Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for alignment to the Mathematics Florida Standards (MAFS). ​The instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 1, focus and coherence, by focusing on the major work of the grade and being coherent and consistent with the Standards. The instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 2, rigor and balance and practice-content connections, by reflecting the balances in the Standards and helping students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations by giving appropriate attention to the three aspects of rigor. The materials meet expectations for meaningfully connecting the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
14
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
17
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
22
31
38
35
31-38
Meets Expectations
23-30
Partially Meets Expectations
0-22
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for Gateway 1, focus and coherence. The instructional materials meet the expectations for focusing on the major work of the grade, and they also meet expectations for being coherent and consistent with the standards.

Criterion 1a

Materials do not assess topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced.
2/2
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Criterion Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for not assessing topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced. The materials assess grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades.

Indicator 1a

The instructional material assesses the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. Content from future grades may be introduced but students should not be held accountable on assessments for future expectations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for assessing grade-level content.

Assessments are located in the Assessment Guide book. Assessments consist of a Prerequisite Skills Inventory, Middle-of-Year Test, End-of-Year Test, 19 Module Tests, and 6 Unit Performance Tasks. Each Module Assessment consists of Form A and Form B.

The Middle of Year Test assesses the standards taught in approximately the first half of the year of Into Math Florida, and the End of Year Test assesses the full year of standards. For example:

  • Middle of Year Test, Problem 3, “Lyla saw 3 cows in the grass. Then she saw 3 more cows. Which picture shows how many cows Lyla saw altogether?” (1.OA.1.1)

Module Tests are available digitally and in the Assessment Guide. Examples include:

  • Module 3 Test, Forms A and B, Problems 2, 3, and 5, students use the properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Students are given an equation and find another way to find the total. (1.OA.2.3)
  • Module 6 Test, Forms A and B, Problems 1-8, students solve addition and subtraction word problems within 20 involving situations of adding to, taking apart, putting together, with unknowns in all positions.  Students find solutions for “how many” questions using sums and differences represented as objects, models, or equations. (1.OA.1.1).
  • Module 9 Test, Forms A and B, Problem 2, students identify bundles of ten with given models. (1.NBT.2.2.a)
  • Module 9 Test, Forms A and B, Problems 3, 8, and 9, students use models to determine how many tens or asked to match a given number of tens as ___ tens and 0 ones. (1.NBT.2.2c)
  • Module 9 Test, Forms A and B, Problems 4-6, students look at numbers 11-19 and select the correct answer of 1 ten and ___ ones. (1.NBT.1.2b)
  • Module 10 Test, Form A, Problem 2, students are given a story problem of number of times one kid jumped compared to another kid. Students choose the correct comparison statement. (1.NBT.2.3)
  • Module 12 Test, Problems 1, 3, and 5, students add two-digit addends with single-digit addends to add within 100. (1.NBT.3.4)
  • Module 12 Test, Forms A and B, Problems 7 and 8, students show ten more or ten less of a number using equations, word problems, or matching sums and differences. (1.NBT.3.5)
  • Module 12 Test, Forms A and B, Problems 9 and 10, students solve word problems, “Noah saw 40 fish. There were 30 green fish and the rest were orange. How many orange fish did Noah see?” (1.NBT.3.6)
  • Module 15 Test, Forms A and B, Problems 1 and 2, students identify flat surfaces or faces of shapes. (1.G.1.1)
  • Module 15 Test, Forms A and B, Problems 3 and 5-7, students create composite shapes or identify shapes used to create composite shapes. (1.G.1.2)

Performance Assessments with multiple tasks for each unit are provided in the Assessment Guide. Example:

  • Unit 3, Problem 2, Jamal has some marbles. He has 28 green marbles. If the number of blue marbles is 10 more than the number of green marbles, how many blue marbles does Jamal have? Write how you know. (1.NBT.3.4) 


Criterion 1b

Students and teachers using the materials as designed devote the large majority of class time in each grade K-8 to the major work of the grade.
4/4
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for students and teachers using the materials as designed devoting the large majority of class time to the major work of the grade. The instructional materials devote at least 65 percent of instructional time to the major clusters of the grade.

Indicator 1b

Instructional material spends the majority of class time on the major cluster of each grade.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for spending a majority of instructional time on major work of the grade.

  • The approximate number of Modules devoted to major work of the grade (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 15.5 out of 19, which is approximately 82 percent.
  • The approximate number of Lessons devoted to major work of the grade (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 84 out of 104, which is approximately 80 percent.
  • The approximate number of days devoted to major work (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 141 out of 167, which is approximately 84 percent.

A lesson-level analysis is most representative of the instructional materials as the lessons include major work, supporting work connected to major work, and the assessments embedded within each module. As a result, approximately 80 percent of the instructional materials focus on major work of the grade.


Criterion 1c - 1f

Coherence: Each grade's instructional materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for being coherent and consistent with the standards. The instructional materials have supporting content that engages students in the major work of the grade and content designated for one grade level that is viable for one school year. The instructional materials are also consistent with the progressions in the standards and foster coherence through connections at a single grade.

Indicator 1c

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations that supporting work enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade. Throughout the instructional materials, major work of the grade is supported by non-major work.

Examples of how the materials connect supporting work to the major work of the grade include:

In Module 8, students are using data from graphs (1.MD.3.4) to add and subtract (1.OA.1), for example:  

  • In Module 8, Lesson 1, More Practice/ Homework, students interpret picture graphs (1.MD.3.4), write addition and subtraction models (equations) to solve word problems (1.OA.1.1), and add and subtract within 20 (1.OA.3.6). 
  • In Module 8, Lesson 6, Build Understanding, students interpret picture graphs (1.MD.3.4), write addition and subtraction models (equations) to solve word problems (1.OA.1.1), and add and subtract within 20 (1.OA.3.6).
  • In Module 13, Lesson 3, Step It Out and On My Own, students compute the value of a combination of coins (1.MD.2.a.b), which connects to adding within 100 and adding using multiples of 10 (1.NBT.3.4).
  • In Module 19, Lesson 1, students write the numbers for the hours on the clock and answer, “What are the numbers on the clock?” and “How does the hour hand move around the clock?” (1.MD.2.3), which is connected to counting to 120 (1.NBT.1.1).


Indicator 1d

The amount of content designated for one grade level is viable for one school year in order to foster coherence between grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials for Into Math Florida First Grade meet expectations that the amount of content designated for one grade-level is viable for one year. 

As designed, the instructional materials can be completed in 167 days. The suggested amount of time and expectations for teachers and students in the materials are viable for one school year as written and would not require significant modifications.

  • There are 120 days of instruction.
  • There are 3 days per year for the Interim Growth Assessments.
  • There are 6 Units. One day per Unit for the Performance Task and Unit Opener review activities for a total of 6 days.
  • There are 19 modules, and there are 2 days per module for the Module Are You Ready?, Module Review, and Module Test, for a total of 38 days.

The suggested pacing from the publisher is one day per lesson for most lessons. However, some lessons are listed for two days. There are no lessons that require more than two instructional days to complete. 


Indicator 1e

Materials are consistent with the progressions in the Standards i. Materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards. If there is content from prior or future grades, that content is clearly identified and related to grade-level work ii. Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems iii. Materials relate grade level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for being consistent with the progressions in the Standards, providing all students with extensive work of the grade, and explicitly identifying prior knowledge needed for grade level work.

