Alignment: Overall Summary

Collections 2017 for Grade 10 does not meet expectations of alignment. While many texts are of quality and are appropriately rigorous for the grade level as a whole, there is minimal guidance for the teacher to support students as they prepare to transition into more rigorous texts at the end of the school year. Most questions are grounded in evidence, and the instructional materials provide some opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts, although additional supplements may be needed to ensure students developing comprehensive proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language skills by the end of Grade 10. The materials partially promote building knowledge and strengthening students' academic vocabulary, as the structures to do so (connecting texts and tasks, sequencing of cohesive practice and skills) is inconsistent over the course of the school year.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
27
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
12
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet expectations for Gateway 1. Materials meet criteria for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. The instructional materials also include texts that are worthy of student's time and attention. There is little intentional instruction of speaking and listening skills throughout the Collections. While there is opportunity for reading a depth and breadth of materials, there is minimal guidance to support teachers in guiding students to reading beyond the classroom to be able to comprehend materials at the end of the school year.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
13/16
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Criterion Rating Details

HMH Collections Grade 10 include texts that are of publishable quality and consider a range of student interests, text types, and genres. Anchor texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task, and texts are accompanied by information explaining the rationale for placement in the year-long course. While there is opportunity for reading a depth and breadth of materials, there is minimal guidance to support teachers in guiding students to reading beyond the classroom to be able to comprehend materials at the end of the school year.

NOTE: Indicator 1b is non-scored and provides information about text types and genres in the program.

Indicator 1a

Anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 meets the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests. The materials contain anchor texts written by established and credible published authors or well-known sources. Many of these texts are well-known and would appeal to a range of students interests. Text are varied and include short stories, poems, memoirs, myths, dramas, speeches, arguments, science writings, historical writings, and media texts.

Anchor texts in the majority of the collections and across the yearlong curriculum are of publishable quality. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The anchor text in Collection 1 is the Court Opinion by William J. Brennan from Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion, and an editorial by Ronald J Allen, “American Flag Stands for Tolerance.” William J. Brennan, who served on the Supreme Court from 1956 to 1990, wrote the court opinion on this case that centered on flag burning as a form of expression protected by the Constitution.
  • The first anchor text in Collection 3 is from The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and translated by David Wylie. This tale of sudden transformation has long been recognized as a piece of classic literature from the World Literature category. Kafka was born in Prague and his style coined the term, Kafkaesque; he is known widely as an important author who explored the dark, twisted, and foreboding reality that many people find in life.
  • The anchor text in Collection 6 is “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This text is well-known as a foundational document in the Civil Rights Movement written in 1963. This classic example of argument or persuasive writing contains many elements of both the genre of writing as well as commentary of historical importance.

Anchor texts are well-crafted, content-rich, and include a range of student interests, engaging students at the grade level for which they are placed. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Collection 2 contains a wide variety of text types to engage students. This collection consists of a variety of genres of writing including science, argument, poetry, essay, and short story. The content-rich texts focus on the connection between human and the natural world to include a range of students’ interests.
    • “Called out” by Barbara Kingsolver
    • “When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer” by Walt Whitman
    • Hope for Animals and Their World by Jane Goodall
    • “My Life as a Bat” by Margaret Atwood
    • “Carry” by Linda Hogan

Anchor texts do not require revision or supplements in order to ensure quality. The majority of the texts throughout the Collections in the 10th grade textbook are written by authors of known quality in their respective fields. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis in Collection 3. Kafka’s novella is known internationally and is the source of the literary technique of Kafkaesque style that describes dark and disturbing story ideas.
  • Neil deGrasse Tyson’s science essay, “Coming to Our Senses,” in Collection 4. Dr. Tyson is one of the most influential voices in the modern scientific community.
  • Mohandas K. Gandhi’s letter, “Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin,” in Collection 6. Gandhi is well known around the world for his impact on politics and his activism that has influenced activists across the world in their fight for equality and freedom.

The texts in HMH Collections Grade 10 are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading. They are high-quality texts that will appeal to a wide variety of students, as well as introducing students to a variety of writing types that they will come in contact with as adult readers. Finally, the texts throughout the collection represent a multitude of cultures and ideas to provide a basis for evaluative thinking on the part of the students.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
*Indicator 1b is non-scored (in grades 9-12) and provides information about text types and genres in the program.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 meets the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Throughout the collections students engage with an appropriate distribution of texts and text types for grade 10. Literary texts include short stories, poems, plays, graphic novel, and myths. Informational texts include science writings, historical essays, arguments, memoirs, and foundational texts. Media selections are comprised of graduation speeches, documentary, and a photo essay.

HMH Collections 2017 Grade 10 materials include the following distribution of text types and genres required by the standards for the grade:

The overall balance of literary and informational texts with which students engage is 45% literary to 55% informational. Text types include short stories, poems, explanatory and expository texts about science, multimedia, and plays.

Samples of how the materials distribute these texts over the course of a school year include the following:

  • Collection 1
    • Literary Texts
      • Short stories “What, of This Goldfish, Would You Wish?” by Etgar Keret
      • Short stories “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson
      • Poem “Without Title” by Diane Glancy
    • Informational Texts
      • Court Opinion Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion by William J. Brennan
      • Editorial “American Flag Stands for Tolerance” by Ronald J Allen
      • Speech Excerpt from Towards a True Refuge by Aung San Suu Kyi
      • Public Document Excerpt from The Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the UN Commission on Human Rights
      • Informational Text “With Friends Like These…” by Dorothy Rowe
  • Collection 3
    • Literary Texts
      • Novella From The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka
      • Graphic Novel From The Metamorphosis by Peter Kuper
      • Poem “The Starry Night” by Anne Sexton
    • Informational Texts
      • Science Essay “From Simplexity” by Jeffrey Kluger
      • Article “Life After People” by Dolores Vasquez
  • Collection 6
    • Literary Texts
      • Short Story “The Briefcase” by Rebecca Makkai
      • Poem “Cloudy Day” by Santiago Baca
    • Informational Texts
      • Foundational Text "Letter from Birmingham Jail" by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
      • Memoir Revolution 2.0 by Wael Ghonim
      • Argument From "Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin" by Mohandas K. Gandhi

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 meets the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Throughout the collections, there are a variety of literary and informational texts that give students experience in reading different types of writing like science essays, plays, poems, short stories, and memoirs.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level (according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 meets the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

Examples of texts with appropriate text complexity include, but are not limited to:

  • Collection 1, “American Flag Stands for Tolerance,” newspaper editorial by Ronald J. Allen
    • Quantitative - 1170 Lexile
    • Qualitative - The “Levels of Meaning/Purpose” in this story is rated at the mid-low level. Although the purpose is implied, it is easily identified from the context. The “Structure” of the story is in the mid-high range because the organization of the main ideas and details is complex but mostly explicit. “Language Conventionality and Clarity” is in the mid-high level of the scale because there are some unfamiliar words and more complex sentence structure. “Knowledge Demands” is mid-high because there are somewhat complex civics concepts.
    • Reader and Task - Suggestions are provided in order to assist students in accessing the text in the “Zoom In On” feature: “Students may find the language of the court opinion dry or difficult, especially on the first reading. Have pairs familiarize themselves with the content by taking turns reading each paragraph aloud before reading independently for closer analysis” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1, “American Flag Stands for Tolerance” 15C). The tasks include analyze the impact of word choice and cite evidence for inferences.
  • Collection 3, from The Metamorphosis, novella by Franz Kafka
    • Quantitative - 1110 Lexile
    • Qualitative - The “Levels of Meaning/Purpose” in this story is rated at the mid-high level. There are multiple levels of meaning. The “Structure” of the story is in the mid-low range because of less familiar story concepts, but here are no shifts in chronology. “Language Conventionality and Clarity” is in the mid-high level of the scale because there is an increased number of unfamiliar words and more complex sentence structure. “Knowledge Demands” is mid-low because the situation includes unfamiliar aspects, and some cultural and literary knowledge is useful.
    • Reader and Task - Suggestions are provided in order to assist students in accessing the text in the “Zoom In On” feature. “Have students work in pairs to comprehend the opening paragraph. As one student reads aloud, the other student should try to visualize what the scene might look like. Then have students use their own words to describe what they visualized” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 3, from The Metamorphosis 93C).
  • Collection 6, “from Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin,” argument by Mohandas K. Gandhi
    • Quantitative - 1210 Lexile
    • Qualitative - The “Levels of Meaning/Purpose” in this story is rated at the mid-low level because there is one purpose that is easily identified. The “Structure” of the story is in the mid-high range because the organization of the main idea and details are complex but mostly explicit. “Language Conventionality and Clarity” is in the mid-high level of the scale because of the complex and varied sentence structure. “Knowledge Demands” is mid-high because it has complex social studies concepts.
    • Reader and Task - Suggestions are provided in order to assist students in accessing the text in the “Zoom In On” feature. “Help students make a chart of points of comparison before they begin reading and viewing. Possible subject headings are . . . topics, letter and video” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 6, “from Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin” 351C).

