Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the expectations of alignment. Rigorous, engaging texts are high quality and are organized to be the central focus of lessons while supporting students’ knowledge building. The materials support student growth in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and developing language skills over the course of the school year, with attention to close reading and analysis of texts, topics, and themes. The materials also meet the expectations for instructional supports and usability, with guidance for differentiation and program design for implementation.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
28
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
32
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
33
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the expectations for high-quality texts are the central focus of lessons, are at the appropriate grade-level text complexity, and are accompanied by quality tasks aligned to the standards of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language in service to grow literacy skills. Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention, are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade, although there are missed opportunities to address instructional goals in below level and stretch texts. Materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading and provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
12/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criterion for texts are worthy of students’ time and attention, are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading.  Anchor texts are of publishable quality, worthy of careful reading, and consider a range of student interests, and the materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. While text sets represent a broad range of complexities, from well below the band and into the stretch level, there is a variance in the opportunities to address instructional goals in texts that fall below grade level in comparison to stretch texts. Although the materials represent a variety of modes, genres, and complexities to support students’ literacy skill development, there is no staircase of complexity.  Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level and students have the opportunity to read a diverse range of texts and genres throughout the school year.

Indicator 1a

Anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
Texts range in a variety of topics to engage students.

Examples of texts in the materials include (but are not limited to):

  • “Chivalry” by Neil Gaiman. This selection is a short story by Neil Gaiman about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, in particular Sir Galahad, and places them in modern-day London.
  • A selection from Inferno: A Doctor’s Ebola Story by Steven Hatch, MD. This excerpt from a memoir contains vocabulary, voice, images, and cultural details, making this narrative rich and engaging, as well as informative. 
  • From “The Rape of the Lock” by Alexander Pope. Pope’s satire is a mock-heroic poem that makes much of a small incident. It is worthy of study for its contribution to the genre and its historic context. 
  • "A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift. This satire suggests impoverished Irish families might sell their children as food for the rich, drawing attention to the British treatment of the Irish and of heartless treatment of the poor.
  • Great Expectations by Dickens. This novel deals with the idea of family, devotion, and relationships. It has a strong plot that deals with the concepts of loss, love, and expectations, all while understanding the ideas of ambition and loyalty. This novel is considered a “classic” example of Dickens as a mature writer of the narrative technique using different perspectives in time.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
*Indicator 1b is non-scored (in grades 9-12) and provides information about text types and genres in the program.
0/0
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

The Grade 12 materials include a distribution of text types and genres that are appropriate.

The following are examples of literature found within the instructional materials:

  • Unit 1--“Chivalry” by Neil Gaiman
  • Unit 2--“A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” by John Donne
  • Unit 3--Excerpt from The Rape of the Lock by Alexander Pope
  • Unit 4--From Frankenstein by Mary Shelley 
  • Unit 5--“Dover Beach” by Matthew Arnold
  • Unit 6--“A Cup of Tea” by Katherine Mansfield

The following are examples of literature found within the instructional materials:

  • Unit 1--“Beowulf is Back!” by James Parker
  • Unit 2--“Hamlet’s Dull Revenge” by René Girard
  • Unit 3--Excerpt from A Vindication of the Rights of Woman by Mary  Wollstonecraft
  • Unit 4--“Frankenstein: Giving Voice to the Monster” by Langdon Winner
  • Unit 5--“The Great Exhibition” by Lara Kriegel
  • Unit 6--“Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level (according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis).
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis.  

The entire text set for the unit, including those in the independent reading section, represent a broad range of complexities from well below the band to reach into the stretch level. All texts address the topic and essential question, but some of the texts that fall below grade level provide only superficial opportunities to address the instructional goals while the stretch texts are well supported with appropriate strategies for whole class and small group study; specifically, the mentor texts are well below the lexile grade band, and texts that students must model should be on lexile or above lexile. In each unit, independent reading selections are often more complex, even far more complex, than instructional texts.

Examples of texts that partially meet expectations of rigor include: 

  • In Unit 1, students read “Chivalry” by Neil Gaiman, 810L This text is the Mentor Text, and the quantitative measure falls well below the grade band; by the end of the unit, students will compose a short story of their own. The text is primarily explicit and told in a chronological format. Although historical, the situations and context should be largely familiar to first semester grade 12 students. Students could read and understand the passage independently, and within the Teacher's Edition, it is noted that students should read the text independently or within a small group: “Have students work in small groups and pairs to read and discuss the selection.” However, the fact that this text is the Mentor Text, in consideration with the quantitative measures, does not make this text appropriate for the grade. 
  • In Unit 2, students read an excerpt from “Speech Before the Spanish Armada Invasion” by Queen Elizabeth I, 1310L. While this text is within the “stretch” lexile band for Grade 12, the excerpt is extremely small, and this text is used for the “Collaborate & Compare” section where “This analysis will help [students] compare this speech with the article ‘For Army Infantry’s First Women, Heavy Packs and the Weight of History.’”
  • In Unit 6, students read a passage from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, 890L. The quantitative measure falls well below the grade band. The text is primarily explicit and told in a chronological format. Although historical, the situations and context should be largely familiar to second semester grade 12 students. Instruction focuses on understanding first person narrative and setting. Students could read and understand the passage independently.

Examples of texts at the appropriate level of rigor include:

  • In Unit 3, students read “A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift, 1590L. This text fits into the “stretch” category of the grade level band and is considered an essential text to understanding satirical writing. Students will be appropriately challenged by the writing style and language while being supported with appropriate scaffolding and accompanying supports and activities. 
  • In Unit 4, students read “Frankenstein: Giving Voice to the Monster” by Langdon Winner, 1350L. This is the mentor text for the unit and falls into the “stretch” level of the grade level band. It is very appropriately supported with collaborative discussion questions, vocabulary mini-lessons on Latin Roots and it is preceded by a selection of the Frankenstein novel which it derives its inspiration from.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

The Grade 12 materials represent a variety of modes, genres, and complexities to support students’ literacy skill development, but do not provide a staircase of complexity. Instead, each of the six units includes a broad variety of texts supported by consistent and regular instruction and practice. Each unit encourages students to apply strategies from Notice & Note, a system of recognizing text elements for which students have experienced instruction in grades 6-10 of the series. These elements are presented as six “signposts” that can help students better comprehend a text. Students apply the strategies to most texts read as a whole class and are expected to recognize these same signposts when reading independently. However, attention to increasingly difficult and rigorous texts is not consistently supported. 

Each unit includes a text set read and discussed as a whole class, a text set read and discussed in small groups, a text set for independent reading from which students can select texts, and an optional novel. Each unit is organized around four essential questions and all texts are related to the topics necessary to respond to the essential questions. 

Overall, the six units do not present a continuous progression of text complexities, but each unit does represent development of grade level literacy skills with texts that represent a variety of complexities, from below to above the recommended grade band. Within each text set, students develop literacy skills to engage with a broad variety of media and texts.

In the beginning of the year, in Unit 1 the students are reading the short story “Chivalry” by Neil Gaiman which is also the mentor text for the unit. It is well below grade level however, which seems to be at odds with where students should be in as readers by the twelfth grade. In addition to that text, students also read from the Beowulf Poet, The Canterbury Tales, and from Le Morte d’ Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory. All three texts are very well-connected to the era in British literature students should be reading about and are appropriate for the grade level complexity band.  Also, students are asked to compare two texts: letters and poems. The letters are from The Paston Letters by the Paston Family and from “My Syrian Diary” by Marah. Although “My Syrian Diary” is a below grade level text, it is a good choice given the subject matter and writing style that students should be looking at. Finally. Students are asked to compare two poems “The Wanderer” by Anonymous and “Loneliness” by Fanny Howe, both of which are appropriate for students’ learning at this point. The independent reading text selections include additional Beowulf texts, as well as an article about Beowulf, a ballad and an article titled “Journeymen Keep the Medieval Past Alive” by Melissa Eddy. All of these texts are on or above grade level.

In the middle of the year, approximately Unit 3,  students are reading several texts about the Restoration and the 18th century. First, they are asked to read from The Rape of the Lock” by Alexander Pope, “A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift, and “Satire is Dying Because the Internet is Killing it” by Arwa Mahdawi. All three of these texts are at or above grade level and offer an appropriate challenge to students’ learning at this point. In addition, students are asked to read from “The Journal and Letters of Fanny Burney: An Encounter with King George III” by Fanny Burney along with a comparison between “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” by Mary Wollstonecraft and “Education Protects Women From Abuse” by Olga Khazan. The last two texts of the unit include another comparison, a novel excerpt from A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe and the mentor text from Inferno: A Doctor’s Ebola Story. All of these texts are also at or above grade level and appropriate for the unit’s essential question and historical period. Finally, the independent reading selections include two poems and two articles. One article, “Once below Gas Station, Virginia Cemetery Restored” by Wyatt Andrews is below grade level but it is an option for inclusion. All the rest of the texts are at or above grade level.

Throughout Unit 6, each text selection offers the following sections: “Get Ready,” “Check Your Understanding,” and “Respond.” Within these sections, there are tasks such as but not limited to “Analyze the Text,” “Research,” “Create and Discuss,” and “Respond to the Essential Question.” And, the independent reading selections, some of which are the poem “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” by Dylan Thomas and a short story “Marriage Is a Private Affair,” by Chinua Achebe, are within the same lexile range of “not available” (poetry) to 970L.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet do not meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The publisher provides the quantitative measure of each print text except poems as a Lexile measure. The Lexile Text Measure is listed in the teacher's edition as part of the instructional overview that prefaces each unit. The publisher explicitly describes the qualitative measures of the text in the “plan” section before each text. Reader and task considerations for each text are explicitly described and include English learner support and suggestions for differentiation when students struggle. These supports are directly related to the content of the text, the qualitative elements.  Each text set is crafted to address an essential question, includes a mentor text for the end of unit writing task, and provides students an opportunity to engage in close reading and analysis of content building toward the final performance task. These elements of the Teacher's Edition illustrate attention to reader and task. 

Examples demonstrating this information:

In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 1: Origin of a Nation

  • The text set for the unit includes different forms of poetry (for which there is no quantitative analysis), a romance, a short story, diary entries, and a collection of letters.  Lexile text measures range from 810L to 1130L. 
  • The mentor text for the unit is the short story “Chivalry” by Neil Gaiman. The Lexile text measure is 810L (far below the grade band expectation).
    • "Ideas presented: much is explicit, but requires some inferential reasoning. Use of irony."  
    • "Structures used:  clear, chronological, largely conventional."
    • "Language used: mostly explicit, some figurative language, dialect, and archaic language."
    • "Knowledge required: situations and subjects mostly familiar. Some historical and literary reference, mostly explained in text." 
    • "English learner support includes practice appositives, use content, retell. "
    • "Support for differentiation includes contrast realistic and fantastical elements; compare."

In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4: Emotion and Experimentation

  • The text set for this unit includes many poems, a novel excerpt from Frankenstein with a Lexile text measure of 890L, and an essay with a Lexile measure of 1350L. 
  • The mentor text for the unit is “Frankenstein: Giving Voice to the Monster” by Langdon Winner. The qualitative measures include
    • "Ideas presented:  multiple levels of complex meaning."
    • "Structures used:  complex but mostly explicit. Exhibits traits of persuasive argument."
    • "Language used: increased academic and domain-specific words."
    • "Knowledge required: cultural and literary knowledge essential to understanding."
    • "English learner support includes use cognates, acquire new vocabulary, compare quotes, language conventions."
    • Support for differentiation includes identify parallel structure; reteaching: monitor comprehension.

Indicator 1f

Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet  the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

The materials reviewed for Grade 12 include mentor and supporting texts that allow for students to engage in a range and volume of texts in order to achieve grade level reading. There are six units that revolve around an essential question for students and provide multiple texts.

Throughout the year, students are exposed to a wide variety of texts in both print and multimedia formats which are identified in the table of contents for each unit. Each unit begins with an Analyze and Apply section that uses one text as a “Notice and Note reading model” along with another text which serves as a mentor text followed by other supporting texts. The next group of texts, Collaborate and Compare, provide a comparative analysis of two different selections, both of which connect to the essential question/topic but which may be different in “genre, craft, or focus”. In addition, there are independent reading selections which can be accessed with the digital edition. Finally, there are suggested texts provided which can give educators even more options for text selection.