In the Planning and Pacing Guide, a Correlations Chart is included containing all grade-level standards. Tasks are aligned to grade-level work and are connected to prior knowledge. A typical lesson has Are You Ready? to assess student readiness for the upcoming module, Warm-Up Options, and Spark Your Learning activities intended to assist with activating prior knowledge. Build Understanding/Step It Out, On My Own, and More Practice/Homework, which includes a spiral review, are available in most lessons. Additionally, every lesson provides Small Group Options or Math Center Options that can be used to plan for differentiated instruction.

The instructional materials clearly identify content from future grade levels and use it to support the progression of the grade-level standards. Each Module and Lesson begin with Teaching for Success identifying the standards for “Prior Learning”, “Current Development”, and “Future Connections” respectively. Units begin with lessons connected to the standards from prior grades that are relevant to the current topic. Examples include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 1, Prior Learning-Modeled addition with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g. claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations (K.OA.1.1). This standard correlates with Grade K Lessons 5.1, 5.3, 5.5, 11.1, 11.3, and 11.5. The learning is connecting making sense of problems by developing an understanding of addition and use the relationships between quantities created by joining amounts (1.OA.1.1). From these lessons future connections include, using addition within 100 to solve one and two step word problems and using facts with a symbol for the unknown (2.OA.1.1). This standard correlates to Grade 2 Lessons 15.1 and 15.3.
  • In Module 3, Lesson 2 identifies Prior Learning as K.OA.A.1, representing addition with objects, drawings, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations. The Current Development is identified as 1.OA.B.3, apply the Commutative property to addition. Future Connections are identified as 2.OA.B.2, fluently add and subtract using mental math.
  • In Module 6, Lesson 6, Mathematical Progressions Across the Grades, Prior Grade K standard K.OA.1. (found in Lessons 2.1-2.5) is identified as prior learning. These standards review solving word problems with addition and subtraction within 10 and using symbols and drawings to represent problems. This learning is used to connect with the current development lessons which target 1.OA.1.1. In these lessons, students begin to solve word problems with addition within 20 having students putting together and taking apart, and using symbols to represent a problem with visual mathematical models. From these lessons, future connections will be made with Grade 2 standard 2.OA.1.1 in lessons 14.1-14.5 and 15.1-15.3, where students will use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one and two-step word problems, involving putting together, taking apart, and comparing.
  • In Module 17, Lesson 4, Mathematical Progressions Across the Grades, Prior Grade K standards K.G.1.2 and K.G.2.6 (found in Lessons 16.1-16.6) are identified as prior learning. These standards review identifying shapes and composed single shapes. This learning is used to connect with the current development lessons which target 1G.1.3. In these lessons, students begin to partition shapes into two or four equal shares and identify those equal shares as fourths or halves. From these lessons, future connections will be made with 2.G.1.3 in Lessons 22.1-22.5, where students will partition rectangles, identify, describe, draw equal shares, and use different ways to show equal shares.

Overall, the materials provide opportunities for students to engage in extensive grade-level work. For example: 

  • Units 1 and 2 address addition and subtraction with data in preparation to assist students with developing understanding of numbers to 120 in Unit 3. 
  • Unit 4 returns to addition and subtraction in base ten to extend students understanding of operations within the place value system. 
  • These units support implementation of Units 5 and 6 (geometry and measurement) where students engage in understanding shapes, fractional parts, length and time. The majority of these lessons focus on supporting the major work of the grade level. 
  • In Module 12, Lesson 5, students represent addition with tens and ones (1.NBT.3.4) through Motivate, Set the Stage, Task 1, Task 2, and On My Own.

Are You Ready? and Activate Prior Knowledge are included in lessons frequently for students to work with prior-grade standards in ways that support learning of grade-level problems. Examples include:

  • In Module 3, Lesson 1, Are You Ready? includes ways to make 4 and 5 (K.CC.2.4b), using symbols to add (K.OA.1.1) and drawing equal groups (K.CC.3.6). 
  • In Module 10, Lesson 5, Activate Prior Knowledge is used to assess and activate prior knowledge as needed through the Problem of the Day when students use a 100 chart, start at 99 (circle the number) and shade to count up nine more. Based on the Problem of the Day, students complete an Interactive Reteach or a prerequisite skills activity.
  • In Module 18, Lesson 4, Spiral Review, students complete numbers up to 120 (Grade 1, Lesson 10.1). These spiral reviews are located in the More Practice/Homework section of the student materials.


Indicator 1f

Materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards i. Materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. ii. Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for fostering coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards.

The materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by MAFS cluster headings, including:

  • In Lesson 2.3, the learning objective, "Use counting on as a strategy to subtract", is shaped by 1.OA.3, Add and subtract within 20.
  • In Lesson 14.2, the learning objective, "Move children from using models to adding 2 digit numbers using place value to add", is shaped by 1.NBT.3, Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.
  • In Lesson 15.2, the learning objective, "Compose three-dimensional shapes into composite shapes", is shaped by 1.G.1, Reason with shapes and their attributes.

The materials include problems and activities connecting two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important, and examples of this include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 3, On My Own connects 1.OA.1, 1.OA.2, and 1.OA.3 as students solve addition word problems, apply properties of operations, and make 10 to add.
  • In Module 14, Lesson 2, Step It Out and On My Own connect 1.NBT.3 and 1.NBT.2 as students solve addition problems based on understanding place value.
  • In Module 11, Lesson 3, connects 1.NBT.2 and 1.OA.4 as students use symbols for greater than, less than, and equal to in order to compare numbers.


Gateway Two

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for Gateway 2, rigor and balance and practice-content connections. The instructional materials meet expectations for reflecting the balances in the standards and helping students meet the standards’ rigorous expectations by giving appropriate attention to the three aspects of rigor, and they meet expectations for meaningfully connecting the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

Criterion 2a - 2d

Rigor and Balance: Each grade's instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards' rigorous expectations, by helping students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for reflecting the balances in the standards and helping students meet the standards’ rigorous expectations, by giving appropriate attention to: developing students’ conceptual understanding; procedural skill and fluency; and engaging applications. The instructional materials also do not always treat the aspects of rigor separately or together.

Indicator 2a

Attention to conceptual understanding: Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for developing conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific standards or cluster headings. 

Each module contains two types of lessons specifically designed to engage students with conceptual understanding, Spark Your Learning and Bridging Lessons. The instructional materials present multiple opportunities for students to develop and independently demonstrate conceptual understanding, and examples include:

  • In Lesson 1.2, Count Back begins with students working in pairs and using connecting cubes, counters, or drawing pictures to show subtraction. During Build Understanding, students use manipulatives and pictures to count back, solve, and write an equation to solve the problem. (1.OA.3.5)
  • In Lesson 6.2, students represent the number of animal cards in two different ways using counters, connecting cubes, or pictures and an equation. (1.OA.1.1)
  • In Lesson 7.3, students select and draw a number of counters that are more than three and fewer than 10. Students then show three fewer counters. Students use pictures, counters, and equations to deepen their understanding of unknown problems. (1.OA.1.1)
  • In Lesson 9.1, students choose a tool to represent a teens number using tens and ones. Students also use a ten frame and answer, “How many one cubes fill a ten frame?” “How do you know the value of each digit?”. (1.NBT.2.2)
  • In Lesson 10.1, students work with partners to represent a two-digit number and use that drawing/representation (using a picture or base ten blocks) to help them write the number of tens and ones in the number. (1.NBT.2.2)
  • In Lesson 18.2, students compare the length of objects to the length of a string and determine if the string is longer or shorter. Students answer, “How does the length of the object on the first table compare to the length of the string?” Students also compare the lengths of objects and draw to show which objects are longer or shorter. (1.MD.1.1)

Students are also provided opportunities to build shared understanding via Let’s Talk activities. An example includes:

  • In Lesson 1.4, students use strategies such as counting on, making ten, decomposing a number leading to a ten, using the relationship between addition and subtraction, and creating equivalent but easier or known sums. The Teacher’s Edition states, “Select children with a clear understanding of making a ten to explain how they solved the problem. Select children with a clear understanding of addition to explain how they found different ways. Encourage children to ask questions of their classmates. Discuss any patterns children notice such as adding in any order to make 10.” (1.OA.3.6)


Indicator 2b

Attention to Procedural Skill and Fluency: Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for attending to those standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.

