Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

Developing Core Literacy Proficiencies for Grade 6 fully the expectations of alignment to the standards. The materials provide appropriate texts and associated tasks and activities for students to build literacy proficiency and advance comprehension over the course of the school year. Students engage in writing, speaking and listening, and language tasks to build critical thinking as they grow knowledge and build skills to transfer to other rigorous texts and tasks.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
17
32
36
32
32-36
Meets Expectations
18-31
Partially Meets Expectations
0-17
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
28
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
31
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

Overall, the Grade 6 materials meet the expectations for Gateway 1. A variety of high quality, complex texts support students’ growing literacy skills over the course of the year. However, some text types and genres called for in the standards are not represented.

Materials support students’ growth in writing skills over the course of the year using high-quality, text-dependent questions and tasks. Materials do not include explicit instruction targeted for grammar and convention standards.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
18/20
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Criterion Rating Details

Overall, the Grade 6 materials meet the expectations for Text Quality and Complexity. The anchor texts (including video, audio, and visual texts) are of high quality, are appropriately complex, and support students’ growing literacy skills over the course of the year, including opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading that will move them toward grade-level proficiency. The materials only reflect a partial coverage of the text types and genres required by the standards.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

Texts encompass many text types such as poems, speeches, informational texts, personal narratives, and media such as newscasts, and online sources. Additionally, texts exhibit exceptional craft, rich vocabulary, and syntax, as well as provide useful content information. The materials allow teachers and students an adequate amount of time to spend working with complex texts that are engaging and consider a range of interests.

  • In Unit 1, students read A Brief History of Wolves in the United States by Cornelia N. Hutt. This text builds content knowledge about North American wolves. It also addresses the causal relationship between humans and wolves. Students also read an excerpt of Jack London’s White Fang; this excerpt describes the role of wolf parents and describes the sensory experiences of wolf pups.
  • Unit 2’s sole text is “Connecting the Dots.” Steve Jobs delivered this commencement speech at Stanford University on June 12, 2005. This text is used to help students learn to make evidence-based claims and encourages multiple readings as Jobs tells three anecdotal stories within the speech. This text is of high interest to Grade 6 students.
  • In Unit 3, students read “Ancient Cave Behavior” by Emily Sohn. This informational article was published by Science News for Students and builds useful content knowledge about the behavior of the early people of South Africa’s southern coast. Students also read “Forgotten Cave in France Was Hiding Stone Age Art” which was originally published by The Associated Press and adapted by Newsela.com. The article provides students with information on the steps the French government took to create a life-size replica of Grotte Chavet preserving the original cave which contained prehistoric cave art.
  • In Unit 4, students read “Poverty and Fracking” by John Harpole which was published by The Denver Post. This article is rich in content knowledge as it provides facts and statistics about the benefits of hydraulic fracking on energy costs. Students also read “Fracking Fury” by Janna Palliser which was published by Science Scope and provides many facts and statistics about the negative impact of hydraulic fracking on the environment.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet expectations that the instructional materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

Texts include a majority of informational texts and a small number of literary titles. Supplemental texts within the modules are also weighted heavily toward informational texts. A wide distribution of genres and text types as required by standards to support student literacy development in Grade 6 is not evident. They include, but are not limited to speeches, historical fiction, non-fiction, articles, videos, photography, websites, and periodicals.

To fully meet the expectation of the balance for Grade 6 according to the Common Core State Standards and to ensure students have opportunities to engage with texts from a broad range of cultures and periods, the teacher would have to add a range of text types to include literature such as adventure stories, historical fiction, mysteries, myths, science fiction, realistic fiction, allegories, parodies, satire, and graphic novels, as there are no examples of these texts in the materials.

The only examples of literature found within the instructional materials for Grade 6 include:

  • Unit 1, Text 6: White Fang (Part II Chapter 1), by Jack London
  • Unit 1, Text 8: White Fang (Part II Chapter 3), by Jack London

The following are examples of informational text found within the instructional materials:

  • Unit 1, Text 2: “A Brief History of Wolves in the United States,” by Cornelia N. Hutt
  • Unit 2: “Connecting the Dots,” 2005 Commencement Address Standford University, by Steve Jobs
  • Unit 3, Text 6.1: “Cave and Rock Art,” The Blackbirch Encyclopedia of Science & Invention
  • Unit 3, Text 9: “Origins of Religion,” by Frank E. Smith
  • Unit 4, Text 2.1: “What’s Behind the Natural Gas Boom?” by Alexis Madrigal
  • Unit 4, Text 4.2: “The Cost of Fracking,” by Environment America Research and Policy Center

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

The texts with provided Lexile levels range from 970L to 1200L; most texts fall within either the Current Lexile Band or the Stretch Lexile Band for grades 6-8. The texts are appropriate for Grade 6, according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Some texts do exceed these bands, but the associated tasks are designed to make them accessible to sixth graders. The few texts that do not have Lexiles provided qualitatively meet the requirements for this grade level because they serve as introductory pieces for a unit, provide for the exploration of a subject via a variety of experiences, and allow for the comparison of fictional narrative with real-life accounts.

  • In Unit 1, Part 3, Activity 1, students read an excerpt of White Fang by Jack London. The Lexile level is 1020L which falls on the high end of Common Core’s Stretch Lexile Band for Grades 6-8. Because this text is complex, the student task suggests that students listen to the first read of this text, and student groups are given shorter excerpts to read, analyze, and present to the class because of the “density of the description.” White Fang also contains figurative language with complex vocabulary and provides readers with multiple perspectives developing a complex theme. The tasks associated with this text makes it appropriate for Grade 6 students.
  • In Unit 2, Part 1, Activity 3, students read the unit’s sole text, “Connecting the Dots.” Steve Jobs delivered this Commencement Speech at Stanford University on June 12, 2005. The Lexile level is 900. The Lexile level falls within the Current Lexile Band for Grades 6-8. The speech also has qualitative value because it provides students with the opportunity to analyze figurative language, complex vocabulary, complex sentence structure, and an intricate author’s purpose. The student task suggests that students listen to the speech and participate in a class discussion about their first impression. The tasks associated with this text make it appropriate for Grade 6 students.
  • In Unit 3, Part 2, Activity 2, students read “Why Did Prehistoric People Make Cave Art?” by Adam Benton. The Lexile is 1100 which is on the high end of the Stretch Lexile Band for Grades 6-8. Although the text is complex, students should be able to comprehend this text because “the purpose of the article is implicit but fairly easy to infer.” The textual structure of the article includes complex graphics and text features. The article also includes subject-specific vocabulary with complex sentences. The tasks associated with this text make it appropriate for Grade 6 students.
  • In Unit 4, Part 2, Activity 5, students read “Fracking and Poverty” by John Harpole. This text’s Lexile level is 1090 which falls above the Current Lexile Band but within the Stretch Lexile Band for grades 6-8 and “should be accessible to most sixth grade students.” This piece has qualitative value because it provides students with the opportunity to analyze rhetoric via easy-to-read anecdotes; students also have the opportunity to identify claims and supporting evidence while providing them with rich, grade-appropriate vocabulary. The tasks associated with this texts make it appropriate for Grade 6 students.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year.

Series of texts are at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band. Skills build on one another, as well as the complexity of the texts to support the thinking and literacy skills. In the units with the text sets, there is a full range of the Lexile stretch band providing opportunities to challenge students by giving them complex texts but also by providing more reachable texts as they are working on analysis and synthesis skills.

Each unit has questioning path tools and a toolbox of graphic organizers that allow students to record thoughts for discussion and build student understanding. Students focus on attending to literacy skills that include attending to details, deciphering words, comprehending syntax, interpreting language, identifying relationships, making inferences, summarizing, questioning, recognizing perspective, evaluating information, delineating argumentation, forming claims, using evidence, using logic, using language, presenting details, organizing ideas, using conventions, publishing, and reflecting critically.

As the year progresses, questions and tasks build literacy skills and student independence:

  • In Unit 1, students read closely for textual details. Students read nine texts and draft a multi-paragraph explanation to show their understanding of the texts they have read.
  • In Unit 2, students begin making evidence based claims.
  • In Unit 3, students research to deepen their understanding of a topic.
  • At the end of the year, in Unit 4, students are building evidence-based arguments using the skills from each of the previous units to evaluate and write an evidence-based argument.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

While not all texts have a text complexity analysis, most texts include instructional notes and text notes. There is clear rationale for the purpose and placement of the texts chosen. The instructional notes include a recommendation on how students should read the text (silently and independently, listen to text, read aloud, etc.) and the language in the text. In the teacher’s edition, the curriculum explains the purpose and value of the texts in the Text Notes provided for teachers. For example, some texts are chosen for their value in reinforcing literary techniques while others were chosen as appropriate introductions to a particular time period or topic. All texts were chosen because they were appropriate for sixth-grade students while still allowing some flexibility for a variety of reading levels. Quantitative and qualitative measures are discussed in the text notes section.

Examples of instructional and text notes found in Grade 6 materials include the following:

  • Unit 1, Text 6, White Fang-The Battle of the Fangs Instructional Notes: This is a work of fiction rather than an informational text. Students can first read the text silently and independently or listen to it read aloud, because of the richness of the language and imagery in Text 6. Students must be provided with minimal context but should be told that the text is a story - a work of fiction. Text Notes: “The passage offers a challenging reading experience for students because of its descriptive language, but measures at a level (1020L) in the middle of the Grades 6-8 text band."
  • Unit 2, Steve Job’s Commencement Speech at Stanford University Instructional Notes: Text Notes: “The text presents a number of qualitative characteristics that also make it a complex and challenging read. Jobs uses an essentially narrative structure for much of the speech, wherein he tells the graduates,’three stories’ from his life. However he uses the stories metaphorically to suggest various ideas he wants his listeners (readers) to contemplate. The speech deals with the abstract and perhaps disturbing concept of death and its relationship to how one lives life, providing an intellectual challenge for students.”
  • Unit 3, Text 2, "Forgotten Cave in France was Hiding Stone Age Art" Instructional Notes: Text Notes: “Use Texts 2 and 3 to help students build some general background knowledge about the topic and practice posing Inquiry Questions. Students will gain important background knowledge about The Chauvet cave in particular and about cave art in general. This may lead them to wonder who could have created the art and why.”
  • Unit 4, Text set 1: Instructional Notes: Teachers can scaffold their reading by providing a reading purpose, background information about the text, and one or two initial Guiding Questions to initiate the multistage close-reading process. Text Notes Text. 1.2 "The Story of Energy-Where Does Our Power Come From?": "This video details the process for creating energy from renewable and nonrenewable resources and provides excellent imagery to make connections between one’s individual energy uses and the larger world of energy production. The animation, also, however, shifts from information to argument because it advocates for renewable energy sources at its end."

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. Students encounter a variety of texts including images, videos, informational texts, fictional narratives, scientific studies, and commencement speeches. Most texts are accompanied by a Questioning Path Tool which provides both text-dependent and text-specific questions that guide them into a deeper reading of the text. Finally, each unit provides various student checklists and teacher rubrics that can be used to monitor progress throughout the year.

Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in reading a variety of text types and disciplines and also to experience a volume of reading as they grow toward reading independence at grade level. Evidence is as follows:

  • Unit 1 is based on numerous non-fiction texts related to wolves. In Unit 1, Part 2, Activity 2, students read “All About Wolves: Hunting Behavior." The curriculum provides support for this reading via the Questioning Path Tool. This tool provides four levels of both text-dependent and text-specific questioning which include questioning, analyzing, deepening, and extending.
  • In Unit 2, Part 1, Activity 3, students listen as the teacher reads aloud paragraphs 1-9 of Steve Job’s “Connecting the Dots.” They then engage in a discussion about their first impressions of what his speech is about. Students are then introduced to the text-specific questions from the Questioning Path Tool. This tool provides four levels of both text-dependent and text-specific questioning which include questioning, analyzing, deepening, and extending.
  • In Unit 3, Part 1, Activity 2, students read “Forgotten Cave in France Was Hiding Stone Age Art” published by www.newsela.com. When using articles on www.newsela.com, the teacher may differentiate texts by assigning each student the same titled article but on different Lexile levels. Students also read another article from www.newselas.com entitled, “Ancient Humans Art is Older Than We Thought.” Students use both articles to gather background information on Cave Art and pose Inquiry Questions. Teachers are provided with sample text-dependent questions “to drive initial close reading...and discussion.”
  • In Unit 4, Part 1, Activity 3, students watch the animated video, “What’s behind the Natural Gas Boom?” The curriculum provides support for the analysis of this video via the Questioning Path Tool. This tool provides both text-dependent and text-specific questions in the levels analyzing and deepening.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
14/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the expectations of indicators 1g through 1m. The materials support students as they grow their writing skills over the course of the year. High-quality, text-dependent questions and task support students as they grapple with materials, actively participate in discussions of content, engage in a variety of writing types, and demonstrate their learning with evidence-supported arguments. Materials do not include explicit instruction targeted for grammar and convention standards.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

The Grade 6 units include questions and tasks that focus on gathering evidence, knowledge, and insight from what students read. Questions and tasks delve systemically into texts to guide students toward extracting the key meanings or ideas found there. Coherent sequences of text dependent/specific questions and activities are present to ensure text focus and increased reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills.

The program includes a Literacy Tool Box that is a collection of adoptable resources designed to increase literacy skills. The toolbox includes handouts, graphic organizers, checklists, and rubrics which are used throughout the program. These instructional materials support scaffolding, include activities that encourage responses that require text evidence, and can be used in many different contexts.

Text-dependent questions and tasks that students encounter in the Grade 6 materials include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Part 1, Activity 2, students are prompted to attend to the details of a set of visual images found in a text to answer questions including the following: “What details stand out to me as I examine this image? How do specific details help me understand what is being depicted in the image? What do the details of the two artistic works in Image Set 4 suggest about how artists see and depict wolves? What connections or comparisons do I notice among the nine images of wolves?”
  • In Unit 2, Part 2, Activity 2, students listen to a teacher read-aloud of the “Stanford University Commencement Address” by Steve Jobs and respond to text dependent questions including the following: “What seems to be the author’s point of view? What claims do I find in the text? Why might Jobs claim that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have happened to me?”
  • In Unit 3, Part 3, Activity 1, students are asked to read closely Ancient Cave Behavior by Emily Sohn, “Neanderthals: The Oldest Cave Painters” and Interview by Ira Flatow, and “Stone Age Jottings” by Kate Ravilious. They answer text-dependent/-specific questions including: “What details from the text help you understand more about cave art? What evidence supports the claim that some caves may have been used as sites for prehistoric art schools? According to the graphic, what does the repetition of specific symbols suggest about ancient people?”
  • In Unit 4, Part 2, Activity 4, students are asked to read closely Poverty and Fracking by John Harpole in order to increase comprehension and delineate the argument by responding to text-dependent questions including: “What evidence supports the claims in the text and what is left uncertain or unsupported? What is Harpole’s position on hydraulic fracturing? What evidence does this text provide that builds my understanding of the issue of energy and fracking policy in the United States?”

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/-specific questions and activities that build to a culminating task designed to help students synthesize and apply their learning from the unit in an engaging and authentic way.

Questioning Path Tools are provided for many texts and provide both text-dependent and text-specific questions to help students analyze the texts. Each unit also has a Literacy Toolbox with student materials to help guide the students through each task and build to the culminating task. Tasks are developed using the writing process and are rich, scaffolded, and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know and are able to do using reading, speaking, and writing.

The culminating writing tasks for Unit 1 ask students to analyze three related texts, then write several paragraphs about their analysis. Next, students lead a discussion about the three texts. To prepare for this final task, students work through these texts using the Questioning Path Tool and analyze each text by responding to text-dependent/-specific questions. These questions help students deepen their understanding of the text. Examples of this include:

  • In Unit 1, Part 4, Activity 3, the Questioning Path Tool for “We Didn’t Domesticate Dogs, They Domesticated Us,” asks students to answer the question, “In the first four paragraphs, what evidence do the authors present for their claim that the 'common assumption' about how wolves evolved into dogs 'doesn’t really make sense'?”
  • In Unit 2, students are asked to write an Evidence-Based Claim essay as a culminating task. The activities throughout the unit build on each other and help prepare students for the end task. There are five parts to this unit, each building on evidence-based claims and ending with the development of evidence-based writing. Each part uses Questioning Path Tools to help students analyze the text, identify claims within the text, and eventually create claims of their own. For example, in Unit 2, Part 1, Activity 2, students independently read paragraphs 1-8 of Job’s “Connecting the Dots” and answer questions such as “How might I summarize the main ideas of the text and the key supporting details?” and “What were the reasons why Steve Jobs 'decided to drop out' of college? Why was doing so 'one of the best decisions I ever made'?”
  • Unit 3 is devoted to research. Students create a Research Portfolio and develop a reflective research narrative using information from their portfolios as a culminating task. After choosing a research topic, students then conduct the research process, developing a research portfolio, which will then be used to write the research perspective. Throughout the unit, teachers are provided Text Notes to help guide students as they analyze the common texts that will be used as sources. For example, in Unit 3, Part 2, Activity 2, the Text Notes for Text 6.2, “Hands across Time,” provides text-specific questions such as “What was the process used to create the earliest examples of stenciled hands?” and “Mary Reina admires prehistoric artists for their 'courage, imagination and artistry.' Which details from the text lead her to this conclusion?”
  • In Unit 4, the culminating task is writing an evidence-based argument. The entire unit focuses on argument beginning with issues, analyzing arguments, taking a position, organizing an argument, and finally writing their argumentative essays. Throughout the unit, Questioning Path Tools are provided to help guide students analyze the common texts that will be used as sources for their evidence-based argumentative essays. For example, in Unit 4, Part 1, Activity 2, the Questioning Path Tool for “The Story of Energy” provides text-specific questions such as “What reasons does the narrator give for focusing on gas use in the video? How do these reasons relate to US energy use and production? What claims does the video make about the need for renewable sources of energy? What evidence supports these claims?”

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Materials provide protocols for evidence-based discussions. Students are provided with multiple opportunities to work with partners, small groups, and when appropriate, large groups, to practice application of academic vocabulary and syntax and to build communication and presentation skills.Evidence of protocols include:

  • In Unit 1, Part 1, Activity 2, students examine the image(s) in small groups. They use the Guiding Questions Handout from the Literacy Toolbox to help with the task of answering questions such as “What details stand out to me as I examine this image? What do I think this image is mainly about? How do specific details help me understand what is being depicted in the image?”
  • In Unit 2, Part 1, Activity 3, students participate in a close read of an excerpt of the text, “Steve Jobs’ Commencement Speech at Stanford University.” Students participate in a whole class discussion and answer the question, “What in the text makes you reach your observation or conclusion? Point to the specific words or sentences.”
  • In Unit 3, Part 1, Activity 2, students begin the research process by exploring a topic. Students work in reading teams in which they read sections of the website. They use a Guiding Questions Handout from the Literacy Toolbox that helps them answer text-dependent questions to guide their close reading. After students summarize, they share with the class what other information they may want to know about the topic, Cave Art.
  • In Unit 3, Part 3, Activity 3, students develop evidence-based claims and, as a class, discuss the information gathered. Class discussions are designed to deepen students’ understanding of their claims. Students are given a Student Academic Habits Checklist to assist in developing good discussion habits such as collaborating, communicating clearly, and listening.
  • In Unit 4, Part 1, Activity 2, students read, analyze, and discuss “How Much Energy Does the US Use?” by Alexis Madrigal, “The Story of Energy-Where Does Our Power Come From?” by Life Squared, and “History of Energy Use in the US” by Hobart King. Students are placed in expert groups and read one of the three texts. Students jigsaw into cross-text discussion groups to share and discuss to compare what they have learned from the text.
  • In Unit 4, Part 5, Activity 1, students work on developing skills to write collaboratively and are encouraged to hold informal text-centered check-in discussions with a peer or teacher.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Grade 6 materials support students’ practice and application of their speaking and listening skills in concert with their practice in reading for understanding. Students are provided multiple opportunities to work with partners, small groups, and when appropriate, large groups to practice sharing information they have summarized and synthesized and present research they have individually and/or in groups conducted. Students work through various tasks throughout units using provided graphic organizers from the Literacy Toolbox as well as using collaboration and discussions to assist students in refining their work. Appropriate scaffolds help guide students through activities in the units, leading to and supporting the culminating tasks. Speaking and listening work is embedded across the year's instruction to support students increasing skills. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Part 3, Activity 1, students use notes from the previously read texts to discuss how the author’s use of language reflects his or her perspective on the subject. They present evidence from the texts to support their assertions and to connect their comments to the ideas that others have shared. In the text-centered discussion, students are asked to take notes capturing what peers say (listening skills), how their ideas are changing, or what connections and differences they note between texts.
  • In Unit 1, Part 5, Activity 3, students work in small groups and each student takes turns leading a discussion. Each student in the group is an “expert” on a different book. Students give a summary with evidence and then present a question to the group and lead a discussion about it. After discussing, students reflect on their use of “Discussion Habits” in their final discussion.
  • In Unit 2, Part 1, Activity 3, students listen to “Stanford University Commencement Address” by Steve Jobs. As students listen to the speech, they identify the “key details of the speaker’s life.” Next students discuss what they observe the story is about by using specific points from the text. Students are placed into discussion groups as they answer the following questions from the Questioning Path Tool:
    • "At the end of paragraph 4, we learn that Steve Job’s mother 'refused to sign the adoption papers.' Why did she do this, and why did she 'relent' a few months later?
    • What were the reasons why Steve Jobs 'decide to drop out' of college? Why was doing so 'one of the best decisions I ever made?'
    • What are the 'dots' that Steve Jobs connected between his post college experiences and his designing of the first Mac computer?
    • What do you think Steve Jobs means when he says 'you can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards?' What evidence does he use to support this claim?"
  • In Unit 3, Part 3, Activity 3, students develop evidence-based claims and as a class discuss information gathered. Class discussion is designed to deepen students’ understanding of their claims. Students are given a “Student Academic Habits Checklist” to assist in developing good discussion habits such as collaborating, communicating clearly, and listening.
  • In Unit 3, Part 5, Activity 2, students use the model given to articulate and share their text-based responses and constructive reviewer claims as if their review partner (or the teacher) has written the model narrative. Students will then be asked to volunteer to present their responses to the whole class, and discuss how the responses are (or are not) specific, constructive, and text-based.
  • In Unit 4, Activity 1, students analyze a set of political cartoons that are related to the unit’s main issue. They have a class discussion on what the authors’ positions are on the issues in various cartoons. The students look for details in the cartoons to support their thinking and discuss the evidence they find.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Materials include a mix of both on-demand and process writing that covers a year’s worth of instruction and includes encouraging the building of knowledge about a topic. Many opportunities for students to revise and/or edit are found. There are digital resources, short and longer writing tasks as well as culminating projects supported and connected to texts and/or text sets. Writing tasks and projects are aligned to Grade 6 Common Core Standards.

Examples of on-demand writing tasks include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Part 1, Activity 4, students view Two Wolves by David Owens. After viewing the video several times, students create a two column chart (what was important in the video in the first column and why was it important in the second column). Then students use the two column chart to “write a few sentences explaining something they have learned from the video.”
  • In Unit 1, Part 2, Activity 5, students write a short paragraph explaining their analysis of the text, "All About Wolves," by John Vucetich and Rolf Peterson, and reference or list textual details. In Unit 1, Part 4, Activity 5, students continue the process by using their analysis to independently write a text-based explanation of one of the texts read previously in the unit.
  • In Unit 3, Part 1, Activity 4, students compile a research portfolio of sources on a class-selected topic. In Unit 3, Part 5, Activity 2, students will use their portfolios to write a two-page reflective narrative that tells a story about the search, how they came to their perspective on the topic, and describe their experience of inquiry and conducting research. An extension activity is suggested in presentation of this information to the class.
  • In Unit 4, Part 2, Activity 7, students use their notes from one of the texts that they read for this unit to write paragraphs analyzing one of the arguments. The analysis must include the following:
    • State the author’s position
    • Identify the elements of the argument
    • Make an evidence-based claim about how the author’s perspective shapes the position and argumentation
    • Use evidence from the text to support analysis

Examples of process writing tasks include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Part 4, Activity 3, students work in pairs to write a draft Evidence-Based Claim. This draft will “focus on less formal, more fluent writing, trying first to get their ideas out on paper so that they and others can examine them.”
  • In Unit 2, Part 5, Activity 4, students draft an evidence-based essay that supports a claim. In Activity 5, students collaborate to revise before presenting final essays in Activity 6.
  • In Unit 2, Part 4, Activity 7, students independently complete an “Organizing Evidence-Based Claim Tool” for the claim they have formed in Activity 5 and draft a one to two paragraph evidence-based claim from the text, “Steve Job’s Stanford Commencement Speech.” In Activity 8, students use the collaborative review process and revise one aspect of their draft evidence-based claims paragraph.
  • In Unit 4, Part 5, Activities 1-5, students write an evidence-based argument essay as a culminating task for the unit. This is a multi-step process where students make an outline and use some of the graphic organizers found in the Literacy Toolbox to complete their draft. Students revise their drafts collaboratively and present their final copy to the class.
  • In Unit 4, Part 5, students engage in a collaborative, question-based process to develop and strengthen their argumentative essays. Students work with their teachers and peers to draft, revise, and publish their own argumentative essay on “Fracking.”

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing is embedded throughout the curriculum; however, the writing instruction does not fully reflect the distribution of the standards, in particular the various elements of narrative writing. Narrative writing is only included as a follow-up reflection to longer research projects. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Part 2, Activity 5, students write a short paragraph explaining their analysis of the text and list supporting textual details. The design of the unit offers scaffolds and builds to the students attaining the writing skills. In Unit 1, Part 4, Activity 4, students use their analysis to independently write text-based explanations of one of the the other texts in the unit.
  • In Unit 1, Part 5, Activity 4 students are asked to write an explanatory essay of their analysis of a text as their culminating task, citing evidence to support their analyses
  • In Unit 2, Part 4, Activity 7, students independently complete an Organizing Evidence-Based Claim Tool for the claim they formed in Activity 5, and draft a one to two paragraph evidence-based claim.
  • In Unit 2, Part 5, Activities 1-6, students are asked to write an evidence-based claim essay as a culminating task for this unit. Students revise their essays by sharing in small groups and receiving feedback from their peers.
  • In Unit 3, Part 1, Activity 4, student compile a research portfolio of sources on a class-selected topic. In Unit 3, Part 5, Activity 2, students use their portfolios to write a two-page reflective narrative that tells a story about the search, how they came to their perspective on the topic, and describe their experience of inquiry and conducting research. An extension activity is suggested in presentation of this information to the class.
  • In Unit 3, Part 5, Activities 1-4, students write a reflective research narrative explaining their thinking and how their story developed. Students receive feedback from peers to assist in revising their drafts before writing their final copies for the culminating task.
  • In Unit 4, Part 5, Activities, 1-5 students write an argumentative essay as the culminating task for the unit and the series.
  • In Unit 4, Part 5, students engage in a collaborative, question-based process to develop and strengthen their argumentative essays. Students work with their teachers and peers to draft, revise, and publish their own argumentative essay on "Fracking."

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level.

Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Writing opportunities are focused around students’ analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with texts and sources to provide supporting evidence.

  • In Unit 1, Part 2, Activity 5, students write a short analysis paragraph that states and explains their analysis of an excerpt from “All About Wolves,” by John Vucetich and Rolf Peterson.students write a short paragraph explaining their analysis of the text and list supporting textural details. The design of the unit offers scaffolds and builds to the students attaining the writing skills. In Unit 1, Part 4, Activity 4, students use their analysis to independently write a text-based explanations of one of the the other texts in the unit.
  • In Unit 2, Part 4, Activity 7, students independently complete an Organizing Evidence-Based Claim Tool for the claim they have formed in Activity 5, and draft a one to two paragraph evidence-based claim.
  • In Unit 3, Part 5, Activity 2, students draft their own reflective research narratives, working from the draft narrative and statement of their perspectives they have developed previously, using evidence from their tools, and incorporating claims they have developed in response to inquiry questions.
  • In Unit 4, Part 2, Activity 7, students read arguments about “Fracking” and write paragraphs analyzing one of the arguments that they have read by:
    • Stating the author’s purpose
    • Identifying the elements of the argument
    • Making an evidence-based claim about how the author’s perspective shapes the position and argumentation
    • Using evidence from the text to support the analysis
  • In Unit 4, Part 5, Activities 1-5, students work with their teachers and peers to draft, revise, and publish their own argumentative essay on “Fracking.” In this argumentative essay, students state a claim and use evidence from texts to support their position.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

The materials present tables in the initial overview of each unit and sub-sections outlining the alignment to Common Core State Standards. The materials are focused on select standards for the reading, writing, and speaking and listening standards and do not state a direct alignment to the language standards. However, the materials do provide opportunities for students to demonstrate some, but not all, language standards. This occurs in the form of reading and demonstrating understanding of the text and intentions of word choices by the authors. The provided rubrics direct students and teachers to expect standard English language conventions and punctuation to be demonstrated in writing assignments. However, the materials are not as specific for these expectations as specified by the Common Core State Standards for language conventions. The materials do not clearly provide opportunities for students to practice all language and grammar expectations outlined by national college-and-career readiness standards.

The materials promote and build students’ ability to apply conventions and other aspects of language within their own writing. Instructional materials provide opportunities for students to grow their fluency language standards through practice and application. Materials do not include explicit instruction targeted for grammar and convention standards. Although using language and conventions are part of the writing skills on the academic habits checklist, no guidance is provided to teachers on how to facilitate this learning in or out of context. Student Skills Checklist include Using Language and Using Conventions. The Skills Lists state, "Using Language: Writes and speaks clearly so others can understand claims and ideas. Using Conventions: Correctly uses sentence elements, punctuation, and spelling to produce clear writing." Students assess their evidence of demonstrating these skills within the context of writing but receive no explicit instruction of grammar or conventions during the unit.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials meet the expectations of Gateway 2. Texts and tasks are organized around topics and themes that support students' acquisition of academic vocabulary. Comprehension of topics and concepts grow through text-connected writing and research instruction. The vocabulary and independent reading plans may need additional support.

Criterion 2a - 2h

28/32
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials meet the expectations of the building knowledge criteria. Texts and tasks are organized around topics and themes that support students' growing academic vocabulary and understanding and comprehension of topics and concepts. The materials partially support a comprehensive vocabulary plan and independent reading plan over the course of the year. The materials include cohesive writing and research instruction that is interconnected with texts to grow students' literacy skills by the end of the school year.

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Grade 6 materials are grouped around topics such as Unit 1’s focus on wolves, Unit 3’s focus on prehistoric art, and Unit 4’s focus on energy consumption; this intense focus builds not only literacy skills but students’ content knowledge. The instructional materials allow students to develop a range of reading and writing skills. Texts are set up to increase in complexity both in regards to the reading difficulty, as well as the writing tasks complexity.

  • Unit 1 develops students’ abilities to read closely for textual details and is centered around the topic “The Wolf You Feed.” The instructional materials provide students with a variety of texts related to the social behavior of wolves, human impact on wolves, and the differences between wolves and dogs. Students are offered a variety of texts in this unit ranging from photographs to excerpts of Jack London’s White Fang to scientific studies.
  • Unit 2 asks students “to make evidence-based claims through activities based on a close reading of the Commencement Address Steve Jobs delivered at Stanford University on June, 2005.” The materials divide this speech into sections providing students scaffolding at the beginning of the unit. As the unit progresses, students are expected to read and analyze the speech with peers and then independently.
  • Unit 3 focuses on conducting research to deepen understanding and is centered on the topic “Prehistoric Art.” The instructional materials provide a common text set that serves not only as a resource for investigation and/or teacher modeling but as the foundation for the activities in the unit plan. This common text set offers a variety of sources such as virtual tours, images of cave paintings, encyclopedia entries, and online articles.
  • Unit 4 asks student to write evidence-based arguments centered on the topic “Energy Crossroads.” The instructional materials provide students with texts related to “the broad area of energy consumption and production and more specifically on issues and controversies related to the use of hydraulic fracturing, better known as fracking, to access natural gas deep underground.” Students are offered a variety of sources including videos, scientific articles, political cartoons, and animated guides.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics. Consistently throughout the Grade 6 instructional materials, higher order thinking questions are provided in the form of both text-dependent and text-specific questions. These questions are embedded into Questioning Path Tools that are used by students as guides when analyzing texts.

  • In Unit 1, students read a variety of texts centered around the topic “The Wolf I Feed”. Students analyze these texts via Questioning Path Tools which provides questions that require students to analyze language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure. For example:
    • Text 2 “A Brief History of Wolves in the United States”
      • Which details in paragraph 7 to 9 cause me to rethink the historical persecution of wolves in the United States?
    • Text 7 “All About Wolves”: Pack Behavior
      • What is the author’s purpose for writing this explanation on the Isle Royle website?
      • In Paragraph 21, the authors make a claim that "wolves are like humans." What details in the text support this claim?
  • In Unit 2, students read Steve Job’s Stanford Commencement Address. Students analyze these sections of this text via Questioning Path Tools which provides questions that require students to analyze language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure. For example:
  • Text Steve Job’s Stanford Commencement Address, Paragraphs 1-8
    • At the end of paragraph 4, we learn that Steve Jobs’s mother “refused to sign the adoption papers.” Why did she do this, and why did she “relent” a few months later?
    • What do you think Steve Jobs means when he says “you can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards”? What evidence does he use to support this claim?
  • Text Steve Jobs’s Stanford Commencement Address, Paragraphs 15-21
    • What details or words suggest the author’s perspective?
    • How does Steve Jobs explain that puzzling claim he makes in paragraph 21 that “Death is very likely the single best investigation of Life”?
  • In Unit 3, students read a variety of texts on the topic of prehistoric art. Students analyze these texts via Questioning Path Tools which provides questions that require students to analyze language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure. For example:
    • Text 2 “Forgotten Cave in France was Hiding Stone Age Art”
      • The article says that the cave still “fills Chauvet’s voice with wonder.” What details from the article might be the cause for Chauvet’s “wonder”?
      • How do the section titles help you understand the article?
    • Text 6.2 “Hand across Time”
      • Mary Reina admires prehistoric artists for their “courage, imagination and artistry.” Which details from the text lead her to this conclusion?
    • Text 9 “Origins of Religion”
      • What words and phrases does the author use to describe how Paleolithic humans thought about religion?
  • In Unit 4, students read a variety of texts on the topic “Energy Crossroads.” Students analyze these texts via Questioning Path Tools which provides questions that require students to analyze language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure. For example:
    • Text 4.2 “The Costs of Fracking”
      • What seems to be the author’s attitude or point of view (based on their relationship to the issue)?
      • Which sentences best communicate the Environment America’s position about fracking?
      • How does one of the bolded sentences relate to the author’s overall argument, and what specific evidence do they offer for support?

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials contain text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across texts. These questions are provided through Questioning Path Tools and the Guiding Questions Handout. These questions guide teachers as they support student growth in analyzing language, determining main ideas and supporting evidence, identifying author’s purpose and point of view, and analyzing structure of text. Both the student work with individual and multiple texts and teacher materials provide support in growing analytical skills of students.

  • In Unit 1, Part 2, Activity 2, the Questioning Path Tools provides text-dependent questions such as, “What do I learn about how wolves 'consume...their prey'? Which words and details suggest the author’s perspective?” These questions help student analyze texts as they build content knowledge about wolves.
  • In Unit 2, students examine the speech, “Stanford University Commencement Address” by Steve Jobs, June 12, 2005. Students work across this text in chunks to make evidence-based claims. Throughout the unit, students encounter several opportunities to respond to text dependent questions and tasks that require them to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across this individual text. For example, In Unit 2, Part 1, Activity 2, students answer text-dependent questions such as “What were the reasons why Steve Jobs 'decided to drop out' of college? Why was doing so 'one of the best decisions I ever made?' and What are the 'dots' that Steve Jobs connected between his post-college experiences and his designing of the first Mac computer?”
  • In Unit 3, students read a variety of texts and use information from these sources to organize a body of research and write a reflective research narrative that communicates their evidence-based perspective on their area of investigation, which can also be expressed in an optional multimedia presentation. In Unit 3, Part 3, Activity 1, the teacher is provided with text notes for texts 10 through 12. The Text Notes include “sample text-specific questions to drive initial close reading and discussion.” For example, for Text 11, “Neanderthals: The Oldest Cave Painters,” the instructional materials include questions such as, “What details from the text help you understand more about cave art? What would you still want to explore?”

  • In Unit 4, students read a variety of texts and use information from these sources to write an argumentative essay. The instructional materials provide text-specific questions, via Questioning Path Tools, to help students analyze some of these common sources. For example, in Unit 4, Part 2, Activity 5, students answer questions such as, “Which sentences best communicate the Environment America’s position about fracking?” Questions like this help students see the topic of energy from different perspectives.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic and/or theme through integrated skills (e.g., combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Grade 6 materials include sets of questions and tasks to support students to complete culminating tasks in which they are demonstrating knowledge of topics and/or themes. Each module has several Questioning Path Tools that scaffold the material to encourage the successful completion of culminating tasks. The materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to each culminating task. Tasks engage students in speaking, listening, reading and writing, which provide learning through integrated skills. Culminating tasks showcase students' demonstration of topics and themes through a combination of skills, print, and nonprint texts.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 1’s culminating task states, “Students will be reading and studying texts with increasing independence and will be expected to write a text-based explanation and lead a group discussion about one of the final texts at the end of the unit.” Because the focus of this unit is for student to read closely for textual details, the instructional materials integrate the development of explanatory communication skills into the close-reading process and provide Questioning Path Tools to guide students. For example, in Unit 1, Part 3, Activity 5, students participate in structured text-centered discussions in which they examine discoveries they have made by explaining and comparing textual analyses with their peers.
  • In Unit 2, Part 5, Activity 4, students write an evidence-based essay using claims they created based on Steve Jobs’s “Connecting the Dots” as a way to demonstrate their mastery of the unit’s objectives. This activity requires students to express their understanding of the text through writing. In Unit 2, Part 5, Activity 5, “the class discusses final evidence-based claims essays...and reflects on the Literacy Skills and Academic Habits involved in making and communicating evidence-based claims.” This activity asks students to speak about “the process through which they arrived at their claim - how it emerged from their reading of the text and how they honed it.” They also listen as other students share their experience.
  • Unit 3’s culminating task states, “Students will have an organized body of research and will write a reflective research narrative that communicates their evidence-based perspective on their area of investigation, which can also be expressed in an optional multimedia presentation.” To prepare for this final task, students explore topics, collaborate with peers, pose and refine questions, and organize information. Questions and tasks are designed to help students analyze connections that “aid in comprehension, deepen understanding, and prepare students to express their evolving perspective.” For example, students build their listening and speaking skills in Unit 3, Part 1 when they are initiating inquiry. Students initially explore a topic and build background knowledge through reading and text-centered discussion, then initiate inquiry by generating questions collaboratively that can frame and direct their research.
  • The final goal of Unit 4 is for students to be able to write an evidence-based argument. In Unit 4, Part 5, Activity 1, “students learn about the collaborative, question-based approach to developing and improving writing...in the context of talking out a first draft.” This is part of the four components of the Collaborative Workshop. Through this collaborative process, students read each other’s papers and write and edit their own papers. This process is driven through peer editing that asks students to both speak and listen about their own writing and the writing of others.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, yearlong plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

The instructional materials for Grade 6 attend to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high-value academic words through the inclusion of specific vocabulary words in the Questioning Path Tool and teacher-led discussions regarding those questions meant to deepen student understanding of the text. Some support is provided to accelerate vocabulary learning in certain tasks, though it is not consistent through all reading, speaking, and writing tasks. Some opportunities are present for students to accelerate vocabulary learning in reading and writing. Occasionally, vocabulary is repeated in various contexts; however, this is not consistent. Academic vocabulary and Academic Habits are included in the instructional materials, and there are vocabulary words glossed in the texts provided.

While the curriculum provides opportunities for students to increase their vocabulary, materials do not provide teacher guidance outlining a cohesive, yearlong vocabulary development component. The curriculum states, “Although leaving many decisions about the teaching of vocabulary to the teacher, the program provides opportunities for students to increase their vocabulary in areas related to specific content and fundamentals to overall literacy.”

Evidence to support the rating include:

  • Unit 1, Part 2, Activity 1 asks students to read “A Brief History of Wolves in the United States.” The instructional materials identify and define vocabulary that might be unfamiliar to students. However, the only vocabulary instruction provided comes in the form of questions such as, “What words or phrases stand out to me as important?” and “How does the author’s choice of words reveal his or her purpose or perspective?” No guidance is evident to support teachers to extend this for students to learn, practice, apply, and transfer words into familiar and new contexts and across texts.
  • In the Unit 2 overview, there are places where vocabulary is implied in the Literacy Skills, like “Attending to Detail—Identifies relevant and important textual details, words, and ideas,” but there is no explicit yearlong plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words. The textual focus of Unit 2 is Steve Jobs’s “Connecting the Dots.” The instructional materials identify and define key vocabulary, such as "commencement" and "naively," that students might not be familiar with. In Unit 2, Part 3, Activity 1, the Questioning Path Tool for paragraphs 15-21 does not specifically highlight words, but asks, “What details or words suggest the author’s perspective?”
  • Unit 3’s texts center around the topic of Prehistoric Art, but the texts are not provided in the instructional materials; therefore, unfamiliar vocabulary words are not identified or defined. In Unit 3, Part 1, Activity 2, the only vocabulary instruction is provided via questions such as, “The article says that the cave still 'fills Chauvet’s voice with wonder.' What details from the article might be the cause of Chauvet’s 'wonder'?” and “What words are used to describe the paintings?”
  • Unit 4’s texts are centered around the topic “Energy Crossroads,” but the texts are not provided in the instructional materials; therefore, unfamiliar vocabulary words are not identified or defined. In Unit 4, Part 2, Activity 1, students are asked to explain how words add to the meaning of the text. For example, students are asked, “What words, phrases or images stand out to me as powerful and important?” Opportunities for students to learn, practice, apply, and transfer these words, phrases or images into familiar and new contexts are not evident.

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.

Grade 6 materials meet the expectation for materials supporting students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Students are supported through the writing process in well-designed lessons, models, and protocols for teachers to monitor writing development. Feedback is provided by peers, the teacher, and self-evaluations to ensure that students' writing skills are increasing throughout the year. Students apply their learned knowledge to their writing and continue to build on it to make it strong and meet grade-level expectations following rubrics and standards.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Part 2, Activity 3, students write a short paragraph of clear, coherent, and complete sentences that states and then explains something from their analysis of text 5, specifically connected to what they have noted on their Analyzing Details Tool. In Part 3, Activity 3, students draw from their notes, tools, annotated texts, and sentences from earlier activities to construct a paragraph answering their comparative questions. The writing assignments in Unit 1 lead, guide, and instruct students to the final project, which require students to independently write a text-based explanation by including paragraphs that are drawn from their notes from one of the three final texts that they have read.
  • In Unit 2, Part 4, Activity 3, students work in pairs to write “a paragraph that communicates an evidence-based claim using one of their claims from previous assignments." In Part 5, Activity 4, students independently draft an evidence-based essay. The writing assignments in Unit 2 lead, guide, and instruct students to the final project which require students to write a one to two paragraph evidence-based claim.
  • In Unit 3, Part 2, Activity 3, the teacher models for students how to take notes related to a specific topic through research. In Part 3, Activity 2, “students develop an evidence-based claim about some of the common sources using their notes and annotations.” The writing assignments in Unit 3 lead, guide, and instruct students to the final project which requires students to write a reflective research narrative.
  • In Unit 4, Part 1, Activity 5, “students develop and write an evidence-based claim about the nature of the issue.” In Part 2, Activity 7, “students write paragraphs analyzing an argument.” The writing assignments in Unit 4 lead, guide, and instruct students to the final project which require students to write an evidence-based argument.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

The progression of research activities is organized as follows: Units 1 and 2 build skills, such as reading closely for textual details and making evidence-based claims, that will be needed to conduct the research projects outlined in Units 3 and 4. Units 3 and 4 encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and sources. Students engage in research projects that require them to analyze different aspects of the topic using multiple texts and source materials.

In Unit 1, Part 1, Activity 5, students use Guiding Questions to independently explore the Living With Wolves website or the Lobos of the Southwest website. This activity asks students to “apply close-reading skills in the context of Internet research but also enrich their understanding of the topic and other texts they will encounter in the unit.” This activity also asks students to share information they acquired through the Internet research with their small groups.

In Unit 2, Part 2, Activity 1, “students independently read part of the text...to look for evidence to support a claim made by the teachers.” This activity helps prepare for later research by asking them to find supporting evidence from a nonfiction text to support a claim.

In Unit 3, students conduct research centered on the topic Prehistoric Cave Art; students choose an area to investigate and gather information to deepen their knowledge on the topic using multiple texts and sources. There is a learning progression in this unit to help guide students through the research process. For example, in Unit 3, Part 2, Activity 3, students “annotate sources and record key information, personal impressions, and ideas for further exploration.” In Part 4, Activity 2, students organize evidence and evidence-based claims in preparation for the culminating writing task.

In Unit 4, students conduct research centered on the topic, “Energy Crossroads,” and write argumentative essays; students choose an area to investigate and gather information to deepen their knowledge on the topic using multiple texts and sources. There is a learning progression in this unit to help guide students through the research process. For example, in Unit 4, Part 2, Activity 3, “student teams read and delineate arguments and write an evidence-based claim about one position on the issue.” This activity prepares students for the culminating task by asking them to analyze “a text that briefly summarizes the pros and cons of fracking.”

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Grade 6 materials partially meet the criteria that materials provide a design for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. Students regularly engage in independent reading after the teacher models Academic Habits and processes guided by the materials. Independent reading, as noted in the evidence, includes opportunities for reading time both inside of class and outside of class in the form of homework. Students independently practice Literacy Skills while reading and analyzing texts. This includes a range of text types - visual-based texts to printed texts of multiple genres. Students do read portions of text independently as close reading activities at various Lexile levels. However, there is no detailed schedule for independent reading--in or outside of class time--to occur. The majority of independent reading occurs during class. The materials do not include direct guidance for students to track their progress and growth as independent readers and there is no accountability system in place. At times, the materials leave the option for outside of class independent reading to take place, but scheduling and tracking of this is left up to the discretion of the teacher.

Evidence that supports this rationale is as follows:

  • In Unit 1, Part 3, Activity 1, students closely read and analyze White Fang, “The Battle of the Fangs.” The instructional materials suggest that “students can first read the text silently and independently.” Questioning Path Tools provide built-in support as they help students focus on certain aspects of the text to foster understanding and analysis. While the instructional materials provide supports/scaffolds that foster independence, they do not include procedures for independent reading, a proposed schedule for independent reading, or an accountability or tracking system.
  • Unit 2 has students close read Steve Jobs’s “Connecting the Dots.” In Part 1, Activity 2, the teacher’s edition includes instructional notes that have students begin reading independently the first paragraph considering the first two questions on the Questioning Path Tool. After a brief discussion of the first paragraph, students read paragraphs 2 through 8 of the speech independently. Part 1, Activity 4 Instructional Notes state that “students read paragraphs 9 through 14 of Steve Jobs’s speech...to find evidence to support a teacher-provided claim.” The Instructional Notes also indicate that this activity can be given as homework or done independently at the beginning of class. While the instructional materials provide supports/scaffolds that foster independence, they do not include procedures for independent reading, a proposed schedule for independent reading, or an accountability or tracking system.
  • In Unit 3, Part 3, Activity 1, “students … read sources closely, analyzing them for content, perspective, and relevance.” The Instructional Notes suggest that students select a common source and work independently to read the source closely using both the selected Inquiry Question and the Forming EBC Research Tool. The instructional materials use independent reading throughout this unit and provide guiding questions and text-specific questions to help students move from a literal understanding of the common texts to a deeper analysis; however, they do not include procedures for independent reading, a proposed schedule for independent reading, or an accountability or tracking system.
  • In Unit 4, Part 1, Activity 2, “students read and analyze a background text to develop an initial understanding of the issue.” Students are only required to read and analyze one of three texts, but the Instructional Notes suggests that students be provided with the additional texts so that they can do additional reading if desired. These Instructional Notes also state, “by this unit, student should have begun to develop independence as readers who can approach and initially question any text.” The instructional materials use independent reading throughout this unit and provide guiding questions and text-specific questions to help students move from a literal understanding of the common texts to a deeper analysis; however, they do not include procedures for independent reading, a proposed schedule for independent reading, or an accountability or tracking system.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The materials provide a clear, useful, standards-aligned teacher edition, including information to bolster the teacher’s understanding of both the content and pedagogy. Additional information outlines the program’s instructional approaches, philosophy, and the research that undergirds the program.

The materials provide information for students about the program, but there are no information or protocols for communicating with families about the goals and structure of the program.

Routines and guidance within the program assist teachers in progress monitoring, though the connections between the assessments and the standards they are measuring is not clear. Sufficient guidance is provided for interpreting student performance, though specific strategies or guidance for remediation for students who are not proficient is not offered.

The materials do not outline a consistent plan for holding students accountable for independent reading. Student choice is often limited within the independent reading options.

Digital materials are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers, “platform neutral”; they follow universal programming style and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The included technology enhances student learning, including differentiation for the needs of all learners. The program does not provide technology for collaboration. The materials can be easily customized for local use.

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials are designed with great consideration for effective lesson structure, pacing, and are designed to be completed within a school year, including some flexibility for local academic goals and content. Ample review and practice resources are provided and all materials are clearly labeled and accompanied by documentation that delineates their alignment to the standards. The design of the materials is minimalistic (orange, black, and white color scheme) and may not be engaging for students.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The lesson structure is built upon four units. Each unit has 5 parts and each part is broken down into 4-8 activities. The activities can be completed within 1-2 days. At the end of each part, there are formative assessment ideas. At the end of each unit, students complete a culminating project (summative assessment).

Example include, but are not limited to:

  • Students are taught how to read closely in Unit 1:
    • Part 1-Understanding Close Reading
    • Part 2-Questioning Texts
    • Part 3-Analyzing Details
    • Part 4-Explaining Understanding
    • Part 5-Discussing Ideas
      • The culminating project for Unit 1 is a reading closely final writing and discussion project. Students study a text by reading it closely, write a text-based explanation, lead, and participate in a text-centered discussion.
  • Students are taught how to make evidence-based claims in Unit 2:
    • Part 1-Understanding Evidence-Based Claims
    • Part 2-Making Evidence-Based Claims
    • Part 3-Organizing Evidence-Based Claims
    • Part 4-Writing Evidence-Based Claims
    • Part 5-Developing Evidence-Based Claims
      • The culminating project for Unit 2 is an Evidence-Based Claim Final Writing Tasks. Students develop and write an evidence-based claim.
  • Students are taught how to research in order to deepen their understanding in Unit 3:
    • Part 1-Initiating Inquiry
    • Part 2-Gathering Information
    • Part 3-Deepening Understanding
    • Part 4-Finalizing Inquiry
    • Part 5-Developing and Communicating an Evidence-Based Perspective
      • The culminating project for Unit 3 is a Research Written Task. Students write a research reflective narrative.
  • Students learn how to write evidence-based arguments in Unit 4.
    • Part 1-Understanding the Nature of an Issue
    • Part 2-Analyzing Arguments
    • Part 3-Evaluating Arguments and Developing a Position
    • Part 4-Organizing an Evidence-Based Argument
    • Part 5-Developing Writing Through a Collaborative Process
      • The culminating project for Unit 4 is an argumentative final essay

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

The materials provide effective guidance and flexibility for teachers to address all the content and supplement with local academic goals and curricula. The materials address intertwined essential skills delineated in four units. Each unit focuses on a Core Proficiency for literacy that builds skills applicable beyond the English language arts classroom. The materials are vertically aligned by consistently addressing the same Core Proficiencies in four units for grades six, seven, and eight.

Evidence that supports this rationale is as follows:

  • The materials consist of four units focused on four essential proficiencies that are designed to intertwine the building of knowledge. Each unit delineates standards-aligned Academic Habits into five parts with a varying amount of activities that range from 1 to 3 instructional days as determined by the teachers.
  • The materials recursively focus on 20 essential Literacy Skills and 12 Academic Habits applied to text-centered analysis tasks in order to maximize student understanding of skills. Tasks include reading, writing, speaking, and listening.
  • The materials bundle multiple standards and literacy skills into four Core Proficiencies. Each unit focuses on a different proficiency for students to master. The Core Proficiencies include: Reading Closely for Textual Details, Making Evidence-Based Claims, Researching to Deepen Understanding, and Building Evidence-Based Arguments.
  • The materials provide guidance for structuring yearlong instruction and supplementing with local curricular content based on students’ needs as determined by the teacher.
  • The materials are vertically aligned and follow the same formula and address the same Core Proficiencies from grade to grade with increasingly complex texts and opportunities for independent work.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.)

The student resources include texts for Units 1 and 2. There are lists of texts available for units 3 and 4. All 4 units include various tools (graphic organizers) to assist students with reviewing, practicing, and completing activities. All of the tools are labeled correctly with clear directions and/or explanations for how to use the tools.

Examples include:

  • Unit 1 of the student edition, pages 7-43, include a list of texts that will be read for this unit. The tools/graphic organizers provide an Approaching the Text Tool, Analyzing Details Tool, Questioning Path Tool, Model Questioning Paths, Reading Closely Graphic, Guiding Questions Handout, Attending to Details Handout, Reading Closely Skills and Habits Checklists, and Final Writing and Discussion Assignment.
  • Unit 2 of the student edition, pages 87-93, include the speech that will be read for this unit. The tools/graphic organizers provide an Approaching The Text Tool, Analyzing Details Tool, Questioning Path Tool, Modeling Questioning Paths, Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool, Supporting Evidence-Based Claims Tool, Organizing Evidence-Based Claims Tool, Attending to Details Handout, Guiding Questions Handout, Writing Evidence-Based Claims Handout, Making Evidence-Based Claims Skills and Habits Checklists, Self and Peer Review Checklists, and Final Writing Tasks Handout.
  • Unit 3 of the student edition, pages 134-135, include a list of texts that will be read for this unit. The tools/graphic organizers provide a Forming Evidence-Based Claims Research Tool, Organizing Evidence-Based Claims Research Tool, Taking Notes Tool, Exploring a Topic Tool, Potential Sources Tool, Research Evaluation Tool, Research Plan Handout, Research Portfolio Handout, Attending to Details Handout, Posing Inquiry Questions Handout, Assessing Sources Handout, Connecting Ideas Handout, Researching to Deepen Understanding Skills and Habits Checklist, Area Evaluation and Research Evaluation Checklists, and Final Writing Tasks Handout.
  • Unit 4 of the student edition, pages 179-181, include a list of texts that will be read for this unit. The tools/graphic organizers provide an Analyzing Details Tools, Questioning Path Tool, Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool, Organizing Evidence-Based Claims Tool, Delineating Arguments Tool, Evaluating Arguments Tool, Guiding Questions Handout, Connecting Ideas Handout, Evidence-Based Arguments Terms Handout, Model Arguments Handout, Building Evidence-Based Arguments Skills and Habits Checklist, and Final Writing Tasks Handout.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

The materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of both primary and supporting standards at the following levels: year, unit, and part. Both the Reading Closely: Guiding Questions Handout and the Questioning Path Tools, which are used extensively throughout the instructional materials, are aligned to specific reading and writing standards.

Evidence that supports this rationale is as follows:

  • In the Developing Core Literacy Proficiencies: User Guide, the materials provide an Alignment of Targeted CCSS with OE Skills and Habits chart. This chart provides the CCSS Anchor Standards and the aligned Literacy Skills and Academic Habits.
  • For each Unit, the materials provide the CCSS alignment and divide the standards into primary targeted skills and related reading and writing skills from supporting CCSS; in addition, the instructional materials provide the targeted and supporting standards for each part of each unit.
  • Throughout the materials, students use the Reading Closely: Guiding Questions Handout. This handout organizes questions into four areas: Language, Ideas, Perspective, and Structure. The language questions address Common Core State Standards R.4, L.3, L.4, and L.5. The ideas questions address Common Core State Standards R.2, W.3, R.8, R.9. The perspective questions address Common Core State Standard R.6. The structure questions address the Common Core State Standard R.5.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject. The visual design, while not distracting or chaotic, does not help students engage with the subject. Materials are printed in black and white with orange headings, very few graphics or pictures are provided, and the graphic organizers do not allow much room for student response. There is no color-coding to help convey structure and speed up visual searching. The materials are not visually engaging.

Evidence that supports this rationale is as follows:

  • In the Unit 1 materials, the only visuals provided serve as Text 1. These consist of a variety of photos of wolves. All visuals are in black and white. In Unit 1, Part 3, Activity 1, the Questioning Path Tool for Text 6, White Fang, “Battle of the Fangs,” provides nine questions with sub-questions but does not provide any room for students to record notes/answers.
  • In the Unit 3 materials, no visuals are provided. Many tools are provided in this unit including the Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool and the Organizing Evidence-Based Claims Tool. These graphic organizers, which are designed to help students prepare for writing, do not provide adequate space for students to record evidence, details, or reflections.
  • In the Unit 5 materials, no visuals are provided. All texts are accessible via the internet. In Unit 4, Part 1, Activity 2, the Questioning Path Tool for text 1.1, “How Much Energy Does the U.S. Use,” provides four questions but does not provide any room for students to record notes/answers.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials provide a teacher edition with strong support, clear guidance, and abundant useful instructional notes. Advanced literary concepts are supported with additional information to bolster the teacher’s understanding of both the content and the pedagogy. The standards alignment within the materials is clearly delineated within unit overviews.

The instructional approaches and program philosophy are described within the materials as well as the program’s focus on research-based strategies.

The materials provide information for students about the program, but there are no information or protocols for communicating with families about the goals and structure of the program.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The Grade 6 teacher’s edition provides annotations and suggestions for how to present the content in the student edition through text and instructional notes. The technology that is embedded to support and enhance student learning include The Odell Education Literacy Toolbox and texts. The Odell Education Literacy Toolbox (www.wiley.com/go/coreliteracy) is an electronic version of the graphic organizers that are included in the teacher and student editions.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, the technology used in this unit includes videos and websites for students to view. An example of a video that students view is Two Wolves by Dave Owens. An example of a website that students use is www.livingwithwolves.org. An Instructional Note in Part 1, Activity 5 states the following:

“This activity is an optional extension of Part 1, in which students can enrich their skills of looking for details with web-based text. It is recommended for students who have access to a computer either as an individual or in groups. Accessing an informational site can not only help students apply close-reading skills in the content of internet research but also enrich their understanding of the topic and other texts they will encounter in the unit. Students might be expected to develop deeper understanding of a part of the website through close reading and viewing and to bring details and information they have found back to a small-group discussion.”

  • In Unit 2, Part 2, Activity 2, a text notes state:

“Paragraphs 9 through 14 present Steve Job’s second illustrative story that he shares with the Stanford graduates, a story ‘about love and loss.’ In this section of the speech, Jobs chronicles the rapid ascension of Apple from ‘two of us in a garage into a $2 billion company with over 4,000 employees’- and also his fall from grace: ‘And then I got fired.’ This second section of the speech presents students with a perplexing story to unravel and understand. Discerning the meaning Jobs wants the graduates to find in his story of failure and redemption will require students to examine his perspective and the language he uses to convey his view of his professional life.”

  • In Unit 3, all of the texts that students read “are accessible for free on the Internet without any login information, membership requirements or purchases. Because of the ever-changing nature of website addresses, specific links are not provided. Teachers and students can locate these texts through web searches using the information provided.” An example of Instructional Notes in Part 3, Activity 1 is the following:

“In this activity, students employ skills developed in the Reading Closely for Textual Details and Making Evidence-Based Claims units to analyze selected sources for content and perspective. The approach to close reading developed in those units and incorporated here involves strategically questioning texts to access deep meaning associated with key textual details. In the Reading Closely unit, students develop this proficiency using a general Guiding Question and Questioning Path Framework. Now, in the context of their research, students use their Inquiry Questions to guide their analysis. If students need further work on developing independence in close reading, teachers are encouraged to use the additional materials such as the Questioning Path and Analyzing Details Tools contained in the Reading Closely Unit.”

  • Unit 4 states, “the unit generally employs texts that are accessible on the web for free without any login information, membership requirements, or purchase. Some informational texts may; however, need to be accessed through online database portals (e.g., EBSCO, Gale), which are available to teachers and students through their state or district library systems. Because of the ever-changing nature of website addresses, links are not provided. Teachers and students can locate these texts through web searches using the information provided.” An example of text notes in Part 1, Activity 2 is the following:

“This site enables students to read about renewable, nonrenewable, and secondary energy sources. Because many of the common texts for the unit focus more specifically on the topic of natural gas and the issues concerning fracking, all students might read and discuss selected parts of the section of the site on ‘Natural Gas,’ specifically ‘Where Our Natural Gas Comes From’ and ‘Natural Gas and the Environment.’ Then students could be assigned to read about another energy form or be allowed to select those forms they want to read about. Each topic provides information about the source, how energy is produced, and how people use the energy that results.”

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The Grade 6 teacher’s edition contains a user guide including adult-level explanations and definitions of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

The User Guide includes the following: an explanation of the Proficiency-Based Approach to Developing Literacy, a list of definitions for Literacy Skills and Academic Habits (teacher and student versions), The Literacy Toolbox, Question-Based Approach to Reading, Text-Centered Discussions, Text-Centered Writing, A Skills-Based Approach to Assessment and Evaluation, Alignment of Targeted CCSS, Media Supports, and Electronic Supports/Electronic Version of Materials.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

The Grade 6 teacher’s edition explains the role of the literacy CCSS standards for each of the 4 units. Units are broken down into parts, and the literacy CCSS standards are listed for each part.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Part 1, the CCSS standards aligned to the 5 activities are RI.6.1, RI.6.2, and RI.6.4.
  • In Unit 2, Part 3, the CCSS standards aligned to the 6 activities are RI.6.1, RI. 6.2, RI. 6.3, and SL. 6.1.
  • In Unit 3, Part 1, the CCSS standards aligned to the 6 activities are W.6.7, W.6.8, W.6.9, W.6.4, RI.6.1, RI.6.2, and SL.6.1.
  • In Unit 4, Part 4, the CCSS standards aligned to the 4 activities are W.6.1, W.6.5, W.6.9, RI.6.1, and SL.6.1.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies.

The Grade 6 materials contain instructional approaches of the program and research-based strategies in the User Guide of the teacher’s edition.

The User Guide contains explanations of how to use the graphic organizers/literacy toolbox, text-centered discussions, text-based writing, teacher modeling, read alouds, rubrics, checklists, and academic vocabulary.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

While the instructional materials contain strategies for informing students about the ELA/literacy program, there is no evidence that this program is shared with stakeholders, nor are there any suggestions included as to how parents or caregivers can support their student’s progress and/or achievement.

Within the Grade 6 instructional materials, there are checklists and rubrics that give feedback to both teachers and students. Example of some include:

  • In Unit 1, students can use an informal skills-based checklist to self- and peer-assess the literacy skills of Attending to Details, Summarizing, Identifying Relationships, Recognizing Perspective, and Using Evidence.
  • At the end of Unit 2, a checklist is provided that is broken down into Reading Skills, Thinking Skills, Writing Skills, and Essay Content that ranges from Emerging (Needs Improvement) to Excelling (Exceeds Expectations). Each checklist leaves room for comments by the teacher as to the strengths and areas of growth observed in the work, as well as areas for improvement in future work. However, while there are many checklists included for student reflection and teacher feedback, there are no strategies for including other stakeholders.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
5/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Routines and guidance within the program assist teachers in monitoring student progress. Regular opportunities to assess student progress are included within the materials; however, the assessments do not make strong connections between what is being assessed and the standards that are emphasized within that assessment. Sufficient guidance is provided to support teachers in interpreting student performance, though specific strategies or guidance for remediation for students who are not proficient is not offered.

The materials do not outline a consistent plan for holding students accountable for independent reading, and student choice is often not an option for the independent reading that is required, though the opportunities for student choice do require students to be held accountable for the selections in order to build stamina and confidence.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

The program regularly and systematically offers assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress through formative assessments after every part in every unit and a final project that culminates each unit.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Part 3, the formal formative assessments include the RC Literacy Skills and Discussion Habits Rubric. The less formal formative assessments are the Student RC Literacy Skills and Discussion Habits Checklist. The summative assessment for Unit 1 is the Final Writing and Discussion Assignment. The assignment consists of students becoming text experts by reading a text closely, writing a text-based explanation, and leading and participating in a text-centered discussion.
  • In Unit 2, Part 1, the formal formative assessments include the Making EBC Literacy Skills Rubric. The less formal formative assessments are the Student EBC Literacy Skills and the Academic Habits Checklists. The summative assessment for Unit 2 is a Making Evidence-Based Claims Final Writing Task. The tasks require students to develop and write an evidence-based claim and a global or comparative evidence-based claim essay.
  • In Unit 3, Part 2, the formal formative assessments include RDU Literacy Skills and the Academic Habits Rubric. The less formative assessments are Student RDU LIteracy Skills and the Academic Habits Checklist. The summative assessment is Researching to Deepen Understanding Final Writing Task. Students are required to write a reflective research narrative that includes a story about what they learned, clearly connect ideas, and reflections from research.
  • In Unit 4, Part 4, the formal formative assessments include the EBA Literacy Skills and Academic Habit Rubric. The less formal formative assessment is the Student Checklist. The summative assessment for Unit 4 is an Evidence-Based Argument Writing Task. The task consists of students writing a “multiparagraph essay that makes a case for their position.”

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 do not meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

While the instructional materials do make connections between the assessments and the development of Academic Habits/Literacy Skills, such as Attending to Details and Communicating Clearly, and provide checklists for students to use to self-assess these habits and skills, the assessments do not clearly denote which standards are being emphasized. The instructional materials provide alignment for the year, unit, and part, but do not provide alignment at the activity or assessment level.

Evidence that supports this rationale include, but is not limited to:

  • Each unit is divided into five parts and each part has either a formative or summative assessment. The instructional materials do provide targeted and supported standards for each part, but alignment is not clearly provided for assessments. It is not possible to easily determine which standards apply to each part of an assessment.
  • Only the Questioning Path Tools, which can be used as formative assessments, are aligned to specific reading and writing standards, but the instructional materials do not identify which standards are aligned to which questions.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

Students are assessed often, via formative and summative assessments, and teachers are provided many tools, such as unit-specific rubrics, to help them interpret student performance; however, the instructional materials do not provide strategies or suggestions for how to remediate students who did not master the skills/habits.

Throughout the instructional materials, unit-specific rubrics are provided as tools to assess Literacy Skills and Academic Habits. Each rubric uses a four-point scale to help teachers and students identify areas of strength, weakness, and growth. Teachers are prompted to consider evidence of the skills/habits and rate accordingly. This system of rubrics allows teachers to compare student performance as the year progresses. The instructional materials do not provide follow-up suggestions for students who do not master the skills/habits.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

The Grade 6 materials include routines and guidance that identify opportunities to monitor student progress. Within a unit, each part culminates with formative assessments so teachers can monitor student progress. At the end of each unit, a final project (summative assessment) is provided to monitor student progress.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

There is very little student choice in the Grade 6 instructional materials for independent reading. In the few occasions where there is choice, materials do hold students accountable for their selections and may contribute to their stamina and confidence.

While independent reading is built into earlier units, student independent reading choice is built into only Unit 3 and 4. Unit 3 explores Prehistoric Cave Art, and Unit 4 has students reflect on the topic “Energy Crossroads.” Within each unit is a common source set and while students read many of the same texts as their peers, there is some choice, depending on the inquiry path they wish to follow. Within the student edition, there are many materials that hold students accountable for this reading--the Exploring a Topic Tool, Potential Sources Tool, Taking Notes Tool, Research Frame Tool, and Research Evaluation Tool. Since Unit 4 is focused on Building Evidence-Based Arguments, the tools to hold students accountable include the Questioning Path Tool, Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool, Organizing Evidence-Based Claims Tool, Delineating Arguments Tool, and Evaluating Arguments Tool. These tools can support students in building the notes and skills necessary to write the summative assessments at the end of each unit.

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

Routines and guidance within the program assist teachers in monitoring student progress. Regular opportunities to assess student progress are included within the materials; however, the assessments do not make strong connections between what is being assessed and the standards that are emphasized within that assessment. Sufficient guidance is provided to support teachers in interpreting student performance, though specific strategies or guidance for remediation for students who are not proficient is not offered.

The materials do not outline a consistent plan for holding students accountable for independent reading, and student choice is often not an option for the independent reading that is required, though the opportunities for student choice do require students to be held accountable for the selections in order to build stamina and confidence.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Teachers determine whether students need increased scaffolding and time or less. Differentiation support is integrated into the scaffolding and design of the instructional materials. At times, teachers are reminded to determine whether students need more or less time to develop a Core Proficiency. Most units include supplemental texts. These can be used by the teacher to give students additional opportunities to develop skills. The supplemental texts are categorized as “Extended Reading.” In addition to this, the materials claim to be designed so schools can use local curricular materials. This flexibility allows for teachers to determine the text complexity appropriate for students.

Examples of general supports found on pages xxx-xxxi of the teacher’s edition include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit Design and Instructional Sequence: Students encounter visual images and multimedia texts that reinforce the skills of identifying details and making text-based observations from those details. Thus before they ever encounter print texts of grade-level complexity, students begin to develop skills and strategies through visual learning experiences. Then they learn to transfer these skills to the reading of more complex texts.
  • Short Texts, Focused Reading: Many texts are short in length which enables students to focus on sections of the texts. Text-dependent questions included in the Instructional Notes help with more challenging sections of the texts. More complex texts are “chunked” into smaller reading sections.
  • Read Aloud and Modeling: Students listen to teachers read fluently as they follow along.
  • Guiding Question Framework: This structure helps scaffold students’ thinking as they develop reading skills.
  • Graphic Organizers: The program’s instructional tools provide students with precise and guided processes and scaffolds for interacting with texts.
  • Reading Teams: Students are given opportunities to work on different reading teams or individually. These reading teams can be based on ability, depending on the teacher’s grouping.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Opportunities to read, write, speak, and listen to grade level text and meet or exceed grade level standards are found. The students read the same grade level texts throughout each unit, with the teacher modeling, scaffolding instruction, or reading aloud during whole group learning. There are general supports built into the series to help make students who are not at grade level and students who speak a language other than English successful with the grade level text and grade level standards.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Unit Design and Instructional Sequence: Students encounter visual images and multimedia texts that reinforce the skills of identifying details and making text-based observations from those details. Thus before they ever encounter print texts of grade-level complexity, students begin to develop skills and strategies through visual learning experiences. Then they learn to transfer these skills to the reading of more complex texts.
  • Short Texts, Focused Reading: Many texts are short in length which enables students to focus on sections of the texts. Text dependent questions included in the Instructional Notes help with more challenging sections of the texts.
  • Read Aloud and Modeling: Students listen to teachers read fluently as they follow along.
  • Guiding Question Framework: This structure helps scaffold students’ thinking as they develop reading skills.
  • Graphic Organizers: The program’s instructional tools provide students with precise and guided processes and scaffolds for interacting with texts.
  • Reading Teams: Students are given opportunities to work on different reading teams or individually. These reading teams can be based on ability, depending on the teacher’s grouping.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Materials contain integrated suggestions, Extended Readings, and optional activities to extend learning. The mix of activities offered allow for advanced students to explore texts or more complex texts while practicing the Core Proficiencies skills at greater depth.

Evidence that supports this rationale is as follows:

  • The materials suggest teachers consider the needs and background experiences of students before beginning a unit of study. Specifically, if a student has “advanced skills” or “extensive previous experience,” the teacher can expect the instruction to “move more rapidly.”
  • For advanced students, the materials also suggest teachers concentrate time on engaging students with the Extended Reading texts provided in some units and “emphasize more complex topics.”
  • The materials are vertically aligned and utilize the same lists, handouts, and rubrics provided in the Literacy Toolbox. For advanced students and students with previous experience, the materials recognize they will rely less on the Literacy Toolbox supports and are encouraged to “use their own, developing strategies” for analyzing texts.
  • At times, the materials will present optional assessment opportunities for teachers to collect evidence and for students to demonstrate understanding. In Unit 1, Part 5, the Summative Assessment Opportunities offers an optional collection of evidence through a writing task. Multiple pathways to accomplish the writing are provided by the materials. This is done as a supplement to the summative discussion activity. Due to the intentional vertically aligned design of the materials, this option is presented in every grade level.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

The materials are designed with collaboration as an essential Academic Habit. Students are provided regular opportunities to work as a class, in pairs, and in small groups. In each variation, students develop literacy skills by completing a Literacy Toolbox resource, analyzing text, and collaborating on writing.

Evidence that supports this rationale is as follows:

  • In Unit 2, Part 1, Activity 4, after the teacher models the formation of an evidence-based claim (EBC), students practice the skill in pairs with the support of the Literacy Toolbox resources.
  • In Unit 3, Part 1, Activity 5, after the teacher uses the Area Evaluation Checklist with the class to determine if an area warrants investigation, student reading teams use the same checklist to review their own Areas of Investigation.
  • In Unit 4, Part 1, Activity 2, “students are placed in expert groups to read and analyze one of three texts. Then...students jigsaw into cross-text discussion to share and compare what they have learned from the text each has read.”

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

According to the teacher's edition: “The series provides the materials in the Literacy Toolbox in a digital, as well as print format. They are PDF files that may be edited. Students may type in forms and email their work to the teacher as a digital option” (xxxii). Note: Student work cannot be saved or emailed.

The materials in the digital Literacy Toolbox are all PDF files that can be downloaded and printed. However, if students write on a PDF, no typing can be saved. The publisher recommends students email their work to their teacher. Since students cannot save work, it cannot be emailed, only printed in order to save any work. This also means students must complete what they are working on or it will not be saved to continue working on assignments.

No information was provided on platforms. It was tested on and appears to be compatible with Windows and Apple and is platform neutral. It is web based and compatible on multiple browsers. It was tested on Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, and Safari. It also worked on iPad and iPhone to pull up the digital material, but was not able to edit PDFs on these devices.

“Many texts throughout the Developing Core Literacy Proficiencies Program are available only online. Because of the ever-changing nature of website addresses, specific links are not provided” (xxxii). Most texts for Units 3 and 4 are not provided for students or teachers, and they must go online and search for the titles provided.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Many texts are accessible online to build background knowledge and can be used to supplement the anchor texts. Teachers are provided with an opportunity to utilize audio versions of texts available online and in print format for students to follow along with the text. The PDF versions of handouts and graphic organizers are editable and provided by Odell Education; therefore, students can type directly on the handouts and these can be submitted electronically to the teacher. Texts Sets include a variety of options beyond print, such as videos, audio recordings, images, and timelines. Teachers could choose to assign independent reading and annotations at home due to the accessibility through both the publisher website with a password and the free resources available online. Key words are provided when web addresses are not to assist teachers and students in locating the resources. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, the videos Two Wolves and the Interview with Suzanne Stone are both accessible online and are included in the Reading Closely for Textual Details Unit Texts.
  • In Unit 2, the Making Evidence-Based Claims Media Supports provide direction for locating the video of Steve Jobs addressing the 2005 Stanford University graduate. Details for the recording of the question-and-answer session given by Jobs at International Design Conference in Aspen in 1983 are also provided.
  • In Unit 4, the Building Evidence-Based Arguments Unit Text Set provides texts that are accessible for free on the internet. For example, students and teachers can access “Renewables and Conservation Are Not Enough” and “Truth about Hydraulic Fracking: Animation of Hydraulic Fracking” via YouTube.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

The instructional materials include a criteria-based assessment system throughout the four units included in Grade 6. Students utilize handouts and graphic organizers to practice and demonstrate proficiency relating to targeted skills. The graphic organizers and tools can be used as a formative assessment by the teacher and completed digitally by students using the editable PDFs provided by Odell Education. Student annotation and submission for evaluation can take place electronically. The graphic organizers are included as an instructional tool to support English Language Learners and students reading below grade level: “Visually, the tools help students understand the relationships among concepts, processes, and observations they make from texts. In addition, Media Supports are included in the instructional materials: ‘The various media (i.e. videos, audio, images, websites) can be assigned and explored at the student or group level to differentiate experiences for students based on their interests and abilities.’” Students who require more challenging texts have the opportunity to explore topics using texts at higher levels of complexity. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, students utilize an Approaching Texts Tool that teachers can use to gauge students’ ability to create guiding questions for the first reading of the text and create text-specific questions to help focus the rereading of the text; the tool can be printed and handwritten or completed digitally using an editable PDF.
  • In Unit 2, Media Supports include a video recording of Steve Jobs addressing the 2005 Stanford University graduates that can be accessed using an electronic device via YouTube.
  • In Unit 4, Common Source Sets offer a variety of complexity levels from which teachers may choose for exploration by students.“This Common Source should be accessible to students, but it also should provide some additional reading challenges, often by referencing technical information or terminology.”

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 can be easily customized for local use.

The online resources available allow teachers the opportunity to print additional copies for annotation and offer editable PDFs for students to use and submit their work electronically. Teachers have the choice of which texts they would like to use as model texts when presented with Common Source Sets, such as in Unit 4. Also, teachers can differentiate for students and choose specific texts in the Common Source Sets that individual students or small groups will read together. Additional resources are available to allow for further exploration and to allow an opportunity to increase the level of complexity for students who need an additional challenge. The tools provided offer a method for formative assessment, and teachers can make decisions regarding future units based on student performance. The following Instructional Notes are an example of guidance to the teachers:

  • "Teachers can use these Common Sources as a model in several ways, depending on the classroom context and emerging student interests.
    • Select a single source for modeling that matches with the direction for investigation that the class is likely to pursue. All students read and work with this single Common Source.
    • Use one source for modeling and a second for guided practice. All students read both sources, working with one as a class and the other in small groups.
    • Use all three sources (and additional ones if helpful), grouping students by possible topic interests and modeling and practicing within groups.
    • Find other, similar Common Source(s) related to the topic and subtopics the class is examining."

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 do not include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

While students are encouraged to collaborate with one another throughout the five units in a face-to-face format, there are no opportunities for students to create group projects or peer assess each other’s work virtually. Teachers would need to seek out these opportunities when planning the lessons outside of the tools offered in the instructional materials. OE offers Professional Development to educators on the website: “Odell Education (OE) collaborates with districts and schools that are implementing the Core Literacy Proficiencies Program. OE works with educators on the foundational principles of the instruction, as well as the integration of the units into their curriculum and the use of the materials in their classrooms.” However, opportunities for teachers to engage online with their colleagues is not present on the website.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Thu Aug 31 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Developing Core Literacy Proficiencies Grade 6 Student Edition 978-1-1191-9278-7 Odell Education 2016
Developing Core Literacy Proficiencies Grade 6 Teacher Edition 978-1-1191-9281-7 Odell Education 2016

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ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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