Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 partially meet expectations of alignment. The Grade 2 instructional materials partially meet expectations for Gateway 1. Texts are worthy of students' time and attention. Materials support students building their ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. The materials support students' literacy development with foundational skills. The instructional materials for Grade 2 partially meet the expectations of the Gateway 2. Materials partially meet the criteria that texts are organized to support students' building knowledge of different topics, and there is support for students to engage with and grow their academic vocabulary over the course of the school year. Materials meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts and partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. Materials meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Materials provide procedures and support for daily independent reading, primarily found in the Making Meaning component.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
52
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
24
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the expectations for text quality and alignment to the standards. The instructional materials meet expectations that texts that are appropriately complex, providing opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. The materials partially meet the criteria that materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills. The materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning during reading.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
17/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality, worthy of especially careful reading, consider a range of student interests, and meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Materials meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. Materials partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text-complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level. Materials meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading. Materials provide numerous opportunities for students to engage with a range and volume of texts (through listening and reading) in order to achieve grade-level reading proficiency. In both the Making Meaning and Being a Writer, students are introduced to new texts and a variety of disciplines and genres.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria for anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) being of publishable quality, worthy of especially careful reading/listening, and consider a range of student interests.

The materials reviewed are of publishable quality and are appropriate content for Grade 2 readers. The authors presented are fairly well-known, and some texts are widely-read texts for children. The texts teach new content, skills, and/or vocabulary words and are found in both the Making Meaning and Being a Writer components. Texts throughout the school year are well-crafted, rich in language, provide opportunities for both academic and content language, have rich characters, and are artistically and visually appealing to engage and hold student interest.

The Making Meaning component contains the read alouds for students to improve their reading comprehension skills. The texts are publishable, and many are written by renowned authors. Some of these texts include:

  • Jamaica Tag Along by Juanita Havill (Unit 2, Week 1): This text is about how Jamaica’s brother does not want her to tag along when he plays basketball; so she goes off to play on her own, makes a new friend, and learns a lesson. This text will be of high interest to Grade 2 students.
  • Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst (Unit 2, Week 2): This text is an ALA Notable Children’s text and includes a relatable character that students will find entertaining.
  • Erandi’s Braids by Antonio Hernandez Madrigal (Unit 4, Week 2): In this story, Erandi hopes for a new dress for her birthday and the village fiesta; but, her family’s fishing net has holes in it, and there is not enough money to buy a net and a dress. This text was awarded the Americas Award. It includes rich vocabulary and is worthy of students’ time and attention.
  • Chester’s Way by Kevin Henkes (Unit 4, Week 3): In this text, all three characters have to learn how to accept one another for the way they are and how to become friends. This text includes rich characters.
  • The Art Lesson by Tomie dePaola (Unit 6, Week 2): This is an autobiography of famous children’s author, Tomie dePaola. The text includes rich vocabulary and will interest Grade 2 students.
  • Snails by Monica Hughes (Unit 8, Week 1): This informational text helps students understand how snails move and live. This text includes content rich vocabulary.

The texts in Being a Writer are used as model texts for the writing lessons. Many of the texts are publishable and include:

  • My Little Sister Ate One Hare by Bill Grossman (Unit 1, Week 5): This text published by Dragonfly texts in 1998 is a counting text that has a little girl eat a lot of gross things. The text has a continued silliness rhyme and a predictable ending which will engage Grade 2 students.
  • Dogs Don’t Wear Sneakers by Laura Numeroff (Unit 1, Week 5): This story is a rhymed text with animals positioned in funny scenarios. The text includes visually appealing illustrations.
  • Click, Clack, Moo: Cows that Type by Doreen Cronin (Unit 1, Week 5): This text is about typing cows that lead a strike in Farmer Brown’s barnyard. The text will engage students.
  • Dogzilla by Dav Pilkey (Unit 3, Week 1): This humorous picture book spoofs Godzilla and King Kong as they launch the mice inhabitants of Mousopolis against, respectively, a killer cat and dog. This text includes vivid illustrations and will be of high interest for students.
  • Love Lizzie: Letters to a Military Mom by Lisa Tucker McElroy (Unit 5, Week 2): This story is told by letters written between the main character, Lizzie and her mom. The text includes rich characters and will be relatable to students.
  • I Wanna Iguana and I Want a New Room by Karen Kaufman Orloff (Unit 7, Week 1): These funny stories are in the form of letters being written between child and parent. Students will relate to and be interested in the texts' rich characters.


Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. The curriculum includes a distribution of both informational and literary text types. The subject matter is diverse and includes classic texts as well as a variety of nonfiction topics.

In the Making Meaning component, there is an even distribution of text types. Examples of this include:

Literary

  • Sheila Rae, The Brave by Kevin Henkes (Unit 1, Week 2)
  • The Three Little Pigs by James Marshall (Unit 2, Week 4)
  • Babu’s Song by Stephanie Steve-Bodeen (Unit 4, Week. 1)
  • The Paper Crane by Molly Bang (Unit 5, Week 3)
  • The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter (Unit 6, Week 1)

Informational

  • POP! A Book about Bubbles by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley (Unit. 3, Week 3)
  • The Art Lesson by Tomie dePaola (Unit 6, Week 2)
  • Insect Detectives by Steve Voake (Unit 7, Week 1)
  • Bend and Stretch: Learning about your Bones and Muscle by Pamela Hill Nettleton (Unit 8, Week 2)

In the Being a Writer section, there is an even distribution of text types. Examples of this include:

Literary

  • Click, Clack, Moo: Cows that Type by Doreen Cronin (Unit 1, Week 5)
  • Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good,Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst (Unit 2, Week 4)
  • Dogzilla by Dav Pilkey (Unit 3, Week 1)
  • First Year Letters by Julie Danneberg (Unit 5, Week 1)
  • I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orloff (Unit 7, Week 1)

Informational

  • Kate & Pippin: An Unlikely Love Story by Martin Srpingett (Unit 4, Week 1)
  • “The Coyote” by Douglas Florian (Unit 6, Week 1)
  • “Writing Habits of Professional Authors” by various authors (Unit 8, Week 1)


Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.

The majority of the texts in the materials are at the appropriate complexity level for a read-aloud in Grade 2.

Examples of texts that are at the appropriate level of complexity include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, students hear, The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig, which has a Lexile of 700 and contains complex features such as language features and knowledge demands.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students hear the text, The Tale of Peter Rabbit, which has a Lexile of AD660. The text structure is moderately complex as the story line can be difficult to predict and the theme is clear, but conveyed with subtlety.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, students hear another complex text, The Art Lesson with a Lexile of AD650 and a moderately complex structure, language features, purpose, and knowledge demands.
  • In Unit 9, Week 4, students hear the text, Big Al, which has a Lexile of 740. The story contains complex sentence structure and challenging vocabulary such as clumsy, darted, plowed, bulged, and captured. The theme is implicitly stated, and it develops over the course of the day.


Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence in grade-level skills. (Leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels.)

The materials for Grade 2 provide some opportunities for students’ literacy skills (comprehension) to grow throughout the year. The comprehension strategies increase in complexity as the units progress. In the Being a Reader component, shared reading begins with a read aloud and a simple discussion in which students make text-to-self connections. As the year progresses, students read the text themselves in small groups and discussing characters. The same is true for the Making Meaning component. In the earlier units, the teacher provides the prompt and/or models for students, and later in the year students are required to complete and share a diagram with less support. Texts are repeatedly read and comprehension questions' complexity increases. However, the organization/placement of texts in general do not promote students encountering opportunities for building grade-level skills as outlined by the standards themselves. Texts are organized thematically without a focus on building knowledge, there is a focus on a progressions of stand-alone skills.

In the Making Meaning component, the comprehension strategies presented in the units progress in complexity over the course of the year. In Unit 1, students make text-to-self connections, answer questions about key details in the text, and explore differences in points of view of characters. Students use “Turn to Your Partner” and “Think, Pair, Share” often before completing tasks. In Unit 2, students make text-to-text connections and compare two versions of a fable. Visualizing is the focus of Unit 3. In Unit 4, students are making inferences. In Units 5-7, students are using “wondering” to help them understand fiction and nonfiction texts. Students are incorporating the comprehension strategies from previous units. Unit 8 has students using text features as well as previously learned reading strategies to understand nonfiction text. In Unit 9, students are determining important ideas in fiction and nonfiction texts. They describe how reasons support specific points in text and describe the connections between series of events in texts.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text-complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The Grade 2 materials do not include a complete text complexity analysis for the texts that accompany the lessons in Making Meaning, Being A Reader, or Being a Writer. However, there is a general rationale explaining the purpose of whole-class shared reads and small-group texts. In Making Meaning, a comprehension focus, a text summary, and a social development focus is provided. There is a list of all the texts and a short description of each. In the Being a Reader section, there are Lexile levels provided for the Small Group Reading sets of books, but no qualitative analysis is provided.

For the Making Meaning component, a short rationale including the genre of texts by grade level and a listing of the trade books with a short summary are provided by the publisher.

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, the text, Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine Innings, contains the following synopsis: “This story is based on the life of Alta Weiss, who played baseball for an all-male, semi-professional team in the early 1900s.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, the teacher reads aloud two poems “Bees Bothered by Bold Bears, Behave Badly” by Walter R. Brooks and “Raccoon” by Mary Ann Hoberman. The publisher provides a synopsis of the “Bees Bothered by Bold Bears, Behave Badly”, “This alliteration-rich poem paints a vivid picture of a tussle between a bear and some bees.” The publisher also provides a synopsis of the poem “Raccoon”, Strong rhythm helps convey the drama of a nocturnal encounter with a hungry--and very messy--raccoon.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, the Read-aloud/Strategy Lesson Focuses for The Incredible Painting of Felix Clousseau are as follows: “hearing and discussing a story, wondering about the story, hearing a story again to build comprehension, and referring to the story to support their thinking."
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, the teacher reads aloud The Art Lesson by Tomie dePaola and “Draw, Draw, Draw: A Short Biography of Tomie dePaola” which is a short article about the author/illustrator Tomie dePaola. The publisher provides a synopsis of the book, “This autobiographical tale recounts Tomie dePaola’s early love of drawing.”
  • In Unit 8, Week 1, the teacher reads aloud Snails by Monica Hughes and a short article titled, “Snail Food”. The publisher provides a synopsis of the book, “This book describes the physical characteristics of snails, how they move, and how they survive.”
  • In Unit 9, Week 1, the synopsis for “The Friendship-fostering Buddy Bench” is: “A second-grader creates a special bench at school to encourage new friendships.”
  • In Unit 10, Week 1, the teacher reads aloud little blue and little yellow by Leo Lionni. The publisher provides a synopsis of the book, “This is the story of a blue dot and a yellow dodt who are best friends and what happens to them when they hug each other.”