Students develop procedural skills and fluencies throughout the grade level, and each module contains procedural lessons that help students develop the steps in a procedure and determine when the procedure should be used. Module and Lesson components that specifically attend to student’s developing and independently demonstrating procedural skill and fluency include:

  • In Module Planning: Teaching for Success, Teacher to Teacher notes give the teacher advice on how to question the student in order to build procedural fluency. For example, in Module 6, Teacher to Teacher suggests having students think about the problem 12-5. The teacher asks questions about what equation they could write and how they would use tally marks to solve the problem. (1.OA.1.1)
  • In Lesson 2.6, Step It Out, students use subtraction strategies to solve problems, “Another way to solve 9 - 2 is to count on.” (1.OA.1.1, 1.OA.3.6)
  • In Lesson 3.1, students use pictures and equations to practice representing addition in other ways using the commutative property of addition throughout the lesson. Check Understanding Problem 1, “Ron Plants 3 white rose bushes and 9 red rose bushes How many rose bushes did he plant? ____=____+____ or ____=____+____rose bushes.” (1.OA.2.3)
  • In Lesson 8.7, Spark Your Learning, students use information in a chart to solve a problem using tally marks to show how many flowers are in different vases. “What does each of Lian’s tallies mean?” Students use the tallies to create an addition equation to show the total number of flowers in the vase. (1.MD.3.4)
  • In Lesson 12.5, Spark Your Learning, students build numbers using tens and ones and then add more ones to find a total. In Build Understanding, students continue to show the problem using tens and ones and writing an addition equation to solve the problem. (1.NBT.3.4)

Unit 1 addresses 1.OA.3.6. The lessons address addition and subtraction within 20 and demonstrating fluency within 10. Students build fluency through adding 10 and more, making a 10 to add, adding doubles, and using known sums to add. Specific examples include:

  • In Lesson 1.3, On My Own, Numbers 3-6, students practice adding more to 10 and practice counting using the strategy 10 and more. Students use ten frames to count on from 10 and to add and subtract within 20.
  • In Lesson 1.4, On My Own, Numbers 4-10, students “make ten” to add within 20. Students fluently build 10 and add the remaining value.
  • In Lesson 2.2, Learn Together and Independent Practice, address addition and subtraction within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10 when students use a number line to count back to subtract and solve numerous subtraction problems by counting back.
  • In Lesson 3.7, Step It Out, students find the sum of number cubes to develop fluency within 10 and apply that fluency to find sums within 20. In On My Own, Problem 4, students show three different ways to make 10, and students develop fluency of addition within 10 using the standard algorithm.

In addition, Sharpen Skills are optional activities included with each lesson to build fluency and practice skills. It is optional because this section says, “If time permits.” For example, in Lesson 3.3, students use mental math to add within 20 and solve addition equations (1.OA.3.6).


Indicator 2c

Attention to Applications: Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics, without losing focus on the major work of each grade
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for teachers and students spending sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics. Engaging applications include single and multi-step problems, routine and non-routine, presented in a context in which the mathematics is applied.

Students engage in routine application problems throughout the grade level. In Independent Practice and On My Own, students apply what they have learned to solve real world problems independently. For example:

  • In Lesson 1.7, Independent Practice, students draw and solve, “Julian has 7 green marbles. His brother gives him 4 blue marbles. How many marbles does Julian have? Choose a strategy to add.” (1.OA.1.1)
  • In Lesson 2.6, Check Understanding, students write an equation and explain the strategy they used to solve a word problem: “Nathaniel has 14 apples. He gave 5 away. How many apples does he have now?” (1.OA.1.1)
  • In Lesson 7.6, students solve “There are 5 cherries. There are 8 more blueberries than cherries. How many blueberries are there? Use a strategy to solve the problem. There are ______ blueberries.” (1.OA.3.6)
  • In Lesson 8.2, On My Own, students use colored marbles to create a graph, interpret the data, and reason about the data. (1.MD.3.4)
  • In Lesson 12.8, students Use Mental Math to Make 10 Less and 10 More. During Independent Practice, students solve “Susan, Tracy, and Kris each have a rock collection. Susan has 48 rocks in her collection. Tracy has 10 more rocks than Susan. Kris has 10 more rocks than Tracy. How many rocks do Tracy and Kris each have?”. (1.NBT.3.5)

Examples of non-routine application of the mathematics include: 

  • In Lesson 3.5, On My Own, Problem 8, students write and solve a word problem with three addends. (1.OA.1.2)
  • In Lesson 5.4, students “Write a story problem for the equation. Solve the problem. 17-8=?”. (1.OA.1)
  • In Lesson 6.7, Independent Practice, students respond to “Cindy sees 18 butterflies. Some are orange and some are blue. How many butterflies could be orange and how many could be blue?” Students are given a bar model to help them solve. (1.OA.1)


Indicator 2d

Balance: The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the 3 aspects of rigor within the grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for the three aspects of rigor not always being treated together and not always being treated separately. In general, two or all three, of the aspects are interwoven throughout each module.

All three aspects of rigor are present independently throughout the program materials. Examples include:

  • In Lesson 1.3, students develop procedural skill and fluency of addition within 20. (1.OA.3.6)
  • In Lesson 5.1, students develop conceptual understanding as they use objects and drawings to solve add to and take from problems where the results are unknown. (1.OA.1.11)
  • In Lesson 5.4, students solve Add to and Take from problems. “Bert has some markers. He gives 8 to Alex. Now he has 5 markers. How many markers does he have to start?”. (1.OA.1.1)

Multiple aspects of rigor are engaged simultaneously to develop students’ mathematical understanding of a single topic/unit of study throughout the materials. Examples include:

  • In Lesson 4.3, students develop conceptual understanding of related facts using two color connecting cubes, and they develop fluency in writing related addition and subtraction equations. (1.OA.3.6)
  • In Lesson 7.4, students use procedural skills and visual models to solve difference unknown word problems. (1.OA.1.1)
  • In Lesson 7.7, students build conceptual understanding using a bar model to represent word problems. (1.OA.1.1)


Criterion 2e - 2g.iii

Practice-Content Connections: Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice
9/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for meaningfully connecting the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs). The MPs are identified and clearly labeled throughout the materials, and the instructional materials support the standards’ emphasis on mathematical reasoning.

Indicator 2e

The Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout each applicable grade.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 partially meet expectations that the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs) are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout the grade-level.