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 partially meets the expectations for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. Anchor texts and paired selections typically fall within the grade band; if a text is above or below the grade band, the qualitative measurements or reader tasks support students’ growth in literacy skills. The scaffolding of the texts and the tasks required of students do not consistently ensure students are supported to access and comprehend grade-level texts independently at the end of the year.

The following Lexile ranges are found in the six collections:

Collection 1: 900-1420
Collection 2: 1020-1300
Collection 3: 1110-1490
Collection 4: 1210-1310
Collection 5: 580-1630
Collection 6: 860-1210

Examples of the complexity levels falling inside the grade band with sufficient scaffolding and appropriate tasks that support access for students to access grade-level texts independently at the end of the year include, but are not limited to:

  • In Collection 4, students read a math essay by Keith Devlin, “The Math Instinct,” which has Lexile of 1210. This is in the upper half of the grade band. The qualitative measures put this at a mid-high for levels of meaning, language and knowledge demands, and at mid-low for structure. This is found in the latter half of the year and has reader tasks that support students understanding. Students determine meaning and analyze ideas.
  • In Collection 6, students read the argument, “Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin,” by Mohandas K. Gandhi with a Lexile of 1210. This is in the middle of Collection 6 and on the higher end of the grade band. The qualitative measures place this at a mid-low for levels of meaning, mid-high for structure, and high for language and knowledge demands. The reader task is appropriate in that it asks students to analyze rhetoric.

Most texts which fall outside the grade band do not include sufficient support to ensure students can fully comprehend and access the appropriate components, and teachers may need to provide supplements to these texts. Examples of the complexity levels falling outside the grade band with sufficient scaffolding and appropriate tasks that support students in accessing grade-level texts independently at the end of the year include, but are not limited to:

  • In Collection 3, the third text in the collection is science writing by Jeffrey Kluger, “from Simplexity,” with a Lexile of 1490, which is above the grade band. The qualitative measures say this is mid-low for levels of meaning and knowledge demands and mid-high for structure and language. The reader task focuses on supporting comprehension and tells the teacher to “help students to monitor their understanding as they read, model and then have students practice delivering oral summaries of passages” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 3 129C). This task will support students in understanding the language and structure of this more difficult text.

A representative example of how the texts within the materials often do not clearly guide students can be found in the excerpt "from Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion," in Collection 1. The quantitative measure is 1420 (Lexile) which is above the recommended grade band. The qualitative features are also high. Students are given a guiding question before their reading and but during the reading they work independently. The students may need extra guidance to navigate this complex text. This structure is repeated in many of the texts.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 meets the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level. The Teacher’s Edition contains “Plan” pages before each text which includes both the text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

  • “Why This Text?” is provided for each anchor text. This gives the rationale for educational purpose and placement as well as key learning objectives. For example, in Collection 3 for The Metamorphosis, the “Why This Text?” states: “Students are regularly expected to read narratives and make inferences in order to analyze a text's meaning. This lesson explores the first part of Franz Kafka’s novella, The Metamorphosis” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 3, The Metamorphosis 93A).
  • The Text Complexity Rubric explains the text complexity attributes of each whole class text, the Lexile, and the places within the lesson that will help the teacher determine if the text is appropriate in terms of reader and task. An example of how this is prepared for teachers is found in Collection 5 on pages 203A-203C, “Why Read Shakespeare” an argument by Michael Mack. Text Complexity Rubric gives the quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task measures.
    • Quantitative - 980 Lexile
    • Qualitative - fall in low, mid-low, mid-low and mid-low scales for each of the four measurements below. Under the heading are two columns: on the right states the objective and on the left is a “Zoom In On” feature which gives teachers an activity to complete the objective:
      • Levels of Meaning/Purpose - scored low on the scale
        • Objective - “Help students analyze the rhetorical devices and the language used in an argument.”
        • Zoom In On - “Discuss with students that authors use rhetorical questions and comparisons to make an argument more convincing. Then display lines 67-74 and have small groups answer these questions...”
      • Structure - scored mid-low on the scale
        • Objective - “to help students analyze an argument.”
        • Zoom In On - “Remind students that the author of an argument wants readers to agree with a position or claim. To convince the audience, the author presents reasons and evidence. Have pairs analyze Mack’s argument by completing chart like the one shown. [example chart shown below within the text].”
      • Language Conventionality and Clarity - scored mid-low on the scale
        • Objective - “Teach unfamiliar vocabulary in context.”
        • Zoom In On - The teacher is told to explain that authors of arguments may use “loaded language” or language with strong connotations, in order to stir emotions and help convince the audience. The teacher is then told to guide students in recognizing the loaded words that Mack uses by answering questions about specific lines.
      • Knowledge Demands - scored mid-low on the scale
        • Objective - “Support English learners in understanding the context in which the speech was given.”
        • Zoom In On - “Explain that Mack’s Catholic University of America audience would be familiar with his reference to the Biblical parable of the prodigal son (lines 77-84).” The text then provides two bullets of background on the parable.
    • Suggested Reader and Task Considerations:
      • On the right are things the teacher should consider before reading: “Will students relate to the content of this selection? Are students able to evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s argument?”
      • Zoom In On is again on the left - This labels the goal, “Supporting Comprehension,” and then shares an activity students can complete to reach the goal. “Ask students if they have interest in reading Shakespeare’s plays. Take a poll, and list some of their reasons for and against reading Shakespeare on the board. Explain that they will read an argument stressing that Shakespeare is a vital part of a person’s education. Ask them to decide whether the author convinces them….” The text then lists an after reading activity for students as well.

Indicator 1f

Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 partially meets the criteria that anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. While students read a variety of texts, it is unclear how students are supported towards reading proficiency. Instructions within the Teacher’s Edition do not explain how the entirety of a text is to be read: silently, by the teacher, or aloud as a whole class. General instructions are given in the teacher's edition before each text that tell the teacher to have students use the "As You Read" feature to guide their reading. An example is found in Collection 3 before "the Metamorphosis": “As You Read: Direct students to use the As You Read note to focus their reading” (93). How each text is read is left up to the teacher with little guidance from the program. Students may never read the texts within the collections independently.

The Instructional Overview found at the beginning of each collection clearly identifies the diversity of texts students will be reading within each collection. Below is an example showing the range and volume that can be found from three different collections at this grade level:

  • Collection 1: short stories, documentary trailer, court opinion, newspaper editorial, and a poem
  • Collection 3: novella, graphic novel, science writing, poem, and documentary film
  • Collection 6: arguments, memoir, short story, and a poem

Each collection contains a feature titled Digital Resources for Independent Reading that precedes the Performance Tasks at the end of each collection. This feature suggests digital resources students can use to find out more about the theme or topic of the collection. However, little support is provided and not all suggested tasks may support proficiency. The following is an example of this:

  • Collection 1 suggests student read “”Get Up and Bar the Door” by Anonymous, “Sonnet 30” by Edmund Spenser, “When I have Fears That I May Cease to Be” by John Keats, and “Ah, Are You Digging on My Grave?” by Thomas Hardy. “Have students analyze the emotions and relationships in two of these texts. How do the emotions affect the relationships?” (HMH Collections, 10th Grade, 40b). This page also includes a Creating an Independent Reading Program. This feature suggests ways for teachers to help students increase independent reading by building a classroom library and creating library rules. However, no system is provided for monitoring students' use of the techniques suggested here. Additionally, a teacher may choose to skip this activity.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
14/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Grade 10 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly and followed by culminating tasks. The materials partially meet the criteria for frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage use of academic vocabulary and connection to what is being read. The materials provide opportunities for students to practice writing different types in both on-demand and process settings, with an appropriate emphasis on text-based writing, and grammar and mechanics instruction is clearly organized to support development of these skills over the course of the school year.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 meets the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text; this may include work with mentor texts as well).

The majority of the questions within the textbook require students to go back so they can support their interpretations and build their knowledge from the literal to the inferential. The materials also provide support for planning and implementation by including instructions for the teacher on when to ask the question, how to introduce it and possible student answers. Within each Collection, each text in the textbook contains questions to be read during the reading and questions that will be completed after the reading. During the reading, each question has a bold heading that states the purpose, the question and then an example student answer. Examples of questions a teacher asks while reading include, but are not limited to:

  • "Point out that the narrator does not say much about herself in lines 1-16, but what she says about her husband reveals her character. Ask students to cite text evidence that lets them know what the narrator values" (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1, "The Wife’s Story" 12e).
  • “Ask students to reread lines 85-107 and identify the author’s purpose for writing these paragraphs. (to describe how the beetles recycle decayed animals) What does the language and level of detail reveal about the author’s point of view toward the beetles?” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 2, Hope for Animals and their World 64).
  • “Ask students to make an inference about what is going through Macbeth’s mind after seeing the apparitions of eight kings that look like Banquo (lines 112-122)” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 5, The Tragedy of Macbeth 264).

In addition to the questions during the reading, there is a section after the text labeled, “Analyzing the Text.” This section contains the same general instructions in all Collections that say, “Cite Text Evidence: Support your responses with evidence from the selection.” There are three to six questions in this segment. Each question is preceded by a skill in bold followed by the question; possible students answers are found in the left margin of the teacher’s edition. Examples of questions at the end of the text from the “Analyzing the Text” section include, but are not limited to:

  • “Analyze: In his editorial, Allen talks about the ‘sanctity of the human conscience’ and the ‘enlightenment’ that comes from debate. Explain how the connotations of these words convey his tone. (Both ‘sanctity of the human conscience’ and the ‘enlightenment’ have strongly positive connotations, which convey a positive attitude, or tone toward the freedoms we share and the commitment to keep them)” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1, “American Flag Stands for Tolerance” 22).
  • “Connect: Franz Kafka wrote this story in 1912 in what is now the Czech Republic. What insights into European culture in the early 1900s does the text provide? Cite evidence from the text to support your ideas” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 3, The Metamorphosis 106).
  • “Interpret: How are key ideas refined with clear and concise language in the section ‘What Are Our Demands?’ What purpose does this section serve? (Key ideas are refined through labels, statements of demands, and short explanations of the reasons behind each demand. This section defines the tangible goals of the protest)” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 6, “Revolution 2.0” 348).

HMH Collections also comes with a consumable workbook called The Close Reader. This contains directions before the reading and a short response question at the end. Each question during the reading has the heading “REREAD”; it is preceded by instructions labeled with the “READ” heading. The “READ” label gives the students instructions for what to look for while reading. The “REREAD” section asks students to answer a short answer question based on what they focused on during “READ.” Examples of questions from the Close Reader DURING Reading include, but are not limited to:

  • In Collection 1, students read a speech by Aung San Suu Kyi, “from Towards a True Refuge.”
    • READ asks students to continue to cite textual evidence while reading lines 17-47 by:
      • “Underline the claims that Suu Kyi makes” (24h).
      • “Circle the evidence presented to support those claims” (24h).
    • REREAD ask students to “Reread lines 36-47. Think about Suu Kyi’s choice of words here. How would you describe her tone in this paragraph?” (24h).
  • In Collection 2 students read two poems, “Starfish” and “Sea Stars" (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 2 Close Reader, “Starfish” and “Sea Stars” 58b-58g).
    • “Starfish" asks students to READ lines 1-15 and begin to cite and collect text evidence by doing the following:
      • “Underline examples of figurative language” (58d).
      • “Circle text used to describe the starfish’s body” (58d).
      • “In the margin, explain the actions of the speaker” (58d).
    • In the REREAD section, students are asked:
      • “Reread lines 1-15. How does the description of the ‘approaching darkness’ change the tone of the poem? What happens to the starfish the speaker leaves behind? Support your answer with explicit evidence” (58d).
    • “Sea Stars” asks students to READ lines 1-12 and begin to cite and collect text evidence by doing the following:
      • “Underline words and phrases used to describe the sky, the moon, and the stars” (58e).
      • “Circle text that gives the sea stars human qualities” (58e).
      • “In the margin, explain the comparison the author makes”(58e).
    • In the REREAD feature students are asked the following:
      • “Reread lines 1-12. In your own words explain the central idea of these lines” (58e).
  • In Collection 4, students read a book review by Matilda Battersby (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 4, Close Reader, “Every Second Counts” 170b-170e).
    • In the READ feature students are asked to read lines 1-15 and begin to cite and collect text evidence by doing the following:
      • “Underline three commonly used sayings in lines 1-9” (170c).
      • “In the margin, explain what Battersby means when she says 'time is elastic' in line 6” (170c).
      • “Circle the question she asks in lines 10-15” (170c).
    • REREAD asks students to read lines 1-9. “What is the central idea in these lines? What details support this idea?” (170d).

Short answer questions at the end of the reading have the heading, “SHORT RESPONSE,” and the instructions, “Cite Text Evidence.” Examples of questions from the Close Reader AFTER Reading include, but are not limited to:

  • SHORT RESPONSE: From “Starfish”: “How does the poet’s use of figurative language contribute to her central idea? Cite text evidence to support your response” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 2, Close Reader, “Starfish” and “Sea Stars” 18-22).
  • SHORT RESPONSE: From “Sea Stars:” “In what ways does the author’s use of figurative language contribute to her central idea? Cite text evidence to support your response” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 2, Close Reader, “Starfish” and “Sea Stars” 18-22).
  • "Write an objective summary of this book review. Analyze the way in which key points are introduced and developed. Cite evidence from the text in your response (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 4, Close Reader, “Every Second Counts” 170e).

The instructional materials include questions, tasks, and assignments that are text-dependent/specific and consistently support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year. The teacher materials provide complete support for planning and implementation of text-dependent questions, tasks, and assignments by including information to share before the question and possible student answers.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/ text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 meets the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent and text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding.

The materials contain varied culminating tasks of quality across a year’s worth of material, so students can demonstrate what they know and are able to do in speaking and writing. Throughout the six collections students present a speech, an oral narrative, a response to literature, and an argument. They also write an analytical essay, a research report, an argument, a narrative, and an informative essay. There are text-dependent questions and tasks throughout the unit that help prepare students for success on the culminating tasks.

The culminating tasks are found at the end of each collection. These tasks are rich and require students to demonstrate what they know in speaking and/or writing. Below is a representative list of the performance tasks found in the 10th grade edition:

Collection 1: Present a Speech, Write an Analytical Essay
Collection 2: Write a Research Report, Present an Oral Narrative
Collection 3: Participate in a Panel Discussion, Write an Argument
Collection 4: Present a Response to Literature, Write a Narrative
Collection 5: Write an Informative Essay
Collection 6: Present an Argument

The text-dependent questions throughout the different texts adequately support students in completing the task.

An example of a performance task that uses the unit’s text-dependent and text-specific questions to build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding can be found in Collection 1: Ourselves and Others.

  • The performance task states, “This collection explores the significance of our relationships with others, as individuals and in groups. Look back at the texts you have read, including the anchor text ‘What, of This Goldfish, Would You Wish?’, and make a generalization about how our relationships help define who we are. Share your ideas in a speech that incorporates media elements” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1 41).

Questions throughout the text selections are written to help students gather information that will help them collect evidence for their speech. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • One of the support questions from the teacher's edition in “What, of This Goldfish, Would You Wish?” states, “Have students read the last three paragraphs and identify cultural backgrounds of some of the characters. (The Holocaust survivor came from Europe, Yoni also plans to interview Arabs, Ethiopians, and Americans)” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1 4).
  • A question from the text "Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion" is “CITE TEXT EVIDENCE": Students are asked to read lines 20-25 and find how one justice, Justice Brennan, applies the ideas of another justice, Justice Holmes, to the ideas of this current case. Students read a paraphrase of Holmes’s findings then they are asked, “How does Justice Brennan support the idea that ‘the flag’s deservedly cherished place in our community will be strengthened, not weakened’ by the ruling?” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1 17).

Another example of a Collection’s Performance Task utilizing text questions to build to the culminating Performance Task is in Collection 4: How We See things:

  • “This collection explores how we perceive the world around us, from the use of our senses and instincts to scientific instruments. Review the Emily Dickinson poems and other collection texts. Synthesize your ideas about them by planning and presenting a response to literature.”

Questions throughout the text selections are written to support students in developing ideas about perceiving the world around us and guides them in finding evidence to support their analysis of the literature. Examples of questions include, but are not limited to:

  • In the anchor texts of Emily Dickinson's poetry are several questions to help students engage in understanding the message of the poems. For example, the text asks teachers to “have students paraphrase lines 16-20 of the poem.” The teacher edition then provides the sample paraphrase of “As people's eyes grow used to the dark, there’s a change. Either the night turns out to be less dark, or their vision adapts to the darkness. In either case, everything seems normal. This question supports students in understanding what Dickinson is saying about perception of the world, which directly relates to the task (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 4, "Before I got my eye put out 156).
  • In the scientific text, “Coming to Our Senses,” on page 163 the text has teachers “ask students to name the device Tyson is describing in this passage and explain what the device does.” He happens to be referencing the fictional device, a Tricorder from "Star Trek". The text then goes on to ask the question “How does using this example further Tyson’s central idea?” The answer in the teacher edition is “. . .Tyson is again highlighting the fact that our senses are limited and that even in science fiction stories, we have to rely on scientific tools in order to gain a solid understanding of the world around us.” This emphasizes the portion of the task that focuses on using scientific instruments to perceive the world.

Consistently, across texts there are questions suggested in the teacher’s edition that will support students in building understanding and evidence towards the final Performance task.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The materials provide discussion opportunities and questions throughout the course of the year. The protocols for discussions are found in the “Student Resources” section of the textbook; however, there is no clear emphasis on the application of academic vocabulary, syntax, and language forms to match the purpose of the academic conversations, such as participating in an evaluative discussion. Therefore, students could be involved in conversations with little to no usage of academic language to discuss textual evidence or structure a purposeful academic discussion.

Representative examples that show HMH Collections provides multiple opportunities, protocols, and questions for evidence-based discussions across the whole year’s scope of instructional materials include, but are not limited to:

  • All texts contain questions that correlate with the text that teachers can use for whole class discussion while reading that are text-dependent.
    • “Ask students how Allen’s use of slaughtered instead of killed reveals his attitude toward the subject” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1, “American Flag Stands for Tolerance” 18).
  • In the Teacher’s Edition, there are sections labeled, “To Challenge Students . . .” and “When Students Struggle.” The activities described under these headings often contain group discussions or peer-to-peer work.
    • In Collection 3 during the reading of “Simplexity,” the “To Challenge Students" section has students participate in a debate on the topic “should complexity theory be relied on to design evaluation routes for people in high-rise buildings” and they should use evidence from the text to support their debate (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 3, "Simplexity" 132).
    • Collection 5 illustrates an example of pairs working together during the “When Students Struggle:” “Have students work with partners to paraphrase the remaining lines” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 5, Macbeth 212).
  • After each text in the teacher’s edition of the collections, there is a section titled, “Collaborative Discussion.” This activity asks teachers to have students work in pairs.
    • “What elements of this novella distort the reader’s sense of reality, while at the same time make Gregor Samsa’s situation feel very real? In a small group, discuss textual evidence that supports your responses” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 3, from The Metamorphosis 105).

The Grade 10 HMH Collections and support materials do not provide enough grade level appropriate opportunities for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • While reading text selections throughout the collection, students encounter text-dependent questions and prompts that require them to use evidence from the text. However, none of these are structured in ways that ensure that students use academic vocabulary or academic syntax. Students are not provided samples or models of evidence-based discussion. In addition, a clear emphasis on use of academic syntax, use of academic vocabulary, or use of protocols are not provided or referenced. Examples include, but are not limited to :
    • "Point out to students that Kingsolver calls the flowering of the desert 'a kind of miracle' (lines 16-18). Have students cite other examples of nonscientific reasons for the desert’s flowering" (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 2, “Called Out” 52).
    • "Have students reread lines 52-57 and identify the subjects that the author compares and contrasts and the word that signals the comparison" (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 4, “The Math Instinct” 184).
    • "Have students review lines 194-203 and cite text evidence that explains the chef’s ideas about time and space" (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 6,“The Briefcase” 367).
  • At the end of each reading selection, there is a “Collaborative Discussion” prompt that provides an opportunity for students to discuss. However, students are not directed to use academic syntax, vocabulary, or specific protocols when engaged in these discussions. Examples include, but are not limited to:
    • “What elements of this novella distort the reader’s sense of reality, while at the same time make Gregor Samsa’s situation feel very real? In a small group, discuss textual evidence that supports your responses” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 3, The Metamorphosis 105).
    • “With a partner, discuss how the organization of the document makes it easy or difficult for someone participating in the protests to use. Cite specific textual evidence to support your ideas” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 6, “Revolution 2.0” 347).
  • Academic vocabulary is identified at the beginning of each collection in the Plan pages. For example, Collection 1 includes the academic terms discriminate, diverse, inhibit, intervene, rational. While reading the anchor text, “What of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?”, students are provided the opportunity to discuss this collection’s targeted academic vocabulary using the following prompt in the teacher’s edition. Students consider these words; however, no protocols, suggestions on groupings, or modeling are provided:
    • “For the terms 'diverse' and 'rational': As you discuss this short story, incorporate the following Collection 1 academic vocabulary words: diverse, and rational. To appreciate the different backgrounds and histories of the people living in Israel, ask students to describe some examples from the text of the diverse characters who make their homes there. As you read about Sergei’s actions when Yoni comes to his door and the goldfish’s counsel about what Sergei should do next, ask students to evaluate how rational each character’s reaction to the situation is” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1, “What of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?” 5).

Although the materials provide discussion opportunities and questions throughout the course of the year, there is not a clear emphasis on the application of academic vocabulary, syntax, and language forms to match the purpose of the academic conversations. Therefore, it will be very difficult for teachers to implement the standards and assess growth..

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 partially meets expectations for supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

Protocols and routines for speaking and listening are presented in the Interactive Lessons. These lessons include rules for a good discussion, speaking constructively, listening and responding, giving a presentation, and using media in a presentation. These protocols are not located in the Student Edition.

Protocols and routines for collaborative discussions and debates can be found in the resource section of the student edition. The “Participating in a Collaborative Discussion” pages includes explanations of how to prepare for a discussion, setting ground rules, moving the discussion forward and responding to ideas. The “Debating an Issue” section defines the structure of debate, planning the debate, holding the debate, and evaluating the debate.

There are no speaking and listening rubrics found in the materials.

There are many opportunities throughout the year for students to practice speaking and listening skills in the small performance tasks, large performance tasks, and before, during and after reading each text; however, little intentional instruction of speaking and listening skills is applied. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Performance Task A at the end of Collection 1 is to “Present a Speech." On the second page of the performance task, the Interactive Lesson, “Giving a Presentation: Types of Media; Audio, Video, and Images,” is referenced for student use in preparation. The rubric for this task assesses Ideas and Evidence, Organization, and Language. (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1 41).
  • Performance Task A at the end of Collection 3 is to “Participate in a Panel Discussion.” The Interactive Lesson, “Preparing for Discussion,” is referred to in the sidebar of the student edition. The rubric for this task assesses Ideas and Evidence, Organization and Language; it does not include speaking and listening skills (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 3 145).
  • "After reading 'What, of This Goldfish, Would You Wish?' asks students to do the following: Members of a small group each research a folk tale involving three wishes that was used in this story." Students retell the folktale they research and compare similarities and differences between the tales. Students then discuss how this story fits in with the ones that were researched. Students discuss similar elements or unique features. Finally, they write a individual summary of their conclusions (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1 10).
  • At the end of the essay “Revolution 2.0” students are asked to do a speaking activity that consists of the following: "Choose one section of the text, and give a short informative presentation about current developments having to do with the section you chose. 1. Research current developments regarding one subtopic, for example difficulties Egyptians face. Note your sources and find photos or other media to support your ideas. 2. In a speech, use domain-specific vocabulary to compare ideas in your chosen section of the text with information from your research. Conclude with your view of whether or not progress has been achieved” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 6 348). The only additional support in the teacher notes is to help students create a chart for their research. There are two speaking and listening standards listed, but no rubric or guidelines around domain-specific language referenced in the task.

Although there are opportunities for students to speak and listen during the course of the school year formally and informally, there is little intentional instruction of speaking and listening skills throughout the Collections. In order to have students meet the expectations of the Common Core State Standards, teachers will have to create additional lessons and rubrics for speaking and listening.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 meets the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. The materials provide a mix of both on-demand and process writing, and shorter and longer tasks and projects.

Representative examples of the writing tasks and projects are below. These represent both shorter and longer works, as well as on-demand and process that are aligned to the writing standards.

  • In Collection 1, the compare anchor texts, “from Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion” and “American Flag Stands for Tolerance,” ends with the performance task: “Write a one-page analysis of the differences in tone between the two texts. Conclude your analysis by explaining how the tone of each text fits the context for which it was written” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1 22).
  • In Collection 3, Performance Task B has students write an argument. In this writing, students are to look at Rivers and Tides and two other texts to argue whether or not change is viewed as mostly positive, negative or a combination of the two. This task is clearly an example of a longer process writing as students reread three texts in this collection to synthesize their ideas and find evidence, organize their essay using an outline, draft, review with partners, revise, and create a finished copy of their writing. In this task, students must do the following:
    • Include a clear claim
    • Present and explain text evidence in logically ordered paragraphs
    • Transition from reasons to evidence
    • Include counterclaims
    • Include a conclusion
  • Each Collection also contains smaller writing tasks like letters and journal entries. Examples include, but are not limited to:
    • In Collection 1, after reading “The Lottery,” students write a letter to the editor explaining the story’s events and its overall meaning.
    • In Collection 6, after reading “The Briefcase," students “assume the identity of the chef” and then “write a letter to the professor’s son in which [they] attempt to convince him that [they] could serve as the boy’s father" (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 6 371).
  • The Performance Assessment booklet contains four units of on-demand writing - argumentative, informative, literary analysis, and mixed practice. Within each unit, students complete the following:
    • Analyze the Model - students read two texts and analyze a student model essay.
    • Practice the Task - students read two to four texts, complete prewriting activities, and write the essay.
    • Perform the Task - students read two to four texts, complete prewriting activities, and write the essay.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different types/modes/genres of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections for Grade 10 meets the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Materials provide multiple opportunities across the school year for students to write in different genres that reflect the distribution required by the standards. The students write arguments, informative texts, and narratives. Writing opportunities occur within collections in which students write shorter process pieces following each text, and a larger process piece in the Performance Tasks at the end of each collection. The Performance Assessment Practice booklet adds formally to this by providing students with multiple opportunities to both observe students samples of and write their own examples of two of the three modes of writing, argumentative and informative. There is ample opportunity for practice over the course of the year and all the writing is clearly connected to text(s), even within the Performance Assessment Practice booklet.

Examples of different writing opportunities in the materials include, but are not limited to:

  • Arguments
  • Analytical Essays
  • Analyses
  • Comparison Essays
  • Reflections
  • Editorials
  • Research Essays
  • Letters
  • Journals
  • Narratives

While the program does provide opportunities for the students to write to the requirements of the standards, the only support for teachers or students to monitor their progress is if teachers use the myWriteSource digital resource. Within the textbook, neither teachers nor students are provided with rubrics, checklists, exemplars, or model texts for the smaller performance tasks at the end of each text. The culminating Performance Tasks offer a little more support by adding a brief excerpt of a mentor text from the collection, a student checklist, and a rubric. However, the only way to truly monitor progress in writing skills is using the myWriteSource resource. With writing assignments in this database, students can ask questions with the “Raise Hand" feature at any time. They can also request that their teacher look over their work before the final submission. Teachers can send items back with comments to be revised if they did not meet the expectations.

HMH Collections does give students ample opportunity to practice writing in multiple genres. The support materials in the textbook are lacking, but, if the digital myWriteSource is used, teachers can support and monitor students through the writing process.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 meets the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for research-based and evidence-based writing to support analysis, argument, synthesis, and/or evaluation of information, supports, claims.

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for including frequent opportunities for research-based and evidence-based writing to support analysis, argument, synthesis, and/or evaluation of information, supports, claims. Throughout the collections there are many opportunities that require students to either find text evidence from readings or conduct their own research to support their analysis, claim, or other points within their writing, including referencing text as a basis for narrative writing.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Close Reader Selections require students to go back to the text numerous times to respond to the questions, and they all end with a short writing response - one to two paragraphs asking students to cite text evidence to support their answer.
    • In Collection 1 in response to “from Towards a True Refuge," students are asked, “What is Aung San Suu Kei arguing for and against? How does her word choice and tone affect her overall meaning? Review your reading notes and cite text evidence in your response” (HMH, 10th Grade, Close Reader, Collection 1, “from Towards a True Refuge” 24g).
  • Performance tasks found at the end of Collections ask students to go back into the text and to specifically use the anchor text and at least two other texts in the collection to answer the prompt provided.
    • In Collection 3, Performance Task B has students writing an argument. “Review the anchor selection, Rivers and Tides. In each, is change viewed as mostly positive, mostly negative, or a combination of the two? Synthesize your ideas in an argument essay” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 3 149).
  • The Performance Tasks at the end of the selections within each collection require students to either go back into the selection itself or to do some outside research for the writing assignment.
    • In Collection 2, the performance task at the end of “My Life as a Bat” asks students to use the details from the essay to conduct research on the facts given on the bats and then to create a chart or Venn diagram to compare the story details to the facts. (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 2 76).
    • In Collection 6, the performance task at the end of “Letter from Birmingham Jail” asks students to "write an essay to explain how the two documents explore people’s fundamental human rights and what the two authors want done to end the injustice” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 6 338).

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for research-based and evidence-based writing. The writing tasks require students to mine evidence from the texts in the book to support a claim, and they meets the grade level demands of the Common Core State Standards.

Indicator 1n

Materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 meets the criterion that materials include instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts with opportunities for application context.

Conventions and grammar are taught in two places: before the readings on the Plan pages under the “Language Conventionality and Clarity” section in the qualitative text complexity rubric and after the readings in a feature called Language Conventions. The “Language Conventionality and Clarity” section defines the grammatical term and then states a group of lines from the text in which it is found within the reading. The “Language and Style” section after the text again defines the grammatical term and references specific lines from the text that illustrate the term. Within this feature, there is a brief opportunity for students to learn and practice the function of language defined by the grammatical term under the “Practice and Apply” heading. Here they either look back at the performance task they wrote for the text to find examples of the function of language in their own writing, or they need to revise their writing to include the function of language. Occasionally in this section, students have to write a new paragraph in which they use the function of language.

Below are examples of targeted grammar and conventions from each collection:

  • Collection 1: Formal vs. Informal Tone, Noun Clauses, Colloquialisms
  • Collection 2: Participial Phrases, Relative Clauses, Colons and Dashes
  • Collection 3: Prepositional, Adjectival and Adverbial Phrases, Transitional Words and Phrases, Noun Phrases and Verb Phrases
  • Collection 4: Writing Conventions, Parallel Structure, Adverbial Clauses
  • Collection 5: Rhetorical Questions, Inverted Sentence Structure, Absolute Phrases
  • Collection 6: Repetition and Parallelism, Colons, Semicolons, Prepositional Phrases

Below are representative examples of grammar instruction in the “Language Conventionality and Clarity” and “Language and Style” sections:

  • In Collection 1 on the Plan page for “from Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion,” the “Language Conventionality and Clarity” section focuses on noun clauses and “unpacking sentences.” The teacher tells students that “recognizing noun clauses can help them unpack long sentences.” Then the teacher shares a line from the text and underlines the noun clauses pointing out that “[r]emoving the noun clause makes the sentence easier to understand.” After modeling, the teacher has the students work in pairs to “use this technique to unpack longer sentences in both selections” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1, from"Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion" 15c).
  • In Collection 3, after the text, Metamorphosis, the “Language and Style” section focuses on prepositional, adjectival, and adverbial phrases. The first section defines prepositional phrases and uses lines from the text to show examples. Then, adjectival and adverbial phrases are defined in a chart with the definition on the left and an example of usage from the text on the right. After the examples, students are expected to complete the “Practice and Apply,” which states: “Revisit the speech you wrote comparing the novella with the graphic novel in this selection’s Performance Task. Add or change at least three prepositional phrases. Be sure to include at least one adjectival phrase and one adverbial phrase” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 3, Metamorphosis 128).

The HMH Collections for 10th grade includes instruction of grammar and conventions in context throughout all six collections. All conventions and language standards required by the Common Core State Standards are covered, and students apply them to the texts and their own writing.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Does Not Meet Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 10 do not meet the expectations of building knowledge with texts, vocabulary, and tasks. Materials contain sets of questions and tasks, but they do not consistently require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Over the course of the year, instructional materials stay consistent and do not grow in rigor across the year.The materials do not include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words across texts throughout the year. Materials include do not support students in building writing nor research skills over the course of the school year. The materials partially meet the expectations for materials providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

Materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.
12/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students' knowledge and their ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 partially meets the expectations that texts are organized around a topic and/or themes to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. The Collections include texts that are organized around common themes; however the organization of the texts within the collections and across the textbook do not clearly guide students in developing their proficiency in reading comprehension and building knowledge.

Thematic organizations over the course of the school year focus on types of interactions among people and groups. While these are loosely connected, the selections are not necessarily tied together to grow understanding and knowledge around specific components. Collection themes are:

  • Collection 1: “Ourselves and Others” includes selections about how people interact with others
  • Collection 2: “The Natural World” includes selections about how people are intertwined with nature
  • Collection 3: “Responses to Change” includes selections about change and how people respond to it
  • Collection 4: “How We See Things” includes selections about how a person’s view of the world is affected by the senses and technology
  • Collection 5: “Absolute Power” includes selections about how human ambition is timeless
  • Collection 6: “Hard-Won Liberty” includes selections examining how people win their freedom from oppression

An example of how the texts within a collection are intended to connect to the theme is found in Collection 2: “The Natural World.” Sample texts include but are not limited to:

  • “Called Out,” essay by Barbara Kingsolver
  • “When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer,” poem by Walt Whitman
  • “from Hope for Animals and Their World,” argument by Jane Goodall
  • “My Life as a Bat,” short story by Margaret Atwood
  • “Carry,” poem by Linda Hogan

Another example of texts connected to a common theme is found in Collection 5, “Absolute Power.” Sample texts include, but are not limited to:

  • “Why Read Shakespeare,” argument by Michael Mack
  • The Tragedy of Macbeth, drama by Shakespeare
  • from Macbeth on the Estate, film by Penny Woolcock
  • “from Holinshed’s Chronicles,” history by Raphael Holinshed
  • “The Macbeth Murder Mystery,” short story by James Thurber
  • “5:00 p.m.,Tuesday, August 23, 2005,” poem by Patricia Smith

The organization of the texts within the collections and across the textbook do not clearly guide students in developing their ability to read and comprehend texts proficiently.

Students are frequently given a guiding question before their reading and comprehension questions after the reading, but during independent reading there is little guidance, questions, nor supports to connect concepts or highlight important elements to other texts or ideas.

The materials for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that texts are organized around a theme to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend complex texts proficiently. Although the collections are organized with texts that support and engage students in discussing a given theme, there are no structures in place within the student textbook to support students’ growth in reading and comprehending texts.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 partially meets the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics. Materials contain sets of questions and tasks, but they do not consistently require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Over the course of the year, instructional materials stay consistent and do not grow in rigor across the year.

Each collection includes sets of questions and tasks that require students analyze texts:

  • In Collection 1, students will answer questions and complete task that require students to analyze items including, but not limited to point of view, purpose, tone, writer’s choices, and comparing tone in two texts.
  • In Collection 2, students will answer questions and tasks that require students to analyze items including, but not limited to central idea, figurative, connotative and technical meanings of words and phrases, theme, claim, and writer’s choices.
  • In Collection 3, students will answer questions and tasks that require students to analyze items including, but not limited to text evidence to support inferences, cause and effect relationships, theme, development of ideas, and representations in different mediums.
  • In Collection 4, students will answer questions and tasks that require students to analyze items including, but not limited to development of ideas, parallel plots, tension, determining meaning, comparing poetic structure, and representations in different mediums.
  • In Collection 5, students will answer questions and tasks that require students to analyze items including, but not limited to rhetoric, characters, theme, historical text, word choice, representations of a scene, and how an author draws on Shakespeare.
  • In Collection 6, students will answer questions and tasks that require students to analyze items including, but not limited to argument, evidence and ideas in a functional document, rhetoric, interactions between character and theme, tone, and comparing accounts in different mediums.

There are questions and tasks that ask students to analyze the language, key details, craft, and structure of texts, but they do not go to the necessary depth nor increase in rigor over the course of the instructional year. Although questions are provided, skills are inconsistently scaffolded, so they only sometimes build students’ overall comprehension or understanding of topics. In addition, teachers will often be unable to tell from students’ work whether they mastered concepts of each component. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Theme is intentionally taught in Collections 2, 3, 5 and 6. Within, there are text-dependent questions and tasks during and after the reading that focus on theme; however, they do not increase in rigor from Collection 2 to Collection 6. The questions require the same depth of knowledge and are not scaffolded.
    • In Collections 2 and 3 students support inferences about theme.In Collections 2, students read a poem and are instructed to determine the theme by looking at images, descriptive details, symbols, and repetition. Students are shown a chart that lists types of figurative language to notice (e.g. metaphors), a line from the poem that illustrates that figurative language, an analysis of the line and then questions. In Collection 3, students read a poem and are told to look at imagery and symbols to determine the theme. These tasks are asking the students to perform the same skill in two different collections.
    • In Collections 5 and 6, students read the text and are told to determine the theme by looking at how the character changes, interacts with others, advances the plot and thinks. These tasks do not increase in rigor, so teachers will be unable to tell whether individual students have mastered the concepts. There are also no specific guidelines or rubrics provided, and much of the work is done in large or small groups or with partners.

The HMH Collections for Grade 10 does contain sets of questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning of texts and topic. However, these questions and tasks are not scaffolded in a such a way that builds knowledge throughout the year. Also, the rigor does not increase and it is unclear how a teacher will assess whether or not a student has mastered a concept.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 partially meets the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.The collections are organized around themes. Most of the large performance tasks at the end of each collection require students to integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts; however, there are some that do so at a minimal level. The materials do contain some sets of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts; however, the materials do not provide consistent, clear guidance for teachers in supporting students’ skills. Additionally, many of the questions and tasks are at the explicit level.

Below are representative examples of how the materials do contain some sets of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts; however, they do not provide consistent, clear guidance for teachers in supporting students’ skills and do not prepare students to demonstrate mastery of integrating knowledge and ideas as an embedded part of their regular work by the end of the year.

  • Within each lesson, text-dependent questions appear in the student edition in the “Analyzing the Text” section found after the text, and during the reading of the teacher’s edition. There are typically four to six questions in the “Analyzing the Text” section after each selection. Most questions and tasks are not accompanied by enough instruction for the students to be successful in answering the questions.
    • For example, in Collection 2, after “Carry” the prompt is “Review the descriptions of water in the poem. What does the water symbolize?” (82). Earlier in the reading, the teacher’s edition asks two questions about the way water is described in the poem. This instruction is found only in the teacher’s edition and is given verbally, so, when students present their knowledge of this at the end of the text, they have no access to the instruction.
  • The materials do contain text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to integrate their knowledge and ideas across multiple texts.
    • One example is found in Collection 1 when students compare tone in two different texts, a court opinion and an editorial. Instruction for students on how to compare tone is described in a small section. First, tone is defined and then students are told to “compare the language the two writers use, consider the cumulative impact of their word choices” (21). This is the only instruction for the students on how to compare the texts.

Representative examples of how many of the questions and tasks are at the lower end of Depth of Knowledge include, but are not limited to:

  • Many pages have a “cite textual evidence” label; however, the sample answers often do not specifically cite the evidence and are at the explicit level.
    • For example, in Collection 3, after “Magic Island,” students are asked to infer: “Use your observations about the poem to summarize its meaning, or theme." The sample answer provided is: “The theme is that, while living in a new country may bring happiness, it is not without its challenges” (139) Textual evidence is not cited in this answer.
    • In Collection 5, after Macbeth, students are asked to compare the following: “In what way does this speech reveal a change in Macbeth’s attitude from how he has felt in the past about his deeds?” The sample answer provided is: “Macbeth realizes he has done horrible things. He feels trapped because he is in too deep” (260). Textual evidence is not cited.

The HMH Collections reviewed for Grade 10 partially meets the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts. As shown, much of the support and guidance for students is found only in the teacher’s edition. Students do not have access to the instruction or questions to initiate thinking when performing the tasks. This will make it difficult for students to complete the task and show proficiency.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections for Grade 10 partially meets expectations for providing questions and tasks that support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic or theme through integrated skills. Each unit typically provides a writing performance task as a culminating project that partially contains the necessary skills for reading, writing, speaking and listening. In some instances, the writing performance task requires components of research and the writing process. Speaking and listening skills are also required in some instances. To complete the performance tasks, students draw on their reading and analysis of the anchor selections, and they are also told they can conduct additional research. However, support for students to grow knowledge via these culminating tasks is not comprehensive, and teachers will need to supplement the work presented.

Students complete one to two Performance Tasks at the end of each collection. The Performance Tasks require students to further analyze the selections that have been read in the collection and to synthesize ideas. Students then present their findings in a variety of products, such as speeches, essays, and discussions. The questions and tasks preceding the task sometimes align and support students' understandings and abilities to complete the assignments, but direct connections from the text-dependent questions to the culminating tasks are not always clear, so it does not give the teacher usable knowledge of whether students are prepared for the culminating tasks. Interactive lessons are available to help students understand the procedures and processes for writing, speaking, creating media presentations and conducting research; however, they are not modeled or directly taught in relationship to the performance tasks. Overall, there is limited support for teachers to discern if students are prepared to proficiently and independently demonstrate their knowledge of a topic or theme through the culminating task.

A representative example of how this works in the materials is found in Collection 1, Performance Task A:

  • Students are asked to make generalizations about how relationships define who we really are in a speech that incorporates media elements. To complete this task, students need to have a clear thesis and provide evidence from texts, and incorporate information from "images, music, and other media to enhance meaning and maintain audience interest. Students are to "Use clear language, emphasis, volume, and gestures." The tasks leading up to this include a response to literature, an argument, and a narrative; however, in none of these activities is a rubric, detailed guidelines, or support included. To ensure that the students will be able to complete this task in service of growing knowledge and skills, the teacher will need to supplement with extra assessment and support.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/ language in context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collecctions for Grade 10 partially meets the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials include a consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic and figurative language in context.

The instructional materials target key academic vocabulary words and provide some opportunities for students to practice the words within the contexts of readings, primarily in speaking activities during which students talk about the words. However, writing tasks may or may not require the use of the words or be structured in a manner that would require students to use them. Additionally, there is no cohesive plan for the development of academic vocabulary. There are a lot of critical words targeted within the Collection, but there is not enough practice for students to acquire a solid understanding. Additionally, groupings of the academic vocabulary words are complex and numerous for one group. Vocabulary at this grade level lacks a coherent pattern, and there is no means for teachers to track a student’s usage or acquisition of vocabulary.

Each Collection starts with an Academic Vocabulary section in the Plan pages. Within this section of the teacher’s edition, teachers are given general instructions on when to have students use these words. Each text within the collections also contains a “Critical Vocabulary” section. This includes vocabulary found in the reading.

Although the collections contain both academic and critical vocabulary, the opportunities for students to learn, practice, apply, and transfer those words into familiar and new contexts are limited. The support for students to accelerate their learning of the vocabulary with reading, speaking, and writing tasks is generic and unclear. The materials do not provide a way for the teacher to assess whether or not students have reached standard in their academic vocabulary growth.

Academic vocabulary is addressed in the following areas of the textbook:

  • The Plan pages define the words for the students and tell the teacher that the academic vocabulary can be used during the different discussions, exercises, and writing tasks found in the collection. However, usage of these words during the discussions, exercises and writing tasks is not mentioned in the directions of the task. Also, none of the rubrics for the written Performance Tasks assess the understanding and usage of the words.
  • The “Applying Academic Vocabulary” includes one to two of the academic vocabulary words found in the Plan pages at the beginning of the collection, and gives the teacher general instructions on how to incorporate some of the collection’s academic vocabulary. There is no included method to assess students’ understanding of these words or to monitor their usage.
  • The student resources, "Glossary of Academic Vocabulary"
  • After reading individual selections, there is a “Critical Vocabulary” practice and apply section. Here students complete a vocabulary exercise using the vocabulary from the text. For example, “Choose which of the two situations best fits the word’s meaning." These assessments may give the teacher some information regarding students’ understanding of the words, but it will not tell teachers if students can apply it in familiar and/or new contexts.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
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Indicator Rating Details

HMH Collections for Grade 10 does not meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts. While the materials offer prompts and performance tasks, and students practice writing with each lesson, the materials/unit writing tasks do not increase students’ skills throughout the year, nor to they provide comprehensive support and scaffolding to help students reach the depth of writing that is required of these standards. As the year progresses, materials do not support raised expectations for student writing practice. Teachers may need to supplement instruction to insure students are prepared for Grade 11 expectations.

The materials consist of six collections which incorporate varied types of writing experiences, both on-demand and longer process writing. The materials include opportunities for students to write in all modes required by the CCSS-ELA writing standards for Grade 10 (argumentative, narrative, and informative). After each text is a performance task, and at the end of each collection is a culminating task that asks students to use text evidence from the selections that they have read. Writing spans the entire year, is used frequently, and generally coincides with texts and themes.

Each of the texts contain a performance task; however, not all of the tasks are writing based. The support, guidelines and instruction are found in a box on the bottom half of the page. In the cases in which the task is writing based, students are usually not told the length of the writing and no rubric is included. It is unclear to students and teachers the intention of the assignment; in other words, what writing skill is being assessed and/or taught.

An example is found in Collection 4. After reading, “The Night Face Up,” students are told to write an analysis. In the student edition, the support, guidelines and instruction for this writing is given in a small paragraph. First, theme is defined. Then, students are told to “write a one-page analysis of the story in which you consider the following points: the theme of the story; how the characters, plot, imagery, tone, and setting help convey the theme. Support your thesis about the story’s theme with evidence from the text, and write using the conventions of standard English (HMH, 10th grade, Collection 4, “The Night Face Up” 181)). The teacher’s edition has an additional paragraph in the sidebar that includes general ways for the teacher to support: “Work with students to brainstorm four or five broad statements about the human experience that might apply to this story . . .Then have students form groups for each statement and discuss relevant elements from the story that could become a part of their analyses” (181). No rubric is included.

The culminating tasks at the end of each collection have four sections - plan, produce, revise, and present - that cover three pages in the student edition. It is unclear how long a teacher should spend on each of the sections. The plan has students focus on the prompt, sometimes reread a model text from the collection, and organizer their ideas. Produce has students draft their writing and highlights the language and style lessons covered within the collection. Revise asks students to have a partner or group of peers review their draft. Present gives students the option of presenting their writing to the class or to a small group. Materials for students sometimes include graphic organizers as students make an effort to organize their writing. Although the writing spans the year and there are many opportunities, the instruction for the writing is minimal.

An example is found Collection 1, Performance Task B. Students are to write an analytical essay about how the quotation, “We, as human beings, must be willing to accept people who are different from ourselves,” plays out in the selections they read (45). This is the first major writing assignment of the school year. Analysis writing is taught over the course of pages 45-47 in the student textbook. There is minimal instruction for students and minimal guidance for teachers as they teach these skills to students. The teacher may need to support instruction with extra planning in terms of time and lesson structure. Specific examples of minimal guidance for students includes but is not limited to:

  • On analyzing the texts: “Choose three texts from this collection . . . Note relationships among people or groups explored in each text. Make notes about how people accept others in each text . . . Compare and contrast the author’s views” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1 45).
  • On organizing an essay: “Outline your essay, including these elements: Introduction [that includes an] attention-getting opener [and a] thesis statement about accepting those different from us; Body [that includes an] analysis of the two sides presented in each text, supporting quotations . . . [and] connections between each text’s themes and the quotation; Conclusion [that includes a] restatement of your thesis in light of the evidence presented [and] a general idea about people’s acceptance of others” (HMH, 10 th Grade, Collection 1 46).
  • On language: “You can show readers how your ideas are connected by combining clauses. A clause is a group of words with a subject and verb; you can combine two or more clauses to create compound of complex sentences that give your ideas more context and expressiveness” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1 46).

The teacher’s edition contains some additional information for this performance task in the sidebar of the pages, but it is very general. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • To Support the Plan: “Remind students that their analyses must center on the quotation from Barbara Jordan. They may find it useful to skim through all of the texts in the collection to make notes on why accepting others is both difficult and necessary. They should choose the three texts (including at least one anchor) in which they note the strongest evidence” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1 45).
  • To Support Revise: “Suggest to students that they read their drafts critically while reviewing the criteria on page 48. For each bullet point in the chart, have them identify where their work would fall. They should then focus revisions on the two or three lowest-ranking bullet points” (HMH, 10th Grade, Collection 1 47).

Scaffolding and support are minimal within the materials, also as the year progresses, materials do not support raised expectations for student writing practice. It is understood that there are higher expectations in student skills and knowledge as the year progresses so the expectations in Collection 6 should be higher than the expectations in Collection 1. There is also an understanding that there will be a clear progression of sophistication and expectations, however, the writing instruction throughout all of the Collections is the same. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • The rubrics for all culminating tasks at the end of each collection have the same criterion: ideas and evidence, organization and language, and contain minor differences. “Ideas and Evidence” level 4 for the argumentative essay found in Collection 3 states: “An eloquent introduction includes the titles and authors of the selections; the claim describes the view of change presented in three selections” (152). In Collection 6 for the analytical essay, it states: “The introduction is memorable and persuasive; the claim clearly states a position on the topic” (380).
  • Argument essays are taught in Collection 3 and Collection 6. The guidelines and instructions are basically the same with small differences. In Collection 2, students are given five bullets to guide their thinking when writing their outline; in collection 6 students are told to model the structure of King and Gandhi. Collection 5 tells the students to “use formal language and a respectful tone” while drafting their essay. The “Language and Style” for Collection 2 focuses on formal tone; Collection 5’s centers on academic and domain-specific language. These differences do not show a clear progression of sophistication.

There is an online platform for students to collect their writings with MyWriteSmart and my Notebook as well as a Performance Task Reference Guide. Interactive lessons are also included to help students understand the writing process and the modes in which they are asked to write. While those are available, there are no further explanations for teachers on how to use those lessons effectively to support students. Examples of some interactive lessons are:

  • Writing Informative Texts
  • Creating a Coherent Argument
  • Formal Style
  • Writing Narratives
  • Writing as a Process

HMH Collections for Grade 10 does not meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts. There are many opportunities for students to practice writing; however, the scaffolding and support for both students and teachers is minimal, and there is not a clear progression of sophistication. Much of the writing instruction will need to be supplemented.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections for Grade 10 does not meet the expectations of including a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. Research skills practice and learning do not follow a clear progression; there is not an overview of research skill progressions. Research topics are often broad. Minimal resources are provided to support instruction of research; teachers will need to supplement research work to ensure students are prepared for Grade 11 research activities by the end of Grade 10.

Representative examples of how the progression of research skills does not meet expectations include, but are not limited to:

  • At the end of Collection 3 students are asked to participate in a panel discussion for Performance Task A. They are asked to look at and use The Metamorphosis and two other texts to make a “clear, logical, and well-defended generalization about the ways people adapt to change” (145). Students are also asked to find one other external source that is both valid and reliable to support their generalization about adaptation to change and include this, cited, in their documentation and defense.
  • There are “Conducting Research” pages found in the Student Resources. These two pages summarize the following topics: Focus Your Research and Formulate a Question, Locate and Evaluate Sources, and Incorporate and Cite Sources. There is no instruction for how to complete the skill being defined. For example, under “Locate and Evaluate Sources,” primary and secondary sources are explained. It tells students to use “advanced search features” and that “assessing, or evaluating, your sources is an important step in the research process. Your goal is to use sources that are credible, or reliable and trustworthy” (R8). Then there is a brief chart that has criteria for assessing sources for relevance, accuracy and objectivity.

The instructional materials for Grade 10 provide minimal opportunities for students to acquire research skills that will allow them to synthesize their knowledge and understanding of topics using the texts from the ttextbook and outside sources. They do not include a progression of focused research projects providing students with robust instruction, practice, and application of research skills as they employ grade-level reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language skills.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
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Indicator Rating Details

The HMH Collections for Grade 10 partially meets the expectations that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. The only support for Independent Reading is a page at the end of each collection in the teacher’s edition; however, the guidance for teachers is general with minimal support.

The independent reading program described on these pages develops slowly over the course of the six collections. Since the program is not fully defined until after Collection 6, it is unclear how students will regularly engage in reading outside of the class.

  • In Collection 1 builds the library and the class creates the rules.
  • Collection 2 has the students choosing a book.
  • Collection 3 discusses how and when students will complete the reading.
  • Collection 4 describes how students can record their reading.
  • Collection 5 explains one-on-one conferencing so teachers can assess students’ comprehension.
  • Collection 6 describes how students can share their books with classmates.

The Independent Reading page includes digital resources to support independent reading. The following are offered for each collection:

  • An FYI site that offers online articles from magazines and newspapers. It directs teachers to help students choose a few articles to explore the topic that was explored in the collection.
  • Additional Texts Collections suggests other readings.
  • Novelwise helps students find longer works. This resource includes introductory materials, worksheets, graphic organizers, and discussion guides
  • Nonfiction Connections suggest that teachers encourage students to read speeches, diaries, true-life accounts, newspaper articles, and political cartoons. No other guidance is given.

There is also a feature called Creating an Independent Reading Program. The following are areas of focus for this section across the six collections: Build a Classroom Library and Create Library Rules and Strategies for Selecting a Book, Students Choose Their Own Books, Daily Scheduled Time and Clear Expectations, Parent and Family Communication and Recording Books and Texts Read, Teacher Guidance and Feedback Regarding Text Selection and Progress and Student-Teacher Conferencing, and Opportunities for Social Interaction and Writing In Response to Books Read.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

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Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed (i.e., allows for ease of readability and are effectively organized for planning) and take into account effective lesson structure (e.g., introduction and lesson objectives, teacher modelling, student practice, closure) and short-term and long-term pacing.
N/A

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. This qualifies as substitution and augmentation as defined by the SAMR model. Materials can be easily integrated into existing learning management systems.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate and providing opportunities for modification and redefinition as defined by the SAMR model.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized by schools, systems, and states for local use.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)
N/A
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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 02/22/2017

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Collections Close Reader Student Edition Grade 10 978-0-5440-8762-0 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017
Collections Close Reader Teacher's Guide Grade 10 978-0-5440-8832-0 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017
Collections Performance Assessment Student Edition Grade 10 978-0-5441-4760-7 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2015
Collections Performance Assessment Teacher's Guide Grade 10 978-0-5441-4775-1 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2015
HMH Collections Gr 10 Student Edition 978-0-5445-6953-9 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017
HMH Collections Gr 10 Teacher Edition 978-0-5445-6972-0 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017

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