For the Being a Reader component, there are texts listed for Small Group Reading. Beginning in Set 6, a quantitative analysis is provided. In Set 11, the Lexile level range of 330-950, Fountas and Pinnell Level N, and DRA Level 30 for all the texts in the set. Shared Reading is not a regular component of the reading block starting in 2nd grade as the curriculum shifts to include Word Study and Independent Work only. Independent Work study focuses on students choosing their own texts at a level that is appropriate for them, therefore, qualitative and quantitative analysis is not evident.

For the Being a Writer component, there is a list of trade books provided by the publisher but no rationale for why the texts were used. Each lesson has a writing focus and a social development focus.

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, the teacher reads aloud the book Miss Tizzy by Libba Moore Gray. The publisher provides a synopsis of the book, “Miss Tizzy is a good friend to the neighborhood children, who reciprocate when she becomes ill.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, the teacher reads aloud the book Beardream by Will Hobbs and Ducky by Eve Bunting. The publisher provides a synopsis of Beardream, “A Young Ute boy, worried that the Great Bear will starve if he hibernates too long, sets out to wake him.” The publisher also provides a synopsis of Ducky, “A crate of toys falls off a ship, and the toys disperse far and wide.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, the teacher reads aloud the books Dear Baby: Letters from Your Big Brother by Sarah Sullivan and Love, Lizzie: Letters to a Military Mom by Lisa Tucker McElroy. The publisher provides a synopsis of Dear Baby: Letters from Your Big Brother, “Mike writes letters to his new sister before and after she is born.” The publisher also provides a synopsis of Love, Lizzie: Letters to a Military Mom, “Lizzie’s mom is stationed overseas, but Lizzie and her mom keep in touch with each other by writing letters.”
  • In Unit 8, Week 1, the teacher reads aloud an excerpt titled “Writing Habits of Professional Authors”. The publisher provides a synopsis of the excerpt, “Four writers discuss habits that help them write.”

An additional resource, Lexile Overview: Read-aloud Texts and Small-group Reading Texts, is available from the publisher. This resource includes a Lexile overview as information on genres, format, Lexile levels, and Fountas and Pinnell levels. The document states that qualitative measures were used in choosing texts but does not provide qualitative analysis.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria that support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

Materials provide numerous opportunities for students to engage with (through listening and reading) a range and volume of texts in order to achieve grade-level reading proficiency. In every component of the program (Being a Reader, Making Meaning, and Being a Writer), students are introduced to new texts and a variety of disciplines and genres. The texts are shared with students through read alouds, shared reading, independent reading, and small-group reading instruction. Students are given ample opportunity to listen to and read a range and volume of texts to promote grade-level proficiency. Students are also given opportunities to reread previously read text for different purposes. Students are consistently exposed to a variety of text.

In the Making Meaning module students listen to read alouds on various topics and genres such as literary, poetry, expository and narrative informational. Read alouds are found on all instructional days except “Independent Strategy Practice” days. On those days students practice the skills they have learned in their own individual texts. Students often work with the same text for three days. For example in Unit 2, Week 1 students read Jamaica Tag Along. On day 1, students read independently, and throughout their reading they will answer questions about the text. On day 2, the text is read aloud to students, and more discussion questions are asked. On day 3, students read the story independently after having it read aloud to them again to determine if the illustrations help them read the story. Another example of this is in Unit 9, Week 1 when students read the story “The Friendship-fostering Buddy Bench.” On Day 1, the teacher reads the article aloud to the students. On Day 2, the teacher reads a part twice to the students and asks comprehension questions.

Students also engage in both Small Group Reading and Shared Reading in the Being a Reader component. Students engage in Small Group Reading four days a week in the Being a Reader module beginning in Week 5. Based on reading levels, students read various sets of texts. One book in Set 3 is “The Jug of Water.” A book in Set 8 is “Ruby Bridges Goes to School.” Students work on comprehensions skills and strategies in small, leveled groups. The focus is wondering, and the text is informational. In Set 9, students read “A Goldfish Story.” On the first day, students read the text to themselves. On the second day, the story is read aloud and then discussed, followed by echo reading. On the third day, the students hear part of the story read aloud fluently, then they read the book in pairs with a focus on fluency.

In the Being a Writer module, students listen to various read alouds for ideas and as models for writing.

Students engage in Individualized Daily Reading starting in Unit 1, Week 2 of Making Meaning. Students spend up to 20 minutes a day reading books on their own specific reading level. Individual conferences with the students are supposed to happen daily. Independent reading is also part of Being a Reader in Grade 2.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
14/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly. There are some sequences of high-quality, text-dependent/specific questions, activities, and tasks that scaffold students’ understanding of a text that build to a culminating task. Throughout the school year and each lesson, the application of speaking and listening instruction is frequently applied in each program component. Students engage in Turn and Talks, Think-Pair-Shares, and whole-group discussions. Materials meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. Throughout the course of the school year, students engage with multiple genres and modes of writing in both Making Meaning and Being a Writer. Materials meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level. Students are continuously asked to support analyses and claims with clear information and evidence during discussion. Materials meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

Within the Making Meaning component of the series, students answer text-based questions. Students are required to review their reading in order to answer questions relating to the text. In the Writing about Reading section, students are asked to respond about what they learned from the text.

In the Making Meaning section, students are asked a variety of text-dependent questions.

  • In Unit 2, students listen to The Three Little Pigs. Students turn and talk to discuss: “What happens to the second little pig?” and “Why do you think the wolf is friendly to the third pig?” Students also hear the text Jamaica Tag-Along in the first week of Unit 2. Students answer questions such as “How is Jamaica feeling?” and “Why does Jamaica want to go along and play basketball with her brother?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students read The Incredible Painting of Felix Clousseau and answer: “What inference can you make from this illustration about how the three judges in gray coats are feeling?” and “What inference can you make about how the three judges are feeling when the painting says ‘QUACK!’?”
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, students hear The Art Lesson by Tomie De Paola, and students are asked, “What did you learn about Tomie as a child?” and “What advice did Tomie get that helped him improve his drawing?”
  • In Unit 9, students hear Me First! and answer: “Would you want to be friends with Pinkerton? Why or why not?” Students read the same text the next day and answer questions such as, “What do you think he needs to learn?” and “At the end of the story, what is Pinkerton like?”

In the Writing about Reading component, which is a component of Making Meaning, students write about a text using evidence.

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 2, students write about what they inferred about Lilly from the Chester’s Way and what clues in the passage helped them to make their inference.
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, students are asked to write about what is similar and different about the books, Butterflies by Teresa Wimmer and Spinning Spiders by Melvin Berger.


Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

In the three components of this series, Making Meaning, Being a Reader, and Being a Writer, there is an inconsistency in regards to a culminating task that integrates skills based on a high-quality sequence of text-based questions. The tasks that are identified aren’t culminating, but rather activities to support text. Within each Unit there are a number of weeks of instruction. Each week remains secular and concludes with an activity that may or may not directly correlate to the skill of the week. The one thing that remains the same for the week is the text selection. In addition, the tasks that could potentially be identified as somewhat of a culminating activity are lacking the rigor and objective correlation that is typical with culminating activities from other curriculums.

  • In Making Meaning, there is a ‘Write about Reading’ section that allows the student to write about the text after going through whole group discussion questions.
  • In Being a Writer, the students go through the writing process but do not build to a culminating task that demonstrates understanding of texts.
  • The Being a Reader component does not provide text-based writing or a culminating task since these tasks require students to write about their own topics. While there are daily formative assessments such as one-on-one reading conferences, these do not build to a culminating task.

Beginning in Unit 2 of Making Meaning, students have opportunities to write about what they read in the “Writing about Reading” sections. Students have opportunities to write their opinion of a book, make a connection to it, or respond to the book in other ways; however, these activities are optional and can be done at the end of the lesson or at another time. Again, these activities are inconsistent. Some tasks integrate skills to demonstrate understanding, others do not. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, students listen to a read aloud of Girl Wonder by the teacher. Students were prompted to think, pair, share with the question, “ How does having time to think before you talk with your partner help you?” The unit concludes with students learning how to fill out a reading log. No culminating activity was present during this week and no other activities directly correlated to the text or the genre of Fiction and Narrative Non-Fiction.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, after hearing Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, students write about their favorite part of the story.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1 students are introduced to The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Students orally discuss the book and the teacher engages the group to discuss orally their wonders about the author Beatrix Potter. Throughout the week students read other books by Beatrix Potter and “wondered”. Extension activities do not correlate to objectives (ie: Make a timeline of Beatrix Potter’s life). No culminating activity or project was evident.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, students write their opinion about whether Alex’s mom should allow him to adopt the iguana in I Wanna Iguana. The discussion about the book and its format, along with teacher modeling, prepare students for this task.
  • In Unit 8, Week 3, students hear the story Erandi’s Braids. They are then asked to write about the important message or lesson from the story and have to use the class discussions to help identify and determine this information.

In Being a Writer component of the materials, activities and tasks are also inconsistent. While some activities integrate skills to demonstrate understanding, many activities do not. For example:

  • In Unit 1, students use prompts to begin writing.
  • In Unit 2, students generate writing ideas from their own lives and begin writing sentences without the aid of sentence starters.
  • In Unit 4, students explore fiction writing.
  • In Unit 5, students progress to writing more and begin exploring other topics; however, there is no culminating task after students complete the units.


Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small-group, peer-to-peer, whole-class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The materials in Grade 2 provide opportunities for students to share their thinking about texts in each lesson of Making Meaning. Students engage in Turn to Your Partner and Think-Pair-Share cooperative structures. Guidance and modeling are provided. Teachers are provided guidance on implementing evidence-based discussions through the use of video clips and prompts within the teaching materials. The Making Meaning component has a Vocabulary Teaching Guide which utilizes vocabulary words from the stories students have been reading. There are multiple opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions across the whole year's scope of instructional materials.

At the beginning of each Making Meaning unit, students are assigned a new partner. Students engage in partner structure and direct instruction. Opportunities to practice the structures before actually using them are provided. The Turn to Your Partner structure is taught in Unit 1, Week 2, Day 1. Think-Pair-Share is introduced the next week. Direct instruction and practice is included as well as an opportunity to reflect on the structure when asked, “What is one thing you want to keep in mind today to help your partner conversation go well?”

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 1, students listen to the text, Sheila Rae and discuss with their partner what has happened so far.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 2, students listen to Babu’s Song and discuss: “What happens in this part of the story? Were you surprised by what happens? Why? Turn to your partner.”
  • In Unit 9, Week 1, Day 2, students Think-Pair-Share the question, “What is the most important thing to remember from the part you just heard?”

The Grade 2 vocabulary program consists of 30 weeks of lessons as well as ongoing review activities. Students work with the words from the text the week after the students hear the text. For example, in Making Meaning, Unit 2, Week 2, the teacher reads aloud the text, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, and then a week later students work on the vocabulary words from the text. Students are provided prompts to discuss the words. For example in Week 26 of the Vocabulary Teaching Guide, students are prompted with, "When I hear the word _______, I think of _______ because _______."

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Students are provided with a variety of opportunities to discuss with a partner their understanding of texts read aloud to them or about the shared writing projects they are completing. They are given multiple opportunities to listen and discuss with peers what they are reading, writing, and listening to as well as with the whole class. Follow-up questions and supports for speaking and listening are found throughout materials. There are times throughout the year where the teacher is explicitly told to model proper speaking and listening, and students discuss what they see and hear.

In the Making Meaning component of the materials, students are given multiple opportunities to turn to a partner to discuss what they read, supporting both their listening and speaking. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students listen to and then discuss The Three Little Pigs with their partner.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 1, students hear multiple poems including “Poetry Bees” and then answer questions such as "How do you picture bees?" with their partner. In this lesson, and in many others, there are directives to teachers to support students with their speaking and listening. For example, in this lesson the Teacher’s Manual says, “Facilitate a brief discussion about how they will make sure each partner has a turn to talk.” After working together to speak about the text and answering questions, students also have to answer questions such as, “What did you and your partner do to make sure you each got a turn to talk?” in order to facilitate speaking and listening skills.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, students have the opportunity to work with their partner to discuss what the author means when he writes, "Female earwigs are very good mothers."
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Day 3 after independent reading, students are asked to share questions they had prior to reading the book, questions that were answered in the book, and new questions students had after reading some of the text. This discussion begins in pairs and eventually moves into a whole-group discussion.
  • In Unit 9, Week 4, Day 2, students are asked to "use Think-Pair-Share to discuss the following question: 'What are some words besides sad that you could use to describe how Big Al feels in this part of the story?'” They work in partners to complete this activity.

In the Being a Writer component of the materials, students are asked questions after listening to the story. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students listen to I Will NOT EVER Eat a Tomato and discuss with their partner how the story reminds them of their own life.
  • In Unit 4, the Teacher's Manual explicitly says that “socially, the students learn discussion prompts to help them respond to and build on one another’s thinking. They ask for and give help and feedback respectfully.” Students then hear the stories, Polar Lands, Polar Animals, and Polar Regions, and discuss the texts. Students are given prompts for actively speaking and listening such as I agree with... because... or I disagree with... because....
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 4, students explore writing friendly letters to tell about themselves. On this day they are preparing to write letters to a person of their choice. “Explain that today the students may write friendly letters to anyone they choose. Give the students a moment to decide whom they will write their letters to. Then use Think-Pair-Share to discuss: What do you want to tell this person in your letter? [pause] Turn to your partner. What do you want to ask this person in your letter? [pause] Turn to your partner.”

In the Being a Reader component of the materials, students are regularly required to speak and listen about the shared reading. Students have opportunities to demonstrate listening carefully as well as reflect on what they did to do be a good listener. The Vocabulary Teaching Guide also provides opportunities for students to speak and listen while using prompts that teach students the appropriate way to answer and respond to a question.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process grade-appropriate writing (e.g., grade-appropriate revision and editing), and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

The materials for Grade 2 offer a variety of on-demand and process writing, and incorporate technology components. Students often work with partners to share, review, edit, and revise their writing. There are some open days throughout the program that allow teachers to embed some quick on-demand writing assignments, which allows them to confer with students. There are also some independent writing times when no prompt is provided. Students have multiple opportunities to revise their writing, and add details, illustrations, and proofread for punctuation and spelling.

Students are frequently given opportunities for on-demand writing. Students are given opportunities to complete on-demand writing tasks both individually and with a partner. One partner activity is in the Being a Writer component, in Unit 5, Week 1, Day 1, where students write letters in pairs to the teacher. One example of independent writing is where students write about toys that come to life in Unit 3, Week 2, Day 3. Students also have on-demand writing opportunities when responding to a text. For example in Unit 7, Week 1, Day 1, students write their own opinions about whether they think Alex’s mother should allow Alex to adopt the iguana after hearing the story “I Wanna Iguana."

There are also opportunities for students to engage in process writing. Students revise and edit their writing weekly. For example in Unit 2, Week 3, Day 2, students write and tell more about a pet. They learn about conferencing with each other and giving feedback. An example of process writing is in Unit 1, Week 6, Days 2 and 3 where students begin writing a scary story; then they read their story to a partner and add details to their writing This type of routine gets more sophisticated throughout the curriculum. In Unit 7, Week 2, students are writing about arguments for or against having a pet. On Day 1, they choose an opinion and share reasons to support those opinions. On Day 2, they explore opening sentences that state opinions. On Day 3, they give reasons and use temporal words to connect reasons and opinions. On Day 4, students write closing sentences that restate opinions.

Opportunities to use technology are also embedded in the curriculum. Students are given opportunities for digital storytelling. It is suggested that the stories be shared online, emailed to parents, or stored for others to view on the computer, tablet, or other device. In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 1, students work together to choose a setting and characters from a digital storybook application in order to create a digital storybook. They take turns developing a plot for the story and recording their portion of the story. In Unit 3, Week 4, Day 4, students publish their writing online.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year-long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

The materials in Grade 2 provide multiple opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply different genres/modes/types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards as evidenced in the Being a Writer module. Students have opportunities to practice and progress through the writing lessons in order to learn about the three writing genres throughout the grade.

In Being a Writer, narrative writing is found in Units 1-3. Students are asked to list a short sequence of events that include details. By Unit 3, students are introduced to the fiction genre and include details, actions, feelings, and thoughts into their writing. They recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, and need to include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings as well as provide a sense of closure.

Expository writing is taught in Unit 4 of Being a Writer. Students hear, read, and discuss nonfiction texts. Students write questions about polar lands and animals. Students then do some research and write about the polar lands and polar animals, including opening and closing sentences. Students are also exposed to expository writing in the Writing about Reading section of the Making Meaning component. For example, in Unit 4, Week 2, Day 3, students write about what they inferred from the illustration and what clues the illustration had that helped them make their inferences.

In Unit 7, students are introduced to opinion writing. They discuss a variety of samples of opinion writing before writing their own. They are expected to write many different opinion pieces on varying topics. By the end of the unit, they are asked to write a letter to a parent convincing them of a belief the student has. In Week 2, students are writing about arguments for or against having a pet. They begin by choosing an opinion, share reasons to support these opinions, as well as incorporate opening and closing sentences. Students have additional opportunities for opinion writing in the Writing about Reading section of Making Meaning. For example, in Unit 7, Week 2, Day 3, students have to write their own opinions about which insect is the most interesting and why.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials including regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

Evidence-based writing is included in some of the modules of this curriculum. There are opportunities for this type of writing in Being a Writer and Making Meaning; however, it is inconsistent, and there are opportunities for students to engage in writing about a text without having heard the text or understood the text. In the “Write about Reading” activities, students have to refer back to the text that was read aloud.

The students have opportunities to use the text to demonstrate their ability to write with evidence and understanding of a text. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Day 1, students write their opinion about Miss Tizzy after hearing Miss Tizzy. Students are required to make text-to-self connections after hearing Jamaica Tag-Along, which requires students to understand the text and write how the story reminds them of their own lives.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 4, students write opinions about HONK!
  • In Unit 9, Week 3, students write opinion pieces after reviewing two opinion articles “Zoos are Good for Animals” and “Zoos are not Good for Animals”.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 2, students have to write an opinion about whether they think Isobel did the right thing by taking Pippin to her house after hearing Kate and Pippin: An Unlikely Love Story.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Day 1, of Being a Writer, students have to write their opinion about whether they think Alex’s mother should allow Alex to adopt the iguana after hearing I Wanna Iguana.

There are some examples of writing prompts that may or may not be evidence-based. In these examples, students can use the text to help them, though some students could complete the assignment without having comprehended the story. For example,

  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Da 2, after hearing Draw, Draw, Draw, students write about one thing they pictured as they heard the story and then they write about that thing that they heard.

There are also a lot of opportunities for students to engage in writing that does not require evidence from a text. For example,

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 2 of Making Meaning after hearing Alexander and the No Good Very Bad Day, students have to write about and draw a picture of a time they when had a very bad day, like Alexander. In the Being a Writer component of Unit 2, Week 2, Day 2, students make a list of likes and dislikes to write a story after hearing I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato. In the same Unit, but in Week 3, Day 1, students have to write about a pet they have or would like to have after hearing Let’s Get a Pup.
  • In Being a Writer, Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, students write a fiction story about animal characters after reading Dogzilla.


Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for the Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Language standards are addressed throughout lessons within Being a Reader, Being a Writer, and Vocabulary Teacher Guide (Making Meaning). The instructional strategies of the lessons include teacher modeling, Think-Pair-Share, and Turn to Your Partner. Students are supported in their acquisition of grade-level grammar and convention standards through teacher questioning and the students having opportunities to speak with a partner before recording their responses. Students use Handwriting Notebooks to record their handwriting lessons. Students also are presented with visual materials to help aid in language and convention standards acquisition such as sentence strips, note cards, and vocabulary picture cards.

Materials include explicit instruction of all grammar and conventions standards for the grade level, and instruction is provided in increasingly sophisticated contexts.

Students have the opportunity to use collective nouns. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Unit 3, Week 1, Day 2, at the end of the lesson there is an extension opportunity for using collective nouns. The teacher asks students questions such as: “What do we call a group of wolves or dogs? What do we call a group of fish? What do we call a group of birds?”
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 9, students practice circling and filling in collective nouns in sentences.
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 11, students again practice filling in missing collective nouns in sentences.

Students have the opportunity to form and use frequently-occurring irregular plural nouns. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 8, students practice writing the plural form of words such as sheep, goose and child.
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 11, students practice with irregular plural nouns such as fish and men.

Students have the opportunity to use reflexive pronouns. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 20, students are provided sentences such as, “We take _______ to the funhouse.” Students must select from the words in the word box the reflexive pronoun that completes the sentence. Students are also provided with sentences where they must circle the correct reflexive pronoun to complete the sentence. For example, “My brother and sister go to the fair by (themselves, himself).”
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 24, students are again provided practice with adding in the missing reflexive pronoun to complete sentences. For example, “I taught _______ how to skate.”

Students have the opportunity to form and use the past tense of frequently-occurring irregular verbs. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 14, students fill in missing irregular verbs from a story such as got, gave, sat, told, said, went, found, and kept.
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 17, students need to replace present tense verbs with the correct past tense form. Irregular verbs used in the story include: sat, was, got and found.

Students have the opportunity to use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Unit 3, Week 3, Day 2, when they are reading the story Ducky. When discussing colors in the book, the teacher is instructed: “You might point out that the words yellow, green, blue, red and pink are adjectives. Explain that an adjective is a “word that describes a noun (or a person, place, animal, or thing).”
  • In Being a Writer, Unit 3, Week 3, Day 2, students work on adding more details to their writings, specifically colors and descriptive words. “What colors could you add to your story to help your readers imagine what things look like? [pause] Turn to your partner.”
  • In the Being a Reader, Week 15, Day 2, students have additional practice with adverbs when they learn all about the suffix –ly.
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice Book, Lessons 21, students learn about adjectives through using the five senses and later apply that knowledge to sentence analysis. “Display the next 'Adjectives' activity (WA15). Have the students listen for adjectives as you read the paragraph aloud. Then return to the first sentence and ask the students to identify the adjective in it, as well as the noun it describes. (big; pickle) Confirm the answers by clicking big and pickle to reveal the labels adjective and noun. Point out that an adjective often comes right before the word it tells about.”

Students have the opportunity to produce, expand, and rearrange complete, simple, and compound sentences. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice Book, Lesson 5, students are provided the prompt: “Write two compound sentences about something you collect or would like to collect.”
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice Book, Lesson 19, students must answer the question, “What do you like to do at the playground? What do you bring with you? Write two sentences.”
  • In Being a Writer, Unit 1, Week 2, Day 2, students practice writing sentences as a class about a science experiment that they have completed.
  • In Being a Writer, Unit 1, Week 5, students practice writing silly animal sentences such as: “Kangaroos don’t jump on trampolines.” and “Bats don’t play baseball.”

Students have the opportunity to capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 11, students practice capitalizing proper nouns. Students must circle the proper noun in the sentences; "My favorite holiday is New Year’s Eve." "We celebrate in Salem, the city where I grew up." "We go to a diner called Sadie’s Super Suppers."

Students have the opportunity to use commas in greetings and closings of letters. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 26, the teacher models where commas should be in a letter. Then the teacher displays the “Commas in Greetings and Closings of Letters” activity and reads the letter aloud. The teacher asks, “What is the greeting in this letter? (Where should we add a comma to the greeting?)”

Students have the opportunity to use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently-occurring possessives. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 27, the teacher explains that a contraction is a short way to write two words. "The teacher says 'I have' and asks what is a shorter way to say that, then the teacher models writing I’ve. Explain that an apostrophe takes the place of the letter or letters that are dropped to form the contraction.”

Students have the opportunity to generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Unit 3, Week 2, Day 1, students work on spelling polysyllabic words and adding them to their writing by listening to syllables and approximating the spelling of each syllable. “What words did you spell by listening to their syllables today? Choose one of those words and tell us what you did to spell that word.”

Students have the opportunity to determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 2 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 23, students learn about formal and informal uses of English through learning about audience and purpose. “Explain to the students that in this lesson they will learn how to tell the difference between formal and informal English. Tell the students that formal English is language they should use in their schoolwork and when writing or speaking to an adult. Informal English is language to use with friends or family.”

Materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills both in and out of context. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Unit 5, Week 2, Day 1, students learn how to punctuate a friendly letter since the unit is about writing friendly letters. The teacher shows a model letter and asks the following questions: “What do you notice about the punctuation marks in the date? What do you notice about how the greeting is punctuated? What punctuation is used in the closing?”
  • In Being a Writer, Unit 6, Week 1, Day 4, students list Food Words based on the following question, which elicits adjectives: “What food did you imagine, and what words might you use to describe how the food looks, tastes, and feels?”


Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
21/22
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks that directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context. The materials meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2). The materials meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. The materials meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.The materials provide high quality lessons in foundational skills throughout the school year.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

Foundational skills are presented to address phonics and word recognition. The Word Study Instructional Strand includes an instructional focus where students develop an understanding of how English words are constructed through word sorts and weekly spelling practice. Differentiated instruction that includes phonics, decoding, and word analysis are incorporated in the Small-group Reading sets of the Being a Reader materials. These skills are taught in a logical progression that increases in difficulty throughout the year.

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g. distinguish long and short vowel sounds, apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode two syllable words with long vowels). For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 1, Day 3, the teacher reviews short vowel sounds and then reviews words that students will be sorting. Some of these words include: trap, cut, hop, drip, catch, stitch, at, pot… Students read the words chorally. The teacher next introduces the sort. “Explain that one way to learn more about words is to find words that are the same in some way and to group them together. Tell the students that this is called sorting.” The class then begins to sort the words based on their short vowel sounds.
  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 1, Day 3, the teacher reviews long vowel sounds. Then the students sort long vowel sounds based on words such as shake, these, slide, and cube.
  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 2, Day 3, students sort words by vowel teams and record the ways they sort in their Word Study Notebook. “Sort by Spellings of the Long a Sound. Direct the students’ attention to the list and have them read say. Ask: Which spelling of the long a sound do you see? (a-y) As the students share, drag and drop the word under the appropriate category heading. Use this procedure to sort the remaining words. After all the words have been sorted, have the students read the words in each group together as a class.”
  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 22, Day 3, students apply knowledge of syllables to reading longer words and listen respectfully to the thinking of others and share their own. Gather the class with partners sitting together, facing you. Ask and briefly discuss: “How did it go doing this week’s sort in Independent Work?” Display the “Week 22, Day 3 Words” activity ( WA3). Point to and read aloud mistake and insect. Ask: “Where did you divide these words into syllables yesterday?” As the students respond, draw a dot between the syllables. Review that when there are two consonants between vowels, the word is often divided between the consonants.
  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week, 17, Day 2, students learn to decode words with the suffixes of -less and -ful. “Tell the students that they will read more words with the suffixes -less and -ful; you will show them a word and they will say the suffix and then read the word.” Examples of words student decode are: useful, fearful, helpless, lifeless.

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application. For example:

  • Skills grow in difficulty over the course of the year. At the end of the year in week 29 this is evidenced by how much more independent students are in their word sorts and by the level of information students now know about prefixes and suffixes.
  • Through Word Study, Grade 2 students learn short vowels, long vowels with final e, complex vowels, r-controlled vowels, inflectional endings, alphabetizing, consonant l-e syllables, open and closed syllables, syllabication strategies, prefixes, suffixes, and compound words. During small-group reading, Grade 2 students learn and apply single consonants, short vowels, digraphs, consonant blends, inflectional endings, long vowels, diphthongs, polysyllabic words, and compound words.


Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for the Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-

Students have opportunities to learn about text features throughout the Grade 2 materials. Students learn about text features in the Making Meaning lessons and in the Being a Reader small group sets. Skills were frequently revisited and teacher guidance and opportunities for student practice were also provided. Students have some opportunities to identify text structures (e.g. main idea and details, sequence of events, problem and solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect).

  • In Making Meaning, Unit 7, Week 1, Day 1, “Point to the smaller-print text on page 7 and explain that on some pages of the book, the author gives extra facts and details that add to the main information. Explain that when you come to a page with extra facts and details, you will read it after you have read the main information on the page.”
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 8 Week 1 Day 1, “Show the students page 3 of Snails and remind them that this feature is called the table of contents. Review that the table of contents tells the reader the topics in a book and the pages where those topics can be found. Explain that the pages about a topic and called a chapter. The names of chapters are sometimes called chapter titles.”
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 7 and Unit 8, students use text features to locate information in nonfiction texts. In Unit 7, Week 2, Day 1, students learn about the table of contents. In Unit 8, Week 1, students learn about chapter titles, photographs, labels, bold words, a glossary, and an index.

Students have some opportunities to identify text structures (e.g. main idea and details, sequence of events, problem and solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect). There are some opportunities for students to identify, discuss, and analyze text structure or genre in Being a Reader. If a student is in Small-group 6-9, the student receives more instruction in identifying text structures, but if a student does not have the opportunity to be in Small-group 6-9, the student misses instruction in text features, nonfiction structure, problem and solution, and poetry. There are few opportunities for compare and contrast and cause and effect.

For example:

  • In Making Meaning, Unit 1, students identify key details in texts from the read-aloud texts, McDuff Moves In and Poppleton. Main idea is not mentioned in relation to key details.
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 1, The Reading Community: Fiction and Narrative Fiction, there is no instruction about the difference between the two text categories.
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 2, students compare characters (Jamaica and Alexander) and two versions of the same story (The Three Little Pigs stories).
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 2, Making Connections: Fiction. Students read a fiction book and are asked to retell. There is no discussion of story structure within the lessons to assist with retell.
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 4, students informally explore character. “They come to understand that most stories are about characters, the problems they face, and how they deal with those problems.” On Day 3, students discuss Bernardi’s problem: “Why do you think Bernardi tries to solve his problem by giving money?”
  • In Being a Reader, Unit 8, Week 1, Days 1-3, students have the opportunity to discuss how two texts are the same and how the texts are different. Students discuss what is the same and what is different about the two texts without reference to comparing and contrasting.
  • If students are in the Small-group 6A, students learn about text structure for nonfiction text. The teacher asks, “How does the author organize the ideas in Scout’s Puppies? How do the words and pictures help you understand how the information is organized?”
  • If students are in the Small-group 8A, students review the article, “Wonderful Wheels,” to determine the answers to the following questions: “How does the author organize the information in this article? How do the words and photographs help you understand how the article is organized?”


Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to purposefully read on grade level texts through small group reading instruction, independent reading rotations, and IDR (Individualized Daily Reading). During Being a Reader and Making Meaning, students are taught reading strategies such as self-monitoring. Students learn high-frequency words from Small Group Reading both isolated and embedded within the given text and practice the strategy of read, write, and reread to help promote automaticity of words.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read on-level text. For example:

  • INDEPENDENT READING IN GRADE 2: During Individualized Daily Reading in Grade 2, the students spend up to 20 minutes a day reading books independently at their appropriate reading levels. An IDR section appears at the end of each lesson, except in the case of independent strategy practice lessons. IDR can follow the day’s lesson, or the teacher can schedule it during another time of the school day.
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 3, Week 3, Day 1, during Individualized Daily Reading, students read their own books for 15-20 minutes silently. “Encourage the students to create mental images as they read.”
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 9, Week 1, Day 1, during Individualized Daily Reading, students are directed to read fiction and nonfiction texts for the next four weeks. “Ask the students to preview their texts and think about what they are wondering and learning as they read.”

Opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials and SIPPS for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and grade level decodable words. Multiple opportunities are provided for independent reading. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 6, Day 1 of New School, students learn how to fluently read dialogue. “Provide the students with examples of nonfluent and fluent reading of dialogue.”
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 7, Day 2, students learn about reading fluently as it relates to a character’s feelings. “Explain to the students that thinking about what the characters say and how they might say their words helps reader read fluently, or smoothly, in a way that sounds like talking. Tell them that readers use their voices to show how characters are feeling, such as worried, excited, angry, or surprised.” Students also practice echo reading.
  • In SIPPS Plus and Challenge, fluency practice and IDR consist of reading practice for a minimum of 30 minutes each day. Once a week, the teacher is to check accuracy, rate, and comprehension.
  • According to SIPPS Challenge:
    • “Fluency practice. Students with accuracy levels at or above 95 percent but whose rates are below 60 correct words per minute read quietly aloud to themselves. The purpose is to achieve automaticity, which involves reading most single-syllable words quickly and effortlessly.”
    • The fluency materials include a Fluency Record sheet and reading log sheet. CCC recommends trade books. Grade 3 students may read books written specifically for their grades. “One source of books for reading practice is Center for the Collaborative Classroom’s Fluency Practice Libraries.
    • Determining accuracy and rate are explained in SIPPS.

Materials support reading of texts with attention to reading strategies such as rereading, self-correction, and the use of context clues. For example:

  • In Making Meaning, there are optional lessons to support and supplement the Individualized Daily Reading. These lessons focus on conferring, self-monitoring, using word-analysis, and fluency. “Each day’s IDR instruction establishes a clear purpose for independent reading (for example, practicing self-monitoring or visualizing to make sense of a text).”
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 10, Day 1, “Tell the students that it is important for readers to understand and remember what they read. Explain that one way readers can check to make sure they understand is to stop a few times as they read and ask themselves, “What did I just read?” The teacher then goes on to model Self-Monitoring.
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, students are introduced to self-monitoring strategy and apply it to their independent reading. Introduce self-monitoring. Remind the students that reading books that are just right for them helps them grow as readers. Explain that one way good readers know if a book is just right for them is by pausing while they are reading to think about how well they understand what they have just read.”

Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 4, Day 4, attention is given in whole group instruction to the word live, as it can be read with both the long vowel sound and the short vowel sound. They consider it an ‘outlier’ in this lesson as the focus is on i_e as a long vowel sound combination.
  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 9, Day 1, students practice reading and sorting words with the inflectional ending -ing. “Tell the students that they will sort the words into two categories. One category will be words that have one consonant before i-n-g and the other will be words that have two consonants before i-n-g. Write the category headings smiling and hopping on the “Week 9, Day 1 Sort” activity (WA1). Underline ing, and draw a box around the single or doubled consonant that precedes the ending in each of the words.
  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 25, Day 1, students learn about the schwa sound. Students learn to read, spell, and say father, almost, idea, over, under, away, ever, never.


Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

In Grade 2, there are opportunities for practice in word analysis skills in connected texts and tasks. While word analysis skills are taught in the Being a Reader Small Group sets, not all students can access all of these texts over the course of the school year if the student’s assessment results place the student in earlier small group sets. Students can learn word analysis skills with connected texts and tasks through SIPPS Plus and SIPPS Challenge levels if SIPPS is taught whole class.

Materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels, decode words with common prefixes and suffixes) in connected text and tasks. There are opportunities to read words in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Word Study Week 1, Day 3, students review short vowel sounds and the letter that corresponds to the sound. Students participate in a word sort with single syllable words that contain short vowels in the middle of the word.
  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 5, Day 1, students review spellings of the long e sound. Students read the words and then sort the words based on spellings of the long e sound. “Direct the students’ attention to the “Spelling-Sound Chart” and point to the long e spellings on the chart. Point to the e_e spelling and tell the students that one way to spell the long e sound is e_e as in these. Write the word these where everyone can see it, and have the students read it aloud. Point out that a consonant spelling goes in the blank. In these the consonant is s.”
  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 17, Days 1-3, students review the suffixes -er, -ful and -less. Students work with words such as helpful, helpless, careful, useless, slower and harder.
  • In SIPPS Plus, Lesson 32, during Sentence Dictation, students listen to a sentence and then are guided word by word to determine the spelling of the word based on if the word is a decodable word or sight word.
  • In SIPPS Plus Lesson 33, students read a selection called “First Plane to Fly.” The students are directed to read the selection quietly aloud to themselves and take their time to sound out hard words. There is decoding support provided for the teacher such as with the following words, the teacher should frame the parts: Wilbur, Flyer, further, sister, problems.

Materials provide some opportunities to read irregularly spelled words in connected text. Materials provide frequent opportunities to read irregularly spelled words in tasks. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 4, Day 4, students learn about the different ways to make the long i sound and sort words based on spelling patterns. Students also learn about outliers that can be pronounced in different ways (ex: live). “Point out that when the word is pronounced with a short i sound— /lĭv/—it does not rhyme with drive and five or with any of the other words in the sort. Explain that words that do not fit into any category are called outliers. Tell the students that when they sort words on their own, they may have one or two outliers. When they are recording a sort, they can write these outliers at the bottom of the sorting page.”
  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 12, Day 1, students participate in a whole group word sort into alphabetical order. This word sort includes irregularly spelled words: earth, desert, ocean, island, water.
  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 26, Day 4, there is an extension opportunity for students to use irregularly spelled words in writing. “Review that one reason writers spell words correctly is to make sure readers can understand and enjoy their writing. Think aloud about how one of the words reminds you of something that happened to you. Which of these words reminds you of something that happened to you? What is a story you could write about that? Turn to your partner. After a few moments, signal for the students’ attention and have a few volunteers share their thinking with the class. Encourage the students to use the spelling words and other words from the week’s sort in their writing.”
  • In SIPPS Plus, Lesson 39, students read irregularly spelled words a text called “Dreams on Wheels.”
  • In SIPPS Challenge, students learn to read irregular syllables in tasks.

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. There are opportunities to read decodable texts during SIPPS Plus. Students can encode words during Guided Spelling in SIPPS Plus or Challenge. Lessons do not align or match between Being a Reader, Making Meaning, or Being a Writer. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 22, Day 1 students participate in guided spelling of compound words. (backpack, farmland, goldfish, hillside, rainfall, snowball, sunshine). On Day 2, students participate in reading two syllable words and dividing these words into their two syllables. Later in the day, the students complete a syllable sort - long vowel vs short vowel. On Day 3, students read multisyllabic words by dividing syllables between the consonants.
  • In Being a Writer, Unit 6, Week 1, Day 1, students discuss rhyme in the poem “Boa Constrictor.” “Remind the students that some poems rhyme, or use words that sound alike, while others do not. Have the students open to Student Writing Handbook on page 21, where “Boa Constrictor” is reproduced. Explain that “Boa Constrictor” is an example of a poem that uses rhyme. Have partners read the poem together quietly and underline words that rhyme, or sound alike.”
  • In Making Meaning, Mini-Lesson 7, “Discuss encountering longer unfamiliar words during independent reading. Learn word-analysis strategies for reading unfamiliar, polysyllabic words. Practice word-analysis strategies during IDR. Reflect on using word-analysis strategies.” Students also use the text “A Trip to the Zoo” in this lesson. As a class students also create a chart titled, “Things to Do When You Don’t Know a Word.” Strategies listed on this chart include, “Look for a prefix. Look for a Suffix. Look at all the letters in the word. Break the word into parts. Read each smaller part. Then put the parts together to read the word. Look for words you know inside the unfamiliar word. Ask yourself: Does the word sound right? Reread the sentence and look at any pictures. Ask yourself: Does the word make sense in the sentence?”
  • In SIPPS Challenge, Lesson 8, students write polysyllabic words such as bubble. Students are guided in writing the word based on listening to the word in a sentence and then verbally identifying syllables before printing the word.


Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

The Grade 2 program provides the opportunity for the teacher to observe students reading with Individualized Daily Reading (IDR) assessments. Students read words to assess what has been taught in Word Study. During Small-Group Reading lessons, Day 3, there is a group progress note with questions for the teacher to use as they assess students’ reading. These opportunities do not include all grade level foundational skills.

The lessons within Being a Reader and Making Meaning are structured to provide students with application of foundational skills and provide additional support for teachers to guide students towards mastery of foundational skills. Through the small group reading portion, teachers are provided with lessons for differentiation of foundational skills. A Grade 2 teacher has access to sets 3-5 which come with assessments. As the students progress to sets 6-8, teachers have access to assessments. Materials provide formative and summative assessments the materials and placement test for teachers to know where to start students in small group reading sets.

The SIPPS Extension and Challenge levels are identified as developmentally appropriate for Grade 2. There are assessments in SIPPS Extension level for foundational skills such as SIPPS Assessment, which is used to group students for SIPPS. There are mastery tests and instructional self-checks. A teacher can monitor students fluency using Fluency Practice/Individualized Daily Reading.

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, the teacher observes students reading using an Individual Reading Observation (IDR). These notes occur every other week in sets 3-5 and once or twice during each three-day sequence of lessons in Sets 6-12. The teacher documents if the student can read high-frequency words, decodable words, and polysyllabic words. The student is assessed as they self-monitor and students are assessed for fluency.
  • In Being a Reader, spelling tests are provided in most weeks, 12-24 during Word Study to assess students as they spell eight words representing previous week’s instruction. During weeks 25-29, students are assessed spelling irregular high-frequency words.
  • In the introduction portion of the Grade 2 Being a Reader teacher’s manual, a list of assessments for teachers to use throughout the school year is provided. For summative assessments teachers are provided with a Social Skills Assessment, Word Study Assessment and Spelling tests. The Word Study Progress Assessment description states, “A word list that individual students read aloud three times during the year allows you to monitor how each student is incorporating Word Study Strategies into his or her reading…”

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, the teacher observes students reading using an Individual Reading Observation. These notes occur every other week in sets 3-5 and once or twice during each three-day sequence of lessons in Sets 6-12. The teacher documents if the student can read high-frequency words, decodable words, and polysyllabic words. The student is assessed as they self-monitor, and students are assessed for fluency.
  • In Being a Reader Assessment Resource, Word Study Progress Assessment 1, given after 8 weeks, students read 26 words.
  • In Being a Reader, In Set 10, Day 3, the lesson focus is on self-monitoring and self-correction. Teachers once again need to mark “All or Most Students, About Half of the Students or Only a few students,” in regards to the following questions: “Are the students able to talk about what they read? Are the students able to use illustrations to find clues about the meaning of unfamiliar words? Do they take turns talking and listening?”
  • In SIPPS Extension and Challenge, there is a K-3 Placement Assessment which screens letter names, phonics, and sight words. There are also mastery texts in SIPPS Extension.

Materials support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in foundational skills. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Small-group Set 8, page 34, there are teacher notes provided to help students who struggle to read compound words. Questions are provided for the teacher to ask to support the students, “Do you see a part you know how to read in the middle of the word? At the end? What is it?” “Do you see a smaller word you know inside the word? What is it?”
  • In the Teacher’s Assessment Manual, teachers are provided with whole group checklists to use to assess students. For example, in Week 10, Day 3 in the Grade 2 portion of the Assessment Manual, teachers are asked to check either, “All or most students, About half or most students or Only a few students” in regards to the following questions: Are the students able to generate ideas and start sorting? Do their categories make sense? Are they able to accurately record the sort in their notebooks? Are they able to label their categories?” Teachers are then given a list of questions to ask students who might be struggling: “What is alike about these two words? What other words might you group with these? Why did you decide to group these words together? How can you turn what you just told me into a name for the category?”
  • Teachers are also provided with Group Progress Assessments to use for Small Reading Groups. For example, in The Assessment Manual,, Day 3, the lesson focus is on fluency and comprehension. Based on how the group does on the assessment, the teacher is provided the following suggestions to help students: “Support any student who struggles to read with attention to characters’ feelings by reteaching Day 3, Step 4, using pages 34-43 on “P.S I’ll Be Back Soon.”
  • In Word Study, Week 1, Day 4, the class assessment for Word Study includes the the following suggestion based on assessment results: If many students are struggling, you may wish to compile a different list of final e words and repeat steps 2-5 in the day 4 lesson.
  • In SIPPS Extension, if many students do not pass the mastery test, the teacher is directed to reteach the previous lessons. If only a few students are not passing the mastery test, the direction to the teacher is to provide extra practice for those students.
  • In SIPPS Challenge, if many students do not pass the mastery test, the teacher is directed to reteach the previous lessons. If only a few students are not passing the mastery test, the direction to the teacher is to provide extra practice for those students.


Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.

The materials provide high quality lessons in foundational skills throughout the school year. This is done through Being a Reader and Making Meaning. The materials provide teachers with opportunities for differentiation through small group reading sets. The Being a Reader Teacher’s Manual also provides numerous ideas for supporting ELL students, ideas to support students who were struggling with concepts and at times some extension activities that went along with the Shared Read Alouds. Skills are also repeated numerous times throughout the school year to help students build mastery and independence in foundational skills.

Materials provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 8, instruction begins with a review of oi, oy, au and aw, which were taught in the previous weeks. Students then participate in a sort of words with /oi/ and /aw/. In Day 2 of the week, students participate in an open sort and are required to explain their sorting categories. In Day 3, students participate in ‘Build That Word’ where they use letter tiles to build the following words:
    • Aw- straw, lawn, law, paw, claw, raw, draw
    • Oo- pool, too, cool, fool, tools
    • Oi- boil, coin, oil, coil

Students then participate in a Guided Spelling activity where they spell words that have /oo/ and /ou/: grew, loud, crowd, cloud, chew, too, cartoon. Independent Work this week includes Day 2 word cards to practice sorting and the “Build That Word’ letter tiles to practice building the words from the week.

  • In Being a Reader, Week 2, Day 2, the class works on a “Ways We Have Sorted Chart”(a helpful visual of the chart is included) that covers ways the class has learned to sort words so far and includes items such as “By short vowel sound (short a, short e, short i, short o, short u. By long vowel sound (long a, long e, long i, long o, long u. By vowel sound (short, long).” The teacher informs students that as they learn new ways to sort they will continue to add to the chart.
  • Teachers are also provided with Teacher Notes in the margins throughout lessons to further assist students.In Being a Reader, Week 3, Day 2, “If you have not already done so, you may wish to start a class list of homophones. You may wish to include some familiar homophones, such as there/their/they’re and see/sea, on the chart. Ask the students to notice words that sound the same but are spelled differently in their reading. Revisit the chart and add any examples that the students suggest.”

Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 6, ELL support, Preview the Book: “In Set 6, you will ask the students to read the book prior to the small-group lessons. It may be beneficial for your students to practice reading the book aloud to you. Phrase-cued texts are provided for all the books in Set 6. If you find students struggle to read fluently, consider adding additional sessions specifically aimed toward fluency.”
  • Teachers are also provided with helpful ELL vocabulary words throughout lessons to provide addition support for those students. In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 3 during a lesson on long o spellings teachers are provided with an ELL vocabulary box the instructs teachers, “English Language Learners may benefit from hearing additional vocabulary defined, including: loaf: bread that is not sliced. Mow: use a machine to cut down grass. Roast: cook in an oven. Throne: the chair a king or queen sits in..”
  • In the Being a Reader, Teacher’s Manual on page xxvi, an explanation for Extending the Instruction is provided. Teachers are informed that there are two ways to do this in the Being a Reader manual, Extensions and Independent Work Connections. Teachers are informed that for Extensions, “These optional activities provide additional learning opportunities that extend or enhance the instruction in the core lessons.” For Independent Work Connections: “These optional activities are suggestions for integrating the instruction from weekly lessons in the current or subsequent weeks’ independent work areas.”

Students have multiple practice opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery. For example:

  • Throughout the Being a Reader, Small Group Sets, students have multiple opportunities to practice foundational skills. As evidenced by the Being a Reader, Sets 6-12 Scope and Sequence, some examples of skills that come up again and again for students to practice:
    • Self-monitoring and self-correcting - Set 11 - The Key Collection, Set 8 - Koalas, Set 10 - I Love Guinea Pig
    • Reading/analyzing Polysyllabic Words - Set 6 - Ball Games, Set 7 - Jellyfish, Set 8 - Lightning
    • Fluency (as it relates to paying attention to punctuation) - Set 9 - Not Norman, Set 6 - New School, Set 7 - Chameleon!, Set 8 - The Great Gracie Chase
  • In Being a Reader, Word Study, Week 13, Day 1, an explanation is provided: Beginning in this week, the lessons that make up the Word Study week are sequenced differently than earlier lessons to accommodate a spelling test on Day 4. The spelling words, which are selected from the previous week’s sort, are introduced on Day 1. Then the students practice the words in independent word work during the week. The students will have repeated exposure to the words over two weeks, in the previous week’s sort and again in the Day 1.


Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 partially meet the expectations of the Gateway 2. Materials partially meet the criteria that texts are organized to support students' building knowledge of different topics, and there is support for students to engage with and grow their academic vocabulary over the course of the school year. Materials partially meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts and partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. Materials meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Materials provide procedures and support for daily independent reading, primarily found in the Making Meaning component.

Criterion 2a - 2h

24/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students' knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Within the units of Making Meaning the instructional materials are organized around literary and informational texts and the teaching of reading comprehension strategies. Texts are not consistently organized by topic and students have limited opportunities to build knowledge and vocabulary about topics consistently. Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 2, the title of the unit is Using Making Connections: Fiction. Students listen to Jamaica Tag-Along by Juanita Havill, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst, The Three Little Pigs by James Marshall, and The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig by Eugene Trivizas. Students focus on the skills of making text-to-self connections, answer questions to understand key details and important ideas in the story, and discuss the story’s message. In this unit, Grade 2 students are not presented the opportunity to build knowledge on a topic of focus.

In Unit 3, the title of the unit is Visualizing: Expository Nonfiction, Poetry, and Fiction. Students listen to A Tree is Nice by Janice May Udry, “My Baby Brother” by Mary Ann Hoberman, “Bees, Bothered by Bold Bears, Behave Badly” by Walter R. Brooks, “Raccoon” by Mary Ann Hoberman, POP! A Book About Bubbles by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, and The Paperboy by Dav Pilkey. Students focus on the skills of visualizing to make sense of the text, informally use schema and inference as they visualize, and explore how alliteration and regular beats supply rhythm and meaning in poems. While the unit will present students an opportunity to practice these reading strategies, the unit does not provide support nor texts to grow students’ knowledge and academic vocabulary on a topic.

In Unit 4, the title of the unit is Making Inferences: Fiction. Students listen to Babu’s Song by Stephanie Stuve-Bodeen, Erandi’s Braids by Antonio Hernandez Madrigal, and Chester’s Way by Kevin Henkes. Students focus on the skills of making inferences to understand characters’ feelings, motivations and actions, answer questions to understand key details and important ideas in a story, explore a story’s structure, including character and plot, and discuss a story’s message.

In Unit 7, the title of the unit is Wondering: Expository Nonfiction. Students listen to Insect Detective by Steve Voake, Butterflies by Teresa Wimmer, and Spinning Spiders by Melvin Berger. Students focus on the skills of identifying what they learn from an expository nonfiction book, use wondering to help with understanding, explore text features of expository nonfiction, describe how reasons support specific points the author makes, and visualize to make sense of the book.

In Unit 9, the title of the unit is Determining Important Ideas: Expository Nonfiction and Fiction. Students listen to “THe Friendship-fostering Buddy Bench” by unknown, “Hey Joe, How’s It Going?” by Jennifer Marino Walters, “Giant Jellyfish Invasion” by Ruth Musgrave, “Zoos Are Good for Animals” by unknown, “Zoos are Not Good for Animals” by unknown, Me First by Helen Lester, Erandi’s Braids by Antonio Hernandez Madrigal (repeat from Unit 4, Week 2), and Big Al by Andrew Clements. Students focus on the skills of exploring important ideas in expository nonfiction and fiction, describe how reasons support specific points in text, describe the connections between a series of events in text, explore important ideas in opinion articles, make text-to-text connections, make inferences about what is important in the story, visualize to make sense of the story, make text-to-self connections, and informally explore text structure in narrative texts, including character and plot. Through these text engagements, students are not provided support to build knowledge and vocabulary around topics, as the texts are not coordinated to provide that.

In Being a Writer, the units are focused on the writing process and writing genres.In Genre Nonfiction, students learn about the polar areas of Earth. Students hear three texts about polar areas: Polar Lands, Polar Regions, and Polar Animals. Though these texts are somewhat connected, they do not work together to build knowledge of a topic.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

While there are many questions about key ideas and details of a story, most questions are recall questions. Students are not routinely given the opportunity to analyze the language of the author in order to make meaning and build understanding of the text. The majority of questions asked are ones that require the student to think critically about the text and how it applies to their life and/or surroundings. The questions do not become more complex as the year goes on. However, within a short unit (2-3 days worth of lessons) there was minimal evidence to show an expansion of knowledge. The concepts that are covered are big picture concepts such as inferencing/wondering, key ideas, but the curriculum lacks more detailed concepts such as looking at the craft, structure, or the why behind the text. There are few opportunities for students to answer questions about the author's craft and structure. By the end of the year, these components are not embedded in students’ work rather than taught directly, and teachers will not know from student work if they understand the definitions and concepts of the components identified in each unit, such as compare and contrast.

In Unit 2, Week 2, Making Meaning, During a read aloud of The Three Little Pigs the teacher prompts “What has happened so far?” After other comprehension questions, the teacher asks, “What important lessons about life can we learn from this story? Why do you think so?”

In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 2, Making Meaning, After a read aloud of The Art Lesson by Tomie dePaola the teacher asks “What are some things you wonder about Tomie?” After a turn and talk, the teacher then prompts, “What did you learn about Tomie as a child?” The teacher does have access to a bank of vocabulary words that are suggested to use/teach while the read aloud occurs. No other explicit instruction of vocabulary, craft, or text structure is present.

In Unit 9, Week 2, Day 1, Making Meaning, students are introduced to Zoos are Good for Animals while learning about opinions. The teacher is encouraged to stop and clarify vocabulary as he/she reads. During a re-read of the same article on the same day, afterwards, the teacher asks, “How does the author feel about zoos, or what is the author’s opinion about zoos?” “What in the article makes you think that?”

In all three components, answering questions about ideas and details are dominant. These questions are found after almost e text and vary in degrees of complexity. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Making Meaning, Unit 2, Week 1, Day 2, students are asked why Jamaica wants to go along and play basketball with her brother Ossis after listening to Jamaica Tag-Along.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 1, students are asked Brandi’s problem in the story Brandi’s Braids.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 2 of Making Meaning, students are asked what they learned about Beatrix as a child after hearing Beatrix Potter.
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, Day 2 of Making Meaning, students are asked what steps a caterpillar goes through to become a butterfly after listening to Butterflies.
  • In Unit 9, Week 4, Day 2, students hear the story Big Al, and are asked what are the important lessons they can learn from Big Al and the small fish.

Questions in the materials about craft and structure are present, but rare. Examples from Making Meaning include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3 students hear the poem “Bees, Bothered by Bold Bears, Behave Badly”. Students are asked what they notice about the title and why the poet chose to begin each word with the same sound.
  • In Unit 8, students are introduced to text structure as they listen to Snail. However, no questioning is used to help them understand the text features.
  • Also in Unit 8, as students learn about non-fiction they are directed to look at the “Fun Facts” section and “To Learn More” section, both of which are in text boxes; they are asked what information they learned about bones in these two sections. However, there is not addtional information to reinforce for students that call-outs and sidebars are text structure used to provide additional information in a text.

Integration of knowledge and ideas is done through making text-to-text connections. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 2, Week 4 of Making Meaning, students are asked to describe what's similar and what’s different about The Three Little Pigs and Big Bad Pig.
  • In Unit 8, Week 2, Day 2, using a diagram to build knowledge is used; however, no questioning is used. The teacher points out the diagram and reviews it with the students and then the students draw and label their own diagram, but no questioning is used to facilitate this learning.

When supporting students with word choice and phrases, a lot of work is done with visualizing, which is the focus in Unit 3 of Making Meaning. For example, in Unit 3, Week 4, Day 1, students listen to The Paperboy and are asked, "What are some of the imagines you had in your mind?" Similarly, in Unit 3, Week 3, Day 2, the students are asked, “How do you picture the bubble? How do the words, ‘the bubble shimmers in the sun,’ help you to imagine a bubble that someone is blowing with a bubble wand?”.

Vocabulary is taught but not through questioning of the text, nor do students have an opportunity to learn how to define unknown words in texts. For example, in Week 28 of Being a Reader students listen to Me First and learn about the word, shriek. Students share examples of when they might have shrieked, but no questions are used about the text to help students better understand this word or the text.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

The materials in Grade 2 contain some texts based questions and tasks that require students to integrate knowledge and ideas across individual and multiple texts. This is mostly found in Unit 7, where students build knowledge about animal habitats, specifically those in their own backyard. In other instances, a single text may introduce a topic to students; however, there is not an integration of knowledge and ideas across texts or across multiple days to support an understanding of the topic. There were few examples of where students were required to apply the knowledge across multiple texts, otherwise instruction occurred in silos on a weekly schedule that was very consistent and predictable throughout. Many of the weeks started with one text and as the teacher read aloud the first question frequently was “What has happened so far in the story?” which prompted recall of what was occurring, but didn’t require students to think critically about the text.

In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 1, Making Meaning, The teacher reads aloud Sheila Rae, the Brave. The teacher’s guide instructs the teacher to stop at certain points and ask, “What has happened so far in the story? Turn to your partner” or “What’s happening? What do you think will l happen next? Turn to your partner.” On day 2 during a re-reading of the story, the teacher asks questions to facilitate text to self connections, “How do you think Sheila Rae feels when she starts walking home? What in the story makes you think that?” The teacher also asks, “When have you felt brave like Sheila Rae?” and “When have you felt scared like Louise?” While the questions increase with complexity over the week and some require students to justify their answer with evidence from the text, Sheila Rae, the Brave is the only text that is utilized during this week to teach the skill.

In Unit 3, Week 3, Making Meaning, The teacher reads aloud Pop! A Book About Bubbles and models the visualization strategy and stopping periodically to ask, “What did you see in your mind?” The teacher facilitates a whole group discussing with basic questions, “What is something interesting you found out about bubbles?” and “What is something in this book that you would like to try?” On day 2, while re-reading parts of Pop! A Book About Bubbles, the teacher goes more in depth with questioning by asking, “How do you picture the bubble? How do the words ‘the bubble shimmers in the sun’ help you imagine a bubble that someone is blowing with a bubble wand?”

In Unit 3, Week 4, Making Meaning, The teacher reads aloud The Paperboy. While still working on the strategy of visualizing the teacher prompts a whole class discussion thru think, pair, share, “What are some of the things the paperboy does to get ready to deliver the newspapers? What are some of the images you had in your mind of the paperboy and his dog?”

In Unit 5, Week 2, Making Meaning, The teacher reads aloud Galimoto stopping periodically to ask “What has happened so far? What do you wonder about the story so far?” Students discuss character’s point of view with prompts from the teacher, “What do the people in the village think of Kondi’s idea to build a galimoto? What makes you think that?” “At the end of the story, Kondi wants to turn his galimoto into an ambulance, an airplane, or a helicopter. If you were to build a galimoto, what would you like to build?” At the end of day 2, students participate in a text to text writing connection between Galimoto and Babu’s Song (from Unit 4) by looking at what is similar and different between the two stories.

In Unit 7, students are learning about animal habitats. The questions presented with the read alouds help build knowledge about animal habitats in their backyards. In addition to sharing with partners and the class, students often record things they learned about animals and habits in their Student Response Book. This is the one unit across the entire curriculum that helps students integrate knowledge. Some specific examples include:

  • Unit 7, Week 1, Making Meaning: Students listen to Insect Detective and questions are asked to help build knowledge throughout the read aloud such as “The author states that female earwigs are very good mothers. What reasons does he give to support that idea?”.
  • Unit 7, Week 2, Making Meaning: Students listen to Butterflies and are asked questions such as “What did you learn about butterflies’ habitats?” and “What steps does a caterpillar go through to become a butterfly?”

In Unit 8, Week 1 of Making Meaning students continue their learning about animals in the text Snails and the article “Snail Food”. Through questioning, students discuss what they learned about snails, their habitat, and what they eat. Then in the Writing about Reading section, students compare the text and the article. In Unit 8, Week 2, students then begin to read about their own body in Learning about your Bones and Muscles and answer questions such as what did you learn about bones and muscles, but this does not require an integration of knowledge.

In other cases, there are stories and texts in Making Meaning that build knowledge; however, it is a single text and it does not build on previous texts to support students’ learning about a topic. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, students listen to Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine Innings about Alta Weiss who played baseball on an all male semi - pro team.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students listen to the poem “Bees, Bothered by Bold Bears, Behave Badly” and share their learnings about these animals.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, students listen to Erandi’s Braids which is a fictional story about a girl in Mexico who wants a new dress for her birthday. In this text, students explore a culture that may be different from theirs; however, there are no other texts like this so it does not fully support students’ understanding of this culture.

A few fictional stories also teach lessons, but students again are not required to integrate knowledge and ideas. For example, in Unit 1, Week 4 of Being a Writer, students listen to Miss Tizzy and on the first day, the students are asked what the author wants them to learn about friendship and on the second day students write an opinion piece about whether Miss Tizzy was a good friend, but no other integration about understanding friendship is addressed.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

The materials lack culminating tasks in which students show mastery of multiple standards. What is considered to be a culminating task, can also be perceived as a task to review learning, but doesn’t necessarily require students to demonstrate great knowledge of a topic, just understanding. However, there are some opportunities such as Writing about Reading activities, journal entries, and writing pieces for students to demonstrate knowledge of a topic or skill. The tasks give students the opportunity to demonstrate comprehension and knowledge of a topic or topics. In most of the lessons, earlier questions and tasks give the teacher usable information about students’ readiness to complete these tasks. According to the publisher, “In both Making Meaning and Being a Writer, Writing about Reading activities provide multiple opportunities to analyze a single text in response to a sequence of questions presented by the teacher, and then write a response to the literature using text evidence to support opinions or conclusions.”

In Unit 2, Week 1, Making Meaning, The teacher introduces the concept of Self-Monitoring (Thinking About Reading) utilizing an anchor chart. The teacher is expected to choose their own book and model this strategy. Students are then released to practice self-monitoring on their own during independent reading with their own text selection. No specific literature was introduced during this lesson, there were no opportunities for students to interact with each other.

In Unit 4, Week 1, Making Meaning, The teacher introduces the text Babu’s Song. The teacher stops periodically to ask, “What happens in this part of the story?” At the end the teacher facilitates a whole group discussion around the questions, “What do you think Bernardi will do? What in the story makes you think that?” The teacher very briefly reviews what a character is after the discussion. On day 3, students are introduced to Passages of Bernardi charts (pieces from the story). The teacher re-reads portions of the book and invites students to make inferences about the story.

In Unit 7, Week 2, Day 1, Making Meaning, The teacher reads aloud the first part of Butterflies and leads students through visualizing. After the teacher leads the class in a whole group discussion asking, “What did this book say about butterflies that you already knew?” Students were encouraged to share with someone near them. On day 2, the teacher reads the rest of Butterflies and stops periodically to ask questions such as, “What steps does a caterpillar go through to become a butterfly?” Also in day 2, students turn in their response books and write about their wonders about butterflies on page 15 titled, “What I Learned and Wondered About Butterflies”. Students then shared their writing with a peer. On day 3, students engage in a writing task writing opinions about insects.

Students have some opportunities throughout the Modules to respond to literature and use skills that they have learned; however, these tasks are usually related to a single text or skill and not the culmination of learning involving multiple standards. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Day 1 of Being a Writer, students hear the story Miss Tizzy and then write an opinion of Miss Tizzy and include illustrations.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 2 of Making Meaning, after listening to and discussing, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, students write a text to self connection and then draw a picture of a time they had a very bad day and write about it. This is an end of text activity that students could complete without having heard or understood the text or the lesson.
  • Unit 2, Week 4, Day 1 of Being a Writer, during this week, students have the opportunity to write a new piece or take a previously written document through the writing process, though this is not necessarily tied to a topic or text.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 2 of Making Meaning, students hear Erandi’s Braids and then use the illustrations to make inferences and then write about what they inferred from the illustrations.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 4 of Being a Writer, after hearing Polar Lands, Polar Animals, and, Polar Regions, students write their own opinion about which polar animal they find interesting and why.


Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Tier 2 vocabulary words and concept words are highlighted for each Read Aloud lesson. Students are provided with explicit vocabulary instruction. Words are first introduced in context. Then students are provided a student-friendly definition of the word and examples of the way it is used. Students engage actively with the word in meaningful ways when they first encounter it, such as by applying it to their own experiences. Students practice using the word through engaging activities. Students are provided with multiple exposures to the word over an extended period of time. Teachers teach strategies that students can use to learn words independently, such as recognizing synonyms, antonyms, and words with multiple meanings, and using context to determine word meanings.

In Grade 2, students are provided with a systematic approach to vocabulary. In the Making Meaning module, most lessons within each unit contain a list of "suggested vocabulary" as well as words for students who are English language learners. In addition, there are 30 weeks of explicit vocabulary instruction that includes words found in or related to the read aloud texts in the Vocabulary Teaching Guide. During the three days of vocabulary instruction, students are reintroduced to words learned in the read alouds and new words that are essential for understanding the text. There are four or five words per week, and the students use these words in a variety of ways, make real life connections, and discuss them with partners and as a whole class. In addition, within this vocabulary instruction is guidance for ongoing review for students to review and practice words that have been learned previously. The vocabulary lessons are taught one week after the read aloud. The words are then reviewed in future vocabulary lessons.

In the Making Meaning component, suggested vocabulary is included for teachers to review while reading aloud. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1 with Jamaica Tag-Along, with the words, dribbled, at a distance, whirled, rim, ditch, repaired, smooth, and moat. In the suggested vocabulary, there are student-friendly definitions provided. When the teacher comes across these words in the read aloud, he/she is directed to stop, give the student-friendly definition, reread the sentence, and then continue with the read aloud.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3 when students listen to The Three Little Pigs and some of the words and definitions include: scrumptious, displeasure, and stoked the fire.

In the Vocabulary Teaching Guide, students learn new words that were introduced in the "suggested vocabulary" words from the read aloud in Making Meaning and review previously taught words. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Week 5 students review the words accompany, annoy, convince, eavesdrop, and swirl. Students practice using the words in the "Which Word Am I?" game. One partner gives clues about the word, and the other partner has to try to guess it.
  • In Week 15, students learn the words stunned, chaos, notorious and genius. They practice the word notorious by identifying people who are notorious.
  • In Week 27, students learn the words treat, provide, conserve, and appreciate from the article "Zoos are Good for Animals." Students listen to sentences from the article and use context clues to determine what the words mean.

Concept words are taught in addition to words found in the read aloud. Concept words are words that represent a concept or idea that is important to the story. Sometimes, these concept words are included in order to introduce or review an important word-learning strategy such as learning antonyms.Teacher guidance and support includes both print and digital components, including interactive whiteboard activities, assessment forms, reproducible word cards, family letters and other reproducibles, and professional development media.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

In the Being a Writer module, there are eight units that span the course of the school year and cover narrative, informative, and opinion writing. Students are taught to write poems both individually and as a class. Students are given the opportunity to write expository paragraphs in the Making Meaning module through the Writing about Reading activities. Students begin to give and receive feedback. Writing skills build upon previously-taught skills. The first page of each unit shows the skill progression from grade to grade. Teachers are given protocols for teaching the lessons, and students are given models through guided writing and shared writing. Student writing is assessed through observations (conferencing) and student writing samples. Students begin keeping a writing journal for their ideas and drafts.

In the majority of the units, students listen to a text over the course of several days and use the text as a model for their own writing. In each of these examples, there is a progression of a guided-writing task, to drafting, to revising, and finally to publishing and sharing. In addition, students have time to free write when they are finished with an assignment. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 6, students listen to Harry and the Terrible Whatzit and The Little Old Lady Who was not Afraid of Anything. On the first day, the students generate a list of scary words, the teacher models writing scary sentences, and the students then practice writing independently. On Day 2, the teacher models writing a scary story, and then students write their own scary story. On Day 3, the students revise their writing with guidance, and on Day 4 the students share their writing.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students listen to I Will NOT EVER Eat a Tomato, and similarly to Unit 1, on Day 1, the students make a list of shared foods they like and dislike and can begin using this list to write a story. On Day 2, students share their ideas with a partner and then continue writing their stories. On Day 3, students revise, and on Day 4 students share. In Making Meaning, students hear this story as well, and on Day 1 students write a text to self connection.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students listen to Beardream. On Day 1, students and the teacher write a shared ending to the story before writing one independently. On Day 2, students begin a new writing story with the prompt "It was just a dream," which is used in the read aloud. On Day 3, students continue working on their stories and in Making Meaning write their opinion as to what the scariest thing was that happened to Ducky in the story Duck. Finally, on Day 4, students can continue working on a fiction story that they have started.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, students listen to Polar Lands. On Day 1, students share interesting facts that they have learned and independently write questions that they have about the people who live in the polar lands. On Day 2, the students share their questions, listen to more of the story, and write sentences about people from polar lands. On Day 3 and 4, students work on publishing their piece on polar lands.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students listen to First Year Letters, and on Day 1 students are taught how to write letters and practice writing letters with a partner to the teacher. On Day 2, after seeing the teacher model how to write a friendly letter, students practice writing their own letter to a classmate. On Day 3, students respond to a peer, and on Day 4 students can practice writing a letter to anyone of their choosing. These lessons help students understand audience and purpose since they are writing and responding to each other.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, students listen to various poems. On Day 1, students write their own poem with the sentence stem, "The rain is like...". On Day 2, students can write a poem of their choice. On Day 3, students publish their poem, and on Day 4 students share their poem.
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, students listen to excerpts from Should we Have Pets? On Day 1, students discuss the pros and cons of having pets and then write their opinion. On Day 2, students write a new opinion piece after brainstorming with the class different things on which to write opinions. On Day 3, students continue writing an opinion piece of their choosing. In all of these examples, there is a progression of skills that helps the students independently write about a topic or a text.


Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include support for students to learn research skills and to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

In Being a Writer, Unit 4, students are introduced to research skills and are guided in asking questions about a topic and in taking notes about what they have observed or learned. In the beginning of the Unit, students hear and discuss short nonfiction passages, participate in science experiments, and then write about their experience. In later weeks, students write three nonfiction pieces about the lands, animals, and peoples of the polar regions. Students select interesting facts to include in their pieces and write opening and closing sentences.

In the document, "CCC Grade 2 CCSS Correlations," the standards W.2.7 and W.2.8 were identified as being in the following units and lessons:

  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 2 of Being a Writer, students listen to Kate & Pippin: An Unlikely Love Story and write a shared nonfiction piece about what they learned about Kate and Pippin from the story.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Days 2 and 3 of Being a Writer, students write about the "Which is Stronger" experiment, telling why they did it, describing what happened, and what they found out.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 4 of Being a Writer, students follow along as the teacher conducts the "Suck it Up" experiment. Then, in pairs, students write about the experiment.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Days 2 and 3 of of Being a Writer, students individually write questions they could ask their partner to garner research. Then, students interview their partners and write down the answers to the questions.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Days 2 and 4 of Being a Writer, students chart interesting facts and then write about polar lands independently. Students are using evidence from the text to engage in evidenced-based writing. For context, students previously listened to Polar Lands, Polar Regions, and Polar Animals.


Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

The Making Meaning component of this program provides procedures and supports for independent reading throughout the year. Independent Daily Reading (DR) is included at the end of all lessons, except in the case of independent strategy practice lessons, and gives the students opportunities to practice the reading skills they have learned, build stamina, and foster a love of reading. Reading conferences with the teacher help to hold the students accountable for their reading as well as give the teacher an opportunity to assess the student’s reading progress. There is a proposed schedule for independent reading. There is also a tracking system to track independent reading. A Family Letter is included at the end of each unit to highlight the skills that have been taught and to give information to parents as to how they can support their child’s reading life at home.

In Grade 2, Independent Daily Reading begins in Unit 1, Week 2. Students spend up to 20 minutes a day reading books on their own independent reading level. In Unit 1, students learn the procedures for IDR and how to identify “just-right” books for them. They also begin tracking the books they are reading in their Student Response Journal in the Reading Log section. In Unit 2, students learn questions that they can ask themselves to monitor their comprehension. Formal conferring begins in Unit 3, with checklists (IDR Conference Notes) and supports (Resource Sheet for IDR Conferences) for the teacher to monitor student progress. In this unit, and all following units, students also begin to apply the reading comprehension strategies that they are learning to their own reading.

The Family Letter describes the skills that the students have been working on during each unit, and includes ways that families can help support each child’s growth as a reader. For example, the suggestions in the Unit 1 Family Letter are making weekly trips to the local library to borrow books, setting aside a time to read together everyday, discussing how the books that they are reading remind them of their own lives, and modeling good listening by paying attention to their child when discussing the books they are reading.

Each lesson has a specific purpose to provide students with instruction around independent reading. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students practice monitoring their own reading and confer with the teacher individually about their reading lives. They read independently and share their reading in pairs and with the class. During the actual independent reading, the teacher stops the class periodically to have them them think about how well they just understood what they just read.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, students read independently for 15 - 20 minutes and then confer with the teacher on their use of a reading strategy.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students read silently for 20 minutes and keep track of what they wonder while reading.


Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

+
-
Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
N/A

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A
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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 05/15/2019

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
SIPPS Challenge Level Teacher?s Manual 978--1-61003-203-2 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Temple Cat 978-0-618-11139-8 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Jellies: The Life of Jellyfish 978-0-7613-1485-1 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
CCC Collaborative Literacy Being a Writer Second Edition Student Writing Handbook 978-1-61003-254-4 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2014
CCC Collaborative Literacy Being a Writer Second Edition Skills Practice Book 978-1-61003-264-3 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2014
CCC Collaborative Literacy Being a Writer Second Edition Digital Teacher's Manual Set 978-1-61003-399-2 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2014
Ann?s Book Club 978-1-61003-651-1 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Scout?s Puppies 978-1-61003-659-7 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
CCC Collaborative Literacy Making Meaning Third Edition Student Response Book 978-1-61003-708-2 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2015
CCC Collaborative Literacy Making Meaning Digital Teacher's Manual Set 978-1-61003-774-7 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2015
Being a Reader Assessment Resource Book 978-1-61003-826-3 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
CCC Collaborative Literacy Being a Reader Digital Teacher's Manual Set 978-1-61003-842-3 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2016
CCC Collaborative Literacy Digital Assessment Resource Book 978-1-68246-251-5 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2016
Being a Reader Small-group Teacher's Manual Set 7A 978-1-68246-339-0 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Being a Reader Small-group Teacher's Manual Set 8A 978-1-68246-340-6 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Being a Reader Small-group Teacher's Manual Set 6A 978-1-68246-341-3 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017

About Publishers Responses

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Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

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All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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