All MPs are identified throughout the materials, however, there are inconsistencies in the identification of the MPs, some inaccuracies in the identification of an MP, and over-identification of the MPs throughout the materials. In addition, while MPs are identified, it is not always clear what questions or tasks align to the MP. For example:

  • MPs are identified in both the Planning and Pacing Guide and the Teacher Edition. However, they do not always align with each other. For example, in Lesson 14.2 the Pacing Guide identifies MP.1.1, while the Teacher Edition identifies MP.2.1, MP.6.1, and MP.7.1.
  • The Planning and Pacing Guide explains each MP and provides a correlation to specific lessons. The correlation for MP.2.1 can be found in every Spark Your Learning lesson. MP.1.1 and MP.3.1 are correlated to every lesson. MP.4.1, MP.5.1, MP.6.1, MP.7.1, and MP.8.1 are correlated with most lessons.
  • In the Planning and Pacing Guide, Content Architecture describes where to find the MPs. Spark Your Learning includes MP.1.1, MP.3.1, and MP.5.1, however, in the Planning and Pacing Guide, Spark Your Learning is connected to MP.2.1. Connect Concepts and Skills include MP.7.1 and MP.8.1, and Apply and Practice include MP.2.1 and MP.6.1.

In each lesson, Focus and Coherence identifies the MPs within the lesson, and the MPs are also identified throughout the lesson before a task. Because the identification is associated with a task, there are connections to grade-level content. For example:

  • In Lesson 5.4, Build Understanding, Task 2 identifies MP.2.1 when students solve “Ann picks 10 flowers. She gives 4 away. How many flowers does she have now?”. Students are asked what number they should start with and how many they should count back.
  • In Lesson 6.5, Build Understanding, Task 1 identifies MP.3.1. Students use a bar model to solve and write an equation for a word problem. Students turn and talk with a partner, “Does this problem have another answer? Explain which numbers would change?”.
  • Lesson 16.3 identifies MP.5.1 and MP.6.1 as a focus for this lesson. In Build Understanding, Task 2 indicates MP.6.1, “How can you make a square and rectangle using 4 squares?”.

Some lessons include an explanation about the connection to the MPs in Professional Learning. For example, in Lesson 6.3, MP.4.1, information includes, “Children have just worked through ideas of finding the total, and breaking a number apart in pieces of their choosing. Now they are asked to identify the second part in the part-part-whole relationship. As children further explore concepts of working with numbers in a nonlinear fashion, the basis for algebraic thinking begins to be established, as well as developing number sense.”


Indicator 2f

Materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for carefully attending to the full meaning of each practice standard (MP). 

The materials attend to the full intent of all eight MPs. In the Teacher’s Edition, the Focus and Coherence for each lesson describes how the MPs are addressed with the lesson. The Planning and Pacing Guide includes a description of lesson components that address specific MPs.

  • During Spark Your Learning, students encounter a productive perseverance task that engages students with MP.1.1 (Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them), MP.3.1 (Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others), and MP.5.1 (Use appropriate tools strategically).
  • Connect Concepts and Skills lessons focus on MP.7.1 (Look for and make use of structure) and MP.8.1 (Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning) where students connect understanding they have developed with more efficient procedures. These practices help students explain and justify the procedures they use along with MP.4.1 (Model with Mathematics) when students are connecting their understanding to a procedure. 
  • Apply and Practice lessons provide opportunities for MP.2.1 (Reason abstractly and quantitatively) as well as provide opportunities for MP.6.1 (Attend to precision) as students apply procedures in practice.

Examples of the instructional materials attending to the full meaning of the MPs include:

  • MP.1.1: In Lesson 7.4, Build Understanding, Task 1, “What information in the problems help you know if you should add or subtract?”. Directions continue with, “How is this word problem different from the first problem on this same page?”.
  • MP.2.1: In Lesson 3.5, On my Own, Problem 7, “Reason: Complete the equation to find the unknown addend. 1 + 3 + ? = 5.”
  • MP.4.1: In Lesson 6.7, Step It Out, Task 2, “Lia has some animal books. She gives 9 books to Max. Now she has 7 books. How many books did Lia start with?”. Students are guided to create a visual model for the problem, write a model they can use to solve the problem, and use the models to organize their thinking.
  • MP.5.1: In Lesson 14.1, Build Understanding, Task 1, “Use tools to solve the problem. How can you use the place value chart to show your work? “There are ten children at the park. Then 26 more children come. How many children are at the park now?” Teachers are guided to ask, “What do you know about place value charts and how to use them?” What are some tools you could use with the place value chart to solve the problem? How will you use the place value chart and tools to add the numbers?”.
  • MP.6.1: In Lesson 12.5, Step It Out, Task 2 prompts teachers to “Guide students through the steps to solve an unknown addend.” “Eli has 6 paint jars. He gets some more paint jars. Now he has 46 paint jars. How many paint jars did Eli get?”
  • MP.7.1: In Lesson 16.1, Build Understanding, Turn and Talk, “How is a rectangle and a square the same? How are they different?”.
  • MP.8.1: In Lesson 2.2, Build Understanding, Task 2, “The kangaroo jumps down 3 steps. What step is the kangaroo on now?... A. How can you use the picture to show how to count back? B. How can you write an equation to solve the problem?"


Indicator 2g

Emphasis on Mathematical Reasoning: Materials support the Standards' emphasis on mathematical reasoning by:
0/0

Indicator 2g.i

Materials prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for prompting students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics. 

Students have opportunities to construct viable arguments through activities such as explaining their thinking or justifying steps, and the materials prompt them to analyze the arguments of others. Examples include:

  • In Lesson 6.6, Step It Out, the Turn and Talk prompts students with “What is another equation you could write to show the answer to this problem?”
  • In Lesson 8.3, Build Understanding, Problem 1C states, “Did more friends wear blue or red shirts? Circle your answer. How do you know?”
  • In Lesson 8.5, On My Own, Problem 3 states, “Reason. There are 12 children in art class. 5 children paint. The rest make clay pots. Andy made this bar graph to show the data. He made a mistake. Explain the mistake Andy made.”
  • In Lesson 14.3, Build Understanding, the Turn and Talk states, “How can you solve a subtraction problem? Explain the steps you used to subtract 90-40.”
  • In Lesson 16.2, On My Own, Problem 4, students “....construct arguments. Explain how to draw a triangle. Write your answer.”
  • In Lesson 17.2, Independent Practice, Problem 6, students “....construct arguments. How do you know that the shares are equal?” “Jake has a square patio. How can he use tape to make 2 equal shares?”
  • In Lesson 17.3, On My Own, Problem 7, students “....construct arguments. How do you know that you colored half of each shape?”.
  • In Lesson 18.1, On My Own, students “....construct arguments. Mercer thinks she circled the longest pencil. What is her mistake?”.


Indicator 2g.ii

Materials assist teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for assisting teachers in engaging students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics.

The materials provide teachers with Sample Guided Discussions, Turn and Talks, and Leveled Questions to assist teachers in engaging students in discourse. There is also some teacher guidance on how to lead discussions beyond the provided questions. Examples include: 

  • In Lesson 4.3, Learn Together, Turn and Talk states, “Have children share their Turn and Talk responses with a partner. Remind children to ask questions of each other that focus on understanding how to order the numbers used in an addition fact to write a related subtraction fact. Then, have them refine their answers.”
  • In Lesson 4.7, Step It Out, What to Watch For, the teacher asks students, “Is there only 1 possible answer to this problem? Explain.”
  • In Lesson 11.1, Spark, Build Shared Understanding Let’s Talk states, “Have a pair of students show each number. Have the class use the agree sign to determine which number is greater by comparing the number of tens and ones.” 
  • In Lesson 13.1, Spark, Build Shared Understanding Let’s Talk states, “After a child has walked through their logic about how they ordered the coins, have children use an agree sign to critique the reasoning of the child who shared.” 
  • In Lesson 17.2, More Practice/Homework Problems 1 and 2, the materials prompt teachers to ask students, “How do you know the shares are equal? and How do you know the shares are unequal?”.
  • In Lesson 18.1, Build Understanding, Task 1 prompts, “Before beginning the task, have children describe how to identify the longest and the shortest object of the three. Have partners share their work and discuss how their descriptions compare and contrast.” The Sample Guided Discussion includes, “How do you know which carrot is the longest? I look for the carrot that is longer than the other 2 carrots. What do you need to show?”.


Indicator 2g.iii

Materials explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for attending to the specialized language of mathematics. The materials provide explicit instruction on communicating mathematical thinking with words, diagrams, and symbols. The materials use precise, accurate terminology and definitions when describing mathematics and support students in using them. Examples are found throughout the materials.

The Planning and Pacing Guide has a section for Language Development that states Into Math Florida is built upon four design principles to promote the use and development of language:

  • Principal 1: Support Sense-Making;
  • Principal 2: Optimize Output to help students describe their mathematical reasoning and understanding;
  • Principal 3: Cultivate Conversations to facilitate mathematical conversations among students; and
  • Principal 4: Maximize Linguistic and Cognitive Meta-Awareness to help students evaluate their use of language and see how mathematical ideas, reasoning and language are connected.

Language Routines and new/review vocabulary are summarized on the Language Development page for each module, and this also includes Key Academic Vocabulary for Prior Learning - Review Vocabulary and Current Development - New Vocabulary with definitions. Also in Language Development, Linguistic Notes provide teachers help with possible misconceptions relating to academic language. For example:

  • In Module 5, the Linguistic Note states, “As children solve various problem types using addition or subtraction, they may lack the language to express what is unknown. Work with children to identify start, change, result, and difference unknown problem types.” Module 6 includes Review Vocabulary: related facts, addends, total, unknown, difference. 
  • Module 7 includes Key Academic Vocabulary: more, fewer, and how many.
  • In Module 12, the Linguistic Note states, “The language in a math textbook can be challenging for English Language Learners. Many mathematics terms have multiple meanings. Taking time to distinguish between the meanings of these terms will help avoid confusion when asking questions such as How many tens in 34?”.
  • In Module 18, the Linguistic Note states, “The topics for measurement and data are rich with opportunities for cooperative grouping and language development. Take time prior to a lesson to highlight key vocabulary. For example, make sure children understand the suffixes -er and -est as used to compare objects by length.”

The Guided Student Discussion often provides prompts related to understanding vocabulary, for example, Lesson 4.3, Sample Guided Discussion, Think It Through, “What makes a fact related to the fact that you used to solve the problem?”.

Student pages include vocabulary boxes defining content vocabulary. Vocabulary is highlighted and italicized within each lesson in the materials. The vocabulary review at the end of each Module requires students to match new vocabulary terms with their meaning and/or examples provided, fill-in-the-blank with definitions or examples, or create a graphic organizer to help make sense of terms. Some lessons include Vocabulary Review. Connect Math Ideas, Reasoning, and Language Compare and Connect encourage students to use vocabulary terms to discuss mathematics with correct terminology. For example:

  • In Lesson 2.2, Count Back is highlighted in yellow and a visual model of counting back with counters and an equation is represented. 
  • In Lesson 3.6, students draw pictures to define equal and unequal. 
  • In Lesson 8.3, Connect Math Ideas, Reasoning, and Language Compare and Connect states, “Remind children they are familiar with using symbols to represent numbers. Before beginning the task, show children samples of tally charts. Have partners share their work and discuss how each tally mark represents 1 unit of data.”
  • In Lesson 15.1, Build Understanding, Connect Math Ideas, Reasoning, and Language Compare and Connect states, “Remind children they can describe shapes using real-world knowledge. Before beginning the task, have children describe in their own words the shape of a cone, cylinder, and rectangular prism. Have partners share their work and discuss how their descriptions compare and contrast.”

Vocabulary cards can be used with vocabulary games. The eGlossary includes vocabulary terms and definitions translated into ten different languages. The Interactive Glossary provides the definition and a visual (diagrams, symbols, etc.) for each vocabulary word. The Interactive Glossary also provides space for students to make graphic organizers or drawings for each new vocabulary term. In the student materials, the instructions state, “As you learn about each new term, add notes, drawings, or sentences in the space next to the definition. Doing so will help you remember what each term means.”


Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

Criterion 3a - 3e

Use and design facilitate student learning: Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for being well-designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The instructional materials include an underlying design that distinguishes between problems and exercises, assignments that are not haphazard with exercises given in intentional sequences, variety in what students are asked to produce, and manipulatives that are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent.

Indicator 3a

The underlying design of the materials distinguishes between problems and exercises. In essence, the difference is that in solving problems, students learn new mathematics, whereas in working exercises, students apply what they have already learned to build mastery. Each problem or exercise has a purpose.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations that there is a clear distinction between problems and exercises in the materials.

Each Module presents lessons with a consistent structure. During the instructional sections, which include Build Conceptual Understanding and Connect Concepts and Skills, students have opportunities to learn new content through examples and problems for guided instruction, step-by step procedures, and problem solving.

At the end of the lesson, Apply and Practice provides a variety of exercises which allow students to independently show their understanding of the material. Exercises are designed for students to demonstrate understandings and skills in application and non-application settings. Test Prep and Spiral Review also include exercises. 

The materials distinguish between problems and exercises within each lesson. Lessons include Spark Your Learning or Step it Out, Turn and Talk, Build Understanding, Check Understanding, and On My Own sections. Spark Your Learning Problems activate prior knowledge and introduce new mathematics to students. Build Understanding includes problems that help students build conceptual understanding of the mathematics topic being taught.

Check Understanding and On My Own sections include exercises that ask students to use the newly learned mathematics in each lesson. Additional practice and Homework is available in separate student edition, providing more exercises for students to solve.

Indicator 3b

Design of assignments is not haphazard: exercises are given in intentional sequences.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations that the design of assignments is intentional and not haphazard.

Overall, lessons are intentionally sequenced and scaffolded so students develop their understanding of mathematical concepts and skills. The structure of a lesson provides students with the opportunity to activate prior learning, build procedural skills, and engage with multiple activities that utilize concrete and abstract representations and increase in complexity.

Exercises are given in intentional sequences. In general, lessons are designed to begin with activating prior knowledge and build toward conceptual development and procedural skill. In Spark Your Learning, students use manipulatives and/or visual models to experiment with the mathematics. Thus developing a concrete or representational understanding. This is followed by a Turn and Talk with a partner allowing students to process the connections they have found. Throughout the lessons, students are provided scaffolding with new content in Build Understanding and Step It Out, where the abstract concept is broken down into smaller steps with additional Turn and Talks, and students complete independent exercises to build understanding and mastery. Check Understanding provides a mid-lesson check in and can be used to indicate the need to differentiate learning for students. Students practice the abstract concept in On My Own.

Indicator 3c

There is variety in what students are asked to produce. For example, students are asked to produce answers and solutions, but also, in a grade-appropriate way, arguments and explanations, diagrams, mathematical models, etc.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for having a variety in what students are asked to produce.

In Spark Your Learning, Build Understanding, and Step It Out, students use visuals to show their thinking. In Turn and Talks, students frequently construct arguments and give explanations. There are opportunities for students to produce answers and solutions in On My Own, while also providing opportunities for students to provide written explanations. Throughout the materials, students represent mathematics using equations.

Indicator 3d

Manipulatives are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and when appropriate are connected to written methods.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for having manipulatives that are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

The materials identify the manipulatives needed at the beginning of the lesson. On the student pages there is a picture of the manipulative that they will use. Examples of manipulatives for Grade 1 include: base ten blocks, connecting cubes, pattern blocks, square dot paper, and counters. 

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or online) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The visual design of Into Math Florida Grade 1 is not distracting or chaotic. The printed and digital materials follow a consistent format. Teacher editions provide information for teachers to be able to access digital resources. There is room for students to record answers and show their thinking.

Features of the materials are consistently presented, and the use of colored fonts supports identification of lesson components. For example, Turn and Talks are highlighted in yellow, and Check for Understandings are always in red font. Visual images mirror the situation in the problem or can be used by students as they solve the problem.

Tasks within a lesson are numbered to match the module and lesson numbers. Student practice problem pages include enough space for students to write their answers and provide explanations.

Criterion 3f - 3l

Teacher Planning and Learning for Success with CCSS: Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for supporting teacher learning and understanding of the MAFS. The instructional materials include: quality questions to support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences, a teacher edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials, a teacher edition that partially contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons, and explanations of the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum.

Indicator 3f

Materials support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students' mathematical development.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for providing quality questions to help guide students’ mathematical development. 

Throughout the Teacher Edition, questions are posted to help support teachers with questions to guide students’ mathematical development. Activate Prior Knowledge, Spark Your Learning, Build Understanding, Learn Together, and Turn & Talk consistently provide questions to drive student discussion.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for containing ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials.

In the Module planning pages, there is a variety of information that can help teachers understand the materials in order to present the content. Each lesson identifies the relevant content standards and Mathematical Practices, an Essential Question, Learning Objective, Language Objective, materials needed, and Mathematical Progressions Across Grades that contain prior learning, current development, and future connections. Unpacking the Standards provides further explanations of the standards’ connections. This section gives an explanation of the content standard contained in the lesson and Professional Learning, which sometimes contains information about the practice standard contained in that lesson. Teaching for Depth provides teachers with information regarding the content and how this relates to student learning. There are additional suggestions about activating prior knowledge or identifying skills in Warm-up Options, activities to Sharpen Skills, Small-Group Options, and Math Centers for differentiation.

There are two prompts in each module related to Online Ed: “Assign the auto-scored Are You Ready for immediate access to data and grouping recommendations.” Also, “Assign the auto-scored Module Test for immediate access to data.” Within lessons, there are multiple prompts: Warm-Up Options and Step It Out both have an icon, “Printable & projectable.”; “More print and digital resources for differentiation are available in the Math Activities Center.”; and “Assign the auto-scored Check Understanding for immediate access to the data and recommendations for differentiation.”

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for containing adult-level explanations so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject. The materials include adult-level explanations of the grade-level content, but the materials do not include adult-level explanations of advanced mathematics concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

The materials include explanations and examples of the course-level mathematics specifically for teachers that can improve their own knowledge of the subject. In the Teacher Edition modules, there are examples and support for the adult in the math classroom as it relates to grade-level standards. For example:

  • The Mathematical Progressions table in each module and lesson highlights Prior Learning, Current Development and Future Connections.
  • Professional Learning describes Visualizing the Math present in each lesson.
  • Planning and Pacing includes a correlation chart for the math practices that defines each math practice in full.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that explains the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade twelve.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for explaining the role of the grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum.

Each module in the Teacher Edition includes Mathematical Progressions Across the Grades which lists prior learning, current development, and future connections. Similarly, the beginning of each lesson in the Teacher Edition includes Mathematical Progressions that show connections to prior and future grades’ standards, as well as other lessons within the program.

In the Planning and Pacing Guide, Progressions and Algebra Readiness notes, “Algebra as a course of study today is integrated around four progressions of elementary and middle school content leading to the Algebra course: Number and Operations, Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Statistics and Probability, and Functions” and includes a table that shows how the domains in Grades K-5, 6-7, and Grade 8 / Algebra fit into these progressions.

Indicator 3j

Materials provide a list of lessons in the teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials), cross-referencing the standards covered and providing an estimated instructional time for each lesson, chapter and unit (i.e., pacing guide).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1  provide a list of lessons in the Teacher's Edition, cross-referencing the standards addressed, and a pacing guide. 

Each course in this series includes a Planning and Pacing Guide including the standards and pacing (number of days) for each lesson. There is another standards chart in the Planning and Pacing Guide that lists each standard and correlation to Student Edition Lessons. In the Teacher Edition, pacing is provided in the module planning pages, and the standards contained in each lesson are identified with written descriptions as well as listed under Current Development in the Mathematical Progressions chart.

Indicator 3k

Materials contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 include strategies for parents to support their students progress. The Family Resources tab includes several resources for parents:

  • “Family letters inform families about the skills, strategies, and topics students are encountering at school.” Each module includes a letter, found online in four languages, providing vocabulary, a home activity, and discussion prompts. This letter is available in English, Spanish, Haitian-Creole, and Portuguese.
  • Math on the Spot videos are available for specific lessons within a module.

Indicator 3l

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 explain instructional approaches used and how they are research-based.

The Planning and Pacing Guide contains Teacher Support Pages including a section on Supporting Best Practices. “Into Math Florida was designed around research-based, effective teaching practices such as those described in Principles to Actions (NCTM 2014).” These include:

  • Establish mathematics goals to focus learning.
  • Implement tasks that promote reasoning and problem solving.
  • Use and connect mathematical representations.
  • Facilitate meaningful mathematical discourse.
  • Pose purposeful questions.
  • Build procedural fluency from conceptual understanding.
  • Support productive struggle in learning mathematics.
  • Elicit and use evidence of student thinking.

The Planning and Pacing Guide describes four design principles from the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (SCALE) that “promote the use and development of language as an integral part of instruction”. These principles are: Support sense-making; Optimize output; Cultivate conversation; and Maximize linguistic and cognitive meta-awareness. To address this, the instructional materials include language routines that “help teachers embrace these principles during instruction.” Each module contains a Language Development page in the Teacher Edition stating where the language routines should be used. On the lesson pages of the Teacher Edition, there are Support-Sense Making boxes describing how the language routine can be used. Also, notes are located in the margin of the Teacher’s Edition providing connections from the strategy to the principle.

Criterion 3m - 3q

Assessment: Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 partially meet expectations for offering teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the MAFS. The instructional materials provide strategies for gathering information about students’ prior knowledge, strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions, and assessments that clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies for gathering information about students' prior knowledge within and across grade levels.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for providing strategies for gathering information about students’ prior knowledge within and across grade levels.

  • At the beginning of the year, students’ prior knowledge is gathered through a Prerequisite Skills Inventory. “This short-answer test assesses core precursor skills that are most associated with on-grade success.” (Assessment Guide)
  • Each module begins with Are You Ready, a diagnostic assessment of prior learning related to the current grade-level standards. Intervention materials are provided to assist students not able to demonstrate the necessary skills. Commentary for each standard explains how the prior learning is relevant to the current module’s content. 
  • Prior learning is identified in the Mathematical Progressions section at the beginning of each module and lesson of the Teacher Edition.

Indicator 3n

Materials provide strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for providing strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.

  • The module overview in the Teacher Edition contains Common Errors as students engage in an introductory task and provides questioning strategies intended to build student understanding.
  • The Spark Your Learning planning page for each lesson in the Teacher Edition includes Common Errors related to the content of the lesson that identifies where students may make a mistake or exhibit misunderstanding. There is a rationale that explains the likely misunderstanding and suggests instructional adjustments or steps to help address the misconceptions. 
  • There are also Watch Fors boxes and question prompts that highlight areas of potential student misconceptions.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for providing opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.

The materials provide support for ongoing review and practice.

  • Within each lesson there are activities to Activate Prior Knowledge. The Problem of the Day is a review problem from prior units/lessons. Make Connections provides teacher support on next steps based on the students’ responses.
  • Sharpen Skills provides ongoing fluency practice.
  • Test Prep questions “provided are intended to assess the child’s ability to extend understanding…”
  • The Spiral Review can “help determine if children have retained information taught in the past.”

There is no specific guidance provided to teachers on how to interpret and give feedback to students for the Sharpen Skills, Test Prep, and Spiral Review.

Indicator 3p

Materials offer ongoing formative and summative assessments:
0/0

Indicator 3p.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized. 

The Lesson Focus and Coherence page indicates the CCSSM that will be addressed within the Lesson. Throughout the lesson, there are formative assessments in Check for Understanding, On My Own, and More Practice/Homework. Each lesson has a diagnostic assessment, Are You Ready, correlated to standards.

Each Module has an End of Module Test, and the standards associated with each problem on this test can be found on the Individual Record Form within the Assessment Guide Book. In addition, Assessment Preparation includes Standards-Based Practice for most lessons.

Each Unit has a summative Performance Task that includes the standards in the teacher pages of the Assessment Guide, although the individual questions do not indicate which standards are being assessed.

Indicator 3p.ii

Assessments include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that assessments include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

Each lesson has a diagnostic assessment, Are You Ready, and the materials state that when using Online Ed, teachers can assign the Are You Ready digitally “for immediate access to data and grouping recommendations.”

"Check Understanding is a quick formative assessment in every lesson used to determine which students need additional support and which students can continue on to independent practice or challenges.” (Planning and Pacing Guide) Check Understanding presents a limited number of questions, usually 1-3, which includes a digital option that can be “auto-scored online for immediate access to data and recommendations for differentiation.” 

Each performance task includes a task-specific rubric indicating a level 0 response through a level 3 response. The structure of the rubrics is the same, but specific words are changed to reflect the mathematical content of the module. Level 3 indicates that the student made sense of the task, has complete and correct answers, and checked their work or provided full explanations. Level 2 indicates that the student made sense of the problem, made minor errors in computation or didn’t fully explain answers. Level 1 indicates that the students made sense of some components of the task but had significant errors in the process. Level 0 shows little evidence that the student has made sense of the task or addressed any expected components and has an inability to complete the processes. The Performance Task Rubrics for the Unit Performance Tasks do not suggest Reteach Lessons or provide other guidance that teachers can use for follow-up with students.

The Individual Record Forms in the Assessment Guide suggest Reteach Lessons that teachers can use for follow-up based on the Module assessments, but there are no other suggestions for follow-up with students or guidance to teachers.

The Individual Record Forms for the Prerequisite Skills Inventory, Beginning-of-Year, Middle-of-Year Test, and End-of-Year Tests do not suggest Reteach Lessons or provide other guidance that teachers can use for follow-up with students.

Indicator 3q

Materials encourage students to monitor their own progress.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 include Scales to Track Learning Goals at the end of each lesson. The Teacher Edition introduction states, “The scales below can help you and your students understand their progress on a learning goal. Scales are also available in Module Resources.” 

Each lesson contains “I can” scales with four levels of “I Can” statements written in increased difficulty. While there is a note saying, “The scales below can help you and your students understand their progress on a learning goal” there is no explicit indication of how to use these scales. 

At the end of On My Own, there is Learning Mindset where students write a response to reflect on the lesson.

Criterion 3r - 3y

Differentiated instruction: Materials support teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades.
12/12
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet expectations for supporting teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades. The instructional materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners and strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners. The materials embed tasks with multiple entry points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations, and they provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth. The instructional materials also suggest support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations and provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for providing strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.

  • At the beginning of each module, Teaching for Depth provides information on strategies to use when teaching the concept, including Represent and Explain, which focuses on ways for students to describe and picture a concept, or Make Connections, which helps students understand a new idea by connecting it to previous knowledge.
  • At the beginning of each module, Mathematical Progression Across the Grades makes connections to both prior and future skills and standards to scaffold instruction.
  • At the beginning of each module, Diagnostic Assessment, Are You Ready?, allow teachers to “diagnose prerequisite mastery, identify intervention needs, and modify or set up leveled groups.”
  • Each lesson provides Warm-up Options to activate prior knowledge such as: Problem of the Day, Quick Check for Homework, and Make Connections.
  • Throughout the lessons, there are notes, strategies, sample guided discussion questions, and possible misconceptions that provide teachers structure in making content accessible to all learners.
  • Student practice starts with up to four Check Understanding exercises to complete with guidance before moving to independent work in On My Own.

Indicator 3s

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.

  • There are Reteach and Challenge activities for each lesson.
  • Each module includes Plan for Differentiated Instruction that provides teachers with teacher-guided, Small-Group Options and self-directed Math Center Options based on student need: “On Track/Mixed Ability, Almost There (RtI), and Ready for More.”
  • Each lesson provides Leveled Questions in the Teacher’s Edition identified as DOK 1, 2, and 3 with an explanation of the knowledge those questions uncover about student understanding.
  • In the Teacher’s Guide, Spark Your Learning provides On Track, Almost There, and Common Error to support a range of learners. Each section describes student actions and has teachers either describe and practice or reminds them of important strategies to support learning and how to intervene.

There are three “Language Routines to Develop Understanding” used throughout the materials: 1) “Three Reads: Students read a problem three times with a specific focus each time.” 2) “Stronger and Clearer Each Time: Students write their reasoning to a problem, share, explain their reasoning, listen to and respond to feedback, and then write again to refine their reasoning.” Also, 3) “Compare and Connect: Students listen to a partner’s solution strategy and then identify, compare, and contrast this mathematical strategy.”

Indicator 3t

Materials embed tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for embedding tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.

STEM Tasks are provided at the beginning of every instructional unit and include cross-curricular tasks which allows multiple entry-points and various solution strategies or representations, for example:

  • In Unit 5, STEM Task: “You have worked with two and three dimensional shapes. Use what you know to identify, describe, compose, and partition shapes. Draw or use shapes to create an interesting and colorful logo design.”

Turn and Talks throughout each lesson provide opportunities for students to share a variety of ways to solve the problem, for example:

  • In Lesson 17.3, Turn and Talk: “How do you know the shares are equal? Encourage children to find different ways to make 2 equal shares, and then explain how they know the 2 shares are equal.”

In the Planning and Pacing Guide, Spark Your Learning tasks are “designed as ‘low-floor/high ceiling’ tasks that all students can access but that can also be extended to provide challenge.” Teachers are provided guidance on how to assist various levels of learners, depending on how they respond to the problem.

Indicator 3u

Materials suggest support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics (e.g., modifying vocabulary words within word problems).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for suggesting support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics.

In addition to the strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners described in Indicator 3s, there is further support in place for English Language Learners (ELLs) and other special populations.

There is Language Development to support English Learners in each module which includes linguistic notes that provide strategies intended to help students struggling with key academic vocabulary such as: “Speak with students about words that can have multiple meanings….”, and “Visual cues help students…”. Language Development also includes information about the Language Routines embedded in the instructional materials: Three Reads; Stronger and Clearer Each Time; Compare and Contrast; Critique, Correct, and Clarify. These are identified by a pink box throughout lessons with speech bubble that identifies the Language Routine to be used. In addition, there are supports for special populations including:

  • Language Objectives are included in every lesson.
  • Reteach and RtI worksheets can be assigned online or printed.
  • Turn and Talk prompts designed to support students, for example, “go back and reread the problem and break it into pieces. For example: What do you know? What do you need to find?”.
  • A multi-lingual glossary is available online.

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for providing opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.

In addition to the strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners described in Indicator 3s, there is further support in place for advanced students:

  • Optional lessons are provided online that teachers may choose to utilize with advanced students. 
  • Each lesson has a corresponding Challenge page, provided in print or online, addressing the same concepts and standards where students further extend their understanding and often use more complex values in their calculations. 
  • On the module opener page, Extend the Task in the margin of the Teacher’s Edition provides ideas for extending the task.

Indicator 3w

Materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 meet the expectations for providing a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.

Pictures of adults and children in the materials show a variety of demographics and personal characteristics. There are a variety of names used in word problems throughout the materials. The lessons contain a variety of tasks and situations in the story problems that interest students of various demographic and personal characteristics. There is a balanced approach to the use of gender identification. Examples include:

  • The materials reference roles instead of pronouns (e.g., the players, book fair, sailboats, collection of toy cars, piggy banks, carton of eggs).
  • The materials include a set number of names used throughout the problems and examples (e.g., Janette, Anton, Zed, Ari, Tai, Nick, Sam). These names are presented repeatedly and in a way that does not stereotype characters by gender, race, or ethnicity.

Indicator 3x

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

In the Planning and Pacing Guide there is a section titled, “Grouping and Recommendations. This section states, “One of the most valuable and time-saving tools for teachers is the Recommend Groups tool online. It synthesizes data from assessments and places students into leveled groups, which teacher can modify as needed. Recommended lesson-level resources for each group surfaced in the tool and can quickly be assigned to each group.” 

  • Each lesson provides teachers with a differentiated plan that includes small-group options. 
  • The materials provide students with self-directed activities at math centers.
  • Throughout the materials, there are ample opportunities for students to Turn and Talk with a partner. 
  • Using the Check for Understanding, the teacher is directed to pull students into small groups and use the Teacher Tabletop Flipchart.

Indicator 3y

Materials encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.

The student Interactive Glossary is available in both English and Spanish, and School-Home Letters are available in English, Spanish, Haitian-Creole, and Portuguese. Examples of home language connections and connections to assist in embracing the culture of students are present to assist in facilitating student learning.

Criterion 3aa - 3z

Effective technology use: Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Into Math Florida Grade 1: integrate some technology in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices; are web-­based and compatible with multiple internet browsers; include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology; are intended to be easily customized for individual learners; and do not include technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other.

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.). In addition, materials are "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform) and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 are web-based and compatible with multiple Internet browsers.

  • The materials are platform-neutral and compatible with Chrome, ChromeOS, Safari, and Mozilla Firefox.
  • Materials are compatible with iPads, laptops, Chromebooks, and other devices that connect to the internet with an applicable browser. Online use was difficult on a Chromebook with scrolling and loading issues as well as difficulty seeing all pieces of the interactive editions.
  • The materials are not compatible with an Android device (using Chrome browser). Although the website can be reached, it is not possible to zoom in or out, nor can one move the screen, so a student cannot access the entire screen.

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology through a website called Online ED, which parallels the print textbook. Only one module per grade is currently available in the digital format, so some of the evidence is stated in the materials but has not actually been observed.

  • Lesson problems from the Student Edition, assessments, and unit performance tasks are provided to be completed and scored using technology, providing students with feedback on whether the answers are correct or incorrect.
  • Online Ed is designed to make recommendations for differentiation after auto-scoring of Check Understanding problems within each lesson. 
  • Growth monitoring assessments are “designed to be administered in 40 minutes, 3 times per year. The system utilizes a secure bank of assessments to adapt to each student’s ability and maps progress on the Quantile Framework.” (Pacing Guide)
  • Dynamic Reporting allows teachers to drill down into data for deeper insights into student performance. Assignment reports show detailed results for each assignment. Standard reports show progress towards mastery of each standard. Interim growth measure reports help identify intervention needs and link to recommendations and groupings. 
  • Assessments can be created using a question bank that repeats the questions presented throughout the interactive lessons. However, teachers cannot modify questions nor add new questions.
  • The online system has dynamic reporting by assignment or standards. If teachers are using the online system, they can view student progress for interim growth, module readiness, and lesson practice and homework.

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. i. Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. ii. Materials can be easily customized for local use. For example, materials may provide a range of lessons to draw from on a topic.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 are intended to include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students. Full functionality of online materials is not accessible at the time of this review.

  • Teachers can assign lesson problems and assessments, as well as view assessment analytics. 
  • Teachers can group students according to individual needs. The online component has Recommended Groups that “synthesizes data from assessments and places students into leveled groups.” (Pacing Guide) Recommended lesson resources can be assigned to each group.
  • Teachers can create assessments using a bank of items.

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 provide minimal opportunities to be adapted for local use. Full functionality of online materials is not accessible at the time of this review.

  • Pieces of a lesson can be assigned directly to students or groups of students. 
  • There is a question bank for teachers to create assessments. The bank repeats the questions that are already included in each lesson, and these questions cannot be modified.

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 do not incorporate technology that provides opportunities for multiple students to collaborate with the teacher or one another.

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Into Math Florida Grade 1 include interactive lessons that can be found in online practice on the digital platform. The interactive lessons include drag and drop options, multiple choice questions, and click-on-the-correct item questions. Students are able to submit their completed assignment for teacher feedback via the digital platform.

Interactive Lessons are provided online for each lesson. Audio is provided to read each page. Students can draw pictures. (Note: Students using a computer must use the mouse to draw.) For example, in Lesson 1.5, Build Understanding, Interactive Lessons, students draw or add shapes to solve the word problem. The problem can be read aloud to them. Some interactive taks provide in-time feedback to students as they answer questions telling them “That strategy you used worked! Great effort!”, if given a correct answer

No virtual manipulatives were found in the online lessons. Some lessons do include the draw or add a shape interactive tools.

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Report Published Date: 2019/02/04

Report Edition: 2020

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

Math K-8 Review Tool

The mathematics review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complements the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations