Alignment: Overall Summary

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for Alignment to the CCSSM. In Gateway 1, the materials meet expectations for focus and coherence, and in Gateway 2, the materials meet expectations for rigor and practice-content connections.

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
14
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
18
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
17
24
27
24
24-27
Meets Expectations
18-23
Partially Meets Expectations
0-17
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for focus and coherence. For focus, the materials assess grade-level content and provide all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards. For coherence, the materials are coherent and consistent with the CCSSM.

Criterion 1a - 1b

Materials assess grade-level content and give all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

6/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for focus as they assess grade-level content and provide all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

Indicator 1a

Materials assess the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for assessing grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades.

Within the i-Ready Classroom Mathematics materials, the Unit Assessments are found in the Teacher Toolbox and include two forms for Unit Assessment, Form A and Form B. Both Forms contain similar problems for each unit. The Unit Assessments can be found at the end of each unit in the materials. 

Examples of assessment items in i-Ready Classroom Mathematics include:

  • Unit 1, Unit Assessment, Form A, Problem 5, assesses 6.G.1 as students find the area of a parallelogram by decomposing it into a rectangle. “The parallelogram shown on the grid represents Leta's current garden. The side of each grid square represents 1 ft. Leta wants to redesign her garden so that it is a rectangle with the same area as her current garden. Explain how Leta can redesign her garden.” A grid with a parallelogram (base of 4ft, height of 5ft) is provided.

  • Unit 2, Unit Assessment, Form A, Problem 11, assesses 6.NS.1 as students compute quotients of fractions. “What does it mean to divide with fractions? Use models and words to describe how to divide with fractions. Use $$1\frac{1}{4}$$÷$$\frac{5}{8}$$ in your response. Show your work.”

  • Unit 3, Unit Assessment, Form A, Problem 9, assesses 6.RP.3 as students use ratio and rate reasoning to solve a real-world problem. “Rashid reads a total of 35 pages every 5 days. Based on this information, how many days will it take Rashid to read a total of 84 pages? Record your answer in the grid. Then fill in the bubbles.”  

  • Unit 4 Unit Assessment, Form B, Problem 6, assesses 6.RP.2 as students solve a real-world problem using unit rate. "At a fabric store, metallic ribbon costs $16 for 4 ft. White ribbon is priced at 3ft per dollar. Use rates to show which kind of ribbon is more expensive per foot. Show your work."

  • Unit 6, Unit Assessment, Form A, Problem 2, assesses 6.EE.8 as students write and graph inequalities. “There are at least 6 tomato plants in Josephine’s garden. She plants 4 more tomato plants. Write and graph an inequality to show the number of tomato plants in her garden.”

One assessment item aligned to a standard beyond Grade 6. This problem can be omitted from the assessment and would not require major modifications to modify the assessment.

  • Unit 5, Unit Assessment, Form A, Problem 8, “Stoyanka collects donations for an animal shelter. At the end of March, she had $545.40 in donations. In April, she collects donations of $20.20 each. At the end of April, she had $787.80 in donations. Use an equation with a variable to find the number of donations Stoyaka collects in April.” The materials align this problem to 6.EE.7, which indicates an equation in the form x + p = q.  This problem aligns to 7.EE.4, as it results in the equation in the form px + q = r. $545.40 + $20.20x = $787.80.

Indicator 1b

Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for giving all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards. In the materials, there are ample opportunities for students to work with grade level problems. This includes:  

  • Lessons contain multiple opportunities for students to work with grade-level problems in the “Try It”, “Discuss It”, “Connect It”, “Apply It”, and “Practice” sections of the lessons. 

  • Differentiation of grade-level concepts for small groups are found in the “Reteach”, “Reinforce”, and “Extend” sections of each lesson. 

  • Fluency and Skills Practice problems are included in the Math Toolkit in addition to the lessons.

  • Interactive tutorials for the majority of the lessons include a 17 minute interactive skill tutorial as an option for the teacher to assign to students. 

Examples of extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards include:

  • Unit 1, Lesson 2, Session 3, Apply It, Problem 8, students find areas of polygons by decomposing and composing the polygons in various ways (6.G.1). “The polygon represents the top of a desk. What is the area of the top of the desk? Show your work.” 

  • Unit 2, Lesson 8, Session 2, Fluency and Skills Practice, using the standard algorithm for division provides students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of 6.NS.2 (Fluently divide multi-digit numbers using the standard algorithm). The worksheet contains multiple problems for students to divide multi-digit numbers with up to 5 digit dividends. Problem 6, "$$75,232 ÷16$$."

  • Unit 3, Lesson 13, Session 3, Apply It, Problem 9, students use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world problems by: completing a table of equivalent ratios and plotting the pairs of values on the coordinate plane (6.RP.3). “Every 4-oz serving of Yum’s Yogurt contains 8 g of protein. Complete the table of equivalent ratios. Then plot points on the graph to represent the ratios.” The table includes missing values in both columns of the table, and students are provided a labeled graph to plot the points.

  • Unit 4, Lesson 18, Interactive Tutorials, Solve Problems with Percent, students use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems (6.RP.3). Students are prompted throughout the tutorial to find equivalent ratios in tables, and use equations to solve the problems. The first three problems in the tutorial:

    • “At hockey practice, Coach Taylor always sets aside 20% of the total time for players to warm up. The rest of the practice is spent on game play. Today’s practice is 60 minutes. Coach Taylor needs to find out how much time players should spend warming up.”

    • At hockey practice, Coach Taylor always sets aside 20% of the total time for players to warm up. The rest of the practice is spent on game play. Coach Taylor wants to know the total practice time if he has the players warm up for 15 minutes.

    • At hockey practice, Coach Taylor always sets aside 80% of the total time for game play. The rest of the practice is spent on the warm up. At practice yesterday, players spent 72 minutes on game play. The players want to know the total practice time.”

  • Unit 5, Lesson 19, Session 1, Connect it, Problem 2a, students demonstrate how two expressions are equivalent (6.EE.4). “The expressions 36+20 and 4(9+5) both represent the area, in square feet, of the outer rectangle. They are equivalent expressions because they have the same value. Show that these expressions are equivalent by finding the value of each expression.” Problem 2b, “You can also use the distributive property to show that the sum 36+20 is equivalent to the product 4(9+5). To rewrite 36 + 20 as a product, you can use the greatest common factor (GCF) of 36 and 20 as one of the factors. The GCF of 36 and 20 is __ . Rewrite each term using the GCF as a factor. __×9+__×5. Use the distributive property. __× ( __+ __).” (6.NS.4) 

  • Unit 7, Lesson 31, Session 2, Practice, Problem 2, students demonstrate their understanding of median and variability (6.SP.5). “Abran sees his favorite granola bar from the example in a vending machine at an airport. The cost is $2.75. What are the new values of the median, lower quartile, and upper quartile? Show your work.”

Criterion 1c - 1g

Each grade’s materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.

8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for coherence. The materials: address the major clusters of the grade, have supporting content connected to major work, make connections between clusters and domains, and have content from prior and future grades connected to grade-level work.

Indicator 1c

When implemented as designed, the majority of the materials address the major clusters of each grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations that, when implemented as designed, the majority of the materials address the major clusters of each grade. Materials were analyzed from three different perspectives; units, lessons, and days. Each analysis includes assessments and supporting work connected to major work of the grade.  

  • The approximate number of units devoted to major work of the grade is 5.5 out of 7 units, which is approximately 79%. 

  • The number of lessons, including end of unit assessments, devoted to major work of the grade is 36 out of 47 lessons, which is approximately 77%. 

  • The number of days, including end of unit assessments, devoted to major work of the grade is 113 out of 152, which is approximately 74%. 

A day-level analysis is the most representative of the materials because the number of sessions within each topic and lesson can vary. When reviewing the number of instructional days for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6, approximately 74% of the days focus on major work of the grade.

Indicator 1d

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations that supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.

Throughout the materials, supporting standards/clusters are connected to the major standards/ clusters of the grade. The following are examples of the connections between supporting work and major work in the materials: 

  • Unit 1, Lesson 3, Session 3, Connect It, Problem 3 connects the supporting work of 6.G.4 with the major work of 6.EE.2a when students analyze an expression for finding the surface area of a net. There are no variables in the expression, but at this point in the course it is mathematically reasonable because that standard has not yet been introduced. “Aisha wrote the expression $$2(\frac{1}{2})(4⋅3)+6(3+4+5)$$ for the area of the net. Explain why the expression represents the area of the net.”

  • Unit 2, Lesson 7, Session 3, Apply It, Problem 8 connects the supporting work of 6.NS.3 with the major work of 6.EE.2c when students “Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables. Perform arithmetic operations, including those involving whole-number exponents, in the conventional order when there are no parentheses to specify a particular order. What is the value of the expression $$x^2y$$ when $$x=0.8$$ and $$y=3.15$$? A $$0.2016$$, B $$0.504$$, C $$2.016$$, D $$5.04$$.”

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 11, Session 2, Connect It, Problem 2 connects supporting work of 6.G.2 to major work in 6.NS.1 using fractions to solve volume problems. For example, “Why could you fill the prism with cubes that have edges that are $$\frac{1}{8}$$ft long? How many cubes would fit along each edge of the prism?

  • Unit 4, Lesson 16, Session 3, Try It, connects supporting work of  6.NS.2 and 6.NS.3 to major work in 6.RP.A as students find unit rates involving decimal numbers. “Antonio uses dish soap in his recipe for giant bubbles. He compares the prices of two brands of dish soap. Which is the better buy?” A diagram shows Brand A costs $2.56 for 32 oz and Brand B costs $4.80 for 48 oz.

  • Unit 6, Lesson 28, Session 3, Practice, Problem 2, connects supporting work of 6.G.3 to major work in 6.NS.8 as students graph points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane to draw polygons and find the length of the sides. “A rhombus is a four-sided figure with all sides the same length. Points F(-2,-2), G(-2,3), H(2,6) are three vertices of the rhombus FGHJ. Vertex J is directly below vertex H. a. Graph rhombus FGHJ. Label J with its coordinates. b. What is the perimeter of the rhombus? Show your work.”

Indicator 1e

Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains in a grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for including problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains in a grade. 

