. Other routines that provide opportunities for grouping include anchor charts, boxes and buttons, categorization, chalk talk, choral reading, echo reading, fishbowl, gallery walk, give one-get one-move on, graffiti wall, grammar safari, graphic organizers, jigsaw, link up, literary dominoes, mix and mingle, outside-in, partner reading, praise/question/suggestion, question corners, quick write, quiz-quiz-trade, reader’s theater, and response techniques.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Effective technology use: Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials work well on all technology platforms and are easy to access. They are easily customizable for local use. Supports for teachers to use technology as a part of the learning process with students is available. Adaptive technology is not offered with this program.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Accessibility was tested on Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, an Android phone, an iPhone, and an iPad. All access was successful.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. Technology is used throughout modules and lessons to enhance student learning and draw attention to evidence and texts, including many works of art, videos, songs, and other multimedia representations of the topic under study.

  • In Module 3, Lessons 1-7, students learn about American Sign Language through links to the online American Sign Language Dictionary.
  • In Module 4, Lessons 28-32, digital links are provided in the materials to support student learning on the topic of food. Students have the opportunity to view paintings, sculptures, and videos including: "Cakes" (painting) by Wayne Thiebaud, "Two Cheeseburgers, with Everything (Dual Hamburgers)" (sculpture) by Claes Oldenberg, "Try Something New" (video) by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
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Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 do not meet expectations that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. Adaptive or other technological innovations are not included in the instructional materials.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 can be easily customized for local use. The Implementation Guide states, “When observing teachers, school leaders should keep in mind that Wit & Wisdom is not a scripted program, and Wit & Wisdom instruction will vary from classroom to classroom. While the lessons can be implemented as written, teachers will study the modules and come to know them as deeply as the educators who wrote them. Teachers should use their knowledge of the modules and of their students to customize lessons when needed.” However, all handouts and lessons can only be downloaded in pdf form and can not be edited.

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 do not include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate.

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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 02/27/2020

Report Edition: 2016

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA K-2 (No Foundational Skills) Rubric and Evidence Guides

** These review tools are intended to be used for comprehensive programs that do not contain a foundational skills component and are instead designed to be implemented with a supplement.**

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

Math High School

ELA K-2

ELA 3-5

ELA 6-8


ELA High School

Science Middle School

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