  • In Teacher's Edition, Unit 2: A Celebration of Human Achievement, the following texts are provided: 
  • Mentor Text: “Hamlet’s Dull Revenge” by Rene Girard (literary criticism)
  • Supporting texts: 
    • The Tragedy of Hamlet by William Shakespeare (drama) 
    • From Hamlet by BBC Shakespeare (film clip) 
    • “Sonnet 30” by Edmund Spenser (poem)
    • “Sonnet 75” by Edmund Spenser (poem) 
    • “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” by John Donne (poem) 
  • Collaborate and Compare texts: 
    • “To His Coy Mistress” by Andrew Marvell (poem) 
    • “Twenty-One Love Poems (Poem III)” by Adrienne Rich (Poem)
    • from “Speech Before the Spanish Armada Invasion” by Queen Elizabeth I (speech) 
    • “For Army Infantry’s First Women, Heavy Packs and the Weight of History” by Dave Phillipps (article)
  • Independent Reading Texts: 
    • “Sonnet 18” by William Shakespeare (poem) 
    • “Sonnet 29” by William Shakespeare (poem) 
    • “Sonnet 130” by William Shakespeare (poem) 
    • “Elizabeth I: The Reality Behind the Mask” by Brenda Ralph Lewis (article)
    • “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” by Christopher Marlowe (poem) 
    • “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd” by Sir Walter Raleigh (poem) 
  • Suggested Drama Connection: Othello by William Shakespeare 

In Teacher's Edition, Unit 5: An Era of Rapid Change the following texts are provided: 

  • Mentor Text: “The Victorians Had the Same Concerns About Technology As We Do” by Melissa Dickson (essay)
  • Supporting Texts 
    • from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (novel) 
    • Factory Reform by Timelines.tv (documentary)
    • “The Lady of Shalott” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson (narrative poem) 
    • from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  •  Collaborate and Compare texts: 
    • “Dover Beach” by Matthew Arnold (poem)
    • “The Darkling Thrush by Thomas Hardy (poem) 
    • “My Last Duchess” by Robert Browning (poem)
    • “Confession” by Linh Dinh (poem) 
  • Independent Reading Texts: 
    • “Sonnet 43” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning (poem) 
    • “Remembrance” by Emily Bronte (poem)
    • “The Great Exhibition” by Lara Kriegel (article)
    • “Christmas Storms and Sunshine” by Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell (short story)
    • “Evidence of Progress” by Thomas Babington Macaulay (essay)
  • Suggested Drama Connection: A Doll’s House by Henrick Ibsen

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criterion for materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly, while sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills. The materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax, while also supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports. The materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. The materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards and include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level. The materials also include explicit instruction of the grade-level grammar and conventions standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.  

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). 

The instructional materials include questions and tasks that require careful reading over the course of a school year. The majority of questions are text dependent and require students read closely for content and author’s craft, such as word choice. Students are required to reinforce their responses and answers to questions using evidence from specific texts that students are required to read. Questions are structured to support students learning to recognize signposts from Notice & Note strategies such as the significance of contrasts and contradictions. Each unit includes a mentor text with annotation and reflection tasks focused on the primary learning goal of the unit writing task.  Within each of the six units, students experience recurring sections, such as Analyze & Apply and Collaborate & Compare; these sections reinforce concepts, theories, ideas, and critical thinking directly related to each text read. Also, throughout each text, students experience a sidebar on the page that support student annotations to assist in going back to the text for future tasks that require students to re-engage with said text.

Examples of how the materials support text dependent questions include, but are not limited to:

  • In Volume 2, Unit 6, students read George Osborne’s speech, “Budget 2016: George Osborne’s Speech,” and they also read the editorial by Chris Hall, “Will the Sugar Tax Stop Childhood Obesity?” At the close of both texts, students complete the Analyze the Text section located within the Collaborate & Compare section, and they must discuss the texts using group discussion questions. For example:
    • "1. Analyze: Which elements of the arguments offered by each author are most in conflict? How might the conflict affect readers?"
    • "4. Evaluate: Which author’s argument do you find more effective and why?"

Examples of tasks that support students in engaging with the text directly, drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text include:

In Student Edition, Volume One, Unit 4:

  • Students are asked to adapt their argument for a debate.
    • "After reading a choice of a text, students are asked to collaborate and share with a partner what they have learned in independent reading."
    • "Students are asked to focus on writing an argument similar to those found within the unit."
    • "Background reading - relate back to the response log and texts within the unit."

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/ text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials containing sets of sequences of text-dependent/text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding.

Each unit is organized around an essential question and a mentor text to guide students’ thinking around a topic. Close reading of the mentor text focuses on topic development and writer’s craft. Within each individual lesson, after every reading assignment, students are presented with various sections to complete to represent their understanding of the text and how their understandings and empathizing connects to the outside, “real” world; these tasks that build up to the cumulative tasks at the end of the unit consist of, but are not limited to, the following: Analyze the Text, Create and Discuss, Analyze Podcasts, Research, Create and Present, and Collaborate & Compare. The lessons include sequences of text-dependent questions that guide their understanding of the selections in the unit and build to the culminating writing task. Lessons leading up to culminating tasks require the demonstration of various skills, including reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

  • In Student Edition, Unit 2, students are asked to write a literary analysis that will focus on the theme of revenge that is found in Hamlet by William Shakespeare. Specifically, students are asked to “write a literary analysis of a scene in Hamlet that shows the hero struggling to overcome an internal or external conflict.”

There are several tasks and questions throughout the unit that support this culminating writing task: 

  • After students have read Act II of Hamlet, they are asked to discuss the following prompt with a small group. The prompt asks, “ Hamlet is not quick to act; instead he takes time to think through each decision he makes before moving forward. Why is Hamlet so cautious?” Furthermore, they ask students to 
    • gather evidence from the text about Hamlet’s pretending to be mad and his plan to test Claudius’s guilt.
    • discuss why Hamlet takes these measures. Consider what might happen if he immediately tried to take revenge.
  • After students have read Act III of Hamlet, they are asked analysis questions. One of the questions asks, “Soon after Hamlet decides against killing Claudius while he is praying, he mistakes Polonius for the King and kills him without hesitation. What does this combination of events suggest about revenge?” 
  • After students have read Act IV of Hamlet, they are asked questions revolving around the topic of revenge. For example: 
    • Which events in Act IV result from Hamlet’s killing of Polonius? How does this sequence of events help explain why Hamlet was slow to take action earlier in the play?
    • Does Gertrude seem sincere in Scene 1 when she tells Claudius that Hamlet killed Polonius in a fit of insanity, or is she trying to protect him?
    • Reread Hamlet’s soliloquy in Scene 4, lines 48-58. This isn’t the first time that Hamlet has berated himself for not taking revenge. Is he just repeating himself, or do you sense a change in his attitude? Explain.  
  • In Student Edition, Unit 3, the culminating tasks are to write a personal narrative about a significant experience and to present a personal narrative adapted from the essay. 
    • The unit begins with a study of satire and an exploration of traditional period works. 
      • Students read The Rape of the Lock by Alexander Pope to analyze satire, the heroic couplet, and the mock epic. They then write a rhymed satirical poem. 
      • Students read “A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift and explore satirical devices and author’s purpose. They discuss the satirical essay then write a satirical essay to address a problem in school or the community. 
      • The next reading in the text set is a modern era editorial by Arwa Mahdawi, “Satire Is Dying Because the Internet Is Killing It.”
      • Students analyze the development of ideas and tone, then write a satire.
      • The rest of the texts in the unit are essays which represent the 18th century and the modern era. 
      • The mentor text is from Inferno: A Doctor’s Ebola Story by Steven Hatch, M.D.
      • Students analyze the author’s perspective and connect to memoirs.
      • Students write to take informal notes, then create an informational poster about the topic. 
      • Students build knowledge of the genre across the unit and develop personal experiences and perspectives in several contexts before the culminating task.
  • In Student Edition, Unit 5, the culminating tasks for the unit are to write a research report about a modern invention that has changed the social order or the way people live their daily lives and give a multimodal presentation adapted from the report. 
    • The text set includes excerpts from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte and Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, as well as a poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson. These traditional texts require students to examine point of view, setting, allegory, mood, plot, and characterization of complex texts. Tasks include writing a comparison, a poem, and a short story. 
    • Students also view a documentary about factory reform. They evaluate the genre and write a short story. 
    • The mentor text for the unit is an essay by Melissa Dickson, “The Victorians Had the Same Concerns About Technology As We Do.” 
      • Students analyze the compare and contrast essay, and evaluate multimodal texts. They write an op-ed and discuss in groups. 
    • The unit rounds out with several traditional poems and a modern era poem, providing students the opportunity to prepare and practice oral presentations.
  • In Teacher's Edition, Unit 6, students must write an argument: “This unit focuses on modern and contemporary literature. Responding to the devastation of two world wars and the loss of the once-powerful British Empire, British writers struggled to carve out a role for themselves in their new and different world. For this writing task, you will write an argument about a social or political issue in your community, such as school choice or homelessness. You can use both George Osborne’s speech given to the House of Commons and Chris Hall’s editorial as mentor texts to write your own argument. As you write your argument, you can use the notes from your Response Log, which you filled out after reading the texts in this unit.” The writing prompt is: “Write an argument about a social or political issue facing your community and the government’s role in helping to solve this issue.” Students will complete the following sections: Plan, Develop a Draft, Revise, Edit, and Publish. Once students complete the cumulative writing task, they then must debate an issue: “You will now adapt your argument for a debate with your classmates. You also will listen to other debate teams and prepare to critique their presentations.” There are scaffolding steps throughout this section of the cumulative task to ensure student success. 
    • Students read Katherine Mansfield’s short story, “A Cup of Tea.” Students then complete the Analyze the Text section, which consists of specific questions that address similar concepts within the cumulative task that follow Bloom’s Taxonomy. They are, but not limited to, the following: 
      • “1. Analyze: How does the third-person limited point of view affect your reaction to Rosemary and her plan to help Miss Smith? How might the story have been different if told by an omniscient narrator?”
      • “4. Connect: ‘A Cup of Tea’ is set in a time when wealthy women did not have professions and were expected to appear fashionable. How does this context influence your evaluation of Rosemary’s character?”
  • In Student Edition, Unit 6, students read “Shooting an Elephant,” an essay by George Orwell. Once students complete the essay reading, they then complete the Create and Discuss section. First, they compose an informational essay: “Write about a social injustice occurring today. Describe the toll that this injustice takes on individuals. Use evidence from research or what you may have witnessed.” Then, students must discuss their essay response: “Use your essay to generate discussion with your peers. Allow each participant time to share an experience as well as its possible outcomes.” 
    • Students read two poems: “The Second Coming,” by William Butler Yeats, and “Symbols? I’m Sick of Symbols,” by Fernando Pessoa. Once students complete both readings, they then complete the Collaborate & Compare section. Within this section are multiple sections: Compare Themes, Analyze the Texts, and Collaborate and Present. 
      • Within the Compare Themes section, students use a provided chart to “compare how the two authors develop their themes,” and in a small group students must “identify similarities and differences between the two poems.” 
      • Within the Analyze the Texts section, students are presented with questions that follow Bloom’s Taxonomy ranging from comparing to critiquing. 
      • In the Collaborate and Present section, students must follow these steps: “1. Decide on the most important details. 2. Create theme statements. 3. Compare and contrast themes. 4. Present your ideas to the class.” All steps provide direction and scaffolds to ensure student success.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. 

There are frequent opportunities where students are expected to participate in evidence-based discussions. After reading assignments, there are small group or one on one interactions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. Specifically, within the online materials, students and instructors are presented with the Speaking & Listening Studio, where additional discussion supports are in place. Also, within the Teacher's Edition, at the beginning of most texts, when instructors are setting up the lesson, instructors are presented with two grouping strategies to support discussion titled Small-Group Options.  These opportunities can also be found in Respond sections after texts, where students are encouraged to work with a panel to discuss what they have learned from the text, as well as modeling the style of the reading assigned. This can also be seen in Critical Vocabulary sections in Respond at the end of a text, allowing students to model the language and syntax, as well as work with a peer. Speaking and listening instruction occurs frequently throughout the year and is supported through teacher resources and materials.

  • In Student Edition, Unit 1, “The World on Turtle’s Back,” by Iroquois storytellers, students write a myth with a partner then present the myth orally with that partner, to either a small group or the whole class. 
    • "Decide how you will divide your myth for presentation. Will each of you read alternate paragraphs, or will one person read the narration and the other read the dialogue?"
    • "Practice reading the myth together before you make your presentation."
    • "Be prepared to answer other students’ questions about your myth and its meaning."
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 1, "Beowulf is full of action and drama and is best appreciated when read aloud. With a partner, present a passage from the epic poem. 
    • Select a passage that features exciting action, rich poetic language, or dialogue between two characters.
    • With your partner, decide how  you will divide the passage and who will read each part.
    • Practice reading with expression, gestures, and appropriate volume. 
    • Present your reading of the epic to your classmates. 
    • Participating in Collaborative Discussions: Credits"
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 2, students watch a film clip by BBC Shakespeare, from Hamlet. Instructors are presented with the section “Small-Group Options” before the initial lessons, and instructors are presented with two options; one is titled “Send a Problem: After watching the first minute and a half of the film, pose this question: How would you describe Hamlet’s mood? Call on a student to respond. Wait several seconds for a response. If the student has no response, he or she must call on another student by name to answer the same question. Have students continue asking each other for assistance as needed. Monitor responses and ask more questions as appropriate.”
  • In Student Edition, Unit 3, “Song of Myself,” written by Walt Whitman. "Use your reading of the selections from 'Song of Myself' to write a three- or four-paragraph argument either supporting or refuting this claim. 
    • With a small group of classmates who took your same position in the argument, prepare to defend that position in a class debate. 
    • Share your ideas and supporting examples with your group members.
    • As a group, select key, well-supported claims that you will present in the debate.
    • Anticipate the claims that the opposing side will make, and prepare rebuttal statements.
    • Engage your audience by speaking clearly and using appropriate eye contact and volume.
    • Always show respect in your interactions with the opposing side."
  • In the Student Edition, from "A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift, students "write a short satirical essay that addresses a problem in your school or community then discuss the process with a partner.
    • Take turns sharing your essays. 
    • Evaluate your partner’s use of satirical devices and the strength of the argument. 
    • Offer constructive suggestions on ways your partner could polish the essay to make it more effective." 
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 5, from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, students "write a comparison of a filmed adaptation of the scene from the novel included in the anthology. Present it to the group. If possible, play segments of the film version to illustrate your points.
    • Read your comparison aloud or refer to it as you present your views.
    • Encourage your listeners to react to you view and offer their own. Ask your listeners how well they followed your points, and if they can add ideas that might strengthen the comparison."
  • In Student Edition, Unit 3, “My Friend Walt Whitman,” written by Mary Oliver, "write an essay about an author whom you admire or whose work you enjoy. Focus on why you think the author’s work is important or influential.
    • Discuss the impact of literature on our lives. Use your essay as the basis of your contribution to the discussion. To prepare for the discussion, you may want to think about the following questions:
      • What are the different kinds of literature we read and why are they important?
      • How do movies sometimes revise or change literature?
      • What can we experience by reading various types of literature?"
  • Within Teacher's Edition, Unit 5, students must reflect on the unit within the Reflect on the Unit section for Unit 5. In the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, instructors are presented with a Reflect on the Unit section: “Have students reflect on the questions independently and write some notes in response to each one. Then, have students meet with partners or in small groups to discuss their reflections. Circulate during these discussions to identify the questions that are generating the liveliest conversations. Wrap up with a whole-class discussion focused on these questions.
  • In small groups, take turns giving and following the instructions you wrote. Evaluate how well the task was laid out, and give feedback on how to clarify any confusing parts." 

The following evidence supports the rationale that frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening are provided throughout the year:

  • In Student Edition, Unit 1, the class is given opportunities after each reading assignment to work both independently and with a small group. Students are able to model language and syntax in these discussion opportunities. The evidence can be found in some examples below:
    • "Practice and apply: Form a small group to identify other words in the poem that have changed their meanings over the years. Share the words and their old and new usages with the class."  
    • "Extend: How did warfare in medieval England differ from the way wars are fought today/ Discuss with your partner."
    • "Enact the scene: with your partner or group, present your dramatic scene by acting it out in front of the class."
    • "After you present your scene, ask your classmates to summarize what happened."
    • "Discuss the poems: Have a group discussion on how thoughts and feelings are expressed in medieval literature and in contemporary literature."
    • "As a group, draw a conclusion on how each writer feels about loneliness."
    • "Write and Discuss: Discuss your completed Word Network with a partner, making sure to talk through all of the boxes until you both understand the word, its synonyms, antonyms, and related forms. Then, fill out a Word Network for the remaining four words. Use a dictionary or online resource to help you complete the activity."

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Materials in the Grade 12 curriculum provide ample opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions about texts to build strong literacy skills. All discussions encountered required students to go directly back to the text, reference evidence, or repeated reading and analysis; and in many cases, instructors are presented possible student responses for additional support. Sections where questions and supports are seen within the Student and Teacher's Editions are: Reflect on the Unit, Introduce the Selection and Quick Start, the Revise section within all major cumulative writing tasks, Create & Discuss, Applying Academic Vocabulary, Create and Discuss, and Collaborate and Present.  The Speaking and Listening Studio is a digital resource that provides a quick reference for students to address specific speaking and listening actions. The margin notes remind students to use the Speaking and Listening Studio for more information about the task. The Speaking and Listening Studio also provides an opportunity for targeted instruction and supports teachers to help guide students in speaking and listening areas.

Evidence that supports the rationale is located in: 

  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 1, students and instructors are presented with the section, Reflect on the Unit. In the sidebar, instructors are presented with the following instruction: “Have students reflect on the questions independently and write some notes in response to each one. Then have students meet with partners or in small groups to discuss their reflections. Circulate during these discussions to identify the questions that are generating the liveliest conversations. Wrap up with a whole-class discussion focused on these questions.” Questions that students must respond to individually and in groups are as follows but not limited to:
    • Reflect on the Essential Questions: “How did the heroes you read about in this unit affect other characters?” and “Think about texts in the unit that show a society that is coming apart. How does this social disorder affect people?”
    • Reflect on Your Reading: “Which selections were the most interesting or surprising to you?”
    • Reflect on the Writing Task: “Which parts of the story were the easiest to write? The hardest to write? Why?”
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 4, Poems by William Wordsworth, the sidebar for “Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey,” provices possible discussion prompts while reading:
      • "Analyze: Why are these feeling important for the speaker? (lines 27-42)"
      • "Analyze: How do these images support the speaker’s idea about a force that affects all things? (lines 93-102)"
      • "Discuss: Consider the ideas Wordsworth expresses in his poetry about nature and the comfort it can provide. With a partner, discuss any of your own experiences in nature that you’ve found meaningful or helpful in your life. 
        • Listen thoughtfully as your partner tells you about his or her experiences.
        • Ask questions about any ideas or details that are unclear or need elaboration.
        • Brainstorm to come up with ideas as to how you and your partner might seek out additional meaningful experiences in nature."
  • In Teacher's Edition, Unit 5, students read “Dover Beach,” by Matthew Arnold and “The Darkling Thrush,” by Thomas Hardy. Once students complete both reads, they must complete the Collaborate and Present section: “Now, with your group, continue exploring the ideas in the poems by identifying and comparing their themes.” Students must follow these steps:
    • “1. Decide on the most important details: With your group, review your chart to identify the most important details from each poem. Identify points on which you agree, and resolve disagreements by identifying evidence from the poems that support your ideas.”
    • “2. Determine a theme: Based on the word choices, figurative language, sound devices, and feelings evoked from each poem, determine a theme for each. You may use a chart to keep track of the themes your group members suggest.” 
    • “3. Compare themes: Compare themes with your group and discuss whether the themes are similar or different. Listen actively to the members of your group and ask them to clarify any points you do not understand.”
    • “4. Present to the class: Next, present your ideas to the class. Be sure to include clear statements on the theme for each poem. Discuss whether the themes are similar or different. You may add other visuals or diagrams to help convey information to the class.” 

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

For every text that students read or view, there is a writing task that either clarifies and deepens understanding of the text, explores the essential question, or helps prepare the student for the end of unit writing task. These are both long assignments with multiple drafts, short assignments for in class responses, focused projects, and other short answer responses. These can be found both before and after a reading assignment within each unit.  At the end of every unit, students must complete a cumulative writing task that emulates one of the following: short story, personal narrative, explanatory essay, literary analysis, argumentative essay, and research essay. These process writing tasks have multiple layers for support. On-demand writing assignments, including shorter, more focused writing projects, are found throughout all six units.  

Examples of on-demand writing include, but are not limited to: 

  • In the Student Edition, students are given multiple opportunities to write, either individually, on larger projects, or on small, focused assignments where they are asked to incorporate digital resources. 
    • Starting on page 351, students are introduced to Civil War Photographs. Within this text there are multiple opportunities to write on demand.
      • Make Connections: “Think about what you know about the Civil War or the other texts you have read on the subject. As you view the photographs, make connections between them and what you already know, and think about what they add to your understanding of the topic. You may also have questions if what you see in the photographs relates to or conflicts with what you already know about the Civil War. Write down any questions that occur to you while viewing.

A representative example of how the program supports the writing process is below:

    • Write an Argument on page 442
      • "Write an argument in which you identify a current barrier to self determination and specify what should be done to remedy it so that self determination is possible for more members of our society.
        • Be sure to:
          • Make a clear and persuasive claim.
          • Ask questions that help develop your claim and research the answers by locating relevant sources and synthesizing the information they provide.
          • Develop the claim with valid reasons and relevant evidence.
          • Anticipate counterarguments, or opposing claims, and address them with a well supported rebuttal or defense.
          • Establish clear, logical relationships among claims, rebuttals, reasons, and evidence.
          • Write a satisfying conclusion that effectively summarizes the claim.
          • Demonstrate appropriate and precise use of language, maintaining a formal tone through the use of standard English.
          • Correctly cite sources you use, even when you summarize or paraphrase."

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different types/modes/genres of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. (Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.)

The text types students must compose that reflect the standards are short story, personal narrative, explanatory essay, literary analysis, argumentative essay, and research essay.  Students write after each reading or viewing experience. Most writing experiences are elements of the writing process and may be completed as a stand-alone product or part of a larger task or learning experience. Digital application is expected and some writing tasks are specifically designed for digital media. A few of the writing tasks are primarily visual, supporting learning about an element of written and spoken presentation: the graphic representation of an idea. Across the entire school year, students write six process essays that reflect deep understanding of the unit’s essential question and of the genre study within each unit.

  • In Student Edition, Unit 6, upon reading all of the texts, students are asked to write a formal argument essay. The instructions explain that students will “write an argument about a social or political issue in their community, such as school choice or homelessness.” It also tells students to use two different mentor texts to give students inspiration and structure. Students then begin organizing their ideas with an argument planning chart, develop a draft, revise (both by themselves and with a partner), edit and then publish their work.

End of unit writing tasks reflect the distribution required by the standards:

  • Unit 1: Write a short story (W3).
  • Unit 2: Write an literary analysis (W1, W2).
  • Unit 3: Write a personal narrative (W3).
  • Unit 4: Write an explanatory essay (W2).
  • Unit 5: Write a research report (W2).
  • Unit 6: Write an argument (W1).

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.

Each unit contains multiple opportunities for students to compose and refine research-based and evidence-based writing. Students are offered opportunities to evaluate and support claims both in formal assignments and informal in-class assignments. This can be seen in the Respond section of readings, where students have opportunities in both Research and Create and Present. In some texts, there are also opportunities to research and analyze in Respond to the Essential Question. This asks students to review annotations and notes to develop support for specific questions. The Teacher's Edition provides a road map of the year which is presented in six units. Each text - or sometimes pair of texts - in the unit is followed by both a brief research prompt and a writing assignment informed by the research. The on-demand writing tasks reflect development of skills necessary to complete the end of unit writing task.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 2, students are asked to read two sonnets: Sonnet 30 and Sonnet 75 by Edmund Spenser. After reading them, students research the literary career of Spenser and answer three questions. 
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 3, students read the article “Education Protects Women from Abuse” by Olga Khazan. After reading the text, students research some of the statistics that are present regarding the education of women and girls worldwide. Then, they share those statistics with a small group and discuss whether or not the statistics support Khazan’s claim. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 5: An Era of Rapid Change, students consider the following questions: "What is a true benefactor? How do you view the world? What brings out cruelty in people? Which invention has had the greatest impact on your life?" The end of unit writing task is a research report about a modern invention that has changed the social order or the way people live their daily lives. Students synthesize information from analysis of texts that portray societal changes across time and the effects on human civilization. They conduct independent research to complete the end of unit task. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 6: New Ideas, New Voices, students consider the following questions: "What makes people feel insecure? Why is it hard to resist social pressure? What is the power of symbols? When should the government interfere in our decisions?" The end of unit writing task is an argument about a social or political issue facing the student’s community and the government’s role in helping to solve the issue. 

Indicator 1n

Materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials including instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.

Each (written) text includes a Language Conventions section at the beginning of the reading that provides information about a convention relative to the text, and directions for what to look for while reading. Texts often include prompts in the margin notes to annotate and respond to the convention identified. After reading, students extend the learning with direct instruction of the language convention and practice by applying what they have learned. In the Create and Apply section, there is another heading labeled Language Conventions which provides additional instruction to students in that grammatical category as well as a “practice and apply” formative assessment in which students can demonstrate their understanding in that particular category. The Grammar Studio is a digital resources that provides students with additional information and practice about specific components of the grammar standards. Students explore spelling, punctuation, parts of speech, clauses, and more throughout the Studio. Teachers can assign specific lessons for students to study independently or in small groups. Teachers can also assign module assessments to track student progress with the topic/standard. 

  • In Student Edition, Unit 1, students read several selections including: “The Wife of Bath’s Tale” by Geoffrey Chaucer. In the Before reading students are told, "In this lesson, you will learn about inverted sentences where the normal order of a subject followed by a verb is reversed." 
    • "While reading: (prompt in margin notes) Annotate: Mark the inverted phrase in lines 217-222. Analyze: How does this inversion help maintain the pattern of the verse?"
    • "Apply: Write three inverted sentences about events in 'The Wife of Bath’s Tale.'”
  • In Student Edition, Unit 5, students read several selections including: From Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. In the Before Reading students are told, "In this lesson, you will learn about gerunds and gerund phrases. A gerund is a verb ending in -ing that is used as a noun. You can add modifiers and complements to a gerund to make it a gerund phrase. Writer use gerunds and gerund phrases to effectively combine short sentences into one." 
    • "While reading: (prompt in margin notes) Annotate: Mark the sentence that contains gerunds in paragraph 45. Evaluate: What do these gerunds emphasize about Jane’s character?"
    • "Apply: Write your own sentences with gerunds or gerund phrases using the sentences above as a model."

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the expectations for materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. The materials build students’ knowledge across topics and content areas; however, academic vocabulary instruction is not intentionally and coherently sequenced to consistently build students’ vocabulary. Questions and tasks build in rigor and complexity to culminating tasks that demonstrate students’ ability to analyze components of text and topics. Reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language skills are taught and practiced in an integrated manner.

Criterion 2a - 2h

Materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.
32/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students' knowledge and their ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.

The materials for Grade 12 are organized around topics or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend texts proficiently. Each of the six units has four Essential Questions that provide a theme for the unit with strands for deeper exploration. All of the texts are arranged in whole-class sets as Analyze and Apply, then small group or partner sets as Collaborate and Compare, then independent readings with a suggested novel are provided. All of the text sets in a unit explore the Essential Question for the unit. Within the Analyze and Apply instruction, the mentor texts provide students the opportunity to read closely and examine the genre of writing which is also the end of unit writing task.  Supporting texts in each of the text sets including the Independent Learning sections provide information relative to the essential topic and culminating task. Many of the texts represent multiple and sometimes conflicting perspectives about the essential topic, and include a variety of styles, genres, and media. The lessons in each of these learning modalities include activities that further student comprehension of progressively difficult text. Students’ knowledge based on the specific topic/lens is deepened after every text is analyzed, based on supporting questions. Assigned to keep an evidence log along with multiple graphic organizers, students can chart their growth as independent readers. Additionally, students display their knowledge in the completion of end of unit tasks that always include writing and often presenting in mixed media. 

  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 1, the title of the unit is, Origin of a Nation, which focuses on the Anglo-Saxon and medieval time periods, and there are multiple Essential Questions presented: “What makes someone a hero?” “What is true chivalry?” “Can we control our fate?” and, “What happens when a society unravels?” By the end of Unit 1, students must be able to compose a short story. The mentor text for this unit is Neil Gaiman’s short story “Chivalry.” Within the Grade 12 textbook, students have been scaffolded from Grades 9 and 10 from one EQ per unit to four EQ’s per unit by Grade 11. Within the Teacher's Edition, there is a break down of each essential question that is referenced throughout the chronologically ordered Grade 12 textbook. For example, within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, under the EQ “What happens when a society unravels?” instructors are offered the following support for students: “Help students connect to their own lives by having them identify systems in the modern world that are designed to maintain peace and stability. How might those systems be threatened, and what might be the consequences for the students personally if modern social or governmental systems fell apart?” Throughout the unit, students read fiction and nonfiction texts that relate to the essential questions and overall topic of the unit, Origin of a Nation. The culminating writing and speaking/listening task directly relates back to the essential question and mentor text: “This unit focuses on literature from the Anglo-Saxon and medieval periods, when England began to develop as a nation. Many works of these periods portrayed national heroes such as Beowulf and King Arthur. For this writing task, you will write a short story about a hero from the past or from your own world. For an example of well-written fiction, you can review, and use as a mentor text, the short story ‘Chivalry’ by Neil Gaiman.” Students also end Unit 1 with a reflection task that directly requires them to revisit the EQ’s, reflect on their reading throughout the whole unit, and their cumulative writing task in relation to the overall topics discussed within the unit. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 3, the title of the unit is Tradition and Reason, which focuses on the restoration and the 18th century, and there are multiple Essential Questions presented: “How can satire change people’s behavior?” “What is your most memorable experience?” “What keeps women from achieving equality with men?” and, “Why are plagues so horrifying?” By the end of Unit 3, students must be able to compose a personal narrative. The mentor text for this unit is an excerpt from Steven Hatch’s memoir Inferno: A Doctor’s Ebola Story. For example, within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, under the EQ “What keeps women from achieving equality with men?” instructors are offered the following support for students: “Challenge students to identify additional ways in which women have not yet achieved social or political equality with men. Which beliefs or assumptions about the differences between men and women contribute to these inequalities? Ask students how they believe gender equality can be achieved and steps they can take to help create a society in which women and men benefit equally.”  Throughout the unit, students read fiction and nonfiction texts that relate to the essential questions and overall topic of the unit, Tradition and Reason. The culminating writing and speaking/listening task directly relates back to the essential question and mentor text: “This unit focuses on literature from the Restoration and 18th century. Although writers in these periods often addressed social issues and historical events, there were also important portrayals of personal experiences, especially in memoirs and journals. For this writing task, you will write about an important personal experience and connect that experience to a topic of wider significance that may be important to a reader. You can use the excerpt from Steven Hatch’s memoir Inferno: A Doctor’s Ebola Story as a mentor text.” Students also end Unit 3 with a reflection task that directly requires them to revisit the EQ’s, reflect on their reading throughout the whole unit, and their cumulative writing task in relation to the overall topics discussed within the unit. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 5, the title of the unit is An Era of Rapid Change, which focuses on the Victorians, and there are multiple Essential Questions presented: “What is a true benefactor?” “How do you view the world?” “What brings out cruelty in people?” and, “Which invention has had the greatest impact on your life?” By the end of Unit 5, students must be able to compose a research report. The mentor text for this unit is Melissa Dickson’s essay “The Victorians Had the Same Concerns About Technology As We Do.” For example, within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, under the EQ “Which invention has had the greatest impact on your life?” instructors are offered the following support for students: “Remind students that many of the inventions that might immediately come to mind could not exist without earlier inventions. Challenge students to identify the ‘small’ underlying inventions that had to come before the ‘big’ inventions that they are more familiar with.”  Throughout the unit, students read fiction and nonfiction texts that relate to the essential questions and overall topic of the unit, An Era of Rapid Change. And, the culminating writing and speaking/listening task directly relates back to the essential question and mentor text: “This unit focuses on the Victorian period, when rapid technological changes affected nearly every aspect of society, including government, transportation, communication, religious practice, and relations between classes. For this writing task, you will do some research and use outside sources to write about how technology has affected society in our own time. For an example of an essay that uses outside sources well, review the article ‘The Victorians Had the Same Concerns About Technology as We Do.’” Students also end Unit 5 with a reflection task that directly requires them to revisit the EQ’s, reflect on their reading throughout the whole unit, and their cumulative writing task in relation to the overall topics discussed within the unit. 

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet  the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

The 12th grade text is split into two, with Units 1-3 in the first text, and Units 4-6 in the second. In both textbooks, the reading material is supported with opportunities for students to develop higher level thinking. This can be found in Notice & Note, as it asks students to analyze tone, examine and analyze author’s purpose, or look at language conventions and how they influence the text. At the beginning of each unit, there are four essential questions for students to consider as they read the selections, and at the close, students compose a cumulative writing task that requires students to address the essential question; students must also reflect on the unit within the Reflect on the Unit section, specifically Reflect on the Essential Question. Within Analyze Text, there are a variety of question types that require students to look not only at the initial structure but to make inferences about word choice, narrative voice, and structure. The questions and prompts in Analyze the Text provide a variety of complexities from DOK 1 through DOK 4. Students experience questions and tasks within the sidebar that require higher order thinking that occurs after an annotation or margin note is made; by students directly touching and rereading the text and reflecting, they may then more adequately analyze, compare and contrast, synthesize, critique, and evaluate.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 1, students are asked to compare two primary sources: The Paston Letters by the Paston Family and diary entries from My Syrian Diary by Marah. At the end of reading both pieces, students are asked to collaborate in a small group under the heading, “Share and discuss connections.” The directions explain “In a small group, discuss your conclusions about the diaries you analyzed. Consider how writing in the diary form affects the way authors achieve their purposes, convey their messages, and reach their audiences.” 
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 2, students read two poems: “To His Coy Mistress,” by Andrew Marvell and “Twenty-One Love Poems (Poem III),” by Adrienne Rich. Students compare themes between the two poems, and within the Analyze the Text section, students complete the following higher order thinking questions and discuss their responses in groups:
    • "1. Compare: How does the speaker of each poem feel about the passage of time? How are the speakers’ feelings similar? How do they differ?"
    • "2. Evaluate: Which speaker is more reasonable in his or her urgency about the relationship? Why do you think this is the case?"
    • "3. Analyze: How does each speaker respond to the inevitability of death?"
    • "4. Synthesize: According to these two texts, how does being in love affect our perception of age and the passing of time?"
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 5, students are asked to read a selection from the novel, Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte. Before reading, students are asked to “pay attention to how Jane reacts to conditions at the school and to the people she meets there.” In the sidebar labeled Analyze First Person Point of View, students are asked to “mark details about what Jane sees after being lifted from the coach.” In addition, they are asked to analyze “how does this description give the impression that we see everything through Jane’s eyes?” 
  • In Student Edition, Unit 6, students read T. S. Eliot’s poem, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” Within the Analyze the Text section, students must respond in short response to questions that ask them to analyze, infer, draw conclusions, and connect. For example:
    • "3. Analyze: Read the side margin notes about the quotation from Dante’s Inferno at the beginning of the poem and the allusion to Lazarus in line 94. What do the quotation and the allusion have in common? How are they connected to Prufrock’s experience?"
    • "4. Draw Conclusions: Why might Eliot have chosen not to clarify the nature of Prufrock’s “overwhelming question” or what he wants to say to the woman at the party?"
    • "5. Connect: Eliot wrote 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' at a time when new technology and media were rapidly changing society. How might Eliot’s use of stream of consciousness reflect such changes?"

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Every single unit for the Grade 12 text includes an Essential Question (EQ) that students must track throughout each unit. All EQ’s are represented throughout each text and within all materials and tasks. Also, within every single unit, students must complete a Collaborate & Compare section, which requires students to individually evaluate, analyze, synthesize, etc. both texts, and students do this as they compare and contrast texts as well. Within the Collaborate & Present section, students complete small group work to better synthesize what they have learned across the two texts, while also utilizing previously gained skills throughout the unit and previous units. Within each Collaborate & Compare section, there are the following sections: Compare, Analyze, and Collaborate. Each of these section titles may vary depending upon the texts and text types, such as Compare Themes and Collaborate and Present. Students also build knowledge and integrate ideas across every individual text within the unit; students also usually compare texts further within the culminating task at the close of the unit.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 1: Origin of a Nation, students are asked to look at texts from the Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Periods. The first text in the unit is the epic poem by Beowulf translated by Seamus Heaney on page.  After reading the text, students are asked in the section Analyze the Text to “reread lines 268-313. The poet uses various techniques--alliteration, caesura, kennings--in the description of the battle between Grendel and Beowulf. How might these techniques have helped Anglo-Saxon poets chant or sing the poem and convey its meaning?” Then, at the end of the unit students are asked to write a short story as a culminating writing task. Specifically the instructions for the task read: “This unit focuses on literature from the Anglo-Saxon and medieval periods, when England began to develop as a nation. Many works of these periods portrayed national heroes such as Beowulf and King Arthur.” 

Once students read both individual texts, and complete necessary tasks associated with both, individual, texts, students then must complete the Collaborate and Compare tasks, located within the Collaborate & Compare section. Students must complete the following Compare Themes task: “...Compare how the poems develop this theme. What reasons do they give for the necessity of enjoying the present moment?” 

Students will then complete the Analyze the Texts within the Collaborate and Compare section in groups, where they will discuss the questions below:

  • “Compare: How does the speaker of each poem feel about the passage of time? How are the speaker's’ feelings similar? How do they differ?”
  • “Evaluate: Which speaker is more reasonable in his or her urgency about the relationship? Why do you think this is the case?”
  • “Analyze: How does each speaker respond to the inevitability of death?”
  • “Synthesize: According to these two texts, how does being in love affect our perception of age and the passing of time?” 

Students then complete the Collaborate and Present section, where students must get in groups and “...continue exploring the ideas in these texts by discussing the pros and cons of carpe diem and living for the moment. Work together to gain an understanding of the arguments pro and con, and then come to an agreement about your position as a group...” Students are given specific steps to follow as support.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 3, students are asked to read the argument from A Vindication of the Rights of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft and then compare it to the article “Education Protects Women from Abuse” by Olga Khazan. Before reading the first text, students are instructed “As you read, make note of Wollstonecraft’s evaluation of women’s education at the time, her suggestion for needed changes, and her conclusions about how these changes would affect the lives of women. This information will help you compare her argument with the article ‘Education Protects Women from Abuse’ which follows it.” After reading the second text, under the section Compare and Analyze, students “with your group, discuss the similarities and differences between the central ideas of the selections and the ways in which each author develops and supports those ideas. Then analyze how the central idea and techniques used by each author reflect her purposes for writing.” 

Once students read both individual texts, and complete necessary tasks associated with both, individual, texts, students then must complete the Collaborate and Compare tasks, located within the Collaborate & Compare section. Students must complete the following Compare Themes task: “...To begin gathering details with which to make inferences about themes, complete the following chart.” Within the chart, students must gather information regarding form, imagery, figurative language, diction, and other elements.  

  • Students will then complete the Analyze the Texts within the Collaborate and Compare section in groups, where they will discuss the questions below:
  • “Compare: With your group, review the imagery that you cited in your chart. How are the images in the two poems similar? How do they differ?”
  • “Interpret: Both poems describe some of the ways we relate to nature. Discuss each poem’s treatment of nature. Cite evidence in your discussion.”
  • “Evaluate: ...Shelley uses elevated language and formal diction; however...Du fu does the opposite. Which approach do you find most effective, and why?”
  • “Draw Conclusions: According to the two poems, what insights about life or human nature can we gain by considering the wind and other elements of the natural world?” 

Students then complete the Collaborate and Present section, where students must get in groups and “...continue exploring the ideas in the poems by identifying and comparing their themes...” Students are given specific steps to follow as support.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 5, students are asked to read several texts that occurred during the Victorian era, a time period when “rapid technological changes affected nearly every aspect of society.” For example, they are asked to watch the documentary “Factory Reform” by Timelines.tv, an excerpt from the novel Great Expectations by Charles Dickens and the essay/mentor text “The Victorians Had the Same Concerns About Technology As We Do.” The culminating writing task for this unit is to write a research report. In the directions on page 681, students are instructed to “review the notes you have taken in your Response Log that relate to the question, ‘Which invention has had the greatest impact on your life?’ Texts in this unit provide background reading that will help you formulate and develop the topic for your research report. 

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

There are many opportunities for students to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. This can be a combination of reading, writing, speaking and listening. This can be found in Writing Tasks, Respond, Notice and Note, and other exercises throughout each reading assignment. These are meant to build upon the text and allow students to complete culminating tasks. Every unit is comprised of one or multiple Essential Questions. While the titles of the units hint at what each unit consists of, all readings, assignments, tasks, and culminating tasks are centered around the Essential Questions. Within the Grade 9 and 10 textbook, students are presented with one essential question to focus on throughout the entirety of each unit;  however, once students reach Grades 11 and 12, some scaffolds are removed. Students are presented with two or more Essential Questions, and more choice is presented. Within the Grade 9 and 10 textbook, students are scaffolded to higher expectations as only a few units consist of two cumulative tasks (i.e. writing and speaking/listening); and, when students reach Grades 11 and 12, it is an expectation that students complete both writing and speaking/listening sections within the cumulative, combined task. Also located within the “Unit Tasks” section, is the “Reflect on the Unit” section where the topics, or Essential Questions, are revisited once more. All cumulative tasks are a combination of writing, speaking and listening, reading--or rereading--and all cumulative tasks reinforce all Essential Questions presented throughout the unit.