Examples of problems and activities that serve to connect two or more major clusters or domains in a grade: 

  • Unit 5, Lesson 22, Session 2, Apply It, Problem 9, connects the major work of 6.EE.C to the major work of 6.RP.A as students represent a given ratio relationship as an equation in terms of the independent and dependent variable. “A company makes several sizes of phones. For each size, the ratio of the height of the screen to its width is 18:9. Write an equation that shows how to find the height in inches of any of the company’s phone screens based on the screen’s width in inches.”

  • Unit 6, Lesson 26, Session 2, Apply It, Problem 10, connects the major work of 6.EE.B to the major work of 6.NS.C when students must apply their understanding of rational numbers to write and represent an inequality of a given situation. “A state park has several campsites. All of the campsites are at an elevation of less than 6m. An elevation of 0m represents sea level. Use an inequality and a graph to represent the possible elevations of a campsite in the park.”

Examples of problems and activities that serve to connect two or more supporting clusters or domains in a grade are: 

  • Unit 2, Lesson 8, Session 5, Apply It, Problem 2, connects the supporting work of 6.NS.B to the supporting work of 6.G.A when students divide decimals to find the height of a parallelogram when given the area and base. “The area of the parallelogram is 29.4 cm^2. What is the parallelogram’s height?” The image shows a parallelogram with the base, b=5.25cm

  • Unit 7, Lesson 32, Session 4, Apply It, Problem 1, connects supporting work of the grade 6.SP.B and 6.NS.B as students find the mean of a data set containing decimal numbers. “Roberto sells lemonade to raise money for a charity. He collects data on the cost of lemonade at other lemonade stands. He uses the mean of his data as the price of lemonade at his stand. How much does lemonade cost at Roberto’s stand? Show your work.” A table with 15 data points for the cost of lemonade include 2.00, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, 0.50, 1.25, 1.00, 0.50, 3.00, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, 1.25, 1.25, 1.25.

Indicator 1f

Content from future grades is identified and related to grade-level work, and materials relate grade-level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations that content from future grades is identified and related to grade-level work, and materials relate grade-level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades. Each Unit contains the Teacher’s Guide which includes a Unit Flow and Progression video, a Lesson Progression, a Math Background, and a Lesson Overview that contains prior and future grade-level connections to the lessons in the unit. Examples include:

  • Unit 2, Lesson 7, Lesson Progression, Add, Subtract, and Multiply Multi-Digit Decimals, builds on Grade 5, Lesson 10, Add Decimals, 5.NBT.7, Grade 5, Lesson 11, Subtract Decimals, 5.NBT.7, and Grade 5, Lesson 16, Multiply Decimals, 5.NBT.7. This lesson prepares students for Grade 7, Lesson 10, Add and Subtract Positive and Negative Numbers, 7.NS.1 and Grade 7, Lesson 11, Understand Multiplication with Negative Numbers 7.NS.2. 

  • Unit 4, Beginning of Unit, Math Background, Ratio Reasoning, Prior Learning, “Students should; be able to multiply and divide whole numbers, fractions, and decimals,” and “be able to convert measurement units by multiplying and dividing.” (5.NBT.B and 5.MD.A) Future Learning states, “Students will move on to extend their understanding of rates and percentages. Students will: identify, analyze, and represent proportional relationships,” and “solve multistep percent problems, such as problems about markups and markdowns.” (7.RP.A)

  • Unit 5, Beginning of Unit, Lesson Progression, describes how students connect work in Lesson 20, Understand Solutions of Equations 6.EE.5 to the prior learning in Grade 5, Lesson 30 Evaluate, Write, and Interpret Expressions 5.OA.A.

  • Unit 6, Lesson 24, Overview, Learning Progression, “In earlier grades, students located and labeled positive whole numbers, fractions, and decimals on the number line and compared them using inequality symbols and words. They ordered positive rational numbers.” “In this lesson, students compare and order positive and negative rational numbers. They interpret inequalities as statements about the relative position of numbers on the number line. They also write inequalities to represent and interpret inequalities in real-world contexts.” “In Grade 7, students will write inequalities with a variable to represent real-world situations with unknowns. They will solve inequalities that include a variable and graph solutions to inequalities on the number line.”

  • Unit 7, Lesson 30, Overview, Learning Progression, describes learning for earlier grades connected to using dot plots and histograms. “In earlier grades, students made picture graphs and bar graphs. They used line plots to display and interpret a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit.” (5.MD.B) Then, “In Grade 7, students will understand that random sampling can be used to gain information about a population and that generalizations are only valid if the sample is representative of the population.” (7.SP.A)

Indicator 1g

In order to foster coherence between grades, materials can be completed within a regular school year with little to no modification.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 foster coherence between grades, in that materials can be completed within a regular school year with little to no modification. In Grade 6, the 126 days of lessons, 13 days of assessments, 14 days of Math in Action lessons, and 5 days of supplementary activities are included in the total days represented in the materials for a total of 158 days. 

  • Materials include 7 Units divided into 33 Lessons which are divided into 126 sessions for a total of 126 days of instruction. 

  • Lesson 0 which includes an additional 5 days of work to create routines, develop structure, and set up the year of lessons.  

  • There are 7 additional days allotted for the end of unit assessments and 6 additional days for diagnostic assessments throughout the school year. This includes a total of 13 days for assessments.

  • There are 7 Math in Action lessons divided into two sessions each for a total of 14 days.

According to i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Implementation, sessions are designed to be 45-60 minutes in length. Pacing information from the publisher regarding viability for one school year can be found in the Pacing Guide for the Year which is located in the Teacher Toolbox under the Program Implementation tab. The Pacing Guidance for the Year summarizes the amount of time for units, lessons, sessions, and assessments to be scheduled throughout the year.

Gateway Two

Rigor & the Mathematical Practices

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for rigor and balance and practice-content connections. The materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application. The materials make meaningful connections between the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

Criterion 2a - 2d

Materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations, by giving appropriate attention to: developing students’ conceptual understanding; procedural skill and fluency; and engaging applications.

8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for rigor. The materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, give attention throughout the year to procedural skill and fluency, spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of mathematics, and do not always treat the three aspects of rigor together or separately.

Indicator 2a

Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for developing conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings. The lessons include problems and questions that develop conceptual understanding throughout the grade-level. Examples include:

  • Unit 2, Lesson 9, Session 2, “Connect It”, Problem 4, Understand Division with Fractions, students develop conceptual understanding by using and comparing models of dividing fractions by fractions (6.NS.1).  “How can you show the quotient $$\frac{4}{6}÷\frac{1}{6}$$ with a bar model? How is using a bar model similar to showing the quotient with a number line? How is it different?”

  • Unit 5, Lesson 19, Session 4, “Try It”, is an example of an opportunity for students to develop conceptual understanding with teacher guidance. “Which of these three expressions are equivalent? $$3(x+2)+2x$$; $$2+4(x+1)+x$$; $$2(3+3x)-2x$$.” The teacher guide provides guidance for teachers to facilitate discussion and student connections to using properties of operations to rewrite expressions (6.EE.3). Students are prompted to explain the steps used to rewrite the expression. “How does each expression change from one step to another? Why is each step necessary?”

  • Unit 6, Lesson 25, Session 1, “Model It”, Problem 1, students develop conceptual understanding of absolute value of rational numbers (6.NS.7) by describing distances of objects below and above sea level. “A scientist standing on the deck of a boat uses a drone, and a scuba diver uses a camera to explore a sea cave. The table shows the elevations of four objects relative to sea level. (The table shows the following objects and their elevations: Camera -20 ft., Cave floor -30 ft., Drone 20 ft., Boat deck 5 ft.) a. Use the number line to show the elevations of the objects from the table. Label each object at its elevation. b. Are any objects the same distance from sea level? If so, how far from sea level are they? c. Another object is 3 ft from sea level. Is the object’s elevation positive, negative, or could it be either? Explain.”

The materials provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding throughout the grade with the use of visual models, real world connections, mathematical discussion prompts, concept extensions, and hands-on activities. Examples include: 

  • Unit 2, Lesson10, Session 3, “Apply It”, Problem 9, students develop conceptual understanding of dividing fractions by fractions in real world situations (6.NS.1). “It takes Francisco $$\frac{5}{6}$$ minute to upload a video to his blog. How much of one video can he upload in $$\frac{1}{2}$$ minute? Show your work.” 

  • Unit 3, Lesson 12, Session 1, “Model It”, Problem 4, students independently engage in writing while developing conceptual understanding of ratio relationships (6.RP.1). Students explain the difference and demonstrate their understanding of units in ratios. “Explain how the ratios of 5 tacos for every 2 guests and 2 tacos for every 5 guests are different. Include a model in your explanation.” 

In Unit 6, Lesson 23, Session 2, “Model It”: Vertical Number Lines, Problem 3, students develop conceptual understanding of negative numbers and plot numbers and their opposites on a number line (6.NS.5 and 6.NS.6). “a. Use a rational number to label each point on the number line. b. What is the opposite of each number you wrote on the number line? c. Plot points at -1.75 and $$-\frac{3}{4}$$.”

Indicator 2b

Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation for procedural skill and fluency.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for giving attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency. Within each lesson, there is a Session that provides additional practice for students to have in class or as homework. Additionally, many lessons include a Fluency & Skills Practice section. Examples include: 

  • Unit 1, Lesson 5. Session 2, Apply It, Problem 9 provides the opportunity for students to develop procedural skill and fluency with evaluating numerical expressions with whole number exponents (6.EE.1) with teacher guidance. “On the Luck Five game show, Troy wins $5 if he answers one question correctly. Each time he answers another question correctly without making a mistake, the amount of money he wins is multiplied by 5. Troy answers 6 questions correctly without making a mistake. His winnings are represented by the expression $$5^6$$. How much money does Troy win? Show your work.” In the teacher’s edition, teacher’s are directed to provide guidance to the students if they cannot evaluate the expression correctly. “If student add six 5s and get $30, then ask them to think about the difference between $$5^6$$ and 6(5). Ask if they can rewrite each expression in a different way that uses six 5s. Elicit the fact that $$5^6$$ is $$5×5×5×5×5×5$$, or the product of six 5s, and 6(5) is 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5, or the sum of six 5s.”

  • Unit 2, Lesson 7, Session 3, Practice Problem 1, “A green rope is 60.5 m long. Each meter of the rope has a mass of 0.052 kg. What is the total mass of the green rope? Show your work.” Problem 2, “Find 0.102 × 7.3. Show your work.” (6.NS.3)

  • Unit 4, Lesson 18, Session 2, Fluency Skills and Practice contains multiple problems for students to find percent of a number. (6.RP.3c) In Problem 6, students “Find the percent of the number. 75% of 80.”

Materials provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate procedural skills and fluency throughout the grade level. Within each lesson, students engage with practice problems independently at different sections of the lesson. Examples include: 

  • Unit 1, Lesson 5, Session 4, Apply It, Problem 4, students evaluate multiple expressions involving whole-number exponents (6.EE.1). “Which expressions have a value of 100 when m=5? Select all that apply. $$2m^2+50$$; $$(2m)^2+50$$; $$(m+5)^2$$; $$m^3÷5⋅4$$; $$4m^2$$; $$(4m)^2$$.”

  • Unit 2, Lesson 8, Session 2, Practice, Problem 2, students fluently divide multi-digit numbers using the standard algorithm. (6.NS.2) “Platon’s mom buys a car using a loan. She repays the loan by paying $22,032 in 48 equal monthly payments. How much is each payment? Show your work.” 

  • Unit 5, Lesson 21, Session 4, Practice, Problem 5, students solve multi-digit division problems using the standard algorithm. (6.NS.2) “Neva is training for a race. This week, she bikes 5.5 times as far as she runs. Her total distance running and biking this week is 26 mi. How far does Neva run this week? Show your week.”

Indicator 2c

Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for being designed so teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics. 

Engaging routine and non-routine applications include single and multi-step problems. Examples include:

  • Unit 2, Math in Action, Session 2, Discuss Models and Strategies, non-routine problem, students find the volume of right rectangular prisms with fractional edge lengths by packing it with unit cubes with fractional edge lengths (6.G.2). “Alberto wants to set up an aquarium as a demonstration of freshwater ecosystems for the science club. Read the information he finds about aquarium ecosystems. Then suggest a tank, a number of guppies, and an amount of gravel for Alberto to use to set up his ecosystem.” 

  • Unit 4, Lesson 16, Session 2, Try It, routine problem, students use unit rates (6.RP.3) to solve real-world problems. “Aswini jogs on the track at her school. She uses a watch to track her progress. At this rate, how long will it take her to jog 16 laps?” There is a picture of a watch that says “15 minutes, 6 laps.” 

  • Unit 7, Lesson 30, Session 2, Try It, non-routine problem, students use a set of data to answer a statistical question (6.SP.2). “Elizabeth records the number of points her favorite basketball team scores in each game. She predicts that the team will score about 120 points in its next game. Is Elizabeth’s prediction reasonable? Display Data Set: Points Scored in a way that supports your answer.” There is a picture of the data set included.

Materials provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate routine and non-routine applications of the mathematics throughout the grade level. Examples include:  

  • Unit 2, Lesson 11, Session 4, Apply It, Problem 9, non-routine problem, students identify the dimensions and find volume of a right rectangular prism when given an edge length of a cube as a fraction (6.G.2). “Give the dimensions of a right rectangular prism that can be filled completely with cubes that have edge lengths of $$\frac{1}{2}$$in. Explain how to use the cubes to find the volume of the prism.”

  • Unit 5, Math in Action, Session 1, non-routine problem, students use variables to represent two quantities that change in relationship to each other (6.EE.9). “The cheerleader, marching band, football team, and school mascot purchase new uniforms. The packing slip shows the total amount each team pays and provides information about tax and shipping charges. Choose one type of uniform. Write and solve an equation to find the price of one uniform before shipping and tax.” Teacher directions include: “read this problem involving writing and solving an equation. Then look at one student's solution to this problem on the following pages. There are many ways to solve problems. Think about how you might solve the New Uniforms problems (previous) in a different way.” 

  • Unit 6, Lesson 26, Session 5, Apply It, Problem 2, routine problem, students draw a graph and write an inequality to model possible values of a given situation (6.EE.5). “Each week, Patrick buys more than 2 pounds of apples. Apples cost $1.37 per pound. Draw a graph that represents the possible amounts of money that Patrick spends on apples in a week. Then write an inequality that represents your graph.Show your work.”

Indicator 2d

The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the three aspects of rigor within the grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations in that the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the three aspects of rigor within the grade. The Understand lessons focus on developing conceptual understanding. The Strategy lessons focus on helping students practice and apply a variety of solution strategies to make richer connections and deepen understanding. The units conclude with a Math in Action lesson, providing students with routine and non-routine application opportunities.

All three aspects of rigor are present independently throughout each grade level. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Lesson 4, Session 4, Apply It, Problem 4, students develop conceptual understanding by using variables to represent numbers while writing expressions and solving mathematical problems (6.EE.2, 6.EE.6). “In a video game, players start with a score of 100 points. They earn 8 points for each gold coin and 25 points for each gem they find. Isaiah finds 3 gold coins and 2 gems. Write and evaluate an algebraic expression to find Isaiah’s score. Use c for the number of gold coins found and g for the number of gems found. Show your work.”

  • Unit 3, Lesson 13, Session 2, Practice, Problem 5, students practice procedural skills and fluency while solving real world problems with ratios and rates (6.RP.3). “A manager of a clothing store always orders 2 small T-shirts and 3 large T-shirts and 3 large T-shirts for every 4 medium T-shirts. The manager plans to order 24 medium T-shirts. How many small T-shirts and large T-shirts should the manager order? Show your work.” 

  • Unit 5, Lesson 19, Session 2, Develop, Apply It, students apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions (6.EE.3) by solving, "A company sells fruit cups in packs of 4. The packs currently weigh 20 oz. The company plans to reduce the weight of each cup by n oz. The expression 20-4n represents the new weight, in ounces, of a pack of fruit cups. Rewrite the expression for the new weight as a product of two factors. Show your work." 

Multiple aspects of rigor are engaged simultaneously to develop students' mathematical understanding of a single unit of study throughout the grade level. Examples include: 

  • Unit 2, Unit Review, Performance Task, attends to conceptual understanding and application as students apply their understanding of volume (6.G.2) and dividing fractions by fractions (6.NS1.) to solve a real-world problem. “Geraldine supplies number cubes to companies that make board games. Each number cube measures $$\frac{3}{4}$$ inch on each edge. For shipping, the number of cubes can be packed into any of the boxes shown.” Images of three boxes are shown labeled with their dimensions (4 in × 4 in × 4in, 4 in × 3$$\frac{1}{2}$$in × 2 in, $$2\frac{1}{2}$$in × $$6\frac{1}{4}$$in ×$$2\frac{1}{2}$$in). “Geraldine receives an order for 780 number cubes. First, she needs to know the maximum number of cubes she can fit in each box. Then she needs a packing plan for the order. Remember: only whole cubes can be packed. Design a packing plan for Geraldine. Your plan must include the following requirements: the maximum number of cubes that can fit into each box is identified, the fewest number of boxes is used to pack the 780 number cubes, no box is packed with fewer than half the total number of cubes it can hold.”

  • Unit 5, Lesson 21, Lesson Quiz, Problem 5, attends to conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application as students write and solve equations (6.EE.7) and divide decimals (6.NS.3) in a real-world situation. “Jerel runs 5 days each week. On each of 4 days, he runs 2.3 km. If Jerel runs a total of 14 km, how many kilometers does he run on the fifth day? Show your work.”

  • Unit 6, Lesson 26, Session 5, Refine, Apply It, Problem 2, students attend to procedural skill and fluency and conceptual understanding while solving inequalities (6.NS.3). “Each week, Patrick buys more than 2 pounds of apples. Apples cost $1.37 per pound. Draw a graph that represents the possible amounts of money, m, that Patrick spends on apples in a week. Then write an inequality that represents your graph. Show your work.”

Criterion 2e - 2i

Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for practice-content connections. The materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

Indicator 2e

Materials support the intentional development of MP1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; and MP2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; and MP2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. The MPs are embedded within the instructional design. In the Teacher’s Guide, Front End of Book, Standard of Mathematical Practice in Every Lesson, teachers are guided “through a dedicated focus on mathematical discourse, the program blends content and practice standards seamlessly into instruction, ensuring that students continually engage in developing the habits of the mathematical practices.”

The Table of Contents and the Lesson Overview both include the Standards for Mathematical Practice for each lesson. In the Student Worktext, the Learning Target also highlights the MPs that are included in the lesson. MP1 and MP2 are identified in every lesson from 1-33.  

There is intentional development of MP1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them, in the Try It problems, where students are able to select their own strategies to solve the problem. Teachers are provided with guidance to support students in making sense of the problem using language routines such as Co-Craft Questions and Three Reads. Examples include: 

  • Unit 2, Lesson 11, Session 1, Explore, Try It, students find the volume of a right rectangular prism “Jiro has some small cubes. He puts them together to make a large cube, as shown. What is the volume of each small cube.” 

  • Unit 5, Math in Action, Session 2, students analyze the relationship between dependent and independent variables using graphs and tables and write an equation to model a real-world problem . “Track and Field Training. A coach plans workouts for several groups of athletes on the track and field team. Read the coach’s plans for how each group should complete a 400-meter lap around the track. Choose one group and make a table and a graph to analyze the relationship between distance, d, and time t, for that group. Then write an equation that models the relationship.” Data about the speed and distance of each group is included in the problem. In the Reflect section, students discuss how to make sense of the problem. “Use Mathematical Practices - As you work through the problem, discuss these questions with a partner. Make Sense of Problems - Which variable is the dependent variable and which is the independent variable? Explain.”

  • Unit 7, Lesson 30, Session 1, Explore, Try It, students display data in plots on a number line and summarize numerical data sets in relation to their context. “The parks department can add one new program to its summer camp. The data shows the ages of children who have signed up. Based on the Data Set: Ages in Years, which age group should get the new program?” 

There is intentional development of MP2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively, in the Try-Discuss-Connect routines and in Understand lessons. Students reason abstractly and quantitatively, justify how they know their answer is reasonable, and consider what changes would occur if the context or the given values in expressions and equations are altered. Additionally, some Strategy lessons further develop MP2 in Deepen Understanding. Teachers are provided with discussion prompts to analyze a model strategy or representation. Examples include: 

  • Unit 3, Lesson 12, Session 1, Explore, Model It, Problem 2, students understand the concept of a ratio and use ratio language to describe a relationship between two quantities as they solve, “You can also use a ratio to compare two quantities. One way to describe a  relationship between ratios is to use the language for every or for each. a. In Eldora’s lab group, there are 3 test tubes for every 1 student. Complete the model to show this ratio relationship. b. Use your model to complete these sentences that use ratio language. For every 1 student, there are ____test tubes. There are ____test tubes for each ____. There is ____student for every ____test tube.” 

