Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations of alignment. Texts are of high quality. The materials provide opportunities for student growth in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and developing language skills over the course of the year. The materials also meet the overall expectations for instructional supports and usability, with guidance for implementation.

See Rating Scale Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
40
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
30
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
30
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The Grade 4 myView Literacy materials include a broad variety of high-quality texts of appropriate complexity. However, the organization of texts does not consistently support growth toward deep comprehension of increasingly rigorous texts as the strategies and scaffolds receive more emphasis than the texts themselves. There are a range of text types and disciplines to support students in a volume of reading.

Students participate in frequent discourse supported by a range of text-dependent questions and tasks. Writing instruction occurs daily with students producing both on-demand and process-driven products that align to the requirements of the standards. The materials include explicit instruction of grammar and conventions.

Throughout all units, students receive instruction in and practice of phonics, fluency, and word recognition and analysis skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
18/20
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Criterion Rating Details

The myView Literacy materials for Grade 4 include high-quality anchor texts that support student learning and build content knowledge, including a variety of fables, myths, folktales, poems, and informational texts. Texts are at the appropriate level of complexity for the grade and include a text complexity analysis detailing the quantitative and qualitative levels as well as the reader and task demands. The organization of texts does not consistently support students' deepening comprehension of increasingly rigorous texts, and there is an overemphasis on strategy and scaffolds instead of on the texts themselves. There are a broad range of text types and disciplines to support students in a volume of reading.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

The texts capture a wide range of student interests using detailed illustrations and rich language that includes the unit academic vocabulary. Texts support student learning and build knowledge of the unit theme. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, students read Reaching for the Moon by Buzz Aldrin. This is an autobiography that includes facts that are supplemented by unexpected details. This text blends events in the history of flight and space exploration with a few events of Aldrin's life.  
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, students read from "Butterfly Eyes and Other Secrets of the Meadow” by Joyce Sidman. The illustrations are enticing and the language is age-appropriate.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students read an excerpt from Mama’s Window by Lynn Rubright. This is a realistic fiction story with compelling characters and a rich sense of family. It is a relatable story about overcoming obstacles and dealing with conflict.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students read Weslandia by Paul Fleischman. This literary text employs the use of interesting pictures and a seemingly odd character with whom students can relate, especially if they may feel like they don’t belong or are struggling with being different or finding friends. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students read an excerpt from Can You Guess my Name? By Judy Sierra. This selection of traditional tales from around the world is age-appropriate, contains strong vocabulary, and colorful illustrations. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, students read two myths, “Pandora” by Cynthia Rylant and “Race to the Top” by Geraldine McCaughrean. Both contain rich story lines and engaging illustrations. The vocabulary is rigorous and the plots are of high interest for students.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students read Top 10 Ways You Can Reduce Waste by Nick Winnick. This is an argumentative text that contains rich academic vocabulary and is engaging for students.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

The materials provide multiple opportunities to read a variety of informational and literary texts. Genres include fables, myths, folktales, poetry, and informational texts. 

The following are examples of literature found within the instructional materials:

  • In Unit 1, Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai
  • In Unit 2, "Butterfly Eyes and Other Secrets of the Meadow, Poems” by Joyce Sidman
  • In Unit 3, Trombone Shorty by Troy Andrews
  • In Unit 4, “Pandora” by Cynthia Rylant
  • In Unit 5, Paddle to the Sea by Holling C. Holling

The following are examples of informational text found within the instructional materials:

  • In Unit 1, “Twins in Space” by Rebecca Boyle
  • In Unit 2, Animal Mimics by Marie Racanelli
  • In Unit 3, How Tia Lola Came to (Visit) Stay by Julia Alverez
  • In Unit 4, Separate is Never Equal by Duncan Tonatiuh
  • In Unit 5, Trashing Paradise by Rukhsana Khan 

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

Anchor texts are placed at the appropriate grade level according to recommendations from the Common Core State Standards. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Rare Treasure: Mary Anning and Her Remarkable Discoveries By Don Brown, 890L. The biography follows a chronological order, beginning with the date of Mary’s birth. The author continues to provide dates of important events as well as Illustrations to help students navigate some of the scientific concepts of uncovering and identifying fossils.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Feathers: Not Just for Flying By Melissa Stewart, 720L.  Connections between ideas are clearly organized and provide supporting details. Headings help students navigate and understand the text. Illustrations support and assist readers in understanding the text. The subject matter is simple with concrete ideas students will relate to. Students may need some background knowledge on different types of birds and feathers for a deeper understanding of the text. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Excerpts from Mama’s Window By Lynn Rubright, 810L. The excerpt is told in chronological order but includes flashbacks to previous events, such as mama’s passing, her dreams, and her decisions. The text includes dialect, such as, “Uncle Free got everythin’ right ’cept these shoes.” Background knowledge of life in the Mississippi Delta and the importance of church and community during this time would be helpful to students.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, The Secret of the Winter Count By Jacqueline Guest, 840L. The plot includes the idea of a dream solving a problem, but the dream is not literal, it is Emma’s confidence that leads her to solve the problem. The third-person narrative is told in chronological order and follows a typical plot structure with a problem, climax, and resolution. The illustrations directly support an understanding of the characters, setting, and events. The story portrays concrete actions that are easy to follow. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Trashing Paradise By Rukhsana Khan, 920L. The author’s purpose is explicitly stated on the first page. The first paragraph is meant to draw readers in and not to inform. Starting with paragraph three, the text follows a description text structure. Photographs and captions, diagrams, and maps directly support the text and aid in readers’ comprehension of the problems in Bali.

The following texts have a Lexile level above the grade-level band, yet the qualitative measure and reader and task components make the text accessible for students:

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, the poem, “Butterfly Eyes and Other Secrets of the Meadow” by Joyce Sidman, 1020L.  The Lexile Level is just outside the “Stretch” Lexile Level (740-1010). The task of Shared and Close Read provides the student the opportunity to develop their skill development and knowledge of poetry and the topic through the guidance of the teacher.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Traditional Tales, Can You Guess My Name? By Judy Sierra, 1060L. The illustrations of the characters and events directly support each tale but are not necessary for understanding the theme or central idea. The maps help students see where each tale originates. The tales include experiences and characters that will be unfamiliar to students but can be easily discerned through the description. Each tale is from a different culture, which could confuse students, but additional background knowledge of traditional tales will help increase understanding.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)

The lessons around the anchor texts are structured to engage students and build comprehension skills, including student demonstration of these skills. Expectations for each lesson are clearly stated and the teacher’s guide is structured for scaffolded instruction that allows for teacher modeling, peer work and release to independent demonstration of skills. At the beginning of the units, students respond to Level 2 Depth of Knowledge (DOK 2) questions based on the passages. Those questions build and increase to DOK 3 questions in the middle and end of each unit. However, the organization of texts does not consistently support students' deepening comprehension of increasingly rigorous texts, and there is an overemphasis on strategy and scaffolds instead of on the texts themselves.

  • The complexity of anchor texts students read provides an opportunity for students’ literacy skills to increase across the year, encompassing an entire year’s worth of growth. For example, in Unit 1, Week 1, Reading Workshop, Check for Understanding, Student Interactive, DOK 2 questions ask, “What characteristics in the text show you that this is an autobiography? Name three. What evidence from the text supports Buzz Aldrin’s idea that he was meant to walk on the moon?”
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Reading Workshop, Check for Understanding, Student Interactive, DOK 2 and DOK 3 questions ask, “What clues tell you that Feathers is an informational text? What is the most amazing thing that feathers can do? Write a brief argument to state and support your opinion.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Reading Workshop, Check for Understanding, Student Interactive, the DOK 2 and DOK 3 questions, ask, “What traits of fiction do Weslandia and The Circuit include? Synthesize details from both texts to create a dialogue in which Wesleyand Panchito discuss a topic.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Reading Workshop, Check for Understanding, Student Interactive, DOK 2 and DOK 3 questions ask, “Which parts of The Secret of the Winter Count are historical and which are fictional? How does the historical setting influence the events in The Secret of the Winter Count?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, the Reading Workshop, Check for Understanding, Student Interactive, DOK 2 and DOK 3 questions ask,  “Why should people around the world learn about the trash problem in Bali and about the Wijsen sisters? Use at least one quotation from a text to support our answer. If you were in charge of communicating facts about a new convenient way to dispose of trash, would you create a written informational text or a digital text? Explain your choice, using an example from each text to support your answer.”
  • The complexity of anchor texts support students’ proficiency in reading independently at grade level at the end of the school year. For example, Unit 1 includes texts with Lexile levels of 840 and 970. Unit 2 includes texts with Lexile levels of 720 and 860. Unit 3 includes texts with Lexile levels of 600 and 830. Unit 4 includes texts with Lexile levels of 940 and 790. Unit 5 includes texts with Lexile levels of 1000 and 920.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level. 

The Getting Started section contains a detailed text complexity analysis and rationale for each anchor texts in all units. Under the Table of Contents for each unit, a Text Complexity Charts tab is accessible and includes information on recommended placement, quantitative measures, complexity levels, qualitative measures, and reader and task considerations for each weekly shared reading text. Less detailed information for supporting Book Club texts and Leveled Readers can also be found in the unit Table of Contents by clicking on the appropriate tab. All anchor texts include a quantitative and qualitative analysis complete with Reader and Task Considerations to enable planning for diverse student needs including English Language Learners, intervention, and on-level/advanced students.

There are Visual Charts for complexity levels in the areas of meaning/purpose, text structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands that rate each on a colored grid from “simple” to “very complex” in tandem with a clear and explicit qualitative rationale for each. The Teacher's Edition lists descriptions for leveled readers and how they connect to the theme and essential question. A drop-down link for the leveled readers contains a pdf guide complete with the title and author, Lexile level, guided reading level, DRA level, and instructional notes. The leveled readers are leveled for differentiation and not anchored to grade level instruction. Guidance is provided for the teacher using teaching points and ELL supports. The Program Overview in the digital materials has a link titled, Text Rationale and Diversity. In this link, the publisher provides a general rational that states, “Texts were chosen based on criteria such as literary merit, author’s craft, themed, gender, and cultural representations/experiences, insight, readability and diversity.”

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Life at the Top by Veronica Ellis, an informational text with a Lexile level of 860. The quantitative measures place this text in the Grade 4-5 complexity band. The qualitative measures suggest that students might need additional support with Language: Pronouns this and those and Knowledge Demands: How the body functions. "Before reading this selection, the teacher should use the Reader and Task Considerations to plan how to address various student populations." Qualitative Considerations include:
    • Levels of Meaning/Purpose: The author’s purpose is explicitly stated on the first page. Athletes live by the idea that altitude builds stronger hearts, more efficient lungs, and better endurance. Some athletes train at high altitudes to become better athletes. The author clearly gives the background and science for high-altitude training and discusses athletes who have experienced it.
    • Text Structure: Connections between ideas are explicit and clear. Text features such as headings help readers navigate the content. Graphics, such as maps, diagrams, and photographs, support the content but are mostly supplementary to understanding the text. 
    • Language Conventionality and Clarity: The sentences are mostly simple with some complex sentences. The vocabulary is mostly familiar, although some is subject-specific (oxygen, altitude, lung capacity, endurance, nutrients). Students may need support with more challenging words (exaggerated, benefits, economy).
  • In Unit 2, Leveled Reader, The Urban Jungle by Rosina Thompson, Lexile Level of 930, Guided Reading Level Q, DRA level 40, and a word count of 2,912. Text Characteristics with the structure of this book being compare and contrast. Features include Text Boxes, Photographs, Captions, Glossary, Index.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Out of My Mind by Sharon M. Draper, realistic fiction with a Lexile level of 600. The quantitative measures place this text below the Grade 4-5 complexity band. The qualitative measures suggest that students might need additional support with Language: Idioms and Knowledge Demands: Cerebral palsy.  "Before reading this selection, the teacher should use the Reader and Task Considerations to plan how to address various student populations." Qualitative Considerations include:
    • Levels of Meaning/Purpose: The excerpt has multiple levels of meaning. While the theme is clear, students might need help understanding Melody’s challenges with communication and movement, which are sometimes described in an implicit way: I had a million thoughts in my head, but I couldn’t share them with anybody.
    • Text Structure: The organization is clear and chronological. Graphics such as illustrations and photographs help readers see how the narrator learns to communicate but are not necessary for understanding. Students might benefit from support in understanding the boldfacing of words that indicate how Melody communicates. 
    • Language Conventionality and Clarity: The sentences are primarily simple and compound. The vocabulary is mostly familiar and conversational; however, students may need support with the idioms started from scratch, go figure, and hungry for more
    • Knowledge Demands: The experiences portrayed are uncommon to most readers, and there are references to people, such as Stephen Hawking and Jerry Lewis. Students may need some background knowledge on cerebral palsy to fully understand the story and the narrator’s feelings and experiences.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Volcanoes by Seymour Simon, informational text with a Lexile level of 960. The quantitative measures place this text in the Grade 4-5 complexity band. The qualitative measures suggest that students might need additional support with Language: Complex sentences and Knowledge Demands: volcanoes.  "Before reading this selection, the teacher should use the Reader and Task Considerations to plan how to address various student populations." Qualitative Considerations include:
    • Levels of Meaing/Purpose: The author’s purpose is implied but easy to identify. The topic is clearly stated in the title, and in the third paragraph, the author introduces the purpose-- to describe what scientists know today about “how a volcano works.”
    • Text Structure: The informational text has a descriptive text structure. The author uses examples of volcanic eruptions to introduce how volcanoes form, the features of volcanoes, and why they erupt. Text features, such as photographs and a diagram, directly support the content and help readers understand the text.
    • Language Conventionality and Clarity: The sentences are mostly simple with some compound and complex sentences. Students may need assistance with multiple phrases in a single sentence. Much of the vocabulary is domain-specific, relating to volcanoes, such as crust, plates, magma, lava.
    • Knowledge Demands: The subject matter may be unfamiliar to some students. There are references to ancient gods and goddesses, but knowledge of these is not necessary to understand the content. Background knowledge of volcanoes, particularly Mt. St. Helens and Surtsey, the volcanic island near Iceland, will be helpful.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading to achieve grade-level reading proficiency.

The materials provide multiple opportunities each week for students to engage in a volume of reading on grade level. Each week, students hear a Read Aloud text and a Shared Text to anchor instructional activities. Small group lessons are included with Leveled Reader selections that range within the grade level band with additional titles available through the online resource provided. Students also engage in independent reading during Book Club time which offers multiple texts from which students can choose and read. Students participate in Reading Workshop for 10-20 minutes daily and Small Group Independent time for 20-30 minutes daily for a daily total up to 50 minutes. During Week 6, students complete a research project with articles provided for students to read supporting the research task. Throughout the program, students read a wide variety of text types across multiple disciplines. Examples of texts students read include, but are not limited to: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, during Reading Workshop students read an Infographic “Cool Homes Around the World”, and listen to the Read Aloud, “Early Exploration”, and Shared Read, Life at the Top. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Reading Workshop, students read the informational Shared and Close Read, Feathers: Not Just for Flying by Melissa Stewart.
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Poetry Collection, students read “A Day on a Boat” by Gwendolyn Zepeda, “I Will be a Chemist” by Mario Jose Molina, and “I Love Mozart” by Dana Crum.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students hear the Read Aloud text, “Too Much of a Good Thing;” a Shared text, La Culebra; Leveled Readers How Anansi Got His Stories (Level P), Run Like the River (Level P), The Age of the Vikings  (Level R), The Banquet (Level S), An Epic Tale (Level S), The Simuteller’s Last Tale (Level T); and Book Club Selections, Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin, Her Stories by Virginia Hamilton, Separate is Never Equal  by Duncan Tonatiuh, On the Way Home by Laura Ingalls Wilder, Juan Verdades by Joe Hayes, Stockings of Buttermilk  by Neil Philip.
  • Ub Unit 5, Week 2, students hear the Read Aloud text, “Mount Vesuvius; a Shared Read text, Volcanoes; Leveled Readers, Digging for Dinosaurs (Level Q), Patterns in Nature (Level R), Adventure in Antarctica (Level S), Force in Energy (Level S), Exploring Our World (Level S), Trouble on Zeplin V (Level T); Book Club Selections, Geology: The Study of Rocks by Susan H. Gray, U.S. Landforms by Diana Meachem Rau, Paddle to the Sea by Holling C. Holling, Morning Girl  by Michael Dorris, What are the 7 Wonders of the World? by Amy Graham, Rain Forest Food Chains by Heidi Moore

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
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Criterion Rating Details

Students participate in frequent discourse about texts and topics supported by protocols that encourage the use of academic vocabulary and syntax within evidence-based discussions and writing. The materials employ a range of text-dependent questions and tasks that cause students to return to the texts as they read, write, and engage in discussions with peers. Writing instruction occurs daily with students producing both on-demand and process-driven products that align to the requirements of the standards. The materials include explicit instruction of grammar and conventions.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). 

The materials include questions, tasks, and extension activities that support literacy growth for students over the course of the school year. Throughout all units, particularly the Reading Workshop sections, students are exposed to various genres and multiple readings including a first read, close read, and reflect and share in each lesson. There are three components to each reading lesson under Reading Workshop. All three components during Reading Workshop include questions, tasks, and assignments that are text-dependent/specific. During the first read, students preview vocabulary from the text, preview the text itself, read the text, develop vocabulary and check for understanding. During the close read, using an informational text, students analyze specific concepts such as craft, structure, plot and setting, predictions, and use context clues within the sentence to determine the meaning of vocabulary words. Students also, reflect and share during the Reading Workshop. Students answer a variety of questions related to the texts being read and the discussion supports students drawing on textual evidence to support their learning of literal and inferential information. Students produce evidence from texts to support their opinions or statements when writing and speaking. In addition, there are supports within the materials to assist the student or group of students in order to demonstrate their thinking about the theme or essential question for the week. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Reading Workshop: Infographic, “What are the advantages of living in different places?” Students are expected to use the infographic to respond to the question.
  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Reading Workshop, after reading Life at the Top students answer, “Which evidence from Life at the Top would be the most convincing in an argument about why all runners should have high-altitude training?”
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Reading Workshop, when reading an excerpt from the book, Minn of the Mississippi by Holling Clancy Holling, students answer, “Highlight evidence in paragraph 8 that helps you understand how the setting affects events, including Minn’s actions.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Reading Workshop, students read The Weird and Wonderful Echidna and The Very Peculiar Platypus by Mike Jung and Wade Hudson and “Cite two pieces of text evidence that show the similarities between the two monotremes.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Reading Workshop, after reading Trombone Shorty, students answer, “Why does Troy Andrews compare the music in Tremé to gumbo?”
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Reading Workshop, students read Can You Guess my Name by Judy Sierra and “Underline two details in paragraphs 9 through 11 that show how the girl feels about the bargain.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Reading Workshop, when reading the book, The Secret of the Winter Count by Jacqueline Guest, students answer, “Emma’s family and the Blackfoot tribe has an approach to finding water that the other group does not. What are those different techniques, and what leads the groups to share information?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students answer the Weekly Question: "In what ways do volcanoes impact Earth?"

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for having sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).

The Readers Workshop, Readers Writers Workshop Bridge, and the Writing Workshop provide teacher modeling for sequences of text-dependent questions that allow students to observe, practice, and revise skills independently, with peers, and in groups. Through presentation and discussion of content, students demonstrate their knowledge by completing tasks that include application of learned reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. In Week 6, there is a Project-Based Inquiry task that bridges what was learned in both the Reading and Writing Workshops. The grading rubrics are formatted to assess a student on the final project that includes applying what was learned in Weeks 1-5, as well as presenting on the material.

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Writing Workshop, Publish, Celebrate and Assess, the teacher and students assess personal narratives the student developed earlier in the unit. A rubric is used to evaluate the final draft of the personal narrative. The teacher has the opportunity to distribute a different assessment or use the student’s personal narrative to evaluate learning. Weeks 1-4 of the unit provided instruction on writing personal narratives and practice for students on steps in writing the personal narrative.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Reading Workshop states, “Before stating an opinion, ask yourself whether you have text evidence to support the opinion. Think about ways you can connect pieces of evidence from different texts to support an opinion. When you include evidence in your own writing, give credit to the author.” 
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Publish Celebrate and Assess, the students connect what was learned in Weeks 1-4 for writing skill development. The students confer with the teacher in the final stages and the final draft is evaluated using a four-point rubric.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Writing Workshop, Independent Writing, students write an opinion essay. Before writing, students have completed seven Minilessons on writing an opinion essay. The Minilessons are titled, Develop a Topic and Opinion, Develop Reasons, Develop Supporting Details and Facts, Compose a Concluding Statement, Compose Using Technology, Fact vs. Opinion, and Change Your Opinion. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, the Inquiry-Based Project focuses on skills and knowledge built throughout the unit. Students complete research and write an opinion article about the most dangerous environmental event. Students work through lessons where they research, collaborate, plan and create a brochure, and present their final project.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Practice for academic vocabulary and syntax are present for each unit in the Turn and Talk and Collaborate sections. Students practice using academic and social language while engaging in evidence-based discussions about the material in smaller groups and within the larger class. Students engage in paired, small group, and whole group discussions at various points in the units. The materials include guidance for teachers in establishing protocols for student discussions throughout the units. Development of discussion techniques and practices are ongoing throughout the units with guiding questions provided to help students develop discussion practices. Suggestions for discussion structure are also provided.

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, the Teacher's Edition states, “Have students complete the chart on page 13 for the listed words. Then have partners share their answers using their newly acquired vocabulary.” The Turn, Talk and Share section states, “Have students work in pairs to generate questions about Iceland, its landscape and other topics introduced with the map. Have them clarify questions as needed. Remind students to ask relevant follow up questions to elicit a more detailed response and to take notes about interesting ideas.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Writers Workshop Develop an Introduction Minilesson is broken into four different chunks: Teaching Point, Model and Practice, Independent Writing, and Share Block. The Minilesson provides the students with the opportunity to discuss during the Share Block their work, compare it with the texts, and use the appropriate academic language for this specific lesson.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Reading Workshop, during the poetry Minilesson, students have the opportunity to listen to the poem two times with the teacher completing think alouds and then apply their responses with evidence and academic language within a graphic organizer that will be used during a discussion.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4 of the Reading Workshop: Infographic, the Turn and Talk states, “What countries do you think are involved in producing the food you eat every day? How might your diet be different if all of your food came from your own region?”
  • In Unit 4, Book Club, Where the Mountains Meet the Moon by Grace Lin, Discussion Chart and Collaboration sentence stems are provided. The teacher provides students with the opportunity to record their thoughts using the sentence stems with evidence from the text to be used while discussing how the texts connect to the week’s theme using the language necessary for syntax and literary development.
  • In Unit 5, Week 6 of Compare Across Texts, the Turn and Talk states, “Read the sentence that relates to each selection. Then, with a partner, review the selection and write a question that could be answered by the sentence. Finally, talk to your partner about how the questions and answers relate to the theme.”

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports. 

The materials provide a variety of opportunities for students to ask questions and hold discussions with peers and teachers about research, strategies, and ideas throughout each unit. Several opportunities for speaking and listening are in each unit that include both whole group and small group discussions including partner work and peer reviews. 

Students engage in discussion throughout the materials. In addition to the labeled discussions in the text, there are multiple questions for each text that the teacher poses to the class which would lead to class discussions. There is an audio option for students to listen to the text being read to them. Additionally, students engage in Book Clubs that involve reading a text and discussing the text with a peer group. Students regularly have discussions about their writing and the writing process. Each unit also provides an inquiry project that involves collaboration with a group in creating the project and then presenting the project to either a small group or the whole class. There is a Listening Comprehension guide in the Teacher’s Edition of each unit. The materials provide support in the planning, providing graphic organizers or other supports for learning the skills and content, but not specifically for listening, speaking, or presenting with evidence.

  • In Unit 1, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, students read a Student Model brochure and then talk with a partner on how to create a brochure that presents an argumentative text. Students orally present their brochure to another group they are directed to be sure to make eye contact as they present and speak clearly and at a natural rate and volume. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Reading Workshop, students engage in Turn and Talk conversations about informational texts that they have read. The teacher then invites two students to share what they discussed with the whole group.
  • In Unit 2, Week 6, Book Club, students engage in small group discussions about the book that they have read with a focus on “students’ ability to effectively share their ideas and build on those of others.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, there is a Listening Comprehension guide for teachers. The Read-Aloud Routine has students listen actively for the narrative sequence of events. The teacher reads the entire text aloud without stopping. Then the teacher rereads the text pausing to model think-aloud strategies related to the author’s purpose. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Respond and Analyze, students discuss how the information in the article affects their viewing of the video. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, Compare Across Texts, Turn, Talk and Share states, “Have students refer to each selection to find examples of the importance of the Earth’s natural features. Ask students to support their statements with an actual passage from the text. Demonstrate by using the following model about the Himalayas.”

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. 

The materials include a balanced variety of on-demand and process writing throughout all lessons. Each unit has a theme for process writing that focuses on developing a specific form of writing that is written and revised over the course of the first five weeks of the unit. Students engage in multiple methods of writing to develop their writing skills including note-taking, checklists, response notebooks, graphic organizers, short answer, and longer essay construction. Students participate in planning, composing, revising, and publishing throughout the unit with individual work, peer conferencing, and teacher conferencing. Each unit contains multiple on-demand writings which are varied in the type of writing and length of writing. Students complete a Process Inquiry Project in Week 6 of each unit that contains a short, focused project that calls for research, writing, revising, and publishing much of which is done on a digital platform. Students respond to text during Readers Workshop their digital notebooks. The Writing Workshop provides longer writing activities that include drafting and editing while the Project-Based Inquiry provides opportunities for students to apply the learned writing skills in a culminating activity. Student writing develops over the course of the year. 

Examples include: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Quick Write, students answer, “Which solution for surviving in an environment described here do you think is the most creative?”
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Reading Workshop, the Reflect and Share section states, “Choose two texts that you enjoyed best or found the most interesting. Use these questions to help you annotate, ‘What details describe the setting? How does the setting change? What are the effects of the setting change?’ Review your annotations and use them to write your response.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, students are introduced to realistic fiction writing. In Week 2, students work on developing the elements of realistic fiction. In Week 3, students develop the structure of realistic fiction writing. In Week 4, students work on writer’s craft for realistic fiction. In Week 5, students publish, celebrate, and assess their realistic fiction writing.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Readers Workshop, the Reflect and Share states, “Choose two fictional characters who feel something like Thunder Rose’s song. Describe the characters in your own thoughts, words, and actions in detail. Include a description of what you and the characters have in common. On a separate piece of paper, organize your response in two or three paragraphs.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 6, the Project-Based Inquiry: the Refine and Research section states, “Read the web article, ‘Who’s your hero?’ Then, on a separate sheet of paper, or in your writing notebook, work with a partner to create a bibliography entry for the article.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Reading Workshop, Reflect and Share, after reading The Himalayas students answer the prompt: “The Himalayas are one set of mountains on Earth. Every continent on the planet has mountains that formed due to tectonic forces. Exploring and studying mountains can be dangerous. Why do some people take the risks involved to explore the landforms of Earth? Use evidence from the texts you have read this week to write and support an appropriate response.”

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. 

The materials provide frequent and multiple narrative, informal, and opinion writing opportunities across the school year. Students learn how to develop writing skills through exposure, practice, and application, requiring the use of evidence gathered from the analysis of materials and claims developed from reading and working with a myriad of sources. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills through the use of checklists, models, and rubrics. Students are given opportunities for instruction and practice in a variety of genres addressed in the standards over the course of the school year. Direction and guidance from the teacher provide the support needed for student development as an effective writer. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry: Environments, Argumentative Writing, Explore and Plan, this activity provides the students the beginning stages for developing their own personal argumentative writing sample. There are supports within the curriculum to guide students and the teacher in being able to address the expectations for the lesson, while meeting the grade level standards.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Writing Workshop, Develop a Conclusion, teacher guidance notes, “To conclude a travel article, the writer may, give an opinion about visiting the destination, refer readers to other sources of information, remind readers of the top reason for visiting the destination.” In Week 3, students develop the structure of an informative travel article. In Week 4, students apply writer’s craft and conventions of language to their travel articles. In Week 5, they publish the articles. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Reading Workshop, Reflect and Share, the directions read, “What other living things did you read about this week? What other creatures or plants do they depend on? Choose a pair of animals or plants that are closely related. Then gather text evidence to write an opinion paragraph about the question: Is it important to know how living things depend upon one another?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Writing Workshop, Historical Fiction, Introduce and Immerse, students work to comprehend the historical fiction genre and its characteristics by completing an activity. Then, the lesson is followed by students developing their own writing sample of a historical fiction story through independent practice.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Writing Workshop, students plan for writing an opinion essay. The Brainstorm a Topic section of the lesson states, “For an opinion essay, you will need a topic about which you have a point of view or a preference. That point of view or preference will be your opinion.” Students continue working on the opinion essay throughout the unit. In Week 2, students develop supporting details and facts and compose a concluding sentence. In Week 3, students organize supporting details and add transitions. In Week 4, students edit their essays. In week 5, students publish their essays.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Writing Workshop, Compose like a Poet, students explore and apply what they have learned about poetry by using imagery as they are writing poems. The teacher models the expectations and the students then apply what is learned in their independent practice by composing a poem about an object.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level.

The materials provide tasks that support integrated reading and writing throughout the year. Each unit includes varied opportunities for students to engage, respond, revise, and build upon their learning using texts they read. Writing opportunities are embedded within daily instruction and throughout student activities. Students have several occasions to analyze the text, define their claims, and support their writing with evidence from one or multiple texts. Students use their recall of information to formulate ideas and often use close reading of the text to support those ideas with evidence from the texts. In Weeks 1-5, a Weekly Question is tied to the shared text students read. In the Reflect and Share component of the Reading Workshop, students respond to this question in writing, citing evidence from the text to defend their claim or provide the information requested in the prompt. In Week 6 of each unit, students complete a culminating research inquiry project in which they write in response to text, cite reasons to support their claims and apply their understanding of the unit theme and Essential Question. Teachers support students by modeling how to analyze and respond effectively to build knowledge through evidence-based writing.

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Reading Workshop, the Model and Practice portion of the lesson states, “Now, while I’m reading, I’m going to look for details that support or confirm, my prediction. I will also look for any information that does not support, or contradicts my position. I will write both kinds of details in the Evidence Related to My Prediction box.”  Students then “Work in small groups to use text structure and their notes to correct or confirm a prediction.”
  • Unit 2, Week 5, Reading Workshop, after reading The Weird and Wonderful Echidna and The Very Peculiar Platypus, students are directed to respond in writing to the question of the week, “How do adaptations make animals unique?” and use evidence from the texts they have read.  
  • Unit 3, Week 2, Reading Workshop, after reading Mama’s Window students write an opinion essay using text evidence. Students respond to the prompt, “Uncle Free states, ‘Sometimes we gotta do things we don’t wanna do James Earle. This here’s one of them times.’ Why do you think he says this to Sugar? Use text evidence to support your opinion.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Reading-Writing Workshop, Analyze Author’s Craft, Read Like a Writer, students use the evidence from The Secret of the Winter Count by Jacqueline Guest to identify the use of simile and respond to the following prompt: "What mood does the simile create? How does it work?" 
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Reading Workshop, the directions state, “Have students read paragraphs 12-14 and highlight details about animals in the Himalayas.” Teachers then ask students, “What inference can you make based on the evidence you highlighted. What idea about humans and animals in the Himalayas is expressed?"

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. 

Each unit has lessons that incorporate the grammar and conventions standards for Grade 4. Grammar and conventions lessons are primarily addressed during the Reading-Writing Bridge lessons, Writing Workshop, Week 6 lessons, and via digital worksheets. The grammar and convention lessons are structured with teacher modeling, then students practicing the target skill. In addition, there are teacher resources that provide additional lessons, including lessons for English Language Learners, students needing intervention, and small group practice opportunities for students who show mastery of grade level concepts. 

Examples of explicit instruction of the grade level grammar and conventions standards in increasingly sophisticated contexts and student opportunities for application both in and out of context include, but are not limited to:

Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why).

  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Use Pronouns, p. 292, the teacher explains that a writer uses pronouns to replace nouns. The teacher explains the five types of pronouns (subjective, objective, possessive, reflexive, and relative). The teacher models using several sentence frames for the student to fill in the appropriate pronoun. The teacher writes who, whose, whom, which, that on the board, and explains that who, whose, and whom refer to people and that which and that refer to animals, objects, and ideas. In the Student Interactive, p. 165, students practice completing each sentence with the correct pronoun.  
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lessons 2 and 4, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Relative Adverbs, pp. 70-71, the teacher explains that relative adverbs join two clauses together, and the teacher displays a table to show where, why, when connecting clauses. The teacher writes a sentence on the board, and the students come up with the correct relative adverb to connect the clauses. Students practice reading to make sure it makes sense. For practice, the students work in pairs to ask each other where, why, when questions and then to respond to the question using a relative adverb in a complete sentence. In the Student Interactive, Lesson 4, p. 460, students use relative adverbs to complete a paragraph.

Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking, I am walking, I will be walking) verb tenses.

  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Lessons 2 and 4, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Progressive Verb Tenses, p. 282-283, the teacher explains that the progressive verb tense shows actions that were, are, or will be happening in the past, present, and future. The progressive verb starts with a helping verb (am, is, are, was, were, or will be) and adding -ing to the verb. The teacher says sentences orally explaining that the progressive verb shows continuing action or activity. Students work with a partner to create sentences with past, present, and future progressive nouns. In the Student Interactive, Lesson 4, p. 160, students practice using completing a verb tense chart as well as edit a paragraph with crossed out verbs to the progressive tense.  

Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions.

  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Lessons 2 and 4, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Auxiliary Verbs, pp. 342-343, the teacher introduces auxiliary verbs by writing the same sentence using the the auxiliary verbs will, can, might, should, and must then underlines the auxiliary verb and explains that this verb describes a conditional action. The teacher models a new sentence with varying auxiliary verbs, will, would, might and then students practice using auxiliary verbs may, shall, should, can, could, and must. Students practice with a partner giving a verb and using the verb with an auxiliary verb in a sentence. In the Student Interactive, Lesson 4, p. 188, students complete sentences with the appropriate auxiliary verb.  

Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag).

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Edit for Adjectives, p. 278, the teacher points out that adjectives, including comparative and superlative adjectives, to help readers know exactly which person, place, of thing a writer means and models a think aloud on how to write with adjectives to be very specific. In the Student Interactive, p. 149, students look at the chart and choose a text from the stack, and identify a comparative adjective and a superlative adjective. Students discuss what each adjective tells about the noun. The teacher reviews the order of adjectives and explains that a writer may use more than one adjective to describe a noun or pronoun. Students return to the stack text and find an example of multiple adjectives used in the correct order.  

Form and use prepositional phrases.

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Prepositions, p. T65, the teacher explains a preposition is a word that helps show relationships, can show when or where something happens, and can also tell direction or add to a description. The teacher names an object in the classroom and describes it using prepositions and prepositional phrases.  Students describe other objects in the classroom by forming and using prepositional phrases.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Edit for Prepositional Phrases, p. T286, the teacher reviews definitions of prepositions and prepositional phrases and gives examples. The teacher selects a few texts from the stack, reads them aloud, and points out instances of prepositional phrases. The teacher omits the prepositional phrases while reading in order to show students how less information is given. The teacher displays sentences. Students identify the prepositional phrases. In the Student Interactive, p. 575, the teacher refers to more examples of prepositions and how to use. Students edit their writing to include the use of prepositional phrases. 

Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons.

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Lesson 2, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Complete Sentences, Oral Language: Complete Sentences, p. T202, the teacher explains a complete sentence must have a subject and a predicate. The teacher writes examples on the board. Students identify the subject and the predicate and tell whether each is a complete sentence or a fragment. Students write complete sentences and exchanges papers with a partner. For each item, partners identify the subject and the predicate. If the sentence is incomplete, students edit it to make it complete.  
  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Lesson 2, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Language & Conventions, Fix Run-On Sentences, p. T270, the teacher defines a run-on sentence as two or more sentences that are joined without correct punctuation or a conjunction, explains a comma splice is a type of run-on that uses a comma to incorrectly connect sentences without also using a conjunction, and that a run-on can be corrected by breaking it up into two complete sentences or by creating a complete compound sentence using a comma and the conjunction, and. The teacher writes groups of words on the board. Students identify them as a complete sentence or a run-on, and corrects each run-on sentence. Students write both simple and compound sentences, exchange papers with a partner, and partners identify if each sentence is complete or a run-on. They correct any run-on sentences.

Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to, too, two; there, their).

  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Lesson 1, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Word Study, Homophones, p. T346, the teacher explains homophones sound the same but are spelled differently and have different meanings. The teacher uses to, too, and two to explain and repeats the process with the homophones there, they’re, and their. The teacher provides sentences containing the homophones to, too, and two and writes them on the board, underlines the homophones and explains the meaning of each along with the spelling. The teacher repeats the procedure using homophones there, their, and they’re. Students identify the correct homophones for these sentences and explains their meanings. 

Use correct capitalization.

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Edit for Capitalization, the teacher reviews the information about capitalization rules in the table on p. 367 of the Student Interactive with the students. The teacher explains when to capitalize articles and prepositions. Students generate examples of words and titles, then talk about which words should be capitalized. The students spend time editing their own written passages to correct for capitalization errors.
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Writing Workshop, Publish, Celebrate, and Assess, Edit for Capitalization, p. T-348, the teacher explains the use of capitalization for races, nationalities, historical periods, documents, events, titles, and languages. The teacher provides example words and titles, using mostly lowercase letters, on the board. Students tell the teacher which words require capitalization. Students complete a digital worksheet on p. 190 on their Student Interactive where they correct capitalization errors in a passage. Students work on their own written passage with a focus on editing for capitalization. Students generate titles for their written passages, then share the titles with the class. Students explain to the class why they chose words in the titles to be capitalized.

Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text.

  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Edit for Punctuation, p. T-288, the teacher explains that authors use different types of punctuation to convey meaning. The teacher explains that direct speech is punctuated using quotation marks. The teacher writes a sentence on the board with direct speech, verbalizing how to punctuate the sentence using quotation marks. The teacher writes another sentence containing direct speech. Students talk about where the teacher needs to add quotation marks (and other punctuation). In the Student Interactive, p. 162, students edit a paragraph that is missing quotation marks (and other punctuation).

Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.

  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Edit for Complete Sentences, p. T-291, the teacher writes two simple sentences on the board and states how two sentences can be combined using coordinating conjunctions, preceded by a comma. The teacher provides common conjunctions including and, but, and or. The students write the new sentence combining the two simple sentences with a coordinating conjunction preceded by a comma. Students work in pairs to write the new sentences.

Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Lesson 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Spelling: Spell Words with Prefixes, p. T-347, the teacher reminds the students that adding a prefix to words does not change how the base word is spelled. The teacher writes two sentences on the board with missing words. Both sentences use the same base word for the missing word, one containing a prefix. Students provide the correct version of the base word in the sentences.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Spelling: Spell Multisyllabic Words, p. T-209, the teacher reminds the students that their knowledge of syllable division can help them spell words. The teacher writes grade-level, multisyllabic words on the board (i.e., emphasize, technical and partner). Students verbalize how the words are divided. The students use a printed or digital dictionary to look up the spelling of the words.

Choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely.

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Writing Workshop, Use Linking Words and Phrases, p. T286, the teacher points out that linking words and phrases improve the flow of ideas throughout an article by showing connections between ideas. The teacher displays sentences and explains that both sentences identify ways to make traveling easier and that a connection can be made between the two ideas by adding the linking word also to the beginning of the second sentence and the word also tells readers that the idea in the second sentence is related to the one in the first sentence. The teacher informs students that other common linking words and phrases include for example, another, and because. In the Student Interactive, p. 365 students add linking words and phrases to complete the sentences.

Choose punctuation for effect.

  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Writing Workshop, Select Punctuation, p. T218, the teacher reminds students that the use of punctuation affects how anything is read and that in poetry it can affect the rhythm and flow of a poem. The teacher chooses a poem from the stack that has prominent punctuation, reads a stanza or two from the poem according to the punctuation marks, and asks if the students read the poem according to the way the author intended with the punctuation used as well as ask how did they know. In the Student Interactive, p. 539, students place punctuation to let readers know when to stop, pause, or slow down when reading the poem.

Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion).

  • In Unit 4, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, Celebrate and Reflect, Celebrate!, p. T384, students read aloud their blog post to another group sharing any media they have included. Students use the student model on p. 417 to model effectively sharing this project with others. When finished, the teacher points out the traits of effective speech with include looking at the audience and making eye contact, not rushing and enunciating clearly with a natural rate and volume, and listening to the audience’s comments and questions carefully before responding.  Students choose an appropriate mode of delivery for their work and are reminded to consider how formal or informal their language should be when they present their blog post to the class. Students listen to presentations. In the Student Interactive p. 424, students presenting jot down their classmates’ reactions.
  • In Unit 3, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, Collaborate and Discuss,  p. T370, Revise and Edit, the teacher tells students that authors almost never publish a first draft, and authors make changes in grammar, spelling, word choice, and meaning.  The teacher explains that a letter to the principal should be written in formal language, so they should make sure their vocabulary is appropriate for the context and remind students that they are asking the principal to buy inclusive playground equipment, so their language must be persuasive. The teacher uses the bottom of Student Interactive p. 208 to model how writers can review their word choice and make necessary revisions and refer back to the original student model on p. 203 to show the changes in context. The teacher gives an example of informal English, that it is used when talking to a friend, and reasons why the writers of the model letter decided to use more formal English. Students read the second change on the bottom on p. 208. The teacher helps students recognize that the original text was written vaguely and using a more specific term indicates that the writers have done their research. Students describe other ways the changes have strengthened the letter.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
6/6
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Criterion Rating Details

Throughout all units, students receive instruction in and practice of phonics, fluency, and word recognition and analysis skills.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression. 

Over the course of a year, students receive phonics and word instruction aligned to grade-level Common Core State Standards for foundational skills. Lessons within each theme include a five-day focus with systematic and explicit teacher instruction, as well as multiple assessment opportunities the teacher can employ. Students are engaged in a variety of activities that allow them to practice introduced phonics skills, including decoding and encoding words and sentences. Assessment types for phonics and word recognition include Baseline, Middle-of-Year, and End-of-Year Tests; Unit Tests; and Progress Check-Ups.

Examples of materials, questions, and tasks that address and provide progression of grade-level CCSS for foundational skills through explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition include but are not limited to the following:

Materials contain explicit instruction of irregularly spelled words, syllabication patterns, and word recognition consistently over the course of the year. For example:

  • Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.
    • In Unit 2, Week 5, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Shared Read, Platypus Poison, Possible Teaching Point, p. T-322, the students read the caption on a page in the reader looking for the word (with a Latin root), territory. The teacher models a think aloud explaining that when we know the root meaning of a word, it will help us read, spell, and understand the word.
    • In Unit 4, Week 1, Lesson 1, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Academic Vocabulary, Assess Understanding, p. T-65, the students complete a digital worksheet (Student Interactive, p. 245) where they read a word bank of words with Latin roots then write a different word with the same root next to the example. The words contain letter-sound correspondences and syllabication patterns already introduced. The students write a complete sentence using the new word they wrote.
    • In Unit 5, Week 3, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Word Study, Syllable Pattern VCCCV, p. 202, Lessons 1 and 2, the teacher explains strategies on how to divide up words with three consonants into syllables by using examples. Students decode words then check the dictionary for accuracy. In the Student Interactive, Lesson 2, p. 532, students break more words into syllables and check for accuracy in the dictionary.

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year to inform instructional adjustments of phonics and word recognition to help students make progress toward mastery. For example:

  • In Middle-of-Year Test, pp. 48-50, Word Study, several questions prompt students to employ phonics and word recognition skills including plural forms of words, prefixes, suffixes, vowel/consonant sounds, multisyllables, word roots, and affixes.
  • In Unit 3 Test, pp. 34-35, Word Study, several questions prompt students to employ phonics and word recognition skills including vowel sounds, multisyllables, and silent letters.
  • In Unit 5 Test, pp. 72-74, Word Study, several questions prompt students to employ phonics and word recognition skills including vowel sounds, multisyllables, affixes, and word roots.
  • In the End-of-Year Test, pp. 86-88, Word Study, several questions prompt students to employ phonics and word recognition skills including vowel sounds, plural forms of words, multisyllables, and root words.

Materials contain explicit instruction of word solving approaches (graphophonic and syntactic) to decode unfamiliar words. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Lesson 1, Page T-342, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Word Study Latin Roots, the teacher explains that words with the same roots frequently share meaning. The teacher provides an example using the words tractor and attraction. The teacher then introduces the root word, terr and states the meaning. The teacher provides examples of words with the root terr. Students orally generate additional words containing the root, terr.
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Lesson 1, p. T-334, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Word Study, Silent Letters, the teacher explains that some letters are silent and that many consist of common patterns. The teacher writes the example word on the board, wrestle. The teacher circles the silent letter w, and talks about how a dictionary can be utilized to determine the sound of letters in words. Students talk about how the w does not make a sound in the word. The teacher writes three more example words with silent letters. Student volunteers say the words. The teacher closes the lesson by pointing out the common orthographic pattern of wr at the beginning of words containing a silent w.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Shared Read, p. T40, Close Read Vocabulary in Context, teacher reminds students to look beyond the sentence for context clues and gives examples such as synonyms or restatements that the author uses. Students underline context clues in paragraph 14. The objective is to use context within and beyond a sentence to determine the relevant meaning of an unfamiliar word or multiple-meaning word.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials, lessons, and questions providing instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Phonics and word recognition skills are addressed during teacher Minilessons and are practiced multiple times over the course of the five units. Teacher modeling, guided practice, and questioning provide students with the opportunity to practice and master word recognition skills in connected text. Student activities include regular opportunities to practice oral reading with a focus on applying word recognition and analysis skills in leveled readers across diverse genres. Assessments to measure students’ word analysis skills are found throughout all five of the unit assessments with a section on word study. The Baseline, Middle-of-the-Year and End-of-the-Year Assessments include a phonics section. Weekly progress monitoring checks include questions to assess word analysis.

Examples of explicit instruction and student practice of word analysis skills in connected text and tasks include, but are not limited to:

Multiple and varied opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to learn, practice, and apply word analysis skills in connected texts and tasks. For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Word Study, Suffixes -ed, -ing, -s, -er, -est, the teacher uses the Related Words lesson to teach students to identify the suffix -ing. Students look through paragraph 29 and identify three words with -ing. Students discuss how the suffix changes the meaning of the base word.
  • In Unit 2, Leveled Readers, Exploring Ecosystems, Word Study: Greek and Latin Roots, p. 4, the teacher explains the meaning of the two Greek roots of hydrothermal. Students combine the meanings of the two roots to generate the definition of the word. Students read the text looking for additional words with Greek or Latin roots.
  • In Unit 4, Leveled Readers, Leaders of Change, Word Study: Suffix -tion, p. 4, the teacher reminds the students that applying knowledge of suffixes helps readers decode and understand the meaning of unknown words. The teacher explains the purpose of the suffix -tion and how it changes a verb into a noun. The students read the text and look for additional words that contain the suffix -tion. Students say the verb form of the word.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Lessons 1 and 2, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Word Study, Syllable Pattern VCCCV, p. 202, the teacher presents words to the students along with a guide for dividing the words into syllables. Students decode four words independently and check in the dictionary to confirm. In Student Interactive, p.532, students divide words into syllables.  

Materials include word analysis assessment to monitor student learning of word analysis skills. For example: 

  • In Assessment & Practice, Unit Tests, Teacher Resources, Summative Assessments Teacher’s Manual with Student Reproducibles, p. T27, Item Analysis Chart for Grade 4, Unit 1, the chart indicates that questions 11 through 20 are focused on word study. The questions assess suffixes -ed, -ing, -s, -er, -est, -ity, -ty, -ic, -ment, syllable pattern VCe, vowel teams and digraphs, and prefixes mis-, en-, em-.
  • In Middle-of-Year Test, p. 48, Word Study questions are included on this test to assess student phonics skills including identifying vowel sounds, digraphs, silent k, final stable syllables, affixes, the VCe pattern, and syllable division.
  • In Grade 4, Progress Check-Ups are available to track student progress and for each unit and each week there are with five questions focused on Word Study with student progress checks on prefixes, suffixes, r-controlled vowels, vowel team and digraphs, syllable pattern, Latin roots, and silent letters to mention a few.
    • In Unit 1, Week 4, Progress Check-Ups, Word Study, p. 14, Questions 6 through 9 assess identifying words with the same vowel variant sound as a given word. Question 10 asks students to identify a word that has two vowels that make one vowel sound (vowel digraph)
    • In Unit 3, Week 3, the Progress Check-Ups assesses students on final stable syllable -le, -tion, -sion. The material provides a simple chart to monitor student progress for the entire year on the Progress Check-Ups.
  • In Unit 4 Unit Test, pp. 62-63, questions assess student phonics skills including syllable division, affixes, and orthographic spelling.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Over the course of the school year, students are provided weekly opportunities to practice oral reading fluency and silent reading with a focus on developing grade-level reading rate, accuracy, and expression. Students practice oral reading with the teacher as the model during whole group instruction, with student partners, and in small group instruction. In Reading Workshop instruction, within Shared Readings, students read orally in pairs, as a class, and independently with multiple opportunities to reread the same text in First Read and Close Read lessons. Each unit contains 75 informal assessments for measuring individual student skill in oral reading fluency. From the results, three levels of proficiency can be assigned. The teacher is provided guidance about how to utilize the fluency test results.

Examples of of opportunities for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, through on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression, include, but are not limited to:

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy and fluency in oral and silent reading. Students have opportunities to read grade-level text with purpose and understanding. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, p. T106, after reviewing vocabulary and discussing First Read Strategies, students may read the text, Rare Treasure, independently, in pairs, or as a class.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, p. T234, the teacher explains the elements of poetry rhyme, rhythm, and figurative language, along with the pattern of words to share feeling or ideas. The teacher explains that people read poetry to enjoy the language. Students read Butterfly Eyes and Other Secrets of the Meadow.
  • In Unit 3, Leveled Readers, Moves and Grooves, students silently read the story and write notes on a graphic organizer as the teacher checks individual students for comprehension understanding. For this lesson, students listen to the teacher orally read part of the text inaccurately. The students raise their hands when they hear an error in the teacher's reading.
  • In Unit 5, Leveled Readers, Challenge in the Rain Field, students silently read the story and write notes on a graphic organizer as the teacher checks individual students for comprehension understanding.

Materials support reading or prose and poetry with attention to rate, accuracy, and expression, as well as direction for students to apply reading skills when productive struggle is necessary. Students have opportunities to read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Leveled Readers, Maui Snares the Sun, p. 4, the teacher models oral reading with prosody by reading a page in the text. The teacher reminds the students to match their oral reading to the punctuation in the passage. Students read pages in the text with a focus on appropriate oral reading of questions.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Lesson 1, Reading Workshop, p. T232, Listening Comprehension Poetry, Fluency, after completing the read-aloud routine, the teacher displays a poem. The teacher models reading aloud a short section of the poem, asking students to pay attention to accuracy. The teacher explains that fluency is about reading without making mistakes. Partners practice reading with accuracy using their favorite lines of the poem.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, p. T50, Fluency, students choose a short passage from the text or a leveled reader.  Student pairs take turns reading the passage aloud, making sure they say each sentence with expression. If students sound flat, the teacher tells them to look for interjections, punctuation, and other signs that more expression is needed. If the student is using too much expression, the teacher should remind them that their reading should sound the same as if they were talking naturally.
  • In Unit 5, Leveled Readers, Digging for Dinosaurs, p. 4, the teacher reminds the students why it is important to read at an appropriate rate. The students read, then reread a page in the text with a focus on appropriate rate of oral reading.

Materials support students’ fluency development of reading skills (e.g., self-correction of word recognition and/or for understanding, focus on rereading) over the course of the year (to get to the end of the grade-level band). Students have opportunities to use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Lesson 2, p. T243, Reading Workshop, Fluency, students take turns reading two paragraphs in a non-fiction passage focusing on oral reading with appropriate rate and employing word decoding techniques for unknown words.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 2, p. T53, Reading Workshop: Small Group, Conferring, Possible Teaching Point, students slow down and look to context clues to help them decode unknown words in a passage.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 2, p. T-53, Reading Workshop: Small Group, Conferring, Literacy Activities, students take turns reading and rereading a passage in connected text with a focus on oral reading fluency.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Close Read, Vocabulary in Context, p. T40, the teacher reminds students to look beyond the sentence for context clues and discusses examples such as synonyms or restatements. Students underline context clues.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current fluency skills and provide teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery of fluency. For example: 

  • In Cold Reads for Fluency and Comprehension: Teacher's Manual with Student Reproducibles, Grade 4, Overview/How to Use the Tests, pp. T5-T6, the teacher is provided with information outlining how there are three "cold reads" measures for each of the 25 weeks in the program. Three levels of proficiency can be assigned. The teacher is provided guidance about how to utilize the fluency test results. For example, teachers can use the results to discern if individual students need re-teaching or more advanced lesson activities.
  • In Assessments & Practice, Summative Assessments Teacher’s Manual with Student Reproducibles, Grade 4, p. T8,  information for interpreting fluency test results including a chart with published norms for oral reading fluency is provided. Directions are given for the teacher to examine notes on student’s miscues to determine the reason rates are low. This could indicate further phonics instruction, comprehension strategies, or increased vocabulary exposure. It could indicate a lack of exposure to models of fluent oral reading. An optional Baseline Fluency assessment is located on p. T13.
  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Lesson 2, Reading Workshop, Assess & Differentiate, Teacher-Led Options, p. 246 the teacher assesses two to four students at a time with a short passage or leveled reader. The pairs of students will take turns reading aloud with appropriate rate. The teacher will provide feedback to the student while reading on rate being too fast or slow as well as model reading if needed as this is a Quick Check for fluency.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The myView texts are organized around a topic using weekly theme-based essential questions to explore the topic deeply. The questions and tasks included in the units support students as they analyze individual texts as well as the knowledge and ideas shared across multiple texts. Students complete culminating tasks at the end of each unit, however these tasks do not always require students to demonstrate the knowledge they have acquired from their reading.

Cohesive, year-long plans for both vocabulary and writing instruction are found within the materials. Students engage in a spectrum of research projects allowing them to delve more deeply into a topic and to report their findings through their writing.

Criterion 2a - 2h

30/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. 


Each unit within the instructional materials begins with a topic using weekly theme-based Essential Questions to explore the topic deeper. Five texts align and support the topic of the unit, as well as multiple Book Club choices students can select. Reading Workshop texts provide another opportunity for students to participate in both Shared and Close Reading in order to complete lesson tasks and the culminating project. A variety of genres are used to explore a weekly question where students analyze, discuss, and synthesize information in order to demonstrate understanding of texts and topics. Each week students are encouraged to reflect and present evidence from multiple texts in order to demonstrate their knowledge gained from the unit tasks. As the year progresses, the complexity of the questions and tasks deepen and ongoing formative assessments allow for differentiation to ensure student proficiency as tasks become more rigorous. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, the Unit Theme is Networks and the Essential Question is “How can a place affect how we live?” Each week during the unit, different texts are used to answer weekly questions about the theme.
    • In Week 1, the text is Reaching for the Moon with the weekly question, “How can visiting new places expand our understanding of our place in the world?” 
    • In Week 2, the text is Rare Treasures: Mary Anning and Her Remarkable Discoveries with the weekly question, “In what ways can a place enrich our lives?”
    • In Week 3, the text is “Twins in Space” with the weekly question, “What can living in outer space teach us about the human body?”
    • In Week 4, the text is Life at the Top with the weekly question, “What are the advantages of living in different places?” 
    • In Week 5, the text is Barbed Wire Baseball with the weekly question, “How can people influence the places where they live?”
  • In Unit 3, the Unit Theme is Diversity and the Essential Question is “How can we reach new understandings through exploring diversity?” Each week during the unit, a variety of texts are used to answer weekly questions about the theme.
    • In Week 1, the teext is Out of My Mind with the weekly question, “Why do people communicate in different ways?”
    • In Week 2, the text is Mama's Window with the weekly question, “How do our experiences help us see the world differently?”
    • In Week 3, the text is Trombone Shorty with the weekly question, “How does music bring people together?”
    • In Week 4, the texts are Westlandia and “The Circuit” with the weekly question, “How do new places influence us?”
    • In Week 5, the texts are from a Poetry Collection with the weekly question, “How do people with interests different from ours help us grow?"
  • In Unit 5, the Unit Theme is Features and the Essential Question is “Why is it important to understand our planet?” Each week, a variety of texts are used to address weekly questions related to the theme.  
    • In Week 1, the text is from Planet Earth with the weekly question, “What do we know about Earth’s features and processes?”
    • In Week 2, the text is Volcanoes with the weekly question, “In what ways do volcanoes impact Earth?"
    • In Week 3, the text is The Top 10 Ways You Can Reduce Waste with the weekly question, “What daily actions can help reduce pollution?”
    • In Week 4, the text is The Himalayas with the weekly question is “What makes an extreme location a place to both protect and explore?”
    • In Week 5, the texts are Trashing Paradise and "Bye Bye Plastic Bags on Bali" with the weekly question, “What happens to what we throw away?”

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.

  • Throughout the materials, individual and groups of students have a variety of opportunities to build their understanding of the content in various ways within reading, reading-writing, and writing. The directions for student tasks are clear and contain language that relates to the content of the unit. In each of the units, students complete questions and tasks that require analysis of individual texts. Every text has text-dependent language support. Each unit contains Reading Workshop lessons with First Read, Close Read, and Reflect and Share sections. During all the First Reads, students identify the genre of the text and provide evidence for their decision. Students complete questions and tasks that require analysis of individual texts. Students analyze language of stories and passages; identify key ideas and details; and examine the structure of passages, pictures, and texts as they relate to the unit topic. In addition to the Reading Workshop, each unit contains a Reading/Writing Bridge in which students use their knowledge to demonstrate their understanding of texts and topics. Examples include: 
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Close Read, after reading Twins in Space, students underline the main idea. 
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Reading-Writing Bridge, students instructions state, “Comparison-and-contrast text structure shows similarities and differences between two events, ideas, people, or things. Some comparing words include also, both, and same. Contrasting words include but, however, and different.”
  • In Unit 1, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry: Inquire, students think of a place in their community that should be made a historical landmark to save or preserve for future generations and create a brochure to tell an audience about this place and convince them that it ought to be a landmark.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Readers Workshop, when reading an excerpt from Butterfly Eyes and Other Secrets of the Meadow by Joyce Sidman, students complete multiple tasks: “What structure, rhythm and rhyme did you notice in the texts? How does Joyce Sidman’s choice of structure for the poem 'Sap Song' connect to its ideas? Analyze the relationships between creatures and plants that are discussed in the text. What do they have in common? Consider the precise language Joyce Sidman uses to describe plants, animals, and insects in the text. Use these descriptions to visualize or create mental images of what she describes. Use your highlighted text to describe what you visualized while reading the poems and prose.”
  • Unit 3, Week 3, Read Like a Writer, students analyze figurative language in paragraph seven of Trombone Shorty and then discuss why the author would have used the figurative language in the text.
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Respond and Analyze, after reading three poems, students analyze how the use of language in each of the poems affect the reader.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2 of the Readers Workshop, students read Thunder Rose by Jerdine Nolan and complete multiple tasks: “Complete these Close Read tasks for Thunder Rose. Underline text evidence that helps you infer a theme of the story. Complete these Close Read notes in Thunder Rose that help you connect ideas within and across texts. Highlight text evidence in paragraphs 15 through 19 that helps you connect ideas to another tall tale or story you know about.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students read paragraphs four and five of Reaching for the Moon and highlight ideas that explain how Buzz Aldrin felt the first time he went flying.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Units center around a topic with embedded text-dependent questions. Students work with multiple texts throughout the materials and are required to analyze information, build knowledge, and demonstrate understanding of material, often using discussion, graphic organizers, constructed responses, and written text types that draw upon textual evidence by identifying key details and comparing/contrasting texts. The curriculum scaffolds the skills of responding and varies in the types of response, in both Reading Workshop and Reading-Writing Bridge. The tasks, questions, and prompts integrate the students’ knowledge of the topic, weekly question, and identified text or texts. Instructional materials build upon the depth of knowledge that students need to access and analyze materials. However, questions students engage with do not consistently promote deeper understanding of the text, and the teacher may need to revise to assure students have access to more than just cursory text-focused items.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Reading Workshop, Respond and Analyze, Check for Understanding, students read two texts, The Weird and Wonderful Echidna and The Very Peculiar Platypus, and answer a series of comprehension questions: "What features of The Weird and Wonderful Echidna and The Very Peculiar Platypus tell you that these are informational texts? Explain the author’s purpose in each text. How does evidence in each text support each purpose? Cite two pieces of evidence showing the similarities between the two monotremes. Synthesize what you learned about monotremes from each text."
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students read the realistic fiction text, From Mama’s Window by Lynn Rubright, and answer the question, “How do our experiences help us see the world differently?” The Student Interactive, p. 66 states, “Think back to the texts you have read this week. What settings did you read about? How did the characters respond to those settings?”
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Reading Workshop, Compare Texts, after reading Pandora and Race to the Top, students use evidence from both texts to support an opinion about why authors include disobedient characters in myths.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, students read The Himalayas by Charles Maynard. The Student Interactive, p. 564 states, “Exploring and studying mountains can be dangerous. Why do some people take the risks involved to explore landforms of Earth? Use evidence from the texts you have read this week to write and support an appropriate response.”

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Reading and modeling of narrative, biography, informational, and opinion texts are included throughout the materials. Many culminating tasks rely on students’ ability to synthesize their understanding and use learned skills to present their knowledge in reading, writing, speaking, and listening tp demonstrate knowledge built from the texts. All units contain a Project-Based Inquiry task with an Area of Focus, where students compare across texts, include inquiry research, and have peer collaboration and discussions. The teacher may need to provide some extra support to assure students are focusing on the content as well as demonstrating writing or speaking skills.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • In Unit 1, Week 6, students answer the Unit Essential Question, “How can a place affect how we live?” After answering the questions, students complete a culminating task, creating a brochure to convince someone that a place in their community should be made a historic landmark. The brochure will be presented to the class. During completion of the project, students engage in research and multiple discussions with a peer. In preparation for this task, students engage in weekly discussions following their shared read, building knowledge and skills to complete the culminating task. 
    • In Week 1, students read Reaching for the Moon and discuss how visiting new places can improve our understanding of our place in the world. 
    • In Week 2, students read Rare Treasure and discuss ways in which a place can enrich our lives. 
    • In Week 3, students read “Twins in Space” and discuss what living in outer space can teach us about the human body. 
    • In Week 4, students read Life at the Top and discuss the advantages of living in different places. 
    • In Week 5, students read Barbed Wire Baseball and discuss how people can influence the places where they live.
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Writing Workshop, the Assessment directions state, “Think about travelers who visit places so that they can see the animals. Write a travel article about a place where animals are adapted to a particular environment. Describe the place and the unique animals. Be sure to include a strong lead paragraph, have clear organization, choose relevant, concrete details, use correct spelling, punctuation and grammar.”  This lesson is a culmination of Weeks 1-4 of Unit 2 in which each week contains Minilessons that model and teach students the skills needed to complete this Week 5 task.
    • In Week 1, Writing Workshop, the lessons include: Analyze a Travel Article, Analyze a Lead Paragraph, Analyze Photographs, Brainstorm and Set a  Purpose, Plan your Travel Article.
    • In Week 2, Writing Workshop, lessons include: Develop an Introduction, Develop Relevant Details, Develop Different Types of Details, Compose Captions for Visuals, Develop a Conclusion.
    • In Week 3, Writing Workshop, lessons include: Compose a Headline, Compose a Body Paragraph, Group Paragraphs into Sections, Develop Transitions, Compose with Multimedia.
    • In Week 4, Writing Workshop, the lessons include: Use Linking Words and Phrases, Use Precise Language and Vocabulary, Edit for Capitalization, Edit for Adverbs, Edit for Coordinating Conjunctions.
  • In Unit 3, Week 6, students answer the Unit Essential Question, “How can we reach new understandings by exploring diversity?” After answering the question, students complete a culminating task writing a letter to the principal convincing him/her that the playground should have inclusive equipment. The letter will be presented to the class. During completion of the project, students engage in research and multiple discussions with a peer. In preparation for this task, students engage in weekly discussions following their shared read building knowledge and skills to complete the culminating task. 
    • In Week 1, students read Out of My Mind and discuss why people communicate in diverse ways. 
    • In Week 2, students read Mama’s Window and discuss how our experiences help us see the world differently. 
    • In Week 3, students read Trombone Shorty and discuss how music brings people together. 
    • In Week 4, students read Weslandia and “The Circuit” and discuss how new people influence us. 
    • In Week 5, students read a Poetry Collection and discuss how people with interests different from ours affect us.
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Writing Assessment, students “Think about events that significantly impacted the development of your state. Write about one person or event in the history of your state that played an essential role in making it the state it is today. Describe how a person or event shaped the state’s history. Be sure to clearly state your opinion, include strong reasons and supporting evidence for your opinion. Choose relevant facts and details, use correct spelling, punctuation and grammar.” This activity is the culmination of the previous four weeks in the Writing Workshop which build through modeling, practice, and application of the skills needed to complete this Week 5 task.  
    • In Week 1, Writing Workshop, lessons include: Analyze an Opinion Essay, Understand Point of View, Understand Reasons and Information, Brainstorm a Topic and Opinion, and Plan Your Opinion Essay.
    • In Week 2, Writing Workshop, lessons include: Develop a Topic and Opinion, Develop Reasons, Develop Supporting  Details and Facts, Compose a Concluding Statement, Compose Using Technology. 
    • In Week 3, Writing Workshop, lessons include: Compose the Introduction and Conclusion, Organize Reasons,  Organize Supporting Details, Use Transition Words and Phrases, Use Technology to Collaborate.
    • In Week 4, Writing Workshop, lessons include: Rearrange Ideas for Coherence and Clarity, Combine Ideas for Coherence and Clarity, Peer Edit, Edit for Complete Sentences, Edit for Nouns.
    • In Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, Collaborate, the directions state, “Direct student pairs to use the checklist on page 416 as they write a complete draft of their blog post. Point out that this checklist has all the elements they need to include in the blog post. Remind students to include a main idea.” Students then “Brainstorm how to incorporate characteristics of digital texts into their blog posts.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, students answer the Essential Question for the unit, “Why is it important to understand our environment?” After answering the question, students complete a culminating task writing an opinion article on the most dangerous environmental event. The article will be presented to the class. During completion of the project, students engage in research and multiple discussions with a peer. In preparation for this task, students engage in weekly discussions following their shared read building knowledge and skills to complete the culminating task. 
    • In Week 1, students read from Planet Earth and discuss what we know about earth’s features and processes. 
    • In Week 2, students read Volcanoes and discuss in what ways volcanoes impact our earth. 
    • In Week 3, students read from Top Ten Ways We You Can Reduce Waste and discuss ways daily actions can reduce pollution. 
    •  In Week 4, students read The Himalayas and discuss what makes an extreme location somewhere to explore and protect. 
    • In Week 5, students read Trashing Paradise and “Bye Bye Plastic Bags on Bali” and discuss what happens to what we throw away.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. 

Academic vocabulary is introduced, defined, discussed, and presented throughout unit reading and writing tasks. Students preview vocabulary before reading the text and the teacher questions to determine what they know before reading and to connect to any prior knowledge. Questions and activities focusing on the unit academic vocabulary words are embedded in the instructional materials. There is a Possible Teacher Point during the Shared Read where teachers can use the Reading Writing Workshop Bridge to reinforce a vocabulary skill. During the Shared Read, there are opportunities for students to use context clues to determine the meaning of words, as well. After the Shared Read, there is Develop Vocabulary time where students have an opportunity to apply their knowledge with the words they have learned in independent practices. Each unit is built around a specific topic allowing for the building of related vocabulary exposure, meaning, and connections to be made throughout the weeks of instruction, increasing students’ word knowledge across texts. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Reading-Writing Workshop Bridge, Academic Vocabulary, students use roots and affixes to determine the meaning of words. Students then use the word in a sentence, demonstrating an understanding of the meaning of the word.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, the Shared Read section states, “The vocabulary words, bristle, brittle, contour, and system, relate to feathers and their functions. Remind yourself of the word’s meaning; ask yourself how the word relates to the topic.” Then on page 246 of the Student Interactive, students “Review the topic in the center circle. Then complete the graphic organizer by writing a word from the word bank in each circle and explaining how each word relates to the topic.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Reading Workshop, Respond and Analyze, Develop Vocabulary, students learn that making connections between vocabulary and the plot helps readers better understand a text. Students then use newly acquired vocabulary to answer questions showing how the author’s choice of words helps them better understand the text, Mama’s Window.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Formative Assessment Options, Apply, students have two options to apply vocabulary knowledge. Option 1: “Have students respond using newly acquired vocabulary as they complete page 240 of the Student Interactive.” During this option, students use words from the word bank (vocabulary words studied) to complete the paragraph. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Reading Workshop, Respond and Analyze, students learn vocabulary, focusing on the difference between concrete and abstract language. Students then use the newly acquired vocabulary in sentences to answer questions about The HImalayas.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.

The Writing Workshop component has a weekly format that remains consistent in each unit throughout the year. Students are exposed to standards-based writing skill Minilessons that support progress toward independent writing. Lessons include modeled writing, shared writing, guided writing, and independent writing. In Week 1 of each unit, the students are immersed in and introduced to a genre of writing. In Week 2, students work on developing the elements of that genre. Week 3 concentrates on developing the structure of the writing. Week 4 contains lessons in author’s craft. Week 5 focuses on publishing, celebrating, and assessing. The daily routines for each lesson contain a 5-15 minute Minilesson with 30-40 minutes of independent writing time, during which the teacher confers with students. During this time, students practice and refine their writing skills. Although the lesson format remains the same throughout the year, the Minilessons progress and students consistently learn more skills in order to demonstrate proficiency at grade level by the end of the school year. A gradual release model is used each week. The teacher models writing and think alouds first to demonstrate the  writing skills students need for the writing type. Next, students engage in shared writing, guided writing, and lastly, independent writing of the specific writing genre for the unit. As students develop their writing skills throughout the unit, they complete a writing prompt assessment that measures their ability to independently complete a written assignment that assesses all of the writing skills upon which they have been building. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students focus on personal narratives. During Week 1, students examine the elements of personal narratives and engage in practice activities where they explore the narrator’s voice, setting, and story events. They also brainstorm and set a purpose as they plan to write their own personal narrative. In Week 2, students use a series of questions to describe the narrator and how the narrator portrays people. Students also work on composing the setting of their narrative, developing ideas with relevant details, using concrete words and phrases to transform general descriptions into specific ones, and using sensory details in their writing. During Week 3, students develop and compose the introduction, event sequence, dialogue, and conclusion of their narratives, while also using transition words and phrases in their writing. In Week 4, students revise their work by adding and deleting ideas for coherence and clarity and edit their work for adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns. Students continue editing in Week 5, focusing on irregular verbs and punctuation marks. Then, students publish and celebrate their work before completing their end-of-unit writing assessment, during which they write a personal narrative in response to a prompt.           
  • In Unit 2, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students work on informational text, focusing on travel articles. In Week 1, students analyze a travel article and elements, such as the lead paragraph and photographs, before brainstorming and setting a purpose as they plan to compose their own travel article. During Week 2, students develop an introduction, relevant details, different types of details, such as facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, and examples, and a conclusion for their travel article. They also compose captions for the visuals included in their work. Students continue their composition work in Week 3, as they compose a headline and body paragraphs for their writing. Students also group their paragraphs into sections, develop transitions, and explore multimedia options before mapping out ideas for including selected options in their travel article. During Week 4, students revise their work, using linking words and phrases, as well as precise language and vocabulary. They also edit for capitalization, adverbs, and coordinating conjunctions. In Week 5, students wrap up editing, with a focus on complete sentences and nouns. Then, they publish and celebrate their writing, before completing the end-of-unit writing assessment, during which students write a travel article in response to a prompt.      
  • In Unit 3, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students learn about realistic fiction. During Week 1, students discuss an anchor chart to help them understand the elements of realistic fiction. Then, they use text to practice identifying parts of the plot and recognizing the elements of fiction, before brainstorming a topic and planning their own realistic fiction story. In Week 2, students begin composing their pieces, focusing on using sensory details and developing internal monologues to describe characters and composing the setting, problem, and resolution. During Week 3, students write from one point of view, compose event sequences and dialogue, plan illustrations, and select a genre for their story. In Week 4, students begin the revision and editing process by using irregular verbs and pronouns in their writing and editing their work for punctuation, prepositional phrases, and coordinating conjunctions. Revision and editing continue in Week 5, as students rearrange and combine ideas and edit for capitalization. Students publish and celebrate their work, prior to completing the end-of-unit writing assessment, during which students write a realistic fiction story in response to a prompt.       
  • In Unit 4, Weeks 1-5, Writers Workshop, students explore opinion writing. During Week 1, students analyze an opinion essay and use text to understand point of view, as well as the reasons and information, such as facts, definitions, examples, and quotations, that authors use to support their opinions. Students brainstorm a topic and an opinion as they plan to write their own opinion essay. In Week 2, students develop their writing by working on the topic, opinion, reasons, and supporting details and facts for their essay. They also compose a concluding statement and use technology to help them experiment with rearranging sentences and paragraphs in order to find the best structure for their reasons and supporting information. During Week 3, students compose the introduction and conclusion, organize the reasons and supporting details, and use transition words and phrases in their writing. They also use technology for a group project, during which students analyze model opinion essays before composing their own. In Week 4, students begin revising and editing their work. They rearrange and combine ideas for coherence and clarity, peer edit, and edit their work for use of complete sentences and nouns. During Week 5, students complete the revision and editing process by incorporating peer and teacher suggestions before publishing the final draft of their opinion essay. After students publish and celebrate their work, they complete the end-of-unit writing assessment, during which students write an opinion essay in response to a prompt.           
  • In Unit 5, Weeks 1-5, Writing Workshop, students study poetry. In Week 1, after discussing an anchor chart on the elements of poetry, students explore what poetry sounds and looks like. Then, they brainstorm ideas and plan to write their own poem. During Week 2, students engage in tasks to practice incorporating elements of poetry into their writing, by composing a rhythm, and using alliteration, assonance, similes, metaphors, rhyming words, and repetition in their written work. In Week 3, students turn their attention to drafting their poem, by working on developing compositions with line breaks, arranging stanzas, selecting punctuation, setting a rhyme scheme, and selecting a genre. Students begin the revision and editing process in Week 4, and check their writing for use of progressive verbs, structure, word choice, comparative and superlative adjectives, and prepositional phrases. During Week 5, students finalize the revision process by adding and deleting ideas for coherence and clarity. Then, they publish and celebrate their writing, prior to completing the end-of-unit writing assessment, during which students write a poem in response to a prompt.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

Each unit has an Essential Question which is supported by a theme, additional weekly Essential Questions, and a variety of multi-genre texts. During Week 6, a Project-Based Inquiry task occurs using anchor texts, Book Club texts, and additional research. Students work both independently and collaboratively to complete this project. It is within the Project-Based Inquiry that students research and develop applicable “real world” products, such as opinion letters, scrapbooks, speeches, informational posters, and brochures. In order to complete these projects based on the theme of the unit, students are required to research, analyze, and synthesize information for this culminating activity. Throughout the Workshops in the weeks building to the final project, students engage in a progression of tasks that build their knowledge through reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 6 of the Project-Based Inquiry, there are five lessons: “Lesson 1: Gather background information from research articles. Lesson 2: Use field research to conduct research. Lesson 3: Use primary and secondary sources to refine research. Lesson 4: Incorporate media to extend research. Lesson 5: Present and reflect on research results.” The Teacher’s Guide states, “Use the opinion article, ‘Save our Theater’ and the Plan your Research chart to help students recognize the characteristics of argumentative texts, including claims, facts, and evidence. This week students will address the theme of Networks by developing and conducting a research plan to write a brochure designed to convince readers that a particular place in their community should be designated a historic landmark.”
  • In Unit 2, the Essential Question is “How do living things adapt to the world around them?” During Week 6, the project, Make Note of It, provides the students the opportunity to use the knowledge from the anchor texts, Book Club, and additional research to complete a research-based project connecting to the theme, Interactions. The students research endangered animals before completing the final project, a poster. The project is divided over five separate lessons. A four-point rubric scale is provided for students and teachers to understand the components needed on the final culminating research project.
  • In Unit 3, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, there are five lessons: “Lesson 1: Gather background information from research articles. Lesson 2: Use search engines to conduct research. Lesson 3: Use paraphrasing and quoting to refine research. Lesson 4: Incorporate media to extend research. Lesson 5: Present and reflect on research results.” The Teacher’s Guide states, “This week, students will extend their understanding of the theme of Diversity by following a research plan and writing an argument letter to the school principal advocating for accessible playground equipment on school property.” The Student Interactive states, “Think about the argument letter you wrote. Which parts of your letter do you think are the strongest? Which areas might you improve next time? Write your thoughts here.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 6, students research the origin of an American tall tale to write an explanatory blog post. While conducting research, students read The Truth Behind the Legend, The Library of Congress, and Who’s Your Hero? in addition to completing independent research and developing a bibliography for their blog post, students create the blog post and share the post with classmates.
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, Project-Based Inquiry, there are five lessons: “Lesson 1: Gather background information from research articles. Lesson 2: Use expert evidence to conduct research. Lesson 3: Use primary and secondary sources to refine research. Lesson 4: Use and online archive to extend research. Lesson 5: Present and reflect on research results.” The Teacher’s Guide states, “During this week, students will develop the idea of Features by following a research plan and writing an opinion article, arguing that a particular type of storm or other environmental event is the single most dangerous.” The Student Interactive states, “With your partner, think of two types of experts you could write to when gathering evidence for your dangerous weather opinion article.”

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

The materials provide opportunities for students to use anchor texts and Book Club texts during Reading Workshop. Leveled Readers support the instruction for the unit and student’s comprehension. Reading supports are available in the Getting Started Program Overview to assist teachers in guiding students to become independent readers. In the beginning of each Introduce the Unit section, the Student Interactive contains an Independent Reading Log, in which students track the date, book, genre, pages read, and minutes read. There is also a place called My Rating, in which students rate the book using a star system. Additionally, students conference with the teacher for three to five minutes at different points each week to discuss specific aspects of what they are reading. Book Club meets twice a week during Small Group time. Students complete an information sheet for Book Club that they use when meeting with their group. Students are expected to finish reading their Book Club book within 10 days. Students document their noticings, connections, and wonderings about their Book Club book daily. There are lessons for free reads that guide students and teachers during independent reading and a pacing guide and lessons for Book Club. Students are to read their Book Club book outside and inside of class in order to keep up with session requirements.

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Independent Reading, the Teacher’s Guide states, “Students can reread or listen to Rare Treasure or another text, Read a self-selected book or their Book Club text, [or] pair up and share with partners the main idea of a self-selected text they recently read.”
  • In Unit 2, Teacher’s Edition, Book Club, five opportunities are available for students to participate in Book Club. Each week there is a summary, guidelines, and protocols for both the teacher and student to conduct a Book Club. The texts for Book Club connect to the theme and each of the anchor texts for the week. Protocols are available for the students to complete during independent reading and before group discussions. There are also checkpoints for understanding regarding student progress towards their comprehension. 
  • In Unit 3, Introduce the Unit, Independent Reading, guidance in this section states, “Reading for longer, or sustained periods of time can build your stamina and make a better reader. The more you read, the better you become. Set some goals to increase your time you spend reading. Keep track of how long you read.” 
  • In Unit 4, Introduce the Unit, students choose books based on their interests and work on reading at a steady and comfortable rate. Students spend increasing amounts of time reading independently throughout the unit. Students use pages in the Student Interactive to log their reading by recording the date, book, genre, pages read, minutes read, and a student rating for the book. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Independent Reading section, the Teacher’s Guide states, “Students can reread or listen to the diagram, ‘Pollutant Emissions,’ with a partner, read a self-selected text, [or] reread or listen to their leveled reader.”

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for instructional supports and usability indicators. Although the materials are well designed, the pacing of daily lessons is not appropriate. The materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards, as well as offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. Teachers are provided with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards. The materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, and digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms. However, the overall web platform presents several navigational challenges and can be difficult to navigate when searching for resources or program components.

Criterion 3a - 3e

5/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials are thoughtfully designed and include copious review and practice resources that support students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject without visual distractions. Suggested timing for lessons and units may not be adequate for the teacher to fully teach included materials at a pace that will allow for maximum student understanding.

The program provides documentation that demonstrates the alignment of the questions, tasks, and assessments to the standards.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 do not meet the criteria that materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

Materials and lessons are well designed. Careful attention to time allotments may be necessary to ensure all portions of the lesson are taught. In the Getting Started Guide, times are listed for each component of these lessons and suggested instructional minutes for them. The lessons are sequenced to incorporate Reading Workshop, Reading and Writing Workshop Bridge, Small Group/Independent, and Writing Workshop. Materials also include a Suggested Weekly Plan that outlines instructional minutes for each section; however, materials may not consistently provide adequate suggested instructional time for the amount of content included within each section.

Each daily lesson format is broken apart into Reading Workshop, Writing Workshop, and Reading-Writing Bridge Workshop sections. Suggestions for instructional minutes are as follows:

    • Shared Reading: 35-50 minutes
    • Reading Bridge: 5-10 minutes
    • Small Group/Independent: 20-30 minutes
    • Writing Workshop Minilesson: 10 minutes
    • Independent Writing: 30-40 minutes
    • Writing bridge: 5-10 minutes

Total time for whole group instruction (reading and writing) 80-110 minutes and small group instruction is 55-70 minutes.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

While the materials are well-designed and lessons are effectively structured, the pacing of individual lessons may not provide time for maximum student understanding. The materials have five units. Each of those units are designed for one lesson a day, five lessons per week over six weeks of instruction. There is a pacing guide available in the Teacher's Edition, and the Suggested Weekly Plan provides a breakdown of the program’s allocation of instructional minutes. Teachers may need to make instructional adjustments to ensure all students are working towards mastery of core content with the suggested timing.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).

The Student Interactive book provides clear directions and explanations with a visual design and structure that is student-friendly and easy to navigate. Each unit has its own section that digitally opens up into a Unit Introduction, complete with an Essential Question and links to the Unit Introduction Activities and Independent Reading. After the Unit Introduction, each week has a drop-down menu that links to the Reading Workshop, Reading-Writing Bridge, and Writing Workshop. Each section is clearly labeled and often accompanied by a graphic or photograph. Within the Student Interactive, a digital notebook allows students to preview vocabulary, check for understanding, note taking, and more. The Teacher's Edition effectively models the thinking and process for many lessons, which students then get to practice and reflect/review with peers. There are also Quick Checks that provide additional review or practice for students who need it and extension for those who have demonstrated the skill. Directions in the Student Interactive are easy to understand and clearly labeled for understanding. However, some response boxes in the consumable worksheets are not large enough to provide adequate space for students to respond.

  • The Student Interactive states, “As you read, mark places where the setting or plot changes. Then, use what you marked to analyze the author’s choices in the text. Go back to the Close Read notes and highlight evidence that shows the setting influences the story. Use your highlighted evidence to complete the chart.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, students read the historical fiction genre. In the Student Interactive, there is a Historical Fiction Anchor Chart. This reference aid shows, “Setting: has a major influence on story events, details based on historical facts, may include true historical events. Characters: maybe entirely fictional, may include real figures from history, may be a combination of factual and imagined. Purpose, Text Structure, Plot, and Theme = same as Realistic Fiction.”

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

The materials include publisher alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessments. The Getting Started guide includes a Planning Resources section that breaks down the Common Core Correlation for the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. The Planning Resources section contains a two-column document that lists the standard and aligns the standard by page numbers with where it is taught in the Teacher's Edition, as well as Student Interactive. In addition to this resource, each lesson in the Teacher's Edition states the objective of the lesson, along with the standard to which it aligns. The Student Interactive also provides a learning goal with each lesson, written as "I can" statements that match the standards. The materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by assessments, as well. 

  • The Student Interactive Learning Goal states, “I can use elements of narrative writing to write a realistic fiction story.”
  • The objective of a lesson in the Teacher's Edition states, “Recognize and analyze literary elements within and across increasingly complex traditional, contemporary, classical and diverse texts in literature.”
  • The Planning Resource states, “RL4.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama or poem from details in the text and summarize the text.” This is done using lessons from, “SI: Unit 3, Week 5 p 180/ TE, Unit 3, Week 4, T324/ SI, Unit 4, Week 2, page 278.”

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The student digital materials provide instruction, lessons, links, and a digital notebook for students to engage in the instruction and demonstrate their work. While these student materials are clearly labeled through units, weeks, and drop-down links, at times it can be challenging to navigate to previous screens and or refer back to materials while responding to questions and discussions. No clear directions are present to help students navigate from one page to the next. Some page change arrows do not function properly and the long time it takes pages to load can become frustrating and distracting for some students. The digital images, graphics, labels, illustrations, and maps are well represented in a visual manner that is not distracting or chaotic allowing students to engage in the material. The Teacher's Edition can be more challenging to navigate as there are a lot of information, sections, guides, plans; the layout of resource materials is vast and can be overwhelming.  

  • The Reading Workshop is located in the column on the right side and includes First Read, Close Read, and Reflect and Share. The Workshop icons take up about one quarter of the webpage, is small in size, and may be difficult for students to navigate and read. Students have to scroll through large quantities of text to get to the next question.
  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Reading Workshop, Map, Weekly Interactive, students click open the activity to further explore the Weekly Opener. The activity says, “Reykjavík, Iceland, is surrounded by water and mountains on nearly all sides. Explore what day and night look like in this part of the world. Look for similarities and differences between the two images.” However, there is only one picture to explore. 
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Reading Workshop, Media, Student Interactive, students watch a video. “Weekly Interactive: Click on Open Activity to further explore the Weekly Opener.” The video then has a Turn and Talk prompt at the end for students to discuss.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The Teacher Edition and accompanying materials provide guidance for instruction, including establishing classroom protocols and information to support reteaching/remediation. Resources are included for communicating with stakeholders about the program and ways to support student progress at home.

Ample professional learning resources are included to support teachers with instruction, including information connecting lessons to the standards and the role of research-based strategies within the program. However, the role of the standards in the overall development of the materials is unclear.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The teacher materials include guidance on establishing protocols, detailed information on presenting materials to students, and annotations on what to do if students need further assistance in understanding material.

In the Teacher's Edition for each unit, the Program Overview provides the teacher with the outline in the resources, their purpose, and guides in using them. In addition, for each lesson within the unit, there are guides on how to implement the lesson and provide support to the students, as well as additional resources. In the Getting Started section, each grade level provides additional resources to support both the teacher and student.

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Weekly Launch, Interact with Sources, there are specific directions to the teacher on guiding students to discuss a topic in a group situation: "Use the following questions to guide discussions: How would you feel about having so much daylight every day in summer and so little in winter? What other parts of the world might be like Iceland and why? What would you most like to see in Iceland? What would you most like to do?"
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Genre & Theme, teachers are directed under the Decide tab: “If students struggle, revisit instruction about autobiographies in Small Group on pages T154.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Reading Workshop, Introduce the Text, the teacher is provided with guidance for presenting content in the Student Interactive: “Introduce the vocabulary words on page 470 in the Student Interactive, and define them as needed.”

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The materials contain a Professional Development Center with videos and white papers that contain advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject. Professional Learning videos are provided to give teachers the research behind the series and enhance teaching practices. These materials are authored by the authors and researchers of the program.

Professional Learning videos are provided to give teachers the research behind the series and enhance teaching practices. The myView Literacy authors provide teachers with best practices. The Professional Development Tab contains full adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary. Categories provided include Assessment, Book Club, Comprehension & Assessment, Differentiation, Dual Language, Engagement, Foundational Skills, Inquiry, Reading, Small Group, and Vocabulary. For example, in Reading there are four video offerings: “Isolated vs. Integrated Skills Instruction in Texts to Improve Comprehension,” “Organizing the Literacy Block and the Reading Workshop Part 1,” “Organizing the Literacy Block and the Reading Workshop Part 2,” and “What is Integrated Skills Instruction?” The White Papers included are “Text Complexity Systems: A Teacher’s Toolkit” and “The Reading Workshop.”

In Vocabulary, there are two video offerings: “How to Start Teaching a Generative Vocabulary Approach” and “What is a Generative Approach to Vocabulary Instruction?” These videos are both authored by Elfrieda “Freddy” Hiebert, Ph.D.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

Although the materials contain a correlations document stating which standards are covered in each lesson, there are no explanations of the role the literacy standards play in the context or development of the curriculum. There is no connection between materials from the previous grade level or indication of how it builds towards future standards. 

In the Getting Started with myView, there is a document titled, “CCSS Correlations Grade 4,” where the CCSS have been aligned with the curriculum.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials contain an explanation of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies.

There are multiple explanations of instructional approaches in the materials. The small group guide provides explanations of how the curriculum uses small groups to meet student needs and support for teachers in how to implement the groups. In the Getting Started section, there are explanations of the instructional approaches. The Assessment Guide provides further explanations of the approaches implemented in the curriculum. 

In Getting Started, there is a document titled Teacher's Edition Lesson Walkthrough that provides an outline to what to teach, how to teach, and why. The explanations are brief in why a lesson is conducted to support student learning. Also, there is a document titled ELL Support, which outlines what a teacher should do to support his/her ELL students at Emerging, Developing, Expanding, and Bridging throughout the curriculum. This is a brief overview of how a teacher can support this group(s) of students.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

The Assessment Guide provides Family-Home Connection letters for each unit. These guides offer information to parents about what the students are studying at school and suggestions on how to support student learning at home.

  • In Unit 2, a letter informs parents that students read informational text and begin to understand how authors use text structure, features, and language to develop ideas. They learn more about word relationships, context clues, and figurative language. They also learn about how Greek and Latin roots can help them with word meaning.
  • In Unit 4, a letter informs parents about student writing: Students practice developing strong opinions and writing about them in an opinion essay. They learn to develop a topic and point of view. They also learn about pronouns, adjectives, and adverbs. This unit’s learning and work will help your child with the following skills: Developing a topic and opinion, Developing supporting details and facts, Organizing supporting details, Composing introductions and conclusions, and Rearranging, combining and revising ideas for coherence and clarity.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Regular assessment opportunities for formative and summative assessments, including regular progress monitoring, are woven throughout the program. Assessment clearly indicate which standards are emphasized and provide sufficient guidance for using assessment data to inform instruction. The materials provide accountability for independent reading based on student choice and interest.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

The materials contain formative assessments that are integrated into daily routines and provide informal opportunities to measure student understanding through Quick Checks, Observational Assessments, Conferring Checklists, Rubrics, and Assess Understanding sections of the lessons. Progress Check-ups are available and designed to measure student progress of the standards. Summative assessments also occur throughout the year. Students are given a baseline at the beginning of the year, which is followed up with mid-year and end-of year assessments. Unit tests to assess the standards taught in each unit in reading comprehension and writing are provided for each unit. 

The Small Group Guide lists options and the purpose for each assessment. For example:

  • “Progress Check-ups: Assess skills taught that week. Monitors progress to intervene as needed.”
  • “Weekly Standards Practice: Given at the end of a lesson as an ‘exit ticket’ to check students’ knowledge of specific literary skills.”
  • “Unit Tests: Assess the key skills from each week’s instruction in the unit.”
  • “End of Year Test: Gives a summative view of a student’s progress for the year.”

Through Examview, teachers can create Cold Reads, Progress Check-ups, and Unit Tests using questions from a bank or creating their own. Teachers can also choose from multiple choice, multiple response, and essays, or include all three. The program offers both English and Spanish. Additionally, teachers can monitor and track student progress within Examview.

The Assessment Guide states: “Once you have collected the data, it is time for action. Set aside some time to organize your observational notes by student. Review them and think about what they tell you about individual students. Ask yourself questions like these: Is this student making progress in this small group? Do I need to assign this student to a different group? Do I need to change the way I am instructing this student? Do I need to change the texts this student is reading?” The Guide also indicates, “...the myView Writer’s Workshop format is that it includes teacher modeling, responsive feedback, and time for reteaching. This structure encourages constant feedback, reteaching, and improvement.”

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

There are several forms of formative, summative, and unit assessments within the materials. The Summative Assessments Guide includes a standards correlation chart for the baseline, middle-of-year, and end-of-year assessments, as well as for all unit tests. The guide provides item analysis information for the teacher, including the item focus/skill, DOK level, and which standard it measures.

  • The Assessment Guide states, “Pearson Realize allows teachers to view each student’s results of assessments taken online, and for assessments aligned to standards, they can see scores by question and by standard. Use the DATA tab of Pearson Realize to view results. Click or tap a bar in the Mastery bar chart to show details of that assessment. Choose the Item Analysis tab to see question level scores. Choose Mastery Analysis tab to see scores by standard.” 
  • In Assessment Guide, Teacher Form, the Weekly Standards Practice details the “slides” to be presented to students that have formative assessments that are used as a measure of vocabulary, phonics, language, and conventions. Alignment of standards is presented at bottom of each slide.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

The materials provide sufficient guidance for teachers to interpret student performance and plan suggested follow-up activities. Other resources include Assessment Guides, Summative Guides, Professional Development videos, educational articles and information within the Teacher's Edition. 

  • Within the Teacher’s Guide are Quick Checks for Assess and Differentiate, which provide data to determine small group instruction, which then includes Strategy Groups, Intervention Activity, On-Level, and Advanced lessons. These occur within every Reading Workshop.
  • The Summative Assessment Guide offers follow-up suggestions. For example, “You may wish to use the following guidelines to help determine how best to help improve students’ areas of need and build upon students’ areas of strength. Students who score below 60% on the Baseline Test might benefit from: • regular instruction during whole-class time • intervention activities during small-group time, more scaffolding, more practice with critical skills, and more opportunities to respond • myFocus Readers to practice word-reading skills.”
  • The Assessment Guide provides a section titled, “How can I use assessment and data to drive instruction?” which explains the types of assessments in the materials, including diagnostic, formative, and summative. It further details an overview of the assessments, including Baseline, Cold Reads, Progress Check-ups Unit Tests, Middle of the Year, End of Year, and Project-Based Inquiries.
  • The Assessment Guide includes a section called, “What is reporting and how do I use it to inform instruction?” It presents a table with the data collection tool, what it looks like, and how it works. For example: The Assessment Guide includes information on Data Based Decision Making, which details four stages of data-based decision making: Collect Data, Document Data, Evaluate Data, and Instruct from Data.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

The Teacher’s Edition provides routines to monitor student progress and are embedded throughout the lessons in each unit. Several formative assessments included within daily routines check for understanding using checklists, conferencing, observation, and rubrics. Progress Check-ups monitor student progress and skills being taught each week, including comprehension, vocabulary, word study, and writing. Cold Reads track student progress each week for comprehension and fluency, and Project-Based Inquiry monitors and tracks student progress through student work centered on the unit theme. A Summative Assessment Guide provides information on interpreting test results, informing instruction, and analyzing results to understand student strengths and weaknesses. The Small Group Guide provides guidance to teachers on how assessment informs instruction, collecting and using information to determine students who need additional skill support, students who have mastered skills being taught, and how to extend the learning for students who are ready to practice and apply skills being taught.

  • “Circulate to discover if students can determine how the elements of a fictional story are similar to and different from the elements of an informational text.”
  • “Quick Check: Notice and Assess: Can students identify the plot and setting in the story to determine the type of fiction? Decide if students struggle, revisit instruction about fiction in small group. If students show understanding, have them continue practicing strategies for reading fiction using the Independent Reading or Literacy Activities in small group.”
  • “Use texts at a student’s independent reading level to practice new strategies. When those strategies become automatic, move on to more challenging and complex texts.”

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Many opportunities exist for students to engage in independent reading and the teacher materials reflect how to build student stamina, confidence, and motivation throughout their reading experiences. Leveled readers that connect to the genres and themes of each unit are available at each grade level for guided reading and independent reading. During small group independent reading time, students can read from self-selected trade books and independently read from passages and texts previously covered in class for practice. Independent Reading Logs at the beginning of each unit ask students to set a purpose and goal for reading. The log has students provide the date, book, genre, pages read, minutes read, and a rating in order to be accountable for their reading. 

  • The Small Group Guide states that Assignment Logs help students stay organized. “Students’ academic stamina can benefit from having some tasks that are ongoing and not completed in one day. Students may be reading a book to prepare for a Book Club meeting or reading a variety of texts for a unit project.” The Self-Selected Reading and Reflection section notes, “Part of being a member of a community of readers is having self-selected books to read. Include reflection activities to keep students focused and accountable.”
  • The Small Group Guide states, “Having students know that they are accountable for their work when working independently will help them stay on task. Self-monitoring is a skill to be practiced and reinforced. Set up a task checklist that is visible on the work surface where the student is working. Monitor the checklist as you walk around the room. Add a self-monitoring section to the assignment log. Have students rate their focus, work, and accuracy.” 
  • The Small Group Guide contains Habits of Good Readers Routines that teaches strategies for students selecting the right book, and a Focus and Stamina routine that offers students strategies for asking questions while they read. 
  • The Small Group Guide presents strategies for teachers to model building stamina while reading: “This chapter about the states of matter is long! I don’t know much about states of matter. I can feel my brain getting tired of reading. This is a good time to think of the questions I have about this topic. I’ll write them down on sticky notes. As I read on, I’ll see if my questions are answered. I think this will help me stay focused as I read the chapter.”

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

myView Literacy provides strategies and tools to support the classroom teacher in meeting the needs of a wide range of learners, including students performing at, above, and below grade level and students for whom English is not their primary language. The materials also provide grouping strategies to support learners in a variety of settings within the classroom.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

The Teacher’s Edition provides many strategies for meeting the needs of all learners, including English Language Learners, students who may require accommodations/modifications to the lessons and/or learning, as well as a multi-tiered system for students who need re-teaching, review, or enhanced instruction. Each lesson in every unit provides teachers with opportunities to assess and differentiate for the students. Teacher-led options include “strategy groups”, “intervention activities”, and “quick checks” that allow for differentiation where needed to ensure students are meeting the standards. 

  •  In Strategy Groups, “Students practice, with scaffolded support, using their independent level or familiar text. Students might each have a different text to use. The students are “trying on the strategy” to see if they understand the process or steps.”
  • In On-Level Groups, “You may choose to use text that is at the students’ instructional level. The guided support of the teacher allows for the use of more complex text. All students in the group may use the same text to make sharing the reading easier.”
  • In Intervention Groups, “The goal is to have all students master the grade-level expectations. When working with students who are struggling with a skill, identify the related sub-skills they have mastered and build from there. From time to time, any student in the class may need intervention. While working on the same skills as other students, you may need to adjust the amount of support and scaffolding based on needs.”
  • In Enrichment/Advanced Groups, “Every learner can learn a skill at a deeper, more complex level. For example, the skill of identifying a character’s emotions can be made more complex when reading text that forces the reader to infer the emotions, rather than reading direct statements in the text. Rather than focusing on more advanced skills, help students become masters of the skills using a variety of more complex texts.”

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Each lesson has components to assess and differentiate learning for students, with suggestions for re-teaching, reviewing, extending, and scaffolding for multi-tiers including ELL students. There are English and Spanish leveled readers. Strategy Groups and ELL guides for scaffolded instruction within the lessons present grade-level content with opportunities for reteaching, review, accommodations, modifications, and additional strategies to check for understanding, while offering targeted support where needed. Each scaffold provides suggestions for emerging/developing/expanding skills. The materials also contain a MyFocus Intervention Guide, which contains scaffolded lessons and “checkpoint assessments” for the skills being taught. 

  • “ELL Targeted Support, Visual Support, Read aloud the caption for each image in the infographic. Tell students to listen for the description of each adaptation.”
  • “Quick Check, Notice and Assess, Can students identify key features in an informational text? Decide: If students struggle, revisit instruction about informational text in small group. If students show understanding, have them continue practicing the strategies for reading informational text using the Independent Reading Library and Literacy Activities in small group.” 
  • “Use the ELL Observational Assessment Checklist to monitor student progress for this unit.”
  • “Differentiated Support Option 2, Extend: If students show understanding, have them sort questions into two groups: those they think will be easy to answer and those they think will be more difficult. Ask students to develop a plan for finding answers to the questions in the second category.”

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

In the Daily Plan, during Small Group Instruction, several options are available: Guided Reading, Strategy Groups, Intervention, On-Level and Advanced Activities, ELL Targeted Support, Conferring, and Fluency. The activities found in this section are geared toward both On-Level and Advanced students, with the bulk of the differentiation accounted for in the use of more complex texts with advanced readers.  

There is a page in the Small Group Guide titled, “What modifications should I make for students who need enrichment of advanced work?”  Extension Activities are available in the Resource Download Center. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Teacher-Led Options, On-Level and Advanced, “Have students use the infographic on pages 50-51 to generate questions about people’s interactions with their surroundings and then choose one to investigate. Throughout the week have them conduct research about the question.”  
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Teacher-Led Options, On-Level and Advanced, “Have students use the infographic on pages 78-79 to generate questions about music as a cultural bridge. Throughout the week have them conduct research about the question.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Teacher-Led Options, On-Level and Advanced, “Have students use the infographic on pages 166-167 to generate questions about poetry in different cultures and time periods. Throughout the week have them conduct research about the question.”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

There are a variety of grouping strategies provided in the instructional materials. There are “Teacher-Led Options, Independent/Collaborative options, Turn Talk and Share, and Whole Group” opportunities. There are times for students to work with a partner and there are Small Group times. During Shared Reading time, students may read independently, in pairs, or as a whole group. 

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Listening Comprehension, “Tell students you are going to read an informational text aloud. Have students listen as you read…”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Small Group, “Use the Quick Check on page T151 to determine small group instruction.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Teacher-Led Options, during Fluency, “Assess two to four students. Model reading at an appropriate rate. Then, have students choose a section they liked from Thunder Rose or a leveled reader. Have pairs take turns reading the excerpt aloud.”  

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials include a web-based platform that is compatible with multiple browsers and devices. The included technology supports student learning, including personalization to support each learner. Materials can be customized for local use. The materials include some opportunities for students and teachers to collaborate electronically through digital platforms, however, the materials lack teacher guidance and support on how to conduct this collaboration or how the collaboration can benefit student performance.

The overall web platform presents several navigational challenges and can be difficult to navigate when searching for resources or program components.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The materials are accessible from multiple Internet browsers including Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, and Safari. Materials were accessed on a Windows-based computer, Chromebook, Android tablet, Android phone, and iPad.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. 

Students use technology in accessing the materials in the curriculum, researching topics within their studies, and publishing writing. Students interact regularly with technology through the implementation of the Student Interactive. Teacher guidance is provided that enables the teacher to effectively instruct students in the utilization of technology and its usefulness. 

  • In Unit 1, Week 6, Collaborate and Discuss, students are provided the option to create a virtual travel brochure rather than one in print. Students are also directed to go online to PearsonRealize.com to find primary sources to complete their project. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Writing Workshop, Develop Structure, detailed guidance is provided in instructing students on how to edit writing using technology, including how to insert text.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Writing Workshop, students are provided with lessons on how to edit writing on computers as needed.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

The curriculum provides opportunities for the teacher to individualize the student experience and assignment completion. The curriculum provides the instructions and video explanation for the teacher to follow to comprehend how to modify the experience for the student while integrating Google Classroom. The curriculum does not provide guidance on how to use adaptive technologies for students with either physical or mental disabilities. The ELL support provides the teacher with the opportunity to use online resources to support dual language students.

  • Getting Started, How-to, Customize myView Literacy, instructions for the teacher on how to personalize the learning, assigning tasks, use additional resources or files that are relevant to the student(s) are provided.
  • Getting Started, How-to, Integrating Google Classroom, instructions for the teacher on how to integrate the curriculum into the Google Classroom are included. This tool supports teachers’ and students’ use of the program’s technology both in and out of the classroom.
  • The Digital Walkthrough for Realize Reader (Online Student Edition) was not available. 
  • All Unit Tests have the ability to be modified or edited based on the needs of the students. There is a link for the teacher to customize each Unit Test.
  • On-level Cold Reads for Fluency and Comprehension (Online), Resources, the teacher has the option to customize this task based on the needs of the student(s).

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

The curriculum provides the teacher with the opportunity to customize tasks, assessments (formative and summative), and add additional materials to best support the students within the classroom. The ability to use the materials online allows the teacher the opportunity to integrate the materials into Google Classroom. 

Under the Create Content tab, teachers have the ability to upload files, add links, and build tests. They also have the option to add items of their choosing to the My Content tab. The Rearrange tab allows teachers to rearrange the order of the table of contents within the materials. There is also a State Customization tab under the Teacher Resources tab, which contains a state-specific lesson plan template.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)

The materials include some opportunities for students and teachers to collaborate electronically through digital platforms when conducting research; however, the materials lack teacher guidance and support on how to conduct this collaboration or how the collaboration can benefit student accomplishments.

The article, “Purposeful Uses of Technology for Literacy and Learning Through Inquiry in Grades K–5” by Julie Coiro, Ph.D. provides the teacher with a research-based article that lists the websites and other forms of technology a teacher can use to enhance literacy practices in the classroom.

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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 04/14/2020

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
myView Literacy Digital Courseware Pilot 1-Year License Grade 4 978-0-134973-97-5 Pearson 2020

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Please note: Beginning in spring 2020, reports developed by EdReports.org will be using an updated version of our review tools. View draft versions of our revised review criteria here.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

Math High School

ELA K-2

ELA 3-5

ELA 6-8


ELA High School

Science Middle School

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