  • In Teacher's Edition, Unit 1, students are presented with four essential questions, and the unit title “Origin of a Nation,” which focuses on the Anglo-saxon and medieval time periods. Based on the Teacher's Edition, instructors must connect to the essential questions: “Read aloud the Essential Questions and the paragraphs that follow them. Open the discussion of each idea by having students respond to the questions that conclude each paragraph.” The EQ’s are as follows:
    • What makes someone a hero?
    • What is true chivalry?
    • Can we control our fate?
    • What happens when a society unravels?

Located within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, instructors are supported with additional information regarding the EQ’s. For example: With the Essential Question, “What happens when a society unravels?” instructors are provided the following support commentary, “Help students connect to their own lives by having them identify systems in the modern world that are designed to maintain peace and stability. How might those systems be threatened, and what might be the consequences for the students personally if modern social or governmental systems fell apart?”

    • In Unit 1, students are presented with a culminating writing task where they must compose a short story; they are also responsible for creating a podcast. The learning objectives can be found within the Plan section of the Teacher's Edition. For the writing task, the learning objectives are as follows in a bullet-pointed list, but not limited to: “Write a short story about a hero; Use the Mentor Text as a model; Decide how setting, characters, conflict, and story events reflect the theme of heroes; Use genre characteristics to write a first draft; publish writing to share with an audience.” The learning objectives for the speaking task are as follows in a bullet-pointed list, but not limited to: “Adapt a short story as a podcast; Choose readers and practice characters; Create sound effects; Provide and consider advice for improvement.” Students will complete the following sections for the writing task: Plan, Develop a Draft, Revise, Edit, and Publish. 
    • Within the same unit of the Teacher's Edition, “Unit 1 Tasks,” students must reflect on the Essential Questions: “By completing your short story, you have created a writing product that is enriched by your thoughts about the reading selections. Now is a good time to reflect on what you learned.” Some of the questions posed in the “Reflect on the Unit” section are as follows: “Review the four Essential Questions on page 1. How have your answers to these questions changed in response to the texts you read in this unit?”, “How did the heroes you read about in this unit affect other characters?”, “Think about texts in the unit that show a society that is coming apart. How does this social disorder affect people?”, and “What improvements did you make to your story as you were revising?”
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 4: Emotion and Experimentation, students are asked to write an explanatory essay “on the relationship between humans and nature.” More specifically, students are asked to use the article “Frankenstein: Giving Voice to the Monster” as a mentor text to plan and draft their own essay. Further instructions explain that students should
    • have a big idea that your essay develops
    • organize your essay into paragraphs that present a key idea
    • support your key idea with evidence such as facts, quotations, expert opinions or evidence
    • write an opening that catches your reader’s attention while introducing your topic
    • write a conclusion that wraps up your ideas and leaves your reader with “food for thought” 

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/ language in context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/language in context.

At the beginning of every unit, students are presented with the Academic Vocabulary section, where students must complete a Word Network chart for five academic terms utilized and practiced throughout the entire unit, with most texts, and reinforced at the close of the unit within the culminating task. Also, before students read almost every single text, students are presented with the Critical Vocabulary section that presents five to ten words that are extremely important to the overall understanding of the text selection; students are required to practice these terms, just as they have with the Academic Vocabulary, by answering questions before and after reading the text. Students also experience a sidebar and footnotes per reading selection where they are further supported with unfamiliar vocabulary within the text being read. Within each unit, students are presented with the Collaborate & Compare section--where they must read two texts and compare--and vocabulary is also presented within this section and the tasks that follow. Another Critical Vocabulary section follows the reading and is used to check for understanding after reading. These tasks may be cloze sentences, using the words another way, answering questions containing the words, or other assessments.  Supports for English Learners in the Teacher’s Edition include notes about especially challenging words, phrases, or concepts that may need further explanation for language learners.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 1, students read a passage from Beowulf by the Beowulf Poet, translated by Seamus Heaney. The Critical Vocabulary section presents the following words: aghast, unrelenting, affliction, plight, baleful, wail, loathsome. Students complete a cloze activity for each word. For example: "He was _____ at the number of casualties that occurred." While reading, these seven words are presented in bold and defined in the margin. After reading, students respond to questions featuring the target vocabulary. “Which is an example of a baleful action? Throwing a rock intentionally or dropping a rock accidentally.” Following this section is a vocabulary strategy: Homophones. The strategy is explained. Students select the correct homophone in sentences containing two choices. Grendel’s powers of destruction were (plane, plain) to (sea, see).
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 3, students read a passage from “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” by Mary Wollstonecraft. The Critical Vocabulary section presents the following words: vindication, prerogative, evanescent, dissimulation, abrogate, inculcate, congenial, Utopian. Students answer questions using one of the vocabulary words in a complete sentence. For example: "Which word means to revoke, or take away?" While reading, these eight words are presented in bold and defined in the margin. After reading, students respond to questions featuring the target vocabulary. Following this section is a vocabulary strategy: Literary Allusions. The strategy is explained. Students explain literary allusions in several paragraphs and analyze how the allusion strengthens the author’s argument.
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4, students read an excerpt from Mary Shelley’s iconic novel, Frankenstein. Students are presented with critical vocabulary in the section titled Critical Vocabulary. The words in this section are as follows: infuse, ardor, inarticulate, precipice, inanimate, tumult, misdeed, and odious. The directions are as follows: “To see how many Critical Vocabulary words you already know, use them to complete the sentences.” Students are given five sentences to complete, two vocabulary terms per sentence, and instructors are presented the answer key within the Teacher's Edition sidebar. There is also an English Learner Support section within the Teacher's Edition sidebar: “Tell students that one of the Critical Vocabulary words has a Spanish cognate: odious/odioso.”
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 5, students read a passage from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. The Critical Vocabulary section presents the following words: self-possessed, trinket, aversion, gilded, dogged, brooding. Students complete a cloze activity for each word. For example: "Eva’s favorite _____ was the necklace her grandmother gave her." While reading, these six words are presented in bold and defined in the margin. After reading, students respond to questions featuring the target vocabulary. Following this section is a vocabulary strategy: Idioms. After the strategy is explained, students apply the strategy by completing sentences that use idioms relative to dogs. “The possessive child clutched the toy _____. (like a dog with a bone) The combat flyer had a _____ with an enemy pilot. (dogfight)”
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 6, students read Katherine Mansfield’s short story “A Cup of Tea.” Students are presented with critical vocabulary in the section titled Critical Vocabulary. The words in this section are as follows: presentable, tactfully, listless, vile, and engagement. The directions are as follows: “To check your familiarity with the Critical Vocabulary words, answer the following questions.” Students are given five sentences to complete, and instructors are presented the answer key within the Teacher's Edition sidebar. There is also an English Learner Support section within the Teacher's edition sidebar: “Point out that one of the meanings of the Spanish word tacto is the same as the English word tact. Although tacto has several meanings...”

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 (meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and practice which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts. 

Students develop substantive understanding of a central topic and of all texts in each unit through writing which is used throughout each unit to help students learn as well as show students’ understanding of the texts. Writing assignments are scaffolded so students will develop a sense of understanding of what they are reading before they begin writing. Within each text, students will complete smaller writing assignments such as answering questions in the section Analyze the Text or responding to the essential question. At the close of every single text read, students must compose a short response, short essay, or respond to questions regarding the reading; every reading is directly related to an Essential Question (EQ). For Grades 11 - 12, there are a total of four EQs per unit, which allows students more student-choice. After each text, students complete a more in-depth assignment under the heading Create and Discuss, which can have students complete an essay, respond to a writing prompt, or write in preparation for a discussion. There are several learning tools to help students develop more substantial writing habits which are included in the Language Conventions section. Finally, at the end of each unit, students are asked to complete a culminating writing task that synthesizes student understanding. This is a multi-step assignment that is carefully scaffolded for student success. In addition, students can write in response to the reflection questions at the end.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 1 revision guide, the end of unit writing task is to write a short story about a hero from the past or in your own world. In unit one, students analyze characteristics of an epic poem, structure, narrator, conflict, characterization, author’s purpose, and tone. The revision guide includes questions to ask with tips and techniques for revising. 
    • "Are the characters fully developed?
      • Mark descriptions of the characters’ appearance, thoughts, and actions.
      • Add details that provide insight into the characters’ feelings and motivation."
    • "Does the dialogue sound natural?
      • Mark important dialogue in the story.
      • Add words and phrases to give each character’s dialogue a distinctive style. Include contradictions and incomplete sentences to make dialogue more informal, or natural."
    • "Is the conflict resolved in a logical way?
      • Mark the resolution." 
    • "Add details to make the resolution more satisfying, and tie up loose ends."
  • In Student Edition, Unit 3 revision guide, the end of unit writing task is to write a personal narrative about a significant experience you have had. In unit three, students analyze satire, satirical devices, development of ideas, tone, arguments, counter arguments, and author’s perspective. The revision guide includes questions to ask with tips and techniques for revising so that they can apply their learning from their reading to their writing. 
    • "Do I include enough sensory details?
      • Highlight the sensory details you used.
      • Add such sensory details as images, sounds, smells, and physical sensations."
    • "Does the reader understand my emotions?
      • Look for the moments where you describe your emotions.
      • Elaborate on emotional moments with details that 'show' emotion rather than just telling."
    • "Is my 'big idea' clearly conveyed to the reader?
      • Write a sentence or two that summarizes your “big idea.” 
      • Add reflection, emotions, and details to bring out the 'big idea' throughout the story."
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 5 revision guide, the end of unit writing task is to write a research report about one modern invention that has changed the social order or the way people live their daily lives. Students analyze point of view, documentaries, allegory, mood, compare and contrast essay, extended metaphors, imagery, and sound devices. The revision guide includes questions to ask with tips and techniques for revising in order for students to apply what they have learned from their reading to their writing. 
    • "Does the body include only relevant key ideas and supporting evidence? 
      • Mark the key ideas. Number supporting evidence for each key idea.
      • Delete irrelevant ideas and evidence. Add evidence to support ideas."
    • "Are sources credited and citations punctuated correctly?
      • Place check marks next to material that requires citation. 
      • Add parenthetical citations if necessary, and correct punctuation."
    • "Does the conclusion restate the thesis? 
      • Bracket the restatement of the thesis.
      • Add works cited entries if necessary and revise incorrectly formatted entries."
  • In Student Edition Unit 6, students are asked to write an argument for their culminating writing task of the unit. Specifically, students are told to “write an argument about a social or political issue in your community such as school choice or homelessness”. Also, students are given additional instructions about the structure and organization of the essay, as well as a logical plan, details about revision, editing and publication.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

After each individual text is presented within each unit, students must complete the “Research” section that requires students to branch outside of the text, within the specific topic posed by the Essential Question. The purpose is for students to further research the elements discussed or introduced within or surrounding specific texts. Also located within the “Research” section are “Connect” and “Extend” tasks that reinforce synthesis and additional research. And, throughout each grade level textbook, at least one culminating activity between the six units requires students to compose an extensive research report.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 1, essential questions are:What makes someone a hero? What is true chivalry? Can we control our fate? What happens when a society unravels?  Students read “Chivalry” by Neil Gaiman.
    • Research: Sir Galahad was considered one of the greatest knights at King Arthur’s court. With a partner, conduct an internet search to discover more about the legend of Sir Galahad. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 2, students read Hamlet and are presented with the “Research” section: “Hamlet pretends to be mad in the play, and Ophelia actually loses her sanity. Do some research on ideas about mental illness in the Renaissance.” 
    • Students are given a chart that indicates “What did physicians think caused madness?” “What medical treatments were used on mentally ill people?” “How were the mentally ill viewed by society?”
    • There is a “Research Tip” provided in the sidebar of the Student Edition: “Use your sources to find sources. If you have an article that is exactly what you are looking for, use that article’s references page to find more relevant sources.”
    • There is also an “Extend” task presented within the “Research” section: “Research how Shakespeare portrays madness in other plays. Synthesize this information with what you learned from your other sources.”
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4, students read “Frankenstein: giving Voice to the Monster” and are presented with the “Research” section: “Winner Suggests that some problems resulting from the development of artificial intelligence might be related to the ‘future of automation and employment.’ He quotes Bill Gates, who also mentions the issue of machines doing many of our jobs. Research these concerns What jobs are currently being replaced by machines? What jobs are in danger of being replaced in the future? Use the chart below to record your findings.” 
    • There is a “Research Tip” provided in the sidebar of the Student Edition: “Look for sources that include up-to-date research and provide evidence in the form of facts, statistics, and logical reasoning.”
    • There is also an “Extend” task presented within the “Research” section: “Use the information you found to think about your own plans for a future career. Write a brief paragraph explaining how the research might influence your planning for the future.”
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 6, students read “A Cup of Tea” and are presented with the “Research” section: “‘A Cup of Tea’ was written in 1922, at a time when British and American women’s lives were undergoing radical change. Do some research to find out about some of the social changes of the 1920s, and complete the graphic organizer.” 
    • Students are given a chart that indicates responses for the following sections: "Education, political power, labor and employment, and fashion.”
    • There is a “Research Tip” provided in the sidebar of the Student Edition: “When researching many aspects of a broad subject, look for websites run by organizations dedicated to that subject, and look through the website’s menu for a ‘Resources’ page. This is a good way to find helpful and credible sources.”
    • There is also an “Extend” task presented within the “Research” section: “How did these changes affect women’s relationships with men on an individual and societal level?”

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 (meet, partially meet, do not meet) the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Students are presented with an “Independent Reading” section within the Grade 12 textbook where they are required to use their understanding of the Notice & Note Signposts to aide in their reading, analysis, and deconstruction of their self selected independent reading texts. Within the “Independent Reading” section of the Teacher's Edition instructors are presented with English Learner Support and “When Students Struggle…” sections, as well as lexile levels to help instructors make a more quantitatively conscientious choice for students that struggle to select texts. Also, at the close of the paper copy of the textbook, students also must complete a “Collaborate and Share” section that requires students to discuss a summary of the text(s), signposts seen throughout, what they enjoyed, and a recommendation to a fellow student or group of students.

In addition, the online portal offers assessments after students have read each individual text that include text-reference based questions at the close of every independent reading; and the assessments include the Notice & Note Signpost skills and skills learned throughout the entire unit. And, each unit is centered around an Essential Question that is part of the design of the “Independent Reading” section of the textbook, as all texts in some way revolve around the concepts of the EQ(s). Also, each unit includes the “Suggested Novel Connection” novel that can be incorporated within the whole class model. Students can read this text independently, and unlike the shorter independent reading selections, the suggested novel is generally less complex than the whole class texts. Most students will be able to tackle this text independently, on their own.

In addition to the response log and annotations, each text in the independent reading collection is followed by an assessment which the teacher can assign. The assessment begins with selected response items and includes a short constructed response prompt as well as an extended response prompt. Questions in the assessment are primarily text-based items.

The texts in the independent reading collection represent a variety of modes, genres, and complexities which provides students the opportunity to build stamina through a volume of independent reading or to build strength by reading stretch-level texts.

  • In the Student Edition, ED Online, Unit 1 Independent Reading: 
    • Epic poem: from Beowulf by the Beowulf Poet, translated by Burton Raffel
    • Grendel’s Mother
    • The Battle with Grendel’s Mother
    • Beowulf’s Last Battle
    • The Death of Beowulf
    • Mourning Beowulf
  • In the Student Edition, ED Online, Unit 3 Independent Reading:
    • Poem: “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” by Thomas Gray
    • Article: “Once Below Gas Station, Virginia Cemetery Restored” by Wyatt Andrews
    • Poem: “On Her Loving Two Equally” by Aphra Behn
    • Article: “King George’s Letters Betray Madness, Computer Finds” by Mindy Weisberger
    • Suggested novel: Candide by Voltaire 
  • In the Student Edition, ED Online, Unit 5 Independent Reading:
    • Poem: “Sonnet 43” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning
    • Poem: “Remembrance” by Emily Bronte
    • Article: “The Great Exhibition” by Lara Kriegel
    • Short story: “Christmas Storms and Sunshine” by Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell
    • Essay: “Evidence of Progress” by Thomas Babington Macaulay
    • Suggested novel: A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 6, the Essential Questions are: “What makes people feel insecure?” “Why is it hard to resist social pressure?” “What is the power of symbols?” “When should the government interfere in our decisions?” The independent reading selections are:
    • Short story: “Araby” by James Joyce
    • Speech: "Professions for Women" by Virginia Woolf
    • Poem: “Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night” by Dylan Thomas
    • Poem: “Digging” by Seamus Heaney
    • Short Story: “Marriage Is a Private Affair” by Chinua Achebe
    • Suggested Novel Connection: Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the expectations for instructional supports and usability indicators.  The materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards, as well as offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. Teachers are provided with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards. The materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, and digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Criterion 3a - 3e

Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criterion for materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding. Student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids. The materials include a publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. The visual design is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed (i.e., allows for ease of readability and are effectively organized for planning) and take into account effective lesson structure (e.g., introduction and lesson objectives, teacher modelling, student practice, closure) and short-term and long-term pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. 

The materials in Grade 12 contain six different units which are all designed around an essential question. The units are titled: Origin of a Nation, A Celebration of Human Achievement, Tradition and Reason, Emotion and Experimentation, An Era of Rapid Change, and New Ideas, New Voices. Each unit contains a section called “Analyze and Apply” with a variety of different text genres to explore the question, a section titled “Collaborate and Compare” which has students comparing two pieces, a selection of independent reading and a culminating writing task. Within each unit there is also one text that is identified as the “Mentor Text” for that unit. At the beginning of each unit in the Teacher's Edition there is a page titled “Instructional Overview and Resources”. On this page there is the suggested pacing for the unit along with the pacing for each text and the culminating writing task. Each unit launches with an explanation of the essential question and a specific quotation that connects to this point as well. After the unit begins, teachers are able to guide their students through each text which is followed by a “Check Your Understanding” activity that asks students multiple choice questions on the text, “Analyze the Text” which asks students more thoughtful questions on the passage, a “Research” section that asks students to research something in connection with the text and “Create and Present” which asks students to apply what they have learned. 

  • In the Teacher's Edition,  Unit 1: Origin of a Nation, students are asked to read the short story “Chivalry” by Neil Gaiman. Before reading the text, students are asked to “pay attention to how Mrs, Whitaker reacts to Galaad and the fantastic objects she comes across in the story”. After reading the text, students are asked three questions to “Check Your Understanding” and then five analysis questions. Next, on page 78 they are asked to “conduct an Internet search to discover more about the legend of Sir Galahad”. Finally, they are given instructions for writing a fantasy scene and presenting that scene with a partner. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 3: Tradition and Reason, students are asked to read the poem “The Rape of the Lock” by Alexander Pope. Before reading the poem students are asked to “look for ways that Pope makes fun of the aristocracy through his description of this incident, including his use of elevated language and other characteristics of epic poetry”. After reading the text, students are asked three questions to “Check your understanding” followed by five analysis questions. Then on page 176, students are asked to find a partner and “do research to learn more about fashions and trends in Britain at the time Pope wrote the poem”. Next, students are asked to write a rhymed satirical poem and then discuss the poem along with Pope’s work.
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 6: New Ideas, New Voices. Students are asked to read the short story “My Daughter the Racist” by Helen Oyeyemi. Before reading the text, students are given the instructions that they should “notice how the narrator’s wish to support her daughter’s independent spirit comes into conflict with the need to protect her”.  Following their reading of the text, students are asked three questions to “Check Your Understanding” followed by five analysis questions. Then, inspired by issues in the short originality.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

Within the textbook, there are six units of study. Per unit, the suggested pacing is thirty days, and the days allotted to certain lessons, for pacing, depend upon the text, text type, tasks, etc. required of students. Larger texts such as Shakespearean plays, novels, excerpts from novels, epic poems, and larger short stories are text selections with tasks that instructors will need to spend more time with their students on, and this is reflected in the pacing guide. The “Collaborate & Compare” section, where students are comparing two texts, usually require the longest time period of focus; this is so that each text and task allows students to gain the maximum understanding of content. For Grades 11 and 12, students experience two “Collaborate & Compare” sections where each are three to five days--totaling similarly with Grades 9 and 10. What stays consistent in terms of pacing, regardless, is the Independent Reading and End of Unit sections--two and three days. The Unit Introduction also is consistent totalling one day. The suggested pacing and overview of unit can be found in the “Instructional Overview and Resources” section. 

Within Unit 1, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • From Beowulf: Grendel, Beowulf, The Battle with Grendel: 6 days
  • From The Canterbury Tales: The Wife of Bath’s Tale: 3 days
  • From Le Morte d’Arthur: 3 days
  • “Chivalry”: 3 days
  • From The Paston Letters / from My Syrian Diary: 4 days
  • “The Wanderer” / “Loneliness”: 5 days
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Within Unit 2, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • The Tragedy of Hamlet: 6 days
  • From Hamlet (film clip): 3 days
  • “Hamlet’s Dull Revenge”: 2 days
  • “Sonnet 30 / Sonnet 75”: 3 days
  • “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning”: 2 days
  • “To His Coy Mistress” / "Twenty-One Love Poems (Poem III)": 4 days
  • From “Speech Before the Spanish Armada Invasion” / “For Army Infantry’s First Women, Heavy Packs and the Weight of History”: 4 days 
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Within Unit 3, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • From The Rape of the Lock: 3 days
  • “A Modest Proposal”: 3 days
  • “Satire Is Dying Because the Internet Is Killing It”: 3 days
  • From The Journal and Letters of Fanny Burney: An Encounter with King George III: 4 days
  • From A Vindication of the Rights of Woman / “Education Protects Women from Abuse”: 5 days
  • From A Journal of the Plague Year / from Inferno: A Doctor’s Ebola Story: 6 days
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Within Unit 4, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • Poems by William Wordsworth: 5 days
  • “Ode on a Grecian Urn”: 3 days
  • From Frankenstein: 5 days
  • “Frankenstein: Giving Voice to the Monster”: 3 days
  • “Ode to the West Wind” / “Song of a Thatched Hut Damaged in Autumn Wind”: 4 days
  • From Songs of Innocence / from Songs of Experience: 4 days
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Within Unit 5, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • From Jane Eyre: 5 days
  • “Factory Reform”: 3 days
  • “The Lady of Shalott” 3 days
  • From Great Expectations: 5 days
  • “The Victorians Had the Same Concerns About Technology As We Do”: 2 days
  • “Dover Beach” / “The Darkling Thrush”: 3 days
  • “My Last Duchess” / “Confession”: 4 days
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Within Unit 6, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • “A Cup of Tea”: 3 days
  • “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”: 4 days
  • “Shooting an Elephant”: 4 days
  • “My Daughter the Racist”: 5 days
  • “The Second Coming” / “Symbols? I’m Sick of Symbols”: 3 days
  • “Budget 2016: George Osborne’s Speech” / “Will the Sugar Tax Stop Childhood Obesity?”: 5 days
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (eg. visuals, maps, etc.)

The grade 12 materials are organized into a consistent structure with careful attention to lesson design. Students move from an introduction to the essential questions and focus elements of the text instructions into a close reading with significant scaffolding and support included, to post-reading instruction to deepen knowledge and develop skills. The textbook, whether print or digital, includes prompts or live links to an accompanying digital resource that provides an opportunity for independent learning or intervention instruction. This can be selected by the student or assigned by the teacher. 

Each unit in grade 12 begins with an introduction to the essential question for the unit, an introduction to the essential academic vocabulary, and a brief reminder to use Notice & Note strategies (learned and practiced in previous grades, but no longer supported with direct instruction) while reading in the unit. Each text is structured similarly. 

  • Get Ready provides students with a Quick Start to connect prior knowledge, instructions for analyzing the mode or genre of text, a preview of critical vocabulary within the text, and an opportunity to focus on language conventions demonstrated within the text. 
  • While reading, students are prompted in the margins to annotate the text including elements of Notice & Note strategies, use of selected conventions, elements of the essential focus of analysis. Critical vocabulary is also defined in the margins. 
  • After reading, students respond to constructed response prompts in the Analyze text section. Research suggests areas to explore further. Create and Present asks students to write and present analysis, research, and synthesis of ideas from across the text or multiple texts. Critical Vocabulary and Language Conventions are also reviewed at the end of the reading.
  • Students with access to the digital texts are prompted to visit the appropriate Studio (i.e. the Vocabulary Studio or Writing Studio) for specific support including explanation of a topic with examples and practice. This may be suggested in a margin note in the printed text or with a live link in the digital text.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria that materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

The publisher does provide a Standards Correlation resource that lists each standard and the page number of the student resource or related Studio where the standard is addressed or assessed. The pages indicated include a specific set of questions, tasks, or assessment items. While the user will not see a specific item assigned to a standard (i.e. "RL.12.3 is found on page 12 and page 12 includes directions for annotating text and inference recorded in a reading log"), the items on the page may represent a variety of applications.

However, the standards are not called out specifically in a consistent manner within the Teacher's Edition or Student Edition to make these connections explicit and reinforce the skills they are learning.

The Common Core State Standards document includes each standard and the page where instruction and assessment can be found in the student text. The page number refers to the printed text and does not reflect navigation through the digital text. 

  • RL.12.3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). 
  • SE: 12, 13, 25, 40, 59, 65, 67, 70, 78, 147, 153, 156, 167, 171, 176, 179, 182, 185, 188, 197, 198, 212, 220, 226, 231, 238, 241, 248, 255, 257, 268, 272, 449, 593, 596, 597, 598, 600, 601, 603, 604, 606, 627, 629, 631, 633, 634, 636, 638, 697, 739, 742, 746, 752
  • On page 12, students are instructed to: 
    • "Annotate: Highlight words and phrases in lines 109–124 that characterize Beowulf as a hero."
    • "Infer: What is the hero’s motivation to go on this quest?"
  • On page 13, students are instructed to:
    • "Annotate: Highlight the words or phrases in lines 131–141 describing Beowulf."
    • "Analyze: What mood is created by the poet’s word choice?"

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The Student Edition pages are perforated and have hole punches for easy transfer to a binder or for single use; students are also expected to include margin notes and annotations throughout each text read, thus, there is ample room for margin notes. Elements throughout every unit are color coded for easy identification; for example, Unit Intro (yellow), Collaborate & Compare (orange), Independent Reading (dark orange), Writing Task (purple), each text within each unit is a varying different shade/ color to indicate a change in text. The tasks and activities included follow the color tab along with the paired text. 

Each section is labeled in the same manner, such as “Analyze the Text,” “Research,” and “Create and Discuss”; there is a definite pattern and organization before, during, and after each text read. The Teacher's Edition is a mirror image of the student edition; the main difference between the Teacher's Edition and Student Edition is that the Teacher's Edition includes additional and extensive teacher notes within the sidebar. While this might be confusing at first, acclimation occurs over time and is extremely helpful as instructor can empathize with what students are seeing. 

All response logs are located at the close of the Student Edition for quick access. 

Within the online platform the following supports are included for students: Reading Studio, Writing Studio, Speaking & Listening Studio, Grammar Studio, and Vocabulary Studio. Instructors are also provided with a “Digital Sampler,” which previews formative assessments, engaging instruction progress monitoring & differentiation, summative assessment, and professional support. The digital materials, when providing students with scores immediately, informs instruction. Additionally, where relevant, the print copy of the Student Edition and Teacher's Edition encourage students to visit the website for additional supports such as the studios. The online application also offers complete and full texts including Additional Connections, which are usually novels or novellas for extended reading, not included within the print text. And, the images included are relevant and adhere to the topics that are covered per unit.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criterion for materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards. The materials contain a Teacher's Edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the Student Edition and in the ancillary materials. The materials contain a Teacher’s Edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary. The Teacher’s Edition explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. The materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies. 

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning..

Within the paper materials delivered to teachers, the following supports are included: 

  • Teacher’s Edition textbook
  • Student Edition textbook
  • Digital Sampler: A New Comprehensive Literacy Solution
  • Assessment Guide
  • Social-Emotional Learning with Learning Mindset
  • Novel & Trade Book Brochure
  • Table of Contents Brochure
  • Research Foundations: Evidence Base
  • Common Core State Standards Correlation

And, while each of the above has a separate booklet to inform instructors on how each is used throughout HMH, within the Teacher's Edition of the textbook, each of the above is touched on, again, at the very front of the textbook. Also consistent within the beginning of the book, instructors are presented with a condensed overview of the online platform.

Instructions within the Teacher's Edition give specific supports on Dr. Kylene Beers and Dr. Robert E. Probst’s text Notice & Note and how to implement the text holistically throughout each textbook via the sections at the beginning of the Teacher’s Edition; “The Perspicacious Reader (And yes, you want to be one)” and “Reading and Writing Across Genres.” Throughout the textbook, Notice & Note strategies are applied explicitly at the beginning of each Notice & Note Reading Model--an identified text that students are required to practice specific Sign Posts with. Also, throughout both the Teacher's Edition and Student Edition, there are annotation supports for the Sign Posts and what students should be identifying while reading.

Within each unit in the paper materials, instructors are given an “Instructional Overview and Resources” section that previews instructional focus, online Ed resources, English Learner support, differentiated instruction, online Ed assessment, and suggested pacing. And, at the beginning of each unit, instructors and students alike are given a unit introduction where the essential question (EQ) is reviewed. During this section, there is a plethora of teacher notes within the Teacher's Edition along the sidebar to assist students to reach maximum understanding and comprehension of the concepts of the unit, including but not limited to the following sidebar sections in the Teacher's Edition: Connect to the Essential Question, Discuss the Quotation, Academic Vocabulary, Respond to the Essential Question, Learning Mindset, and English Learner Support.

Before every text read and deconstructed, instructors are presented with a “Plan” section that usually includes genre elements, learning objectives, a text complexity analysis, online Ed resources, summaries (in English and Spanish), and small group options. Before each text instructors are also presented with Text X-Ray: English Learner Support: "Use the Text X-Ray and the supports and scaffolds in the Teacher’s Edition to help guide students at different proficiency levels through the selection.” Within this section there are supports for listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Also, the Teacher's Edition is an exact replica of the Student Edition with the exception of all additional teacher notes located within the sidebar--for which there are many. For every section that students encounter, there is an equal teacher note that includes instructions or dialogue to students, directions, answers, and higher order thinking prompts/questions to push students further. Within the Teacher's Edition, there are also ample ELL supports as well as challenges for students that master the material the first time. Also, expressed within the answers located in the side bar for corresponding sections in the Student Edition, instructors are presented DOK levels.

Within the Teacher's Edition, like the Student Edition, there are colored tabs at the top of the pages that indicate different sections for easy moving throughout and within the textbook; these match the Student Edition so that instructors may see and empathize with what students are seeing to make instruction and learning more meaningful and seamless.

The sections within each unit within the Teacher's Edition, for individual texts, are as follows:

  • Plan
  • Teach
  • Apply

Lastly, within the online Ed application, the following supports are included for instructors, some of which mirror the student portal access:

  • Professional Learning
  • Speaking & Listening Studio
  • Student Edition
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Current Events
  • Reading Studio
  • Grammar Studio
  • Teacher’s Edition
  • Text Library
  • Media Projects
  • Writing Studio
  • Vocabulary Studio
  • Assessment
  • Intervention, Review, & Extension
  • State-Specific Resources

Also located within the Teacher's Edition of the online portal is the “Data & Reports” tab that includes an assessment report, standards report, and growth report. These tools inform instructors on their next steps with students to inform instruction.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

Instructors are presented with a large body of supporting materials to improve knowledge of the subject. At the beginning of each unit, educators are provided with an “Instructional Overview and Resources”. This outline contains the instructional focus as well as the reading, writing, speaking & listening, vocabulary and language convention targets for each individual text. In addition, they provide online resources, English learner support, differentiated instruction as well as a suggested pacing guide for the texts in this section. Before each text, they provide detailed notes for educator support including how-guides, example scripts for teacher-student interaction, detailed explanations of the content, and the learning objectives. In addition, they explain the genre elements, provide details on the text complexity including qualitative measures and a brief summary of what students will be reading. In more specific detail they are provided a Text X-Ray for English Learner Support, this gives educators detailed information on how to introduce the selection, cultural references and how to support students’ at various levels of proficiency. At the end of each unit, students are tasked with writing a Culminating Writing Task. Educators are given student exemplars as well as a rubric to help support and assess students’ writing. Throughout each text there are sidebars that provide additional support for teachers, a box that is titled When Students Struggle that gives additional insight to educators for any issues that may arrive and even social-emotional support for students which are the boxes labeled Learning Mindset.  

  • In Unit 2, students are asked to read the play The Tragedy of Hamlet by William Shakespeare. While reading the play the Teacher's Edition give instructions to educators under the heading “To Challenge Students” that provide additional assistance to teachers. Specifically, the directions explain that educators should have students “analyze the character of Hamlet as he is presented through the eyes of Laertes and Polonius. Have them identify words and phrases that reveal these characters’ views of him. Then ask students to discuss these questions in small groups: Does the portrayal of Hamlet by Laertes and Polonius match your impression of his character as seen so far in this act? And considering Hamlet is the future king of Denmark, why would Laertes and Polonius oppose his attentions to Ophelia? What might their underlying motives be?" 
  • In Unit 4, students are asked to read the poems from Songs of Innocence by William Blake. Before beginning the poems, in the sidebar it explains that educators should “ask students what ideas come to mind when they hear the word symbol. Challenge them to provide examples of what they have heard or read about and to explain what these symbols represent. Remind students that a symbol can have multiple representations or interpretations--it may mean one thing in one context and another in a different one. Ask students to think of symbols that might have different interpretations. Provide an example to stimulate their thinking…Encourage students to think of the different representations a symbol might have and how meaning might shift as a result of how it is used.” 
  • In Unit 6, students are asked to read the poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” by T.S. Eliot. As students are reading the text, the Teacher's Edition sidebar explains that educators should “discuss the two metaphors in lines 55-61….ask students who Prufrock imagines will ‘pin’ him to the wall. Then, tell them to make an inference about his relationship with women at parties based on these images.” For each of these prompts, an answer is provided that educators can explain or share with students.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

The instructional materials are available in two forms, print and digital. The print version of the Teacher's Edition includes annotated student edition materials that explain the design of the materials, pacing, instructional strategies, assessment, and how the approach fosters a growth mindset and independence. A separate standards alignment document is included as well as an assessment guide.

The digital teacher materials include professional learning modules that introduce all of the materials and allow a teacher to explore the concepts presented in the student materials. These modules are primarily videos with brief activities that allow teachers to learn at their own pace. Through the teacher materials and learning modules, the approach to teaching reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language components are clearly explained and demonstrated.

The Professional Learning Modules include:

  • Introduction: understand the organization of the materials
  • Exploration: dig deeper into the specific expectations and strategies within the units of study
  • Reflection: synthesize information and record learning
  • Application: begin planning classroom use
  • Getting started: demonstrate application

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies.

The Teacher's Edition begins with an introduction to the consultants who created the program. Each is respected across the English Language Arts/Literacy community and represent widely published strategies based on research and documented success. The materials also include a handbook of the research foundations that underpin the entire program.  Topics supported by the research include student-centered learning; the integration of reading, writing, speaking and listening; data-driven growth demonstrated through a balanced assessment system; and blended professional learning and services that support modeling and coaching of instructional strategies and practices. 

Program consultants are:

Kylene Beers Nationally known lecturer and author on reading and literacy; coauthor with Robert Probst of Disrupting Thinking, Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading, and Reading Nonfiction; former president of the National Council of Teachers of English. Dr. Beers is the author of When Kids Can’t Read: What Teachers Can Do and coeditor of Adolescent Literacy: Turning Promise into Practice, as well as articles in the Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy. Former editor of Voices from the Middle, she is the 2001 recipient of NCTE’s Richard W. Halle Award, given for outstanding contributions to middle school literacy. She recently served as Senior Reading Researcher at the Comer School Development Program at Yale University as well as Senior Reading Advisor to Secondary Schools for the Reading and Writing Project at Teachers College.

Martha Hougen National consultant, presenter, researcher, and author. Areas of expertise include differentiating instruction for students with learning difficulties, including those with learning disabilities and dyslexia; and teacher and leader preparation improvement. Dr. Hougen has taught at the middle school through graduate levels. In addition to peer-reviewed articles, curricular documents, and presentations, Dr. Hougen has published two college textbooks: The Fundamentals of Literacy Assessment and Instruction Pre-K–6 (2012) and The Fundamentals of Literacy Assessment and Instruction 6–12 (2014). Dr. Hougen has supported Educator Preparation Program reforms while working at the Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk at The University of Texas at Austin and at the CEEDAR Center, University of Florida.

Elena Izquierdo Nationally recognized teacher educator and advocate for English language learners. Dr. Izquierdo is a linguist by training, with a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics and Bilingual Education from Georgetown University. She has served on various state and national boards working to close the achievement gaps for bilingual students and English language learners. Dr. Izquierdo is a member of the Hispanic Leadership Council, which supports Hispanic students and educators at both the state and federal levels. She served as Vice President on the Executive Board of the National Association of Bilingual Education and as Publications and Professional Development Chair.

Carol Jago Teacher of English with 32 years of experience at Santa Monica High School in California; author and nationally known lecturer; former president of the National Council of Teachers of English. Ms. Jago currently serves as Associate Director of the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA. With expertise in standards assessment and secondary education, Ms. Jago is the author of numerous books on education, including With Rigor for All and Papers, Papers, Papers, and is active with the California Association of Teachers of English, editing its scholarly journal California English since 1996. Ms. Jago also served on the planning committee for the 2009 NAEP Reading Framework and the 2011 NAEP Writing Framework. 

Erik Palmer Veteran teacher and education consultant based in Denver, Colorado. Author of Well Spoken: Teaching Speaking to All Students and Digitally Speaking: How to Improve Student Presentations. His areas of focus include improving oral communication, promoting technology in classroom presentations, and updating instruction through the use of digital tools. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Oberlin College and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Colorado.

Robert E. Probst Nationally respected authority on the teaching of literature; Professor Emeritus of English Education at Georgia State University. Dr. Probst’s publications include numerous articles in English Journal and Voices from the Middle, as well as professional texts including (as coeditor) Adolescent Literacy: Turning Promise into Practice and (as coauthor with Kylene Beers) Disrupting Thinking, Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading, and Reading Nonfiction. He regularly speaks at national and international conventions including those of the International Literacy Association, the National Council of Teachers of English, the Association of Supervisors and Curriculum Developers, and the National Association of Secondary School Principals. He has served NCTE in various leadership roles, including the Conference on English Leadership Board of Directors, the Commission on Reading, and column editor of the NCTE journal Voices from the Middle. He is also the 2004 recipient of the CEL Exemplary Leader Award.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Students and teachers are well informed regarding strategies and suggestions in how achievement and progress can be achieved. Based on the systems provided, it is easy for instructors to present the literacy program, suggestions for support, progress, and achievement strategies to parents and other stakeholders.

However while the instructional materials include strategies for informing students about the ELA/literacy program, there is no evidence that this program is shared with other stakeholders, nor are there suggestions for parents and caregivers to support their student’s progress and/or achievement. The program assists students to be autonomous learners and teaches strategies to reach grade level standards. There is progress tracking data available to provide teachers with information to differentiate.

  • The materials provide opportunities for ongoing assessment and data reporting utilizing a Report on Student Growth and Report on Standards Proficiency.
  • Reports in Ed allow teachers to view progress by class, students, assignments, and skill level. Teachers can adjust instruction based on the results in real time.
  • The materials include opportunities for formative assessments, peer reviews, and Reflect on the Unit questions which students can use to monitor their progress.
  • The assessment materials provide data for students and teachers on ongoing progress. Teachers and students have access to growth measurements, unit assessments, and ongoing formative assessments such as daily classwork checks.
  • Teachers have ways to differentiate and adjust a student's instructional path including but not limited to the instructional purpose, standard, or genre. There are also a variety of supports that teachers can assign based on assessment data. These features are accessible in the online features.
  • Students can also track their data and access support material in the online features.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criterion for materials offer teacher resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. The materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized and they provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up. The materials include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. The materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

Each unit includes an abundance of formative assessment opportunities that provide teachers an opportunity to quickly and regularly adjust instruction as needed to continuously support progress. Items represent a variety of forms and measures including on-demand and process writing, comprehension as well as analysis, and various modes and media. 

Formative assessment opportunities within each unit occur daily and include;

  • Check your understanding
  • Selection tests
  • Writing tasks
  • Independent reading
  • Usage data
  • Online essay scoring
  • Teacher observations
  • Research projects 

Unit assessments identify mastery of skills covered during the course of the unit across all literacy strands and occur six times per year - at the end of each unit. 

Adaptive growth measures occur three times per year and allow teachers to gain an understanding of where students are on the learning continuum and identify students in need of intervention or enrichment.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

The Teacher's Edition includes an opportunity to see all standards addressed and assessed with each lesson. Individual standards are not noted for each item; rather, standards are presented en masse in the alignment materials and addressed in an integrated manner within the materials. The standards for Common Core State Standards as well as several states are listed. 

It is possible for teachers to determine which specific standard(s) is assessed but item-level alignment is left to teacher judgement. 

In both the student edition and Teacher's Edition, standards are listed directly under the title of the instructional element for each text. Clicking on the “show details” link provides a detailed list of all standards before opening the link to the activity or materials. 

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up

Unit assessment identify mastery of skills covered during the course of the unit across all literacy strands and occur six times per year - at the end of each unit. 

Adaptive growth measures occur three times per year and allow teachers to gain an understanding of where students are on the learning continuum and identify students in need of intervention or enrichment. Actionable reports are available in the digital resource. Teachers can review student performance then assign specific texts, tasks, or supports such as elements of a Studio as needed. Tutorials in the form of videos are available for professional learning and can be accessed any time.  These tutorials explain how to create and access class and student reports to monitor progress. 

Formative assessment opportunities within each unit occur daily and include;

  • Check your understanding
  • Selection tests
  • Writing tasks
  • Independent reading
  • Usage data
  • Online essay scoring
  • Teacher observations

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Teachers can monitor student progress through formative assessment analysis and provide actionable feedback or select appropriate instructional strategies consistently.  Each text is structured to develop routines such as annotating text for literary elements, Notice & Note strategies, vocabulary development, and instructional focus as introduced before reading. Each unit ends with a writing task, presentation or collaboration, and a reflection on learning across the unit which gives the student a voice in determining next steps based on identified needs or interest. 

Routine structures include analysis of a mentor text as well as reference to the mentor text when assigning the end of unit task. 

Guidance often takes the form of a reminder to reference a topic in a Studio to support learning as needed. For example, after reading “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” by John Donne, students are assigned an essay. In the margin, students are directed to Writing Narratives in the Writing Studio. Also, there is the Assessment Guide presented to instructors that captures growth measure, diagnostic assessments, interim assessments, and etc. All of these components display measurable tracking per individual student online when students complete assessments through the online platform. Instructors are able to check student progress, view diagnostic skills-based assessment results, view the student growth report, and diagnostic screening(s).

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Each unit includes a selection of texts that students can read independently if they choose. Each text provides students an opportunity to further explore the essential question and include a variety of genres that inspire motivation to read and various complexities to build stamina through a volume of reading. 

The independent reading section of each unit in the student edition begins with a review of the essential question for the unit, a reminder of Notice & Note signposts and how they applied to texts in the whole-class study, and a live link to the reading studio for additional supports. After the independent reading texts, students can reflect on the texts and apply their learning to the end of unit writing task. 

Each unit also includes a suggested novel that is related to the essential question. Students continue to apply reading strategies learned in class to support analysis of text recorded in the reading journal. Teachers can also collect assessment data from digital assessments assigned to students as they read.

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criterion for materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards. The materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards. The materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards. The materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

The teacher’s edition includes a plan or roadmap for the unit at the beginning of each unit. The plan includes the instructional focus aligned to grade-level standards, resources to support whole class instruction, specific resources to support English learners, and strategies for differentiated instruction. This includes resources to support students who struggle and resources to provide further challenge. 

Also included within each unit, throughout the unit, strategies and sections such as Learning Mindset, English Learner Support, Plan, Text X-Ray: English Learner Support, Notice & Note, To Challenge Students, Applying Academic Vocabulary, When Students Struggle, etc. These strategies and sections assist instructors in helping students reach or exceed the grade-level standards. Most of these sections and strategies are located within the side-bar of the Teacher's Edition; however, there are supports located directly within the Student Edition for student assistance. These supports include online links to the online platform, for example: “Go to the Grammar Studio for more on noun clauses,” “go to the Vocabulary Studio for more on patterns of word changes,” “Research Tip,” “Academic Vocabulary,” among other helpful tips and strategies.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

All students are expected to engage with grade-level texts. The text sets for whole class instruction and for independent reading include a range of complexities across the grade band with some just below and some just above. Strategies to scaffold complex text, access grade level learning targets, and support specific cultural references or contexts are provided in the teacher resource materials in print and online. The “Text X-Ray: English Learner Support” section, in the teacher materials, include suggestions for how to introduce the primary content or literary topics in the text, cultural references explained, and strategies for listening, speaking, reading, and writing relative to the text. During the reading of the text, a box labeled “When Students Struggle…” provide detailed explanations of intricacies within the text and how to provide support for understanding. Suggestions for assigning specific tutorials in one of the Studios is noted as appropriate. Margin notes accompany the text to provide “English Learner Support” to identify specific needs or topics relative to identified sections of text.

Also, located within the Teacher's Edition, before every text, there is a summary section with both English and Spanish summary translations.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Each unit plan includes suggestions for periodically challenging students, and Challenge tasks build on whole-class activities to extend or deepen learning. However, these opportunities are in less than half of the texts with no opportunities in the others. Some of these tasks require students to do additional work rather than a differentiated task. For example, students may extend a research topic, make inferences across multiple texts, hold a staged reading, write a memoir, compare poems, identify allusions, or sketch and analyze the Globe Theater. Students can also select more challenging texts for independent reading, but the focus is more on adding tasks than growing literacy. 

Also, within and throughout each unit there are sections such as “To Challenge Students…”; goal setting sections such as “Learning Mindset” to challenge students; open ended response questions within the “Respond to the Essential Question” section; and, extension tasks/questions within Research sections.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

At the beginning of each unit, specific strategies for small-group options are provided with detailed support for at least two methods of grouping students during class instruction. Also, throughout every unit, instructors are presented with various whole class questions located within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition; there are also questions and tasks located within the sidebar of the Student Edition, that are up to instructor discretion for how they may be answered--individually, in pairs, groups, or whole class--along with the annotation models and tasks throughout each reading. Students may be paired or placed in groups to read.

  • Within the Teacher's Edition, Unit 1, students read excerpts from Beowulf. The Small-Group options are as follows:
    • “Review Literary Terms”: Students are given a list of literary terms and phrases; as students discuss, they must use the terms.
    • “Jigsaw with Experts”: Students are designated a numbered section of the text; students are then to discuss the same numbered section as their number. Students then form a new group with a representative from each section, and “these groups should discuss all the sections and the selection as a whole.”
  • Within the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4, students read “Ode to the West Wind,” by Percy Bysshe Shelley, and “Song of a Thatched Hut Damaged in Autumn Wind,” by Du Fu. The Small-Group options are as follows:
    • “Three-Minute Review”: The instructor will pause during reading or lecture; students will then take three minutes to “work independently to reread material, review class notes, and write clarifying questions...then hold a brief discussion and clarification.”
    • “Final Word”: Students give their impressions of “Song of a Thatched Hut Damaged in Autumn Wind” to the group, and other students off their impressions as well. Then, “return to the original student ask if he or she would like to revise his or her initial impression based on the responses of the group.”

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criterion for materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms. Digital materials are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers, “platform neutral,” follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations and the materials can be easily customized for local use. The materials do not include a collaboration platform.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. This qualifies as substitution and augmentation as defined by the SAMR model. Materials can be easily integrated into existing learning management systems.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The digital materials included with the textbooks are web-based compatible programs. They are able to be accessed across multiple browsers including Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox and Microsoft Edge. They are able to be opened with both Apple and PC products as well as smart phones of both kinds including Microsoft, Apple and Google operating systems. In addition, they follow a universal programming style and both students and teachers should be able to access them using tablets including Apple iPads and Microsoft Surfaces, mobile devices like an iPhone or Samsung Galaxy or computers such as a Chromebook or iMac. All digital material including documents, slide decks and videos were accessible on desktops, laptops, tablets and mobile devices. The digital format is clear and easy to read. The navigation on all devices were smooth and straightforward.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate and providing opportunities for modification and redefinition as defined by the SAMR model.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. 

EDonline substitutes digital texts for print matter with a formatting that appears much like the bound textbooks. Text sets are augmented by exclusively digital texts such as audio or video recordings. Available in the student edition, these digital texts place control of viewing and listening in the student’s hands, modifying traditional classroom use. Students can replay as much as needed to focus on evidence in the digital text and analyze craft as well as use in assigned tasks. This may be particularly helpful for language learners and struggling students. 

Technology reaches redefinition by providing immediate flexibility of text and task selection; asking students to do digital tasks like creating a blog, video, or podcast; allowing students to annotate text while reading then collecting those notes for review; providing a variety of formative assessments that teachers can track for evidence of need for intervention or extension; and linking Studio resources to points in the text or tasks that may benefit from a tutorial or review. 

EDonline allows teachers the opportunity to assign selected texts or tasks in response to assessment data. Teachers can assign whole or parts of Studio resources as they recognize need.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. 

The digital materials essentially include that which the textbooks include; however, there are more materials online that support extension and remediation. The online materials assist instructors in personalizing learning for students as the online platform creates a baseline for progress monitoring regarding everything from analysis to the cumulative writing task. And, “Into Literature gives you the ability to curate a unique learning path for each student through ongoing assessments that yield actionable data...” 

Also, included within the Digital Sampler booklet for instructors, the section “Engaging Elements Captivate Student Interest” details the Stream to Start videos that assist in personalized learning as students are captivated before reading. Also, this section of the booklet details specified and individual guidance on how to close read within the online portal, specific videos for students that struggle with certain standards/skills, and interactive graphic organizers to students that need a challenge or additional support (included but not limited to Word Networks and Response Logs). And, students don’t need Wifi to access the materials: “...download when you’re online and access what you need when you’re offline. Work offline and then upload when you’re back online.” The materials are accommodating to students even if they do not have access to internet in their homes.

Additionally, “Interactive peer and teacher feedback loops dramatically improve student performance. An additional 55+ assignable, interactive writing lessons and Level Up tutorials that focus on specific skills are available in the Writing Studio.” For example, “Online scoring allows students to receive quick feedback before submitting their work and gives teachers the option of a supported grading process.” 

And, while there are a plethora of other ways students can personalize their learning with aid of the instructor, these are also worth mentioning: 

  • “Online Independent Reading Gives Students Voice and Choice”
  • Extensive Digital Library
  • “Give Students Ownership to Manage Their Learning”
    • Students are able to “...quickly access texts and resources...track their progress throughout the year...monitor upcoming due dates and let the teacher know when their work is ready for feedback.”
  • “Quickly Differentiate Using Real-Time Data”
  • “Assign New Learning Opportunities with Studio Educational Resources”
    • Reading Studio
    • Writing Studio
    • Speaking & Listening Studio
    • Grammar Studio
    • Vocabulary Studio
  • “Self-Guided Lessons Allow for Remediation, Support, and Extension”

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized by schools, systems, and states for local use.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

The Into Literature textbook series is designed for instructor and student choice. All online materials as well as paper materials are easily customizable for district, administrative, instructor, and student use. 

Within the Research Foundations: Evidence Base booklet: “For teachers, Into Literature provides a flexible design, including expanded access to rich and varied digital resources for each literacy strand.”

In the Digital Sampler Booklet, in the section titled, “The Ultimate Flexibility to Teach Your Way” instructors may “Use Into Literature’s instructional path or create [their] own unique units with intuitive online planning tools.” Some pathways instructors can use to inform their decisions on what and how to use the curriculum are “Teach by Theme,” “Teach by Instructional Purpose,” “Teach by Standard,” and “Teach by Genre”--all of which can be found with these titles in the online platform. Instructors can also choose selections, customize instructions (especially in the online platform as they can build exams and tasks), and assign activities.

The textbook itself is easily customizable as in the Student Edition, pages are perforated and expected to be written upon by students; also, instructors may utilize what they choose from the units as additional material can be found in the online platform: “Interactive peer and teacher feedback loops dramatically improve student performance. An additional 55+ assignable, interactive writing lessons and Level Up tutorials that focus on specific skills are available in the Writing Studio.”

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 do not meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)

The materials reviewed for Grade 12 do not meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and students to collaborate with each other. Collaboration within the curriculum only occurs in person within groups; there is no utilization of online platforms or technologies that promote teacher or students collaboration.

  • There is no evidence of any online collaboration between students in any format whether that be discussion, editing and reviewing, websites, or webinars.
  • Although there are digital resources such as the Speaking & Listening Studio with self-paced lessons for students, there is not a digital discussion board or any evidence of a website to host student to student or student to teacher collaboration.
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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 11/07/2019

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
HMH Into Literature Grade 12 Student Print/Digital Package 978-1-328-60751-5 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2020
HMH Into Literature Grade 12 Teacher Print/Digital Package 978-1-328-60807-9 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2020

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA HS Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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