  • Unit 3, Lesson 14, Session 1, Try It, students deconstruct data in the problem and then reconstruct data in a table using equivalent ratios. . “Hasina is making green tea lattes.  She steams milk to mix with hot tea. Hasina has 12 fl oz of hot tea. Based on the ratio in the recipe, how much milk does Hasina need to steam?” A ratio of “Green Tea Latte, 4:3, Tea:Milk” is provided for the problem.

  • Unit 7, Lesson 29, Session 1, Explore, Model It, Problem 1, students reason quantitatively with numerical data sets in relation to their context . “Keiko is on her school’s track team. She collects data to answer this question. How high did members of the track team jump in yesterday’s high jump event? Complete the dot plot to show Keiko’s data.”

Indicator 2f

Materials support the intentional development of MP3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP3: “Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.” In the Discuss It routine, students are prompted with a question and a sentence frame to discuss their reasoning with a partner. Teachers are further provided with guidance to support partners and facilitate whole-class discussion. Additionally, fewer problems in the materials ask students to critique the reasoning of others, or explore and justify their thinking.

There is intentional development of MP3 to meet its full intent in connection to grade-level content. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Math in Action, Session 1, Reflect, Critique Reasoning, students critique a partner’s solution to designing pens for hens that meet certain criteria (i.e. “all pens will be the same size and hold the same number of hens, each pen should be at least 4 feet high, and there should be at least 8 square feet of floor space per hen.”) . “Do the pens your partner described meet the requirements from Juan’s teacher? Explain.”

  • Unit 4, Lesson 16, Session 3, Try It, Facilitate Whole Class Discussion, provides guidance for teachers to help students construct viable arguments to defend their problem solving strategies. “Call on students to share selected strategies. Remind listeners to be specific when explaining why they disagree with a speaker's idea.” 

  • Unit 5, Lesson 20, Session 3, Apply It, Problem 1, students determine if the reasoning of another makes sense and justify their response. “Greg says that x could represent a value of 3 in the hanger diagram. Do you agree? Explain your reasoning.” The problem is accompanied with a hanger diagram with 3 x’s on one side and 6 1’s on the other side. 

  • Unit 7, Math in Action, Session 2, Reflect, Critique Reasoning, students critique a partner’s solution to using measures of center and variability to make conclusions about a data set (6.SP.5c). “What did your partner conclude about the word lengths in the first round of both spelling bees? Is your partner’s conclusion supported by the data sets? Explain.”

  • Teacher Toolbox Program Implementation Support, Standards for Mathematical Practice in Every Lesson, SMPs are integrated in the Try-Discuss-Connect routine with SMP 3 identified when partners critique each other’s reasoning. In the Teacher’s Guide, at the front of the book, “Discuss It begins as student pairs explain and justify their strategies and solutions to each other. Partners listen and respectfully critique each other’s reasoning (SMP 3). To promote and support partner conversations, the teacher may share sentence starters and questions for discussions. During this time, the teacher is listening in to peer conversations and reviewing student strategies, identifying three or four strategies to discuss with the whole class in the next part of Discuss It.”

Indicator 2g

Materials support the intentional development of MP4: Model with mathematics; and MP5: Choose tools strategically, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP4: “Model with mathematics;” and MP5: “Use appropriate tools strategically, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.” The materials generally identify MP4 and MP5 in most lessons and can be found in the routines developed throughout the materials. 

There is intentional development of MP4: “Model with Mathematics” to meet it’s full intent in connection to grade-level content. Many problems present students with the opportunity to use models to solve problems throughout the materials. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Lesson 6, Session 2, Connect It, Problem 3, students connect a tree factor model to a given situation. “How many blankets and how many flashlights will be in each kit if Akio uses the GCF as the number of kits? Where do you see these amounts in the equations under the factor trees?”

  • Unit 2, Lesson 9, Session 1, Model It, Problem 3, students write a division equation to model a situation . “Lin starts with a board that is $$\frac{3}{2}$$ feet long. She cuts it into pieces that are each $$\frac{1}{4}$$ foot long for her stacking game. a. Complete the model to show how many pieces Lin cuts her board into.” A blank tape diagram that is divided into 3 sections and labeled as $$\frac{3}{2}$$ is included. b. “Write a division equation that represents your model and shows how many pieces Lin cuts her board into. What related multiplication equation does your model represent?”

  • Unit 6, Math In Action, Session 2, Solve It, students model a situation using inequalities . A table is included with 4 different ceramic pottery samples along with the least and greatest estimated age in years for each sample. “Find a solution to the Estimating Ages of Artifacts problem. Choose a sample. Write an inequality to represent the possible ages of the sample based on the least age given in the table. Then graph the inequality. Write an inequality to represent the possible ages of the sample based on the greatest age given in the table. List three possible years in which the ceramic could have been made. Give an early estimate, a middle estimate, and a late estimate.” In the Reflect section, students are prompted to discuss with a partner. “Use a Model. How could you show the possible estimated ages of the ceramic sample using a single number line?”

  • Unit 7, Lesson 32, Session 2, Differentiation, students are guided by the teacher to demonstrate why the mean can be thought of as a balance point. The students use counters and rulers to label a number line above each value to represent the data. Teachers ask, “What is the mean of this data? Teachers have students move each counter to 4, keeping track of how many units they move each counter.” Teachers then ask, “What do you notice about the total units the counters to the left of 4 had to move and the counters to the right of 4 had to move to get to 4?” 

There is intentional development of MP5: “Use appropriate tools strategically to meet it’s full intent in connection to grade-level content.” Many problems include the Math Toolkit with suggested tools for students to use. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Lesson 2, Session 3, Model It, Differentiation Extend provides guidance for teachers to engage students in MP5 as they discuss finding areas of composite figures. Students find an area of a three-dimensional figure by decomposing the figure into triangles and a parallelogram. “Prompt students to compare the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy? Ask: What are the advantages and disadvantages of using decomposition and addition to find the area of the logo? Listen for the decomposition strategy allows you to use simple calculations to find the area, but you may find it difficult to decompose the logo into familiar shapes. Ask: What are the advantages and disadvantages of composing a rectangle around the logo and then subtracting the areas of the right triangles? Listen For: With this strategy, you can find the area of a rectangle, which is a simple calculation. However, more calculations are needed to subtract the areas of the triangles from the total area. Generalize: Encourage students to explain how they might choose an appropriate strategy when solving area problems. Students may state that they use the method that is the most efficient for the given shape, or they may state that they like to use the same strategy to solve all types of area problems.”

  • Unit 3, Lesson 13, Session 2, Try It, students can choose from a variety of tools to demonstrate understanding of ratios. “The ratio of picnic tables to garbage cans in a new national park should be 8:3. The park design shows plans for picnic tables in a small campground and a large campground. How many garbage cans should there be in each campground?” The number of picnic tables in each campground is provided, 40 in a small campground and 120 in a large campground. The math toolkit includes: connecting cubes, counters, double number lines and grid paper.

  • Unit 6, Lesson 28, Session 2, Connect It, Problem 7 students reflect on the models and strategies they use in the Try It to find distance in the coordinate plane. “Think about all the models and strategies you have discussed today. Describe how one of them helped you understand how to solve the Try It problem.” The teacher’s edition states, “Have all students focus on the strategies used to solve the Try It. If time allows, have pairs discuss their ideas.”

  • Unit 7, Lesson 31, Session 3, Deepen Understanding, provides prompts for students to generalize when they may use a box plot instead of a dot plot to represent a data set. “Prompt students to consider when and how box plots are useful representations of data. Ask: What are some advantages to using a box plot to display a data set?...Why is the median not directly in the middle of the box plot?... What are some disadvantages to using a box plot to display a data set.”

Indicator 2h

Materials attend to the intentional development of MP6: Attend to precision; and attend to the specialized language of mathematics for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP6: “Attend to precision;” and attend to the specialized language of mathematics, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. 

There is intentional development of MP6: “Attend to Precision,” to meet it’s full intent in connection to grade-level content. Many problems present students with the opportunity to attend to precision within the mathematics and the reasoning of the answer. Examples include: 

  • Unit 2, Session 1, Math in Action, Reflect. Students explain the results of their calculations. “Be Precise: Would it make sense to round the results of your calculations to get your final answer? Why or why not?” The students struggle with solving how many grains of salt it takes to grow one of the salt crystals. The problem is using decimals as the length of the side of a cube. 

  • Unit 3, Math in Action Session 2, students use and label graphs to compare ratios . “Josephine and her family set goals for how much water to drink compared to other beverages. Choose two family members. Use ratio tables to determine who will drink more water compared to other beverages. Make a graph comparing the two goals that Josephine can share with her family.” The text includes the amount of water in ounces each family member drinks compared to other beverages. For example, Josephine drinks “10 ounces of water for eerie 5 ounces of other beverages.” The question in the Problem-Solving Tips box reminds students to attend to precision, “How will you label the axes of your graph?”

  • Unit 6, Lesson 26, Session 4, Apply It, Problem 7, students attend to precision when identifying how the solutions to an inequality are related to the situation. “Aimee works up to 50 hours a month and earns $12 per hour. She wants to save more than $240 to buy a computer. The inequality 12h > 240, where h is the number of hours Aimee works this month, models this situation. Which values from 0 to 50 are solutions to the inequality? What do the solutions mean in this situation? Explain your reasoning.”

i-Ready Classroom Mathematics attends to the specialized language of mathematics. The materials use precise and accurate mathematical terminology and definitions, and the materials support students in using them. The Collect and Display routine is described as, “A routine in which teachers collect students' informal language and match it up with more precise academic or mathematical language to increase sense-making and academic language development.” Teacher’s guides, student books, and supplemental materials explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics. Examples include: 

  • Unit 3, Lesson 14, Session 3, Discuss It, provides teacher guidance to correct a common misconception when describing paint ratios with the appropriate terms. “Listen for students who think that the quantities in two ratios determine which ratio is greater. For example, they may say that 2:3 is bluer than 1:2 because 2 > 1 and 3 > 2. As students share their strategies, rephrase bluer and repeat the definition of ratio. Elicit discussion on how to determine who has a bluer mixture.”

  • Unit 4, Lesson 15, Session 2, Discus It, Teacher’s Edition, Develop Academic Language: “Why? Support students as they craft clear explanations using precise language. How? Remind students that using precise mathematical language and complete sentences makes explanations clearer and easier to understand. Prior to each Discuss It, work with students to develop a list of precise terms from Model It, such as rate, per minute, equivalent ratios, and ratio relationships. During Discuss It, Collect and Display authentic examples of clear explanations.”

  • Unit 7, Lesson 31, Overview, “Language Objectives: Explain in wiring why the median can be used as a measure of center, Summarize a data set using lesson vocabulary, including lower quartile (Q1), median (Q2), and upper quartile (Q3), Describe the variability of a data set by explaining how box plots and the IQR represent a data distribution in whole-class discussion, Demonstrate understanding of word problems by explaining how the median and IQR connect to the problem context.”

Indicator 2i

Materials support the intentional development of MP7: Look for and make use of structure; and MP8: Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP7: “Look for and make use of structure;” and MP8: “Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning, for students, in connection to grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.” The MPs are embedded within the instructional design. In the Teacher’s Guide, Front End of Book, Standard of Mathematical Practice in Every Lesson, teachers are guided “through a dedicated focus on mathematical discourse, the program blends content and practice standards seamlessly into instruction, ensuring that students continually engage in developing the habits of the mathematical practices.”

There is intentional development of MP7 to meet its full intent in connection to grade-level content. Examples include: 

  • Unit 1, Lesson 6, Session 3, Extend, students find the least common multiple. Teachers are asked to do the following routine for MP 7: Deepen Understanding--When discussing using a list of multiples to find an LCM, share with students that another method for finding the LCM of 6 and 8 is to list multiples of 8 and then check for the first number in the list that is divisible by 6. Prompt students to think about the advantages and disadvantages of this method. Ask: Why does this method work? Listen for: If a multiple of 8 is also a multiple of 6, it is divisible by 6. Ask: What is an advantage to finding the first multiple of a number that can be divided by the other number? What is a disadvantage of this method? Listen for: An advantage is that you only have to list the multiples of one of the numbers and you can stop listing multiples as soon as you find one that is divisible by the other number. A disadvantage is that you have to think about several division problems, which may be harder to do than just listing multiples would be.” 

  • Unit 2, Lesson 7, Session 1, Connect It, Problems 2, students use structure of place value to add and subtract decimals . Problem 2, “Place value can help you add or subtract decimals. You add 25.393 and 24.138 to find Mateo’s time. You can subtract 24.138 from 25.292 to find how much faster Mateo swims the first lap than the second lap. a. How could it help you to line up the decimals on their decimal points? b. What do you need to do before you can subtract the digits in the thousandths place in this problem? Explain. c. Complete the equation: 9 hundredths + 3 thousandths = 8 hundredths + ___ thousandths. d. How much faster is Mateo’s time for the first lap than the second lap. How did you find your answer?”

  • Unit 4, Lesson 17, Session 1, Model It, Problem 4 students use structure of fractions to develop understanding of percents . “How is using a model to show a percent similar to using a model to show a fraction? Use either 50% or 10% as an example in your explanation.”

  • Unit 5, Lesson 22, Session 2,Develop, Try It,  students use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that changes in relationship: “An animal reserve is home to 8 meerkats. It costs the reserve $1.50 per day to feed each meerkat. Write an equation with two variables that can be used to determine the total cost of feeding the reserve’s meerkats for any number of days.” Teachers should be asking questions that “prompt students to think about how the Try It problem describes the relationship between quantities and the two variables.” 

There is intentional development of MP8 to meet it’s full intent in connection to grade-level content.  Examples include: 

  • Unit 2, Lesson 9, Session 2, Start, students use repeated reasoning to make generalizations about halves and fourths in a given number. The table lists $$\frac{1}{2}$$, 1, $$1\frac{1}{2}$$, and 2, then identifies how many halves and fourths are in each of those values. Students use the Same and Different routine to compare and contrast the number of halves and fourths using a table. The materials list possible solutions as, “There are a whole number of halves and fourths in all four numbers. There are twice as many fourths as halves in each number. There are different numbers of halves and fourths in the numbers.”

  • Unit 3, Beginning of Unit, Math Background, Insights on Finding Equivalent Ratios by Multiplying and Dividing, provides teachers with a background of how students can use repeated reasoning to discover multiplicative relationships. “As students continue to use repeated addition to find equivalent ratios, they may begin to notice that each equivalent ratio is related to the original ratio by multiplication. This realization points to another way of finding equivalent ratios: Multiply both quantities in the ratio by the same nonzero number. Once they have discovered this multiplicative relationship, they can use their prior knowledge of multiplicative comparisons to solve ratio problems.” 

  • Unit 4, Lesson 16, Session 2, Develop, Try It, students use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems by solving: “Ashwini jogs on the track at her school. She uses a watch to track her progress. It takes her 15 minutes to jog 6 laps. At this rate, how long will it take her to jog 16 laps?” Teachers should “prompt students to look for the relationships between quantities in a ratio and use fractions and division to find unit rates.” 

  • Unit 6, Math in Action, Session 2, Reflect, prompts students to use repeated reasoning to make a connection between elevation and negative numbers. “How is the depth of an artifact related to its elevation?” Students are provided with depths of an artifact, in meters, and asked to determine their elevations.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for Usability. The materials meet expectations for Criterion 1, Teacher Supports, partially meet expectations for Criterion 2, Assessment, and meet expectations for Criterion 3, Student Supports.

Criterion 3a - 3h

The program includes opportunities for teachers to effectively plan and utilize materials with integrity and to further develop their own understanding of the content.

9/9
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for Teacher Supports. The materials: provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for enacting the materials, contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level concepts and concepts beyond the current grade so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series, provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies, and provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities. 

Indicator 3a

Materials provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials, with specific attention to engaging students in order to guide their mathematical development.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

he materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for providing teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials, with specific attention to engaging students in order to guide their mathematical development.

Materials provide comprehensive guidance that will assist teachers in presenting the student and ancillary materials.

  • The Program Overview provides the teacher with information on program components and description about i-Ready classroom Mathematics implementation.

  • Each unit has a Math Background document that provides the teacher with information to unpack the learning progressions and make connections between key concepts.

  • Each Unit has an Unit Opener that provides the teacher with Unit Big Ideas and describes the themes of the unit.

  • Each Unit has a Unit Flow and Progression video that describes how concepts are developed in the unit.

  • Each Unit has a Professional Development document that provides guidance on instructional strategies, such as Supporting Math and Academic Vocabulary Development, Establishing Classroom Environments That Support Mathematical Discourse for ALL Learners, Knowing and Valuing Every Learner: Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching.

  • Each Unit has a Unit Overview that provides the teachers with pacing, objectives, standards, vocabulary and lesson-level differentiation for each of the lessons in the unit.

  • The Teacher’s Guide provides in-class instruction and practice included in the teacher’s edition.

  • The Teacher’s Guide for Assessments and Reports supports whole group/partner discussion, ask/listen fors, common misconceptions, error alerts, etc.

  • DIfferentiation strategies are included before and during the unit/lesson for the teacher. There are recommended resources to support students’ learning needs that are highlighted in the Prerequisites report.

  • Unit and Lesson Support includes information about prerequisite lessons to focus on, and identifies the important concepts within those lessons.

  • On the Spot Teaching Tips suggest additional scaffolding to support students with unfinished prerequisite learning as they engage with on-level work. 

  • Digital Math Tools contain support videos that explain how to use their digital tools.

  • Ready Classroom Central is an online teacher portal with resources for professional support such as training videos, planning tools, implementation tips, whitepapers, and discourse support.

  • Language Expectations identify examples of what English learners at each level of language proficiency can do in connection with a one grade-level standard. 

  • The Unit Prepare For provides teachers with guidance to support students when completing the graphic organizer in the beginning of the unit, Prepare for Unit. There is additional guidance to Build Academic Vocabulary through the use of identified cognates and specified academic terms. 

  • The Unit Review includes problem notes for teachers identifying the Depth of Knowledge level of each problem and the standard, along with suggested strategies, and possible misconceptions based on the selected answer. 

Materials include sufficient and useful annotations and suggestions that are presented within the context of the specific learning objectives. Throughout each lesson planning information, there is narrative information to assist the teacher in presenting student materials throughout all phases of the unit and lessons. Examples include:

  • Unit 2, Lesson 8, Session 1, Connect It, Problem 3, “How is using the standard algorithm similar to using partial quotients to divide a three-digit number by a one-digit number? How is it different?” The teacher’s edition provides guidance for the teacher, “Look for understanding that the standard algorithm does not use zeros as placeholders in the quotient; instead each part of the quotient is written in its corresponding place value as the division occurs. Error Alert: If students struggle to identify the place value of each digit in the quotient of the standard algorithm and place the digits of the quotient in the wrong position, then have them organize their work on grid paper to maintain alignment. Provide place-value charts so students can match the digits in their quotients to the corresponding place values.

  • Unit 3, Lesson 13, Session 2, Apply It, students answer questions about equivalent ratios. The Teacher’s Edition provides guidance for the teacher, “For all problems, encourage students to use a model to support their thinking. Allow some leeway in precision; drawing number lines with equal spacing between tick marks can be difficult, and precise measures are not necessary to determine a solution to the problem.”

  • Unit 4, Prepare For, teachers are provided with guidance in using the graphic organizer included for students in Prepare for Unit Rates and Percent. This includes guidance in analyzing the term “comparing ratios” and how to build academic vocabulary throughout each lesson in the unit. “Next, have students meet with a partner to share ideas and add new information to the organizer. Circulate and validate responses and clarify any misconceptions.”

  • Unit 5, Lesson 22, Session 2, Develop, Discuss It, teachers are instructed to support partner discussion by “After students work on Try It, encourage them to respond to Discuss It with a partner. If students need support in getting started, prompt them to ask each other questions such as: In your equation, how did you represent the number of days? The cost for a day? How can you organize the information to find a pattern? How can you test whether your equation makes sense?” Common Misconception: “Listen for students who are not precise when defining variables. For example, students may say d = dollars, instead of d = dollars to feed 8 meerkats for n days. As students share their strategies, have partners discuss and reinforce understandings of variables and the need for precise descriptions of the meaning of the variable.”

Indicator 3b

Materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level/course-level concepts and concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for  containing adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level concepts and concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject. 

In the Teacher’s Guide, a Lesson Progression table is provided that links each lesson within the current unit to a prior and future grade level lesson. Within the Math Background section, detailed explanations of the mathematical concepts in each lesson are provided. For example, in Unit 2,  Math Background, Understanding Content Across Grades, insights are provided for prior knowledge, current lesson, and future learning in starting Lesson 7:

  • Prior Knowledge, “Insights on: Adding and Subtracting Decimals. Students learn to add and subtract decimals using the same variety of models and strategies they used to add and subtract whole numbers. Common Error - When students add and subtract decimals using the standard algorithm, they may line the numbers up by the end digits, rather than by place- value. A place-value chart is an excellent tool to help students focus on the value of each digit.” This information is accompanied by example problems worked out using a number line and another using a place value chart. 

  • Current Lesson, insights are provided on adding, subtracting, and multiplying decimals. For example: “Multiplying Decimals - When multiplying decimals, students use both decimal and fractional forms of the factors to make sense of the placement of the decimal point in the product.” This information is accompanied by an example problem worked out using the relationship between decimals and fractions to understand decimal multiplication.

  • Future Learning, insights are provided on understanding addition with positive and negative numbers. For example, “Students use integer chips to observe a key difference between adding two numbers with different signs and adding two numbers with the same sign. When the addends have different signs, they can cancel out zero pairs. When the addends have the same sign, all the chips are of the same type, so there are no zero pairs.” This is accompanied by an example problem solved using integer chips.

Indicator 3c

Materials include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for including standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series.

Correlation information is present for the mathematics standards addressed throughout the grade level/series. 

  • The Correlations Document describes lesson correlation to the CCSSM through multiple lenses. The document identifies the major and supporting areas of focus within the CCSSM, and the lessons address those standards. There is a table correlating each lesson with the standards covered, designating standards as “Focus”, “Developing”, or “Applied” within each lesson. The Correlations Document also identifies the Standards of Mathematical Practice that are included in each lesson. One table is organized by MP while the other is organized by lesson. The Unit Review Correlation identifies the associated standard and lesson to each problem within the Unit Review, along with their Depth of Knowledge level. 

  • The Program Overview provides teachers and explanations for how the standards are addressed in each unit. One section identified is the coherence section titled “Lesson Progression.” 

  • At the beginning of each Unit, “Lesson Progression” shows how each standard connects to and builds upon the previous grade levels. Each standard is identified in each lesson. It is arranged in a flow chart and connects lessons to future grade levels. 

  • In the lesson overview, prior knowledge is identified, so teachers know what standards are linked to prior work. Future grade level content is also identified.

Explanations of the role of specific grade-level mathematics are present in the context of the series. 

  • Grade Level Support, “Learning Progression” identifies prerequisite skills for each lesson and their related standards for the two prior grade levels, when applicable, in a flow chart. For example, the materials identify a prerequisite skill for Unit 2 as, “Multiply with fractions and divide with unit fractions.” It identifies two connected standards from prior grades, Multiply Fractions by Whole Numbers, 4.NF.4, 4.NF.4c, and designated essential skills, Multiply Fractions in Word Problems, 5.NF.6, and Divide Unit Fractions in Word Problems, 5.NF.7, 5.NF.7c.

Indicator 3d

Materials provide strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 provide strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

In the lesson overview, Connect to Family and Community, a letter is provided for students to take home to their family. This letter includes learning in the unit and ways to encourage family involvement in the lessons. The family letter is provided in the following languages: Arabic, Korean, Mandarin, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese. For example:

  • Unit 7, Lesson 30, Understand Probability, School to Home Connection, the letter contains “This week your student is exploring probability concepts…..Your student will be modeling problems like the one below. ‘There are 3 green marbles, 3 red marbles, and 6 blue marbles in the bag. Ravi reaches into the bag and selects 1 marble without looking. Describe some different events from this experiment and their probabilities.’”

Indicator 3e

Materials provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for providing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

Materials explain the instructional approaches of the program. Examples include:

  • The Teacher’s Guide and the Program Implementation area in the digital platform contains a section “Understanding the Try-Discuss-Connect Routine.” This routine is embedded throughout the program. This document explains how the routine is used. “Ready Classroom Mathematics empowers all students to own their learning through a discourse-based instructional routine. Lessons are divided into Explore, Develop, and Refine sessions and are taught over the course of a week. In Explore and Develop sessions teachers facilitate mathematical discourse through a Try-Discuss-Connect instructional routine.” 

  • “Using a Session” in the Teacher’s Guide describes the planning and support features within the Teacher’s Guide. This includes each component of the lesson and teacher’s guide and describes why it is important in the lesson. For example, “SMPs are infused throughout the instructional model. Deepen Understanding is a consistent opportunity to build understanding of a key lesson concept by extending mathematical discourse. The content connects a particular aspect of lesson learning to an SMP, showing how it might look in the classroom.”

  • Integrating Language and Mathematics identifies and explains the six language routines embedded within the curriculum. It identifies each routine, why a teacher may use it, the process and what part of the Try-Discuss-Connect Routine it can be used within. For example, for Say It Another Way, “What: A routine to help students paraphrase as a way to process a word problem or other written text and confirm understanding. Why: Paraphrasing helps students figure out whether they have understood something they have read or heard...How: Students read or listen to a word problem or other written text. One student paraphrases the text. Other students give a thumbs-up to show that the paraphrase is accurate and complete.”

Materials reference relevant research sources. Examples include: 

  • Boaler, (2016), Mathematical Mindsets

  • Council of the Great City Schools, (2016), A Framework for Re-Envisioning Mathematics Instruction for English Language Learners

  • Kersaint, (2016), Orchestrating Mathematical Discourse to Enhance Student Learning

  • National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, (2010), Teaching and Learning Mathematics

  • National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, (2014), Principals to Action

  • National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, (2014), Using Research to Improve Instruction

  • Richhart, (2009), Creating Cultures of Thinking

Materials include research-based strategies. Examples include: 

  • “Collaborative learning (partner or small group) encourages students to present and defend their ideas, make sense of and critique the ideas of others, and refine and amend their approaches.” Examples include, “Ready Classroom Mathematics lessons provide multiple opportunities for collaborative learning, such as Discuss It prompts where students explain and justify their strategies to each other and Consider This prompts where students compare problem-solving approaches, solutions, and reasoning.” The research included to support this is, “Research tells us that when students work collaboratively, which also gives them opportunities to see and understand mathematics connections, equitable outcomes result.” (Boaler, 2016)

  • Professional Development, contains an adapted excerpt from Reimagining the Mathematics Classroom, co authored by Dr. Mark Ellis for teachers. The excerpt explains “funds of knowledge” to teachers and how they can apply this knowledge using the materials. “Connect to Culture in the Teacher’s Guide for each lesson offers suggestions for tapping into students’ funds of knowledge and connecting the knowledge to Try It and other problems.”

Indicator 3f

Materials provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for providing a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities. The Teacher’s Guide includes an Activity Sheet in the Table of Contents which provides a list of printable tools and resources. “Dot Paper, Frayer Model 2, Fraction Bars are available to print and copy for each student.” Materials include a Manipulatives List by Lesson for each grade level. For example: 


Unit 3, Lesson 12: 6 unit tiles per pair and 7 two-color counters per pair.

Indicator 3g

This is not an assessed indicator in Mathematics.

Indicator 3h

This is not an assessed indicator in Mathematics.

Criterion 3i - 3l

The program includes a system of assessments identifying how materials provide tools, guidance, and support for teachers to collect, interpret, and act on data about student progress towards the standards.

7/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 partially meet expectations for Assessment. The materials partially include assessment information in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed and partially provide multiple opportunities throughout the grade to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. The materials provide assessments that include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level standards and practices.

Indicator 3i

Assessment information is included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 partially meet expectations for having assessment information included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

Within the Teacher’s Guide, Teacher Toolbox, Assess, Lesson Quizzes and Unit Assessments are provided. In the Teacher version, Lesson Quizzes identify: tested skills and content standards, DOK levels, Problem Notes, Short Response Scoring Rubric with points and corresponding expectations, worked out problems, and Differentiation suggestions. While the Lesson Quizzes identify the content standards, they do not identify the mathematical practices. For example:

  • Unit 5: Algebraic Thinking: Equivalent Expressions and Equations with Variables, Lesson Quiz, Tested Skills, assesses 6.EE.5, “Problems on this assessment require students to demonstrate understanding that the solution of an equation is a value that makes the equation true....” Problem Notes, Problem 2, “Students could also solve the problem by recognizing that any number multiplied by 1 is equal to itself, so the two sides of the equation have the same value when x = 1. (2 points) DOK 1, 6.EE.5.”

The Teacher version of the Unit Assessments, which have Form A and Form B, identify: Problem Notes, worked out problems, DOK levels, content standards and mathematical practices, Scoring Guide, and Scoring Rubrics. Within the Scoring Guide, “For the problems in the Unit 4 Unit Assessments (Forms A and B), the table shows: depth of knowledge (DOK) level, points for scoring, lesson assessed by each problem, and the standard addressed.” Examples include:

  • Unit 4: Ratio Reasoning: Unit Rates and Percent, Unit Assessment, Form A, Problem 3, “A paint store sells 4 pt of paint for $19. Use a model to write a rate for this situation. What does this rate mean? Show your work.” The Problem Notes state, “Students could also use a table to write an equivalent ratio that shows the rate in dollars per pint. The price in dollars and the number of pints can both be divided by 4 to determine the price for 1 pint. (2 points), DOK 2, 6.RP.2” Within the Scoring Guide, Problem 3 is identified as aligning to 6.RP.2 and SMP8.

  • Unit 4: Ratio Reasoning: Unit Rates and Percent, Unit Assessment, Form B, Problem 3, “A catering company sells an 8 lb container of food for $54. Use a model to write a rate for this situation. What does the rate mean? Show your work.” The Problem Notes state, “Students could also use a table to write an equivalent ratio that shows the rate in dollars per pint. The price in dollars and the number of pints can both be divided by 4 to determine the price for 1 pint. DOK 2, 6.RP.2” Within the Scoring Guide, Problem 3 is identified as aligning to 6.RP.2 and SMP8.

Digital Comprehension Checks “...can be given as an alternative to the print Unit Assessment. For this comprehension check, the table below provides the Depth of Knowledge (DOK), standard assessed, and the corresponding lesson assessed by each problem.” While the Comprehension Checks identify the content standards, they do not identify the mathematical practices.

Indicator 3j

Assessment system provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 partially meet expectations for including an assessment system that provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. 

The assessment system provides opportunities to determine students’ learning. Examples include:

  • Lesson Quizzes contain Choice Matrix and Select Scoring Rubric and Short Response Scoring Rubric. The Choice Matrix and Select Scoring Rubric contains points and expectations for the quiz. 2 points if all answers are correct, 1 point if there is 1 incorrect answer and 0 points if there are 2 or more incorrect answers. The Short Response Scoring Rubric contains points and expectations for the short response question. Students earn 2 points if the “Response has the correct solution(s) and includes well-organized, clear and concise work demonstrating thorough understanding of mathematical concepts and/or procedures.”

  • Unit Assessments contain the Extended Response Scoring Rubric (if there is an extended response question included in the assessment), Short Response Scoring Rubric, and a rubric for Multiple Select, Fill-in-the Blank and Choice Matrix questions (depending on which question types are on the assessment) that provides guidance for scoring each type of problem on the assessment. For example, the Extended Response Scoring Rubric, a response should earn 4 points if, “Response has the correct solution(s) and includes well-organized, clear and concise work demonstrating thorough understanding of mathematical concepts and/or procedures.” This same expectation scores a 2 on the Short Response Scoring Rubric. The Multiple Select, Fill-in-the Blank and/or Choice Matrix  Scoring Rubric contains points and expectations for the assessment. 2 points if all answers are correct, 1 point if there is 1 incorrect answer and 0 points if there are 2 or more incorrect answers. 

The Lesson Quizzes provide sufficient guidance to teachers to follow-up with students; however, there is no follow-up guidance in the Unit Assessments or Comprehension Checks. For example:

  • Unit 2: Decimals and Fractions: Base-Ten Operations, Division with Fractions, and Volume, Lesson 10, the Lesson Quiz provides three types of differentiation: Reteach, Reinforce, and Extend. “Reteach: Tools for Instruction, Students who require additional support for prerequisite or on-level skills will benefit from activities that provide targeted skills instruction. Grade. Reinforce: Math Center Activity, Students who require practice to reinforce concepts and skills and deepen understanding will benefit from small group collaborative games and activities (available in on-level, below-level, and above-level versions). Extend: Enrichment Activity, Students who have achieved proficiency with concepts and skills and are ready for additional challenges will benefit from group collaborative games and activities that extend understanding.” The Reteach section directs teachers back to Lesson 10, Divide Fractions. The Reinforce section directs teachers back to Lesson 10, Use Fraction Division. The Extend section directs teachers back to Lesson 10, Pumpkin Pairs.

Indicator 3k

Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level/course-level standards and practices across the series.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for providing assessments that include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level standards and practices across the series. Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level standards and mathematical practices across the series. 

The formative and summative assessments include a variety of item types to measure grade-level standards. For example:

  • Fill-in-the-blank

  • Multiple select

  • Matching

  • Graphing

  • Constructed response (short and extended responses)

  • Technology-enhanced items, e.g., drag and drop, drop-down menus, matching 

Assessments are provided as a PDF or online for teachers that can be provided to students in either format.

Indicator 3l

Assessments offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 do not provide assessments which offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

Accessibility features are not offered; however, in the Frequently Asked Questions document, “For more detailed information about accessibility features in the Diagnostic, Student Bookshelf, and Comprehension Checks, contact your administrator. District administrators, please contact your Ready Classroom Mathematics Account Manager.”

Criterion 3m - 3v

The program includes materials designed for each child’s regular and active participation in grade-level/grade-band/series content.

8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for Student Supports. The materials provide: strategies and supports for students in special populations to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level mathematics, extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity, strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to regularly participate in learning grade-level mathematics, and manipulatives, both virtual and physical, that are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies and supports for students in special populations to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level/series mathematics.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for providing strategies and supports for students in special populations to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level mathematics.

  • At the end of the Lesson Quiz in the Teacher’s edition, there is a section for differentiation that provides suggestions for Reteach (Tools for Instruction), Reinforce (Math Center Activity), and Extend (Enrichment Activity). Reteach, “Students who require additional support for prerequisite or on-level skills will benefit from activities that provide targeted skills instruction.” Reinforce, “Students who require practice to reinforce concepts and skills and deepen understanding will benefit from small group collaborative games and activities (available on-level, below-level, and above-level versions).” Extend, “Students who have achieved proficiency with concepts and skills and are ready for additional challenges will benefit from group collaborative games and activities that extend understanding.” The digital platform contains these activities for each lesson.

  • In Refine lessons, the teacher’s edition provides suggestions to Group & Differentiate, “Identify groupings for differentiation based on the Start and problems 1-3. A recommended sequence of activities for each group is suggested below. Use the resources on the next page to differentiate and close the lesson.” Resources are suggested for groups Approaching Proficiency, Meeting Proficiency, and Extending Beyond Proficiency. The resources are found in the digital platform (Reteach, Reinforce, Extend). The following pages also contain descriptions of additional activities in the teacher’s edition for Reteach, Reinforce, and Extend.

Indicator 3n

Materials provide extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level/course-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for providing extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity.

Refine sessions provide recommendations for students that demonstrate understanding “Extending Beyond Proficiency” to engage in problems for reinforcement and a challenge. The number of problems is the same as students who are considered to be “Meeting Proficiency”. Additional Enrichment Activities can be found online in the Small Group Differentiation Extend section.

In Explore and Develop sessions, the materials contain a Deepen Understanding section to extend understanding of the lesson’s key concepts through the use of discourse with students. The section contains teacher prompts and suggestions for what ideas to look for from students. Each Deepen Understanding is labeled with an embedded mathematical practice. Examples include: 

  • Unit 1, Lesson 2, Enrichment Activity Building Shapes, students are provided with a challenge question at the beginning and multiple opportunities to draw and explain their answer. “How can you build different polygons with given areas using triangles, rectangles, and parallelograms?”

  • Unit 5, Lesson 21, Session 3, Deepen Understanding provides teachers with prompts to support students in noticing how representations differ based on an equation. “Prompt students to compare differences between a hanger diagram for an addition equation and one for a multiplication equation...Ask: In what situations could a hanger diagram be used to represent addition or multiplication? When could it only represent addition? Listen for: Multiplication is repeated addition. If the variable addend repeats, then you can use a multiplication equation. If not, then you have to use an addition equation.”

Indicator 3o

Materials provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for students to monitor their learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time, and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for students to monitor their learning. 

The Teacher’s Guide provides a lesson structure and instructional routine for the lessons by implementing the Try It-Discuss It-Connect It Routine. “Ready Classroom mathematics empowers all students to own their learning through a discourse-based instructional routine. Lessons are divided into Explore, Develop, and Refine sessions and are taught over the course of a week. Students develop greater understanding of mathematical representations and solution strategies using think time, partner talk, individual writing, and whole class discourse.”

Units begin with a single page consisting of the unit number, title, and subtitle. A self-check list of student friendly skills is included where students can check off skills they know before and after each lesson. Each unit concludes with a Self-Reflection, Vocabulary Review, and Unit Review.

Prompts in the Teacher's Guide suggest appropriate places to give students individual time to think. Discuss It provides students opportunities to share in a small group before whole-class discussion. Students work independently before sharing in small or large groups. 

Each lesson has an area for supporting partner discussion. There are suggested questions the teacher can ask to provide students with oral feedback as to their understanding. Examples include:

  • “Why did you choose the model or strategy you used?”

  • “How did your model help you make sense of the problem?” 

At the end of each unit is a Self Reflection page where students can work in pairs to respond to prompts. Prompts include: 1. Three examples of what I learned are… 2. The hardest thing I learned to do is ____ because… 3. A question I still have is...

Indicator 3p

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

In the Program Overview, guidance for teachers includes the first step is finding where the students are and what content they should be learning. A chart shows how to use data to differentiate instruction with a list of differentiated resources. During a lesson, teachers should informally observe student work and offer resources to use and where to find them. There is no teacher guidance on how to identify students who need a specific grouping strategy.

In the Teacher’s Guide, each lesson contains information to support partner discussion and facilitate whole class discussion. Guidance is provided for differentiation-reteach, reinforce, or extend to help struggling students understand the concepts or skills being taught in the lesson. The Teacher’s Guide also includes a “Prepare For” section of each lesson. This section includes guidance for the teacher on how and when to use grouping strategies. For example:

  • Unit 2, Lesson 11, Session 1, Prepare for Solving Volume Problems with Fractions, “Have students work individually to complete the graphic organizer. Invite students to share their completed graphic organizers, and prompt a whole-class comparative discussion of the words, illustrations, and examples given. Have students look at the prisms in problem 2 and discuss with a partner how the volumes of the prisms can be compared.”

Indicator 3q

Materials provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to regularly participate in learning grade-level mathematics.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for providing strategies and support for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to regularly participate in learning grade-level mathematics.

Materials consistently provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to meet or exceed grade-level standards through regular and active participation in grade-level mathematics. Examples include:

  • Each Lesson Session includes differentiated support for various levels of English proficiency with level 1-3, levels 2-4, and levels 3-5 identified. Support for Academic language is used during the “Try-Discuss-Connect Language” routines in each lesson. 

  • In the Program Overview, language expectations charts are provided that describe the language English Learners can understand and produce in connection with students’ levels of English proficiency. Teachers can use the examples to help meet the needs of English Learners. 

  • Each Unit Overview connects with one of the CCSS addressed in the unit and shows an example of how language expectations can help to differentiate instruction to meet the needs of English learners. 

  • In the Program Overview, there is an Integrate Language and Mathematics section. “Scaffolded language support for a specific problem is outlined. These suggestions for scaffolding and amplifying language can be applied to other problems as well.” 

  • Language objectives are included and students are expected to understand and produce language as they work on lesson objectives. Graphic organizers are used to help students access prior knowledge and vocabulary they build on in the lesson.

  • Discourse cards are available in the Teacher Digital Experience under the Ready Classroom Mathematics Toolbox. These cards provide sentence starters and questions to help students engage in conversations with their partners, small groups or the whole class. 

  • All classroom materials are available in Spanish.

  • Multilingual Glossary is available in Arabic, Chinese, Haitian Creole, Portuguese, Russian, Tagalog, Urdu, and Vietnamese. There is a Bilingual glossary in the student textbook that includes mathematics vocabulary in English and Spanish.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

The materials feature a balance of images and information about people representing various demographic and physical characteristics. Problems represent a balance of settings and ethnic traditions. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Lesson 6 includes the names Malik, Hugo, Jasmine, Akio, Jada, Reth, Luis, Avery, Morgan, Anne, Ria, Carlos, Pilar, Chantel, Ignacio, and Inés as subjects of the problems within the lesson. 

  • Unit 3, Lesson 13, Session 1, Try It features henna paste and Diwali as context for the problem. “Veda uses henna paste to paint designs on her friends’ hands and feet as they prepare to celebrate Diwali, a festival of lights. What is the ratio of tablespoons of henna powder to teaspoons of oil if Veda makes 3 batches of pate?” The accompanying photograph includes bowls of the paste and oil. Connect to Culture further explains henna and Diwali, and provides opportunities for students to share their connections and experiences.

Indicator 3s

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

The materials contain a cognate support routine in the Teacher’s Edition “for students who primarily speak Spanish or other Latin-based languages.” In the Prepare For Unit _, “Academic vocabulary for each lesson is listed in the Lesson Overview. The chart below includes the Spanish cognates for academic vocabulary introduced in the unit and in each lesson. To support students whose primary language is Spanish, use the Cognate Support routine as described in the Unit 1 Professional Learning. Support students as they move from informal language to formal academic language by using the Collect and Display routine. Have students refer to the chart during discussion and writing.” A table with the academic words from the unit and Spanish cognates is included. The “Cognate Support Routine” provides instructions for teachers:

  1. Ask students to identify terms that look or sound similar to words in their home language.

  2. Check to see if the identified terms are cognates.

  3. Write the cognates and have students copy them next to the English terms.

  4. Pronounce the English term and its cognate or ask a volunteer to do so. Have students repeat.

Each lesson includes Family Letters which, “provide background information and include an activity.” They are designed to be distributed after the Explore Session, to inform them of their students’ learning and create an opportunity for family involvement. Letters available include English, Spanish, Arabic, Korean, Mandarin, Russian, Tagalog, and Vietnamese.

Indicator 3t

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

Connect to Culture “provides teachers with ideas to increase engagement and encourage connections among students from a wide variety of backgrounds.” 

  • Unit 6, Lesson 28, Session 1, Connect to Culture, “People have been snowshoeing for about 6,000 years. Snowshoes were essential for survival in snowy areas where people could not easily walk, hunt, or trap during the winter. The first snowshoes were modified slabs of wood. Later, snowshoes were made from a wood frame with rawhide lacing. Today, snowshoes are made from a variety of materials, including alumunium, plastic, and elastic, which make the snowshoes more durable and easier to put on or take off. Snowshoeing is growing in popularity as a great way to exercise outdoors in the winter months. Poll students to find out their favorite winter sports.Record their answers in a tally chart.” Try It, “A sign at an intersection of two snowshoe trails shows the distance along the trails to four locations. When traveling along the trails, how much farther is it from Sandy Creek to Lookout Point than it is from Pilar’s Rock to Meek’s Lake?

Indicator 3u

Materials provide supports for different reading levels to ensure accessibility for students.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 provide support for different reading levels to ensure accessibility for students.

The Unit “Prepare For” section provides academic words and phrases that students will use in the unit. It is suggested for teachers to use the “Academic Vocabulary” routine described in the Professional Learning to provide explicit instruction and active engagement. Another suggestion to support students to move from informal to more formal academic language is by using the “Collect and Display” routine. Students can refer to the chart throughout discussions and writings.

Use of “Three Reads” is suggested as a support to MP1, Make Sense of the Problem. In the Teacher's Guide there are places to develop academic language throughout the lessons. Examples include:

  • Unit 3, Lesson 14, Session 3, Develop Academic Language “Why? Reinforce understanding of language used in comparisons. How? Write bluer, better, yellower, and stronger on the board. Allow time for students to think about when they use these types of words. (to compare) Guide them to share examples using item 1 + is + adjective + then + item 2. Encourage students to use this format to compare ratios in Model It.”

  • Unit 6, Lesson 28, Session 1, Try It, engages students in the Three Reads routine to make sense of the problem. “Before students work on Try It, use Three reads to help them make sense of the problem. After the first read, ask students what they know about the locations on the trails. After the second read, ask students what they are trying to find about the locations. After the third read, ask: What is the important information in this problem?

Indicator 3v

Manipulatives, both virtual and physical, are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 meet expectations for providing manipulatives, both virtual and physical, that are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

Digital tools are available for students. These tools include Counters and Connecting Cubes, Base-Ten Blocks, Number Line, Multiplication Models, Perimeter and Area, and Fraction Models. Geometry, Scientific Calculator and Graphing Calculator are also included but cannot be reviewed as these tools are powered by Desmos. Support videos are available for each of the digital tools, explaining how they may be used and their functions. For example:

  • Grade 6 Standard Manipulative Kit includes algebra tiles, plastic rulers, centimeter cubes, base ten blocks, number cubes, rainbow color tiles, two color counters and connecting cubes. A la carte items are available. The materials state that these items may only be used once, may be common to classrooms, or print options are available. A la carte items include fraction bars, tangrams, geoboards, geosolids and rainbow fraction circle set. 

  • Visual models such as number lines, graphs, or bars, are also available but cannot be manipulated.

The “Try-Discuss-Connect” routine embedded throughout every lesson provides students the opportunity to connect and transition from the use of manipulatives to written methods. Inside of the digital platform, Program Implementation, “Try-Discuss-Connect Routine Resources, Understanding the Try-Discuss-Connect Instructional Routine”, the guide describes how the routine helps students transition from manipulatives to written methods. In the Try It activity, “students have access to a variety of tools and manipulatives to use to represent the problem situation. During the Discuss It activity, “Students present and explain their solution methods and listen to and critique the reasoning of others, models and representations.” “The class then looks at the strategies highlighted in the Picture It and Model It, and students make connections between strategies, their own strategies, and the strategies discussed as a class.” During the Connect It activity, “Students apply their thinking during the lesson to new problems.” The routine integrates the CRA model in the:

  • Try It, “Students use concrete, representational, or abstract strategies to solve the problem, based on their understanding of the problem or mathematical concept.

  • Discuss It, “Students who use more concrete approaches begin to make connections to representational or abstract approaches as they engage in partner discussions.”

  • Connect It, “Through the Connect It questions, students connect concrete and representational approaches to more abstract understanding as they formalize their connections.”

Criterion 3w - 3z

The program includes a visual design that is engaging and references or integrates digital technology, when applicable, with guidance for teachers.

0/0
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6: integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level standards, have a visual design that supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning. The materials do not include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other.

Indicator 3w

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

All aspects of the materials can be accessed digitally. Some components are only digital such as the Interactive Tutorials, Digital Math Tools Powered by Desmos, Learning Games, and Comprehension Checks. Adaptive diagnostic assessment, lesson quizzes, mid-unit, unit assessments, and assignable comprehension checks are all available online for students to complete. The digital materials do not allow for customizing or editing existing lessons for local use.

At the beginning of each unit, the Unit Resources includes the digital tools available in the student digital experience, “Engage students with digital resources that provide interactive instruction, practice, assessment, and differentiation.” These tools include:

  • Interactive tutorials

  • Digital math tools powered by Desmos

  • PowerPoint slides

  • Learning games

  • Digital practice

  • Diagnostic assessment

  • Lesson and unit comprehension checks

In the digital platform, Program Implementation, Digital Resource Correlations, there are Prerequisite Interactive Tutorial Lesson Correlations. This document shows to which lesson the tutorial is aligned. There are Comprehension Check Correlations for each unit that show to which standard and lesson each question on the digital comprehension check is aligned.

Indicator 3x

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 do not include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

The materials do not provide an opportunity for students and teachers to collaborate with each other.

Indicator 3y

The visual design (whether in print or digital) supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 have a visual design (whether in print or digital) that supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

Lesson routines are consistent in grades 6-8. Each lesson follows the same pattern of “Try It, Discuss It, and Connect It.” Session Slides begin with Learning Targets and a Start slide. The sections of each session are labeled at the top, including “Try It”, “Model It”, “Discuss It”, or “Connect It”. The session slides conclude with a Close: Exit Ticket and Vocabulary. 


“Math in Action” sections include one student’s solution as an exemplar model of a possible strategy, use of good problem solving, and a complete solution. Each section is written in first person language explaining each step they took to solve the problem, including completed work and relevant images. Notice That boxes provide important information about that student’s solution. A Problem Solving Checklist textbox can be used by students when writing their own solutions based on the model.

Indicator 3z

Materials provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for i-Ready Classroom Mathematics Grade 6 provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

Unit Resources include the digital tools available in the student and teacher digital experience, “Engage students with digital resources that provide interactive instruction, practice, assessment, and differentiation.” There are digital tools included for:

  •  In-Class Instruction and Practice

    • Interactive tutorials 

    • Digital Math Tools powered by Desmos

    • PowerPoint slides

  • Independent Practice for School or Home

    • Digital Math Tools powered by Desmos

    • Learning Games

    • Digital Practice

  • Assessments and Reports

    • Diagnostic Assessment

    • Lesson and Unit Comprehension Checks

    • Prerequisites Report

    • Comprehension Check Reports

  • Differentiation

    • Interactive tutorials

    • Digital Math Tools powered by Desmos

    • Learning Games

In the digital platform, Program Implementation, Digital Resource Correlations, there are “Prerequisite Interactive Tutorial Lesson Correlations” for each lesson that has a corresponding interactive tutorial. This document provides guidance on how these can be used, “Interactive Tutorials can be shown before an Explore session to build background knowledge on a topic. The chart below shows which Interactive Tutorial can serve as a prerequisite to each lesson, along with which objectives that Interactive Tutorial covers.” Additionally, there are Digital Math Tools Support Videos for students or teachers to watch to learn how to use the Digital Math Tools. 

Ready Classroom Central, Program Overview, Student Bookshelf is a video explaining to teachers how students access and use the Student Bookshelf in Student Digital Experience.

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Report Published Date: 2021/09/15

Report Edition: 2021

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
RCM06 National SW Volume 1 978‑1‑7280‑1298‑8 Curriculum Associates 2021
RCM06 National SW Volume 2 978‑1‑7280‑1299‑5 Curriculum Associates 2021
RCM06 CC TG Volume 1 978‑1‑7280‑1304‑6 Curriculum Associates 2021
RCM06 CC TG Volume 2 978‑1‑7280‑1305‑3 Curriculum Associates 2021

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

Math K-8 Review Tool

The K-8 review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations