Alignment: Overall Summary

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
40
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
24
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials meet the expectations for Gateway 1. Texts students read and hear are of high quality and appropriately rigorous. Questions, tasks, and activities that students engage in as they read, write, speak, and demonstrate comprehension are focused on the texts themselves. Foundational skills instruction meets the expectations of the indicators.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
19/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 fully meet the expectations of including rich and appropriately rigorous, high quality texts. Over the course of the year, materials support students' literacy development by providing access to high quality texts and reading experiences of depth and breadth.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality, worthy of especially careful reading, and consider a range of student interests. The included texts have been previously published and many are written by celebrated authors. Materials include: both fiction and non-fiction texts of varying lengths and topics, and texts that appeal to the interests of young readers.

Examples include:

  • Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech, has won several awards, including the Newbery Medal and the School Library Journal Best Book.
  • The Sun by Seymour Simon is a non-fiction scientific text. Text features include author’s notes and full-color photographs that make the text engaging and high-interest for Grade 5 students.
  • Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis won the Coretta Scott King Award and the Newbery Medal. Knowledge demands are complex due to the historical context of the Great Depression with historical vocabulary and figurative language.
  • Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt has won several awards for notable children’s literature. It has complex demands due to the heavy use of figurative language and complex theme.
  • The Wright Brothers by Russell Freedman is a Newbery Medal winner and a Golden Kite Award winner for non-fiction. The complex text builds knowledge and vocabulary within the context of history and aviation.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Students read twenty-eight texts, a mix of both information and literature in the Shared Reading and ELA lessons. The ratio of fiction to non-fiction is an appropriate balance for the standards in this grade level and includes various text types and genres.

Shared Reading includes four fiction and seven non-fiction texts.

  • Examples of fiction texts read during Shared Reading are: Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech, The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin, and Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis.
  • Examples of non-fiction texts read during Shared Reading are: Plant Cells and Life Processes by Barbara A. Somervil, Oceans and Suns by Seymour Simon, and Ice to Steam: Changing States of Matter by Penny Johnson

Interactive Read Alouds include 13 fiction and four nonfiction texts.

  • Examples of fiction texts read aloud during the ELA Lessons are: The Boy Who Loved Words by Roni Schotter, The Watsons Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis, and several poems including “A Narrow Fellow in the Grass” by Emily Dickinson and “The Eagle” by Lord Tennyson.
  • Examples of non-fiction texts read aloud during ELA Lessons are: Keep On! The Story of Matthew Henson by Deborah Hopkinson, Rats Around Us by Rachael Eagen, and The Wright Brothers by Russel Freedman.

The text types and genres are widely distributed throughout the year. Genres include:

  • Biography
  • Historical Fiction
  • Mystery
  • Poetry
  • Fantasy
  • Informational Texts

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for the appropriate level of text complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

According to the Teacher’s Manual, books selected for Shared Reading lessons are mostly within grade-level bands, and books selected for interactive read-alouds during the ELA lessons are generally above grade level. Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level, and when the selections are in the high end of the band, students are supported by teacher read-aloud, and scaffolding through predictable routines and teacher modeling. Though the Lexile measures do not build sequentially, throughout the year there are texts from the entire grade-level band.

Specific examples include: 

  • In Week 3 of the ELA Lesson, students read Keep On! The Story of Matthew Henson by Deborah Hopkinson with a Lexile of 1070 which is beyond the stretch band for the grade level. Though the book is non-fiction, there are few technical terms and explicit vocabulary instruction focuses on Tier 2 words. The book is read aloud to students and text features such as photos and illustrations are included to support comprehension.
  • In Weeks 4 and 5 of Shared Reading Lessons, students read Rats Around Us by Rachel Eagen with a Lexile of NC 1030. Only an excerpt of this expository, non-fiction text is read aloud to students. There are very few technical terms that need to be introduced in advance. Students are supported with explicit vocabulary instruction, daily text structure lessons, and discussion.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)

In both English Language Arts and Shared Reading, the texts and tasks increase in complexity to develop independence of grade-level skills. Texts are in the appropriate grade-level Lexile band to help students build knowledge, understanding, and comprehension of texts over the school year. Texts within and outside of the grade band are supported by lessons that incorporate discussions, organizers, and anchor charts. In ELA, the questions, writing tasks, and expectation of student understanding and application of their knowledge grows in each unit.

For example:

  • Texts in the first nine weeks have Lexile levels from 770-1070. An example in the first nine weeks in the Shared Reading lesson plan is when students read the novel Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech, which has an overall Lexile of 770. This text is read over the course of six weeks. In order to support students with the complex text containing two stories, the teacher tracks both story structures with two story maps. The teacher engages students in discussion while asking comprehension questions. Students use vocabulary and respond to comprehension questions in the “Assign Written Response” section of the lesson.
  • Texts in the second nine weeks have Lexile levels from 750-1160. An example in the second nine weeks in the ELA lesson plan is The Watsons Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis, which has an overall Lexile of 1000. The text is read over 18 days. The novel contains references to people and events of the 1960s; which requires the teacher to scaffold for knowledge building and comprehension. Students answer discussion questions, learn new vocabulary, compose sentences, and answer written response questions. The teacher keeps a story map with character traits and important events.
  • Texts in the third nine weeks have Lexile levels from 680-950. In the third nine weeks, students read three poems in Week 20 of the ELA Lessons: “The Grackle” by Ogden Nash, “The Pigeons” by Lilian Moore, and “Something Told the Wild Geese” by Rachel Field. The teacher provides an introduction to the poems and reads the poems aloud. While reading, the teacher discusses the rhyme of the poem, and students learn about multisyllabic rhyme, accents, and rhyming couplets. The teacher explains, “Sometimes a poet uses rhymes of more than one syllable to produce a humorous singsong effect.” The teacher continues a discussion on accents and rhyming couplets and asks questions requiring students to look at rhyme scheme and rhyme syllabication.
  • Texts in the fourth nine weeks have Lexile levels from 770-950. In the fourth nine weeks, students read The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrick, which has an overall Lexile of 950. The text is read over 30 days. The book is a narrative that incorporates academic vocabulary and facts from the Civil War. Students engage in choral reading, respond to discussion questions, analyze text structure, and complete written responses. Students write perspective pieces, compare and contrast characters, defend claims with evidence, design products (medals, wedding announcement, poster, cartoons), and write journal entries and newspaper articles.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

According to the publisher, reading and writing research informed the design of Bookworms. In the Teacher Manual Tab there is a section labeled Books, in which the publisher provides the rationale used to determine text complexity. The publisher states the program is calibrated to the Common Core Standards for text difficulty, but is different from a traditional commercial core due to the use of only complete books. An experienced group of teachers proposed the texts that were then reviewed for high-quality and likelihood to build knowledge and motivation. Quantitative measures target readability and qualitative measures target levels of meaning, language complexity, and knowledge demand. Lexile with the revised grade bands is used as the primary quantitative measure, with no attempt to consider other factors sometimes used in leveling, such as formatting and structure; however, text structures increase in complexity as the year goes on. For example, narrative with straight-forward structures and settings were chosen for the beginning of the year. Informational texts were interspersed in units related by theme and to support writing instruction.

The publisher’s guiding principles stated that most books were within grade-level bands for Shared Reading, and books were arranged in slightly ascending order by Lexile when feasible. The Lexile band used for Grades 4 and 5 is 770-980.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading to achieve grade-level reading proficiency.

The instructional materials include opportunities for students to access text through teacher read-alouds, choral reading, and independent reading. Students interact with texts through both the ELA Lessons and Shared Reading. Texts used for interactive read-alouds are often above grade-level and are read aloud by the teacher who models through think-alouds and leads discussion about the text. Shared Reading texts are often read together chorally for the first read with one purpose, and then again in pairs or independently for a second read with another purpose.

Interactive Reading texts are part of the ELA Lessons. The texts are read aloud by the teacher who models through think-alouds and facilitates discussion of the text.

  • In the first nine weeks of ELA Lessons, examples of the texts read to students include: Keep On! The Story of Matthew Hanson by Deborah Hopkinson, Rats Around Us! By Rachel Eagen, “A Narrow Fellow in the Grass” by Emily Dickinson, and The Boy Who Loved Words by Roni Schotter.
  • In the second nine weeks of ELA Lessons, examples of the texts read to students include: The Watsons Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis, The Flu of 1918 by Jessica Rudolph, and The Wright Brothers by Russell Freedman
  • In the third nine weeks of ELA Lessons, examples of the texts read to students include: “Something Told the Wild Geese” by Rachel Field, A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park, “Long-Leg Lou and Short-Leg Sue” by Shel Silverstein.
  • In the fourth nine weeks of ELA Lessons, examples of the texts read to students include: The Porcupine Year by Louis Erdich and Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt.   

Shared Reading texts are read first as a choral read with one purpose, and then students engage in a second read with partners for another purpose.

  • In the first nine weeks of Shared Reading, examples of the texts students read include: Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech, Animal Cells by Barbara A. Somervil, and Plant Cells by Barbara A. Somervil.
  • In the second nine weeks of Shared Reading, examples of the texts students read include: Volcano by Patricia Lauber, Ocean by Seymour Simon, The Sun by Seymour Simon, and The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin.
  • In the third nine weeks of Shared Reading, examples of the texts students read include: Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis, How Does a Waterfall Become Electricity? by Robert Snedden, and Changing States of Matter by Penny Johnson.
  • In the fourth nine weeks of Shared Reading, examples of the texts students read include: The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrick.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Grade 5 meet the expectations for text-focused questions and tasks over the course of the year. Questions and tasks include speaking and writing work that is connected and focused on the text(s) with which students engage. Some culminating tasks are not connected to what students previously read and demonstrated.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

Daily instruction is organized in weekly lessons with three parts: an ELA Lesson, Shared Reading, and Differentiated Instruction, with different texts used in each part of the lesson. Routines in the ELA Lesson and the Shared Reading both have components that require students to engage with the text directly. Though some tasks can be accomplished without the use of the text, both ELA and Shared Reading include teacher-led close reading and student-led close reading with tasks and questions that are text-dependent. Questions, tasks, and assignments require students to engage with the text to answer questions.

Examples include:

  • In Week 5, Shared Reading, Day 4, after reading Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech students are asked, “Why do you think Sal is so nervous during the drive? Provide evidence with quotes from the text.”
  • In Week 10, ELA Lesson, Day 2, after reading The Watson Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis, students are asked, “Do you think Kenny will make fun of the new boy? Why?”
  • In Week 16, ELA Lesson, Day 5, while reading chapter 4 of The Wright Brothers by Russell Freedman, students create a timeline to show important events in the chronology of the text. After reading, the students pretend to be one of the Wright Brothers and journal a record of discoveries, successes, and failures they faced, using the text.
  • In Week 21, ELA Lesson, Day 2, students read chapter 2 of A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park. Students are then asked to draw and label a map going from the bridge to Min’s house and then to the forest. The teacher states, “Use what you can remember from the chapter we read today. Drawing a map or a diagram is one way to summarize information.”
  • In Week 23, Shared Reading, Day 2, students read How Does a Waterfall become Electricity? by Robert Snedden. The teacher tells students, “Use our map and the illustration on page 11 to write a descriptive definition of a waterwheel. Why do you think that the water wheel was used in so many different places?"
  • In Week 31, Shared Reading, Day 3, after reading The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrick, students are asked, “How do you think Smelt will use Homer? Make a prediction that makes sense given what we know so far. Tell why.”

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for having sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).

In the Evaluation section of the Teacher’s Manual, there are two cumulative tasks. In the ELA lessons, there are opportunities for students to take the information they learned about a topic from a variety of texts and apply it to a writing piece. The writing assignment includes integration of skills; however, the teaching notes for these lessons are designed around the type of writing more than the application of knowledge around a topic. During Shared Reading lessons, students discuss the text daily and write a written response. Although they might use the same text, the written responses are different each day and are not culminating tasks. The end of the year cumulative project is the same for Grades 3, 4, and 5. Additionally, culminating tasks are not referenced or clearly labeled in the materials. There are no specific instructions in the lessons or the Teacher’s Manual about culminating tasks.

Examples include:

  • ELA Lesson 25, students complete a cumulative task by preparing for an oral debate about doing the right thing. Students work in groups to prepare and practice a debate on either side of the debate, “You should always tell the truth no matter what” or “Sometimes it is OK to lie depending on the situation.”
  • ELA Lesson, Week 33, as a cumulative task, students write a book advertisement for a book they read during the school year. Students write and present their advertisements to incoming Grade 5 students.
  • ELA Lesson, Week 34, students complete a cumulative task about their reading and writing identity. They write a memoir reflecting on how their feelings have changed about themselves as readers and writers throughout the year. Students design covers and perform a museum walk.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Each lesson provides students an opportunity for evidence-based discussions. According to the section of the Teacher Manual, titled Using this Manual, the instructional plans are intentionally brief to create ease of use in real-time. The Read Alouds section of the Teacher Manual provides general explanations of Every Pupil Response and Partners, strategies to increase student engagement. Every Pupil Response includes taking votes, signaled responses such as thumbs up, and talking with a partner. Partner work includes opportunities for students to confer in pairs about their reading and writing, and questions about the previous day’s learning. It can be signaled by “turn and talk to your partner” or “ask your partner”.

Examples include:

  • Week 3, ELA Lesson, Days 3-4, students use the text Keep On! The Story of Matthew Henson as an introduction to informative writing. The Day 2 lesson begins with students telling their partners about narrative and opinion writing. The teacher is directed to have Partner A discuss the elements of narrative writing and Partner B to discuss the elements of opinion writing.
  • Week 9, ELA Lesson, Days 1-2, students read The Boy Who Loved Words: Through the Page with Genie by Roni Schotter. The students are engaged in a teacher-led discussion and are handed Selig’s word list. They are asked to write three sentences using two words from the list. On Day 2, they review the story and the teacher asks partners to share their sentences. The teacher asks, “So, what exactly is Selig’s purpose? Talk it over with your partner.” Then the teacher asks the students in whole group to tell about their favorite words from the book.
  • Week 19, Shared Reading, Days 1-5, students read Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis. Each day, students participate in a segment of the lesson called “Provide a New Focus for Rereading in Partners”. The teacher provides a question for the focus of the partner reread. No additional teaching notes or protocols are provided. Examples, “What do we learn about his personality traits? Now think about what we learn about the Amos family. Think about why Bud really wants revenge.”
  • Week 20, ELA Lesson, Day 2, students read the poems “The Grackle” by Ogden Nash, “The Pigeons” by Lilian Moore, and “Something Told the Wild Geese” by Rachel Field. On Day 1, students select the poem they thought was best and give reasons for their choices. On Day 2, the students share which poem they voted was the best and the teacher groups students based on the poem they selected. Students are then tasked with compiling their reasons together and presenting to the class.
  • Week 26, ELA Lesson, Days 2-4, students read the text The Porcupine Year (Chapter 3) by Louis Erdich and explain why Pinch and Omakayas disagreed about killing the porcupine. Students work with partners to share their explanation of the disagreement.
  • Week 32, ELA Lesson, Days 4-5, students read Tuck Everlasting (Chapters 23 & 24) by Natalie Babbitt, and write a note to Winnie’s parents explaining why she tried to help the Tucks. Students are directed to ask a partner to share their notes from Winnie to her parents.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

The individual ELA lessons support students speaking and listening about what they are reading and researching. The standards alignment outlines the Speaking and Listening standards targeted throughout the lessons. Lessons require students to share their reflections and engage in follow-up questioning and include collaborative activities with guidance on how to evaluate speaking and listening with a rubric. During the Shared Reading lessons, students engage in speaking and listening about what they are reading. There is a section in the Shared Reading lessons titled, “Review and Share Written Responses”. Students often write a response one day that is shared at the start of the next day’s lesson. Despite the use of follow-up questions and opportunities to share, presentations and supports do not provide much depth. Additionally, it is sometimes unclear if follow-up comprehension discussions are intended for oral or written response, and whether they are meant to be discussed as a class or with peers.

Examples include:

  • In Week 4, ELA Lesson, Day 5, students read Rats Around Us; “Scratch and Sniff: and Creepy Stuff” by Rachel Eagen. The teacher guides students through the organization of the text and students listen to later give ideas of whether or not they would like a rat for a pet. During reading, the teacher asks, “If you look at this picture, you can see that the rat’s jaws are much smaller than a human’s. But which set of jaws is stronger? Talk it over with your partner.” Later students work with a partner to do math from the “Rat” diagram and write a paragraph about whether they would like a rat for a pet.
  • In Week 8, ELA Lesson, Day 5, students write poems using couplets. After writing their poems, students form four groups and each person in the group shares their poem.
  • In Week 15, Shared Reading, Day 3, students read The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin and respond to a series of questions in a segment of the lesson called Engage in Comprehension Discussion. Examples of these questions are, “Why does Grace want to rename the restaurant Hoos on First? What do we learn about Mr. Westing? Why are all the kids trying to explain the murder?”
  • In Week 25, ELA Lesson Plan, Day 2, students write an opinion piece about doing the right thing. On Day 3, the teacher explains the procedures for holding a debate using a rubric. Next, students are divided into groups and debate with another group about the opinion pieces they wrote on Day 2. The remaining students listen to the debate and write questions to ask at the end of the debate.
  • In Week 33, ELA Lesson Plan, Days 1-5, students use the writing process to create a book advertisement in PowerPoint about their favorite book from the school year. On Day 5, students present their book advertisements to the class.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Materials include short and longer writing tasks and projects that are aligned to grade-level standards. Throughout the lessons, students engage in various methods of writing, including on-demand writing in the form of open-ended responses to vocabulary written in context, short paragraphs or sentences in response to daily prompts. Process writing is modeled with the use of checklists, charts, and graphic organizers, and the sequence of planning, drafting, revising, editing, and writing final drafts. Writing instruction takes place during the ELA Lesson, however, students also write in response to reading during the Shared Reading. The ELA Lesson is structured into three segments: Teacher, which includes instruction and modeling; Students, which is structured work time with a specific goal and process; and Share, which allows students to share with peers and the teacher. The Teacher Manual includes an appendix titled Writing, which explains the design of the writing instruction as structurally repetitive. Students engage in the same sequence of writing instruction with different content throughout the year.

Examples include:

  • In Week 1, Shared Reading, Day 5, while reading Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech, students respond to the prompt, “Who do you think the young man is? Give Reasons.”
  • In Week 8, Shared Reading, Day 3, while reading Plant Cells by Barbara A. Somervill, students respond to the prompt “Reread your animal cell notes one more time. Then reread this chapter. Write one paragraph that begins with this sentence: Plants and animals are similar. Write another paragraph that begins with this sentence: Plants and animals are different.”
  • In Weeks 13-15, ELA Lessons, after reading The Watsons Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis, students engage in various information-gathering and writing activities, including identifying the elements of a research paper. Students then use the writing process to complete research papers on Civil Rights.
  • In Week 17, Shared Reading, Day 2, after reading The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin, students respond to the prompt, “How are the judge and turtle alike? Use evidence from the text to support your answer."
  • In Week 24, Shared Reading, Day 2, while reading Ice to Steam: Changing States of Matter by Penny Johnson, students respond to the prompt, “Compare the index and the glossary. How are they similar? How are they different? Are all words from the index also in the glossary? Choose one work from the index that is also in the glossary. Write down the definition, but then also tell how it is used in the actual chapters.”

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Appendix E of the Teacher Manual provides an overview of writing for the year. Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Writing is centered around student analysis and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources. Materials provide opportunities to build students’ writing skills through the use of checklists, models, and rubrics. Over the course of the school year, students are given instruction and practice in a variety of genres addressed in the standards. During the ELA lessons, there is instruction on the different types of writing, using the same sequence: Learn the characteristics of the genre; Evaluate good and poor examples of the genre; Learn to plan the genre; Learn to draft the genre; and Learn to revise, both with peers and independently with different content throughout the year. During Shared Reading, students write in response to reading with opinion, narrative, and informative prompts related to the text.

For example:

  • In Week 4, Shared Reading, Day 2, after reading Walk Two Moons, by Sharon Creech, students respond to the narrative prompt, “Write a letter from Sal to her mother. What do you think she would want to say to her? Make sure to write from her point of view.”
  • In Week 9, Shared Reading, Day 2, after reading Plant Cells by Barbara A. Somervill, students respond to the informative prompt, “Compare and contrast the three types of algae in a short essay. Use this frame. There are three types of algae: dinoflagellates, chrysophytes, and diatoms. They are similar because… They are different because…”
  • In Week 13, ELA Lesson, Days 4-5, after reading The Watsons Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis, students write a news article that could have appeared in a 1960’s newspaper.
  • In Week 14, Shared Reading, Day 1, after reading The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin, students respond to the opinion prompt, “We have focused on the characters. Now think about what the author has done to develop the plot. Describe how the events keep us interested and let us meet the characters.”
  • In Weeks 23-25, ELA Lesson, after reading Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis, students respond to an opinion prompt about whether telling a lie is ever okay. Students also consider the differences between people who think it is acceptable to lie in certain situations and people who believe it is never acceptable to tell a lie.
  • In Week 29, Shared Reading, Day 3, after reading The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrick, students respond to the narrative prompt, “Create a cartoon with three frames about the meeting between Professor Fleabottom and the man in black. In the speech bubbles, write what you think the two are saying to each other.”

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level.

Shared reading lessons have opportunities for students to engage in evidence-based writing instruction. In the “Assign Written Response” and the “Engage in Comprehension Discussion” portions of the lesson there are questions that can be used to develop evidence-based writing. The Evaluation tab in the Teacher Manual has a section called Grading, with Super Sentence Rubrics, Writing Response Rubrics, Example Students Responses, and Example Grading Responses to help support students and teachers. Though these examples are provided to help guide instruction and evaluation of student responses, there are no explicit directions for students to use or cite evidence in their short-answer responses. ELA Lessons provide explicit instruction and modeling to support students in using text-based evidence.

For example:

  • In Week 1, Shared Reading, Day 3, students read Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech and respond to the prompt, “If you were going to dinner with a friend, would you rather eat at Sal’s grandparents’ house or Phoebe’s parents’ house? Why? Support your opinion with specific details.”
  • In Week 13, Shared Reading, Day 5, students read The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin, and respond to the prompt, “Think about the strategies the characters are using. Which one do you think makes the most sense and why?” The question requires evidence from the text, but no additional materials or models are provided to support students.  
  • In Week 23, ELA Lesson, Day 5, opinion writing instruction focuses on reasons and evidence used to support the opinion about whether it is ever okay to tell a lie, drawing from a variety of sources such as personal experience and texts. The teacher models how to use the text, Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis to pull examples from the text to support the opinion.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Bookworms Grade 5 materials provide explicit instruction of grade level grammar and conventions in the Sentence Composing section of each ELA lesson plan in conjunction with the day’s read-aloud. The explicit grammar instruction takes place within four instructional activities: Combining, Unscrambling, Imitating, and Expanding. Each Sentence Composing activity is followed by a writing activity that allows the students the opportunity to use the skill in their own writing. Included is a Fifth Grade Editing Checklist, that students used to revise and edit their writing.

Materials include explicit instruction of grammar and conventions standards for the grade-                                                                                                                                                                level, and materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills both in- and out-of-context. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences. For example: 
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 5, Day 1, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, the teacher shares the following sentence: Rattus rattus did not stay put. The teacher explains that there is more to know and that with the use of the conjunctions since or because we can signal a reason. The teacher further explains that if the sentence starts with Even though, we can signal that we will be providing a counter.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Day 8, Day 2, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, the teacher shows the following sentence: A spotted shaft is seen. The teacher guides students to add prepositional phrases.
    • In ELA Lesson Plans, Week 12, Day 2, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, the teacher shows students how to add an interjection to: The Ohio rest stop was really cool! The teacher adds Wow!
  • Students have opportunities to form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses. For example: 
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 11, Day 4, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, the teacher shares the following sentence: Joey made me quit sobbing. The teacher asks students questions that change the verb tense and explore the effects it has on the meaning:  "What if I want to express that this is a characteristic that is always true? (makes) What if I want to say that it is sometimes true (may or might make). What if I want to express that it happened before something else? (had made). What about if it happened before some other future event? (will have made)".
  • Students have opportunities to use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions. For example: 
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 11, Day 4, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, the teacher shares the following sentence: I followed right behind him pretending I was a reporter. The teacher asks a series of questions that require the students to change the verb tense. What if I want to express that this is a characteristic that is always true? (follow). What if I want to say that it is sometimes true (may or might follow). What if I want to express that it happened before something else? (had followed). What about if it happened before some other future event? (will have followed). The teacher explains that it is important to note that a change in verb tense can effect meaning.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 8, Days 2-4, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate: using a lines from a poem, the students are provided with guided practice on experimenting with verb tenses to see how it can change the tone or meaning.
  • Students have opportunities to use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor). For example: 
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 8, Day 1, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, students use a sentence (He stands, ringed by the azure world.) from the poem “The Eagle.” The teacher prompts: “Let’s try a new construction here. He stands, ringed by the azure world, either ________ or ________. We can use two adjectives or two verbs, but we have to make the same choice in each segment.” The teacher guides the students with replacing the blanks with either two adjectives or two verbs.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 17, Day 1, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, the teacher shares the following sentence: Neither the kite nor the glider would be their last invention. The teacher asks what does neither/nor mean and how is it different than either/or. The teacher has students complete the following sentence frames:  Neither _____ nor _____ would _____. Either _____ or _____ would _____.
  • Students have opportunities to use punctuation to separate items in a series. For example: 
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 4, Day 5, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, the teacher shares the following sentences: Curious, affectionate, and smart, they are beloved pets in many families. The teacher explains that the there are three adjectives separated by a comma and that indicates they are items in a series. The teacher asks students to substitute adjectives to complete the following sentence frames:  Curious, _____, and smart, they are beloved pets in many families. _____, _____, and smart, they are beloved pets in many families.
  • Students have opportunities to use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence. For example: 
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 5, Day 4, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, the teacher shares the following sentence: Each year people kill hundreds of millions of rats. The teacher explains that this is a controversial statement that can be set off with Fortunately, or Unfortunately. The teacher further explains when you start a sentence with a word like that, you need to use a comma.
  • Students have opportunities to use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?), and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?). For example: 
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 11, Day 2, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, the teacher shares the following sentence: He pointed up at a telephone wire. The teacher discusses how to expand the sentence by adding some dialogue. The teacher asks a question first and answers with yes or no and provides a reason. The teacher explains that she will show how to punctuate this in case the students want to use it in their writing.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 21, Day 1, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, students expand the sentence to include dialogue and a response: “I noticed you are marking your path with rice.” Direct instruction is provided about the use of quotation marks to identify the speaker and a comma to set off yes, no, or maybe in the response.
  • Students have opportunities to spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed. For example: 
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 33, Day 3, the Fifth Grade Editing Checklist is provided that has an indicator to remind students to spell grade-appropriate words correctly.
  • Students have opportunities to expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style. For example: 
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 3, Day 3, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, students use a sentence (Peary sent everyone back except Matt.) from Keep On! The Story of Matthew Henson. The teacher prompts: “This simple sentence was really important. We can either start with an introductory word that tells how Peary felt, or we can tell why he did this. We may be able to do both.” After guiding the class in expanding the first sentence, the teacher introduces another sentence: “The flag hung limp and lifeless.” The teacher says, “Let’s add by telling what happened next.” The teacher guides students in expanding the sentence with the following transition words: suddenly, then, and however.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 4, Day 5, Teach Sentence Composing, Combine, the teacher shares the following sentences: Rats have chisel-like front teeth. The teeth are visible from the outside when their mouths are closed. The teacher explains that the two sentences will be combined because the first sentence ends with teeth and the second sentence starts with teeth and that this is a boring construction. The teacher further explains that the second sentence is acting like an adjective to tell more details about the teeth. The teacher explains that the second sentence is turned into a clause by beginning with that: Rats have chisel-like front teeth that are visible from the outside when their mouths are closed.
  • Students have opportunities to compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems. For example: 
    • In ELA Lesson Plans, Week 11, Day 1, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, the teacher shares the following sentence: Four more times Momma lit a match and four more times Joey patoohed them out. The teacher explains that authors create interest in narratives by using informal language. The teacher asks for the students to explain what patoohed means and to give some feedback on whether it would be as effective if the word blew was used instead. The teacher gives the following sentence frame: Four more times Momma _____ and four more times Joey _____. The teacher asks the students to come up with a difference contrast while still using informal language.
    • ELA Lesson Plans, Week 11, Day 5, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, students are provided with guided practice in examining a line from a text that contains informal language used by the author to create interest.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
6/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition, instruction in and practice of word analysis skills, and connected texts and tasks in a research-based progression.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a researched-based progression.

Bookworms Grade 5 materials provide students with opportunities to learn phonics and word recognition. Students are explicitly taught each of the six syllable types in the vocabulary words from the shared text for each week. The teacher also explains how prefixes and suffixes will change the word meaning. Teachers use the six syllable types to explain words each day during teacher directed instruction. Students use words based in the six syllable types in their written responses during Assign Written Response. Students are tested each week on the words presented during word study.  The Informal Decoding Inventory is included in the Appendix to help determine student weaknesses through the use of each of the six subtests.

Materials contain explicit instruction of irregularly spelled words, syllabication patterns, and word recognition consistently over the course of the year. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context. For example: 
    • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 13, Day 1, the students learn the word meanings and the syllable types for the words: lux · ur · i · ous (closed, r-controlled, open, vowel team) and mo · tive (open, closed – there are no English words that end in v!). The teacher explains that luxurious is an adjective that means expensive and fancy. It is further explained that it becomes an adverb when -ly is added. The teacher explains that the word motive is a noun that means to have a reason to do something. The teacher further explains that if the suffix -less is added it changes the meaning to have none, thus, without a motive. The verb form is motivate. During Assign Written Response the word luxurious is used in a super sentence by the students. The next day, the students share the super sentence with a partner during Review and Share Written Response.
    • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 26, Day 1, the students learn the word meanings and the syllable types for the words: pro · dig · ious (open, closed, vowel team) and con · scrip · tion (closed, closed, suffix). The teacher explains that prodigious is an adjective that means extreme and that the adverb form is prodigiously. The teacher explains that conscription is a noun that means a system for forcing people to join the army whether they want to or not. During Assign Written Response, the vocabulary words are used in super sentences by the students.

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year to inform instructional adjustments of phonics and word recognition to help students make progress toward mastery. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Teacher Manual, Appendix F, the materials include the Informal Decoding Inventory (IDI). The IDI includes six subtests that progress in difficulty. Differentiated grouping decisions are made upon the first subtest that is failed. The materials include that there is a criterion of eight for real words and six for nonsense words. The subtests include: short vowel, consonant blends and digraphs, vowel-consonant e, vowel teams, and multisyllabic words. For example:
    • Short vowel directions: Point to sat. Ask the student, “What is this word.” This is repeated for each word: sat, pot, beg, nip, cub, pad, top, hit, met, nut, mot, tip, han, teg, fet, lup, nid, pab, hud, gop.
    • Consonant blend and digraphs directions: Point to blip. Ask the student, “What is this word.” This is repeated for each word: blip, check, clam, chin, thick, frank, mint, fist, grab, rest, clop, prib, hest, chot, slen, bund, bist, hald, slub, shad
    • R-controlled vowel patterns directions: Point to card. Ask the student, “What is this word.” This is repeated for each word: card, stork, term, burst, turf, fern, dirt, nark, firm, mirth, fird, barp, forn, serp, surt, perd, kurn, nirt, mork, tarst
    • Vowel teams directions: Point to neat. Ask the student, “What is this word.” This is repeated for each word: neat, spoil, goat, pail, field, fruit, claim, meat, beast, boast, craid, houn, rowb, noy, feap, nuit, maist, ploat, tead, steen
    • Multisyllabic words directions: Point to flannel. Ask the student, “What is this word.” This is repeated for each word: flannel, submit, cupid, spiky, confide, cascade, varnish, surplus, chowder, approach
  • In the Teachers Manual, Shared Reading, there is a Word Study Assessment every fifth day. In the Word Study Assessment, the “teacher calls out the following vocabulary words without segmenting into sounds or syllables.” Students are asked to spell six words based on the Word Study work throughout the week. Then, the “teacher will ask students to mark half of the words to use in super sentences to demonstrate meaning.”
    • In Week 22, Day 5, when reading, students complete a word study assessment with the following words: jazz, blended, rummage, fumble, resolution, and bawling.
  • In the Teacher Manual, Shared Reading, Word Study, “Word study includes attention to spelling and to meaning of words. Our word study curriculum includes one set of words for the entire class, consistent instruction across the week, and a traditional spelling/vocabulary test every five days. A scope and sequence for Word Study and Vocabulary is provided in Appendix D.”


Materials contain explicit instruction of word solving strategies (graphophonic and syntactic) to decode unfamiliar words. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In the Teacher Manual, Shared Reading, Word Study, the materials define the six syllable types that are taught during the Word Study lessons throughout the Grade 5 materials: closed, open, vowel-consonant-e, r-controlled, vowel team, consonant l-e. The materials explain that the syllable type language be used daily in the teacher directed instruction. There is a chart that includes guidance on where to divide syllables to assist with decoding and to be used with word attack. The materials indicate that the pronunciation generated must be checked against meaning vocabulary to see if it is correct.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 1, Day 1, the students learn the word meanings and the syllable types for the words: return (open, r-controlled) and restore (open, r-controlled). The students learn return can be used as a noun or a verb. The teacher further explains that the prefix re- means again. The teacher explains that restore has the same prefix, so it will have something to do with again and that it means to bring something back to its original condition. The teacher further explains that restore can be used as a noun, but that the suffix -tion must be added to make it restoration. Students read the text to find these words, tell what the words mean, and use these words to create super sentences during Assign Written Response. Students share these sentences the following day with a partner during Review and Share Written Responses.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The Bookworms materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials, lessons, and questions providing instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Bookworm Grade 5 materials provide opportunities for students to learn, practice, and apply word analysis skills in connected text and task through daily Shared Reading: Word Study activities. Word study words are taken from the Shared Reading connected text and used to teach word analysis skills, and every fifth day monitor student learning of word analysis skills. Outside of the Word Study test every fifth day, there are no embedded opportunities to showcase word analysis through oral reading fluency or reading of connected text.

Multiple and varied opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to learn, practice, and apply word analysis skills in connected texts and tasks. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 6, Day 1 the vocabulary words are mischievous and independent. In the Grade 5 Reading & Writing Student Workbook, page 43, each word is presented already broken into its syllables and each syllable is named. Instruction is provided about the part of speech and variations of it. For example, mischievous is an adjective and mischief is the noun form; independent is an adjective and independently is the adverb form. Additional instruction on the word independent includes the meaning of the prefix in- as meaning not, and the root word dependent as meaning needing someone or something. These two words come from the text students have been reading, Walk Two Moons. After reading the assigned section for the day, and discussing their understanding of what was read, students write ‘super sentences’ using the two words.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 8, Day 3, Meaning Vocabulary, the teacher introduces the vocabulary words from the text, gives their meaning, explains how they can be divided into syllables and the syllable types in the word: waste (VCe) and tis · sue (closed, vowel team). Students chorally read these words within the text: Plant Cells. During Assign Written Response, students write super sentences using these two words. The next day during Review and Share Written Response, students share their writing with a partner.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 10, Day 1, Meaning Vocabulary, the teacher introduces the vocabulary words from the text, gives their meaning, explains how they can be divided into syllables and the syllable types in the word: mag · ma (closed, closed), lay · ers (vowel team, r-controlled), lav · a (closed, irregular) and e · rup · tion (open, closed, suffix). Students chorally read these words within the text: Volcano. During Assign Written Response, students write super sentences using these words. The next day during Review and Share Written Response, students share their writing with a partner.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 13, Day 1, the teacher introduces two new words: luxurious and motive. Before the teacher explains the meaning of each word, he/she segments the word by syllable to aid in decoding the word. With the word luxurious, the teacher guides the students to see the syllable types to decode the word: lux (closed) ur (r-controlled) i (open) ous (vowel team). Furthermore, the teacher explains that “we can add an -ly to luxurious to make the word luxuriously. This is an adverb and it describes a fancy way of doing something.” This strategy is also used with the word motive: mo (open) tive (closed). Furthermore, the teacher explains that “we can also add -less to the end; less means none when added as a suffix. When we add -less to the end of a noun it becomes an adjective, in this case, motiveless, meaning without a motive.”
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 23, Day 4, Meaning Vocabulary, the teacher introduces the vocabulary word from the text, gives its meaning, explains how it can be divided into syllables and the syllable types in the word: gen · er · a · tor (closed, r-controlled, open, r-controlled). Students chorally read this word within the text: How Does a Waterfall Become Electricity? During Assign Written Response, students write to explain how a turbine generator in a hydroelectric plant similar to and different from a grinder powered by a waterwheel. The next day during Review and Share Written Response, students share their writing with a partner.
  • In the Teacher Manual, a table is provided “with examples of multisyllabic words, comprising combinations of syllables along with guidance on how to identify the syllables and use them as cues for decoding.” For example, the table describes compound words as “divide between words you know” and closed-closed multisyllabic words as “divide between the consonants.”

Materials include word analysis assessment to monitor student learning of word analysis skills. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Teacher Manual, Appendix F, the materials include the Informal Decoding Inventory. The IDI includes six subtests that progress in difficulty. Differentiated grouping decisions are made upon the first subtest that is failed. The materials include that there is a criterion of eight for real words and six for nonsense words. The subtests include: short vowel, consonant blends and digraphs, vowel-consonant e, vowel teams, and multisyllabic words.
    • Short vowel directions: Point to sat. Ask the student, “What is this word.” This is repeated for each word: sat, pot, beg, nip, cub, pad, top, hit, met, nut, mot, tip, han, teg, fet, lup, nid, pab, hud, gop.
    • Consonant blend and digraphs directions: Point to blip. Ask the student, “What is this word.” This is repeated for each word: blip, check, clam, chin, thick, frank, mint, fist, grab, rest, clop, prib, hest, chot, slen, bund, bist, hald, slub, shad.
    • R-controlled vowel patterns directions: Point to card. Ask the student, “What is this word.” This is repeated for each word: card, stork, term, burst, turf, fern, dirt, nark, firm, mirth, fird, barp, forn, serp, surt, perd, kurn, nirt, mork, tarst.
    • Vowel teams directions: Point to neat. Ask the student, “What is this word.” This is repeated for each word: neat, spoil, goat, pail, field, fruit, claim, meat, beast, boast, craid, houn, rowb, noy, feap, nuit, maist, ploat, tead, steen.
    • Multisyllabic words directions: Point to flannel. Ask the student, “What is this word.” This is repeated for each word: flannel, submit, cupid, spiky, confide, cascade, varnish, surplus, chowder, approach.
  • In the Teacher Manual, Shared Reading there is a Word Study Assessment every fifth day. In the Word Study Assessment, the “teacher calls out the following vocabulary words without segmenting into sounds or syllables.” Students are asked to spell six words based on the Word Study work throughout the week. Then, the “teacher will ask students to mark half of the words to use in super sentences to demonstrate meaning.” For example, Week 22, Day 5 when reading Bud, Not Buddy, students will complete a word study assessment with the following words: jazz, blended, rummage, fumble, resolution, and bawling.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The Bookworms materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Bookworms Grade 5 materials provide opportunities for students to purposely read on-level text through the weekly opportunities to participate in choral reading and partner reading in the Shared Reading Lessons. These readings are followed by a comprehension discussion about the text. In addition, students have opportunities to participate in echo reading, choral reading, partner reading and whisper reading in the Targeting Fluency and Comprehension portion of How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3. While frequent fluency assessments are not provided, the materials do direct the teacher to the use of oral reading fluency assessments such as AIMSweb or DIBELS Next.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy and fluency in oral and silent reading. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to read grade-level text with purpose and understanding. For example: 
    • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 1, Day 1, students participate in choral reading of chapter 1 and 2 of Walk Two Moons. After reading chapter 1, the teacher models how to use inference about the main character’s feelings. Students then reread the text with a partner and are directed to pay attention to the colorful language that the author uses and answer: What does it tell us about Sal’s grandparents? Then students participate in discussion using the following comprehension questions:
      • What do you think a chickabiddy is?
      • Why do you think the author compares the story to a plaster wall? How does that use of language serve the author’s purpose?
      • Why do you think that Sal and her father moved? Give details to support your answer.
      • What did it mean to say that Sal’s mother was resting peacefully? Support your interpretation.
    • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 13, Day 1, students participate in choral reading of chapter 1 of The Westing Game. After page 3, the teacher explains what a one way mirror is and that it may be a clue about the characters. Students then reread the text with a partner and think about how the characters are related to one another. The students then participate in discussion using the following comprehension questions:
      • What is unusual about the tenants being invited to see and rent the apartments?
      • How can we tell that Barney Northrup (whoever he is) has a plan? What is his motive?
      • How can we use the mailbox list on page 5 to help us keep track?
      • What do we learn about Old Man Westing?
      • Why is the doorman bitter?
      • Why do you think the author provides the details about the two boys who got scared in the house?
      • What do we learn about Turtle when she says that she would go in?
      • What is strange about Chris who sees the limper?
    • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 26, Day 1, the students participate in choral reading of chapter 1 and 2 of The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg. After reading page 2, the teacher models how to summarize. The students then reread the text with a partner to find out more about the characters and how they relate to each other. Then students participate in a discussion using the following comprehension questions:
      • Let’s reread the list of Things Uncle Hates. What do they tell us about him?
      • Why do you think Squinton Leach does not take better care of Homer and Harold?
      • What traits do you think Harold has?
      • What did you think that Squint was going to do when he rode off on the horse?
    • What would have happened to the boys if they kept hiding in the hay?
    • Why does Squint lie about Harold’s age?
    • Does Squinton Leach actually sell Harold to the army? Use evidence from the text.
  • In the Teacher Manual, Shared Reading: Comprehension, states that, “In Bookworms Reading and Writing, we always help students target important content by providing a specific focus before they read. This will help them access relevant prior knowledge and lead them toward an appropriate mental representation of text meaning. You will see that in multiple readings the students always have a new purpose for reading. We never target skills in our language with children; we always target meaning.” Additionally, “during choral reading, you will be prompted to model one of seven high-utility comprehension strategies. When you model, you tell the students how you use the strategy to increase your own comprehension of the text. Specifically, you tell what the strategy is, how you used it, and why you used it. Remember that modeling is showing your own thinking; it is different from prompting students to use strategies. Strategies targeted in these lessons are listed in the table below along with procedural cues. Note that we provide the text just before the spot where you think the modeling is most appropriate.”
  • In the Teacher Manual, Differentiated Instruction, Students have the opportunity to read text silently during this block of time. This block of time is called, “Self-Selected Reading” and the Teacher’s Manual explains that, “the classroom library should be a source of self-selected reading” where students have “the experience of selecting books by their own criteria.”

Materials support for reading or prose and poetry with attention to rate, accuracy, and expression, as well as direction for students to apply reading skills when productive struggle is necessary. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. For example: 
    • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 7, Day 1, students participate in choral reading of pages 4 through 7 of Animal Cells. Students reread the text with a partner.
    • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 12, Day 1, students participate in choral reading of pages 1 through 5 of The Sun. Students reread the text with a partner.
    • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 24, Day 2, students participate in choral reading of pages 4 through 7 of Ice to Steam: Changing States of Matter. Students reread the text with a partner.
  • In the Teacher Manual, “during every day’s shared reading, you will lead the whole class in reading the day’s selection aloud.” Additionally, “If the day’s selection is too long, stop choral reading and read the rest of the day’s text aloud. Then move to partner reading. If you skip partner reading, you will not realize the gains in fluency and comprehension that rereading accomplishes.” Students have the opportunity for repeated reading through either choral or echo reading, then partner rereading each day during Shared Reading. Partners are expected to take the roles of reader and coach, where “the reader reads to his or her partner with expression” and “the coach should read along whiles the reader reads, and prompt the reader to reread whenever there is an error.”

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for Gateway 2. Materials do provide organized and cohesive year-long academic vocabulary support, as well as comprehensive writing instruction that supports students in building their writing skills. Students have some practice to analyze different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. The materials partially meet the expectations of building students’ knowledge of topics, with some texts and text sets supporting a topic. Texts are accompanied by questions, tasks, and activities that partially support attention to the topics within and building knowledge.

Criterion 2a - 2h

Materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.
24/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. Shared Reading lessons include a mix of both literature and informational texts.

During the Shared Reading lessons when informational texts are used, students have some opportunities to build knowledge of a topic through multiple reads, collaborative discussions, and writing in response to reading.  ELA units include several topics; however texts are inconsistently organized around a topic/topics to build knowledge. In some sections, the materials provide limited teaching notes that give guidance on how teachers can support students building knowledge of a topic, and a single text set rarely includes more than two books, thus limiting the students' opportunities to apply knowledge and vocabulary in a new context.


For example:

  • Weeks 11-12, Shared Reading, students learn about the sun, the ocean, and related science content while reading the texts The Sun and Ocean by Seymour Simon. The teacher also uses the texts to teach students about the structure and text features of informational texts.
  • Weeks 7-8, Shared Reading, students build knowledge around the topic of plant and animal cells, and their structures and processes while reading Animal Cells and Plant Cells and Life Processes by Barbara A. Somervil. The lesson is supported in Week 9, ELA Lesson, when students write a compare and contrast informative piece on plants and animal cells.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.


Throughout the lessons, students work independently and collaboratively to complete questions and tasks requiring analysis of individual texts. Lessons in ELA and Shared Reading include close reads with sequenced and scaffolded questions. Key ideas are targeted through specific questions and are designed to guide the thinking process toward precise, accurate details to help students identify main ideas, settings, characters, and chronological events. Students are also required to use inferencing skills, determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary in the text, and complete writing tasks with analysis of the message or lesson in a story. Students are supported with graphic organizers during Shared Reading lessons, for both vocabulary and written responses.


Examples include:

  • In Week 3, ELA Lesson Plan, Day 1, students read Keep On! The Story of Matthew Henson by Deborah Hopkinson and are asked a series of questions to support language analysis including, “What does the author mean when she says Matthew was ‘keen as an arctic fox’? What did Matthew mean when he said he was ‘an able-bodied seaman’? Talk it over with your partner. What does the author mean when she says ‘she seemed like a star gliding on water’? What is she referring to?”
  • In Week 7, Shared Reading, Day 4, after reading Animal Cells by Barbara A. Somervill, students are asked questions to support understanding of important information including, “Why does the author compare a single-celled organism to an elephant? How is euglena different from an amoeba? Contrast the two organelles. Why does a paramecium need to live in a pond?”
  • In Week 10, Shared Reading, Days 1-5, after multiple reads of Volcano by Patricia Lauber, students are asked a series of questions to support comprehension including, “What did the author mean when she described the volcano as sleeping and walking? Is that literal language? What was the difference between the stone wind and the avalanche? What does it mean to say that each kind of life makes some other kind possible?”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.


Students encounter many opportunities to analyze knowledge and ideas within a single text; however, there are limited practice opportunities and explicit tasks requiring students to integrate knowledge and ideas across multiple texts. The materials provide more opportunities for knowledge integration with discussion-based questions than with written responses. The Shared Reading section of the Teacher Manual states nearly all Shared Reading questions are inferential, requiring students to combine information from within the text or between the text and prior knowledge. The Teacher Manual also states that written responses in the Shared Reading lessons are designed to help students demonstrate and deepen comprehension daily, whereas the written responses in the ELA Lessons are used to help model thinking for composition processes and is separate from Shared Reading.

During each daily lesson, students discuss a series of questions and then answer a final question during written response. The written responses during the do not consistently require students to integrate knowledge and ideas from the text. The texts are more often used as a reference, and students do not consistently need the text to complete the writing.

  • Weeks 1-6, Shared Reading, students read Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech and integrate ideas throughout the lessons. Questions include:
    • How can we tell there is a story within a story going on here? Students are asked to find specific quotes to justify their answers.
    • After rereading two chapters, students are asked to find quotes to support their answers to the question: What do we learn about Sal’s relationship with her mother?
  • Week 12, Shared Reading, students read The Sun by Seymour Simon, and are asked to respond to the several text-based tasks throughout the lessons. Examples include:
    • Reread and make a list of things that you already knew and things that were new to you in these pages.
    • The words and the diagram on pages 8-9 work together. For each part of the sun labeled in the diagram, go back to the text and find its description. Write a summary about the layers of the sun. In this example, students do have to attend to new information and knowledge gained from the text.  

In Week 19, Shared Reading, Days 1-5, after reading part of Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis, students are asked to use the text to answer questions about the main character. First students discuss in pairs, “What do we learn about his personality or traits?” Next, they are asked, “Why was Jerry sad about his new home? Can you find a quote to support your answer? Why was Bud sad?” Students then chart details and complete a written response to the prompt, “Reread and describe the reasons Bud gives that being six is hard. Provide a quote to support your argument." These questions are focused on the text, but do not provide much support for students to answer questions showing knowledge beyond comprehension of the text itself. 


Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

The instructional materials include cumulative tasks throughout the year that inconsistently require students to integrate skills to demonstrate knowledge. There are some shared reading lesson over several weeks that focus on knowledge building around a general topic; however, students have limited opportunities to demonstrate knowledge learned. The end of the year cumulative project is the same for Grades 3, 4, and 5 and focuses on self reflection.

The materials do include many instances of students writing to questions, but these do consistently act as cumulative demonstrations of knowledge learned in preceding questions and reading.

Some representative examples of how the program supports students in demonstrating their learning through culminating tasks include, but are not limited to: 

  • ELA Lesson, Week 9, after reading the texts, Animal Cells and Plant Cells and Life Processes by Barbara A. Somervil, students use the notes gathered throughout the Shared Reading lessons to write an informative compare and contrast essay about plant and animal cells. In this example, the students do demonstrate knowledge gained through the preceding reading and work.
  • ELA Lessons in Weeks 2, 23, 25, and 33 cumulatively build students’ knowledge and skills in opinion narrative writing throughout the school year. Week 2 begins with initial instruction on opinion writing and students write about their opinion on a self-chosen topic. In successive weeks, the teacher models how to use reasons and evidence from a variety of sources to support an opinion. This does provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate their skills in writing and reasoning, but does not necessarily support them demonstrating building knowledge. 
  • In Week 33, the students integrate the skills they learned on opinion writing to create a book advertisement as a culminating task.  Students write and present their advertisements to incoming Grade 5 students. In this example the focus of the work is on the integration of literacy skills as students read, write, speak, and listen. Although students do anchor it in their self-selected topic, the teacher will need to provide support for students’ topic choice.
  • ELA Lesson, Week 34 students complete a cumulative task about their reading and writing identity. They write a memoir reflecting on how their feelings have changed about themselves as readers and writers throughout the year. Students design covers and perform a museum walk. This example does not include connection to new knowledge or topic, although students are practicing self reflection.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.


Evidence of a year-long plan for vocabulary starts in the Teacher Manual. Shared Reading lessons include a Word Study segment, designed to bring attention to the spelling and word meaning of vocabulary words. Students also engage in explicit vocabulary instruction during Shared Reading, through word meaning, multiple meanings, and super sentences. Words selected for this part of the lesson come from the day’s text, and are displayed and introduced prior to reading. Most of the words selected have multiple meanings, and the Shared Reading lesson builds awareness of “how context constraints these meanings.” Following explicit instruction, students read the words in context and write sentences using the words. Students use semantic webs to plan compound or complex super sentences. ELA Lesson plans incorporate vocabulary instruction primarily in the Model a Comprehension Strategy and Ask Questions During Reading segments of the lesson. Appendix D in the Teacher Manual includes an overview of vocabulary words chosen for each week. Although the vocabulary routines are explicit and consistent throughout the year, the routines do not vary or increase in the rigor of application required by the student.

  • Shared Reading daily vocabulary routine includes “Teach Meaning Vocabulary,” which is direct instruction for vocabulary words, and “Assign Written Response,” which requires students to create a super sentence for the words. The super sentence often includes an additional task of incorporating a reading comprehension strategy. For example:
    • Week 10 Shared Reading, while reading Volcano by Patricia Lauber, during Teach Meaning Vocabulary, students use a diagram from the text to determine the meanings of the words magma, layers, lava, and eruption. During the Assign Written Response, students write Super Sentences with the words.
  • ELA lesson incorporates vocabulary instruction into Interactive Reading during the “Model a Comprehension Strategy” and “Ask Questions During Reading” segments. The words are pulled for their relevance to teaching the text. For example:
    • Week 5, ELA Lesson, Day 2, students read Rats Around Us by Rachel Eagen. During “Model a Comprehension Strategy and Ask Questions During Reading,” the teacher shows the students an animal classification table. The teacher uses think aloud and models using the dictionary to find the phylum to which rats belong because the information was needed to complete the table. The teacher explains the word Chordata, meaning having a spinal cord. Students then explain the terms in the table in a written response.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.


Students are supported through the writing process, and various activities are placed throughout lessons to ensure students’ writing skills are increasing throughout the year. Students are encouraged to develop writing stamina by writing frequently and for various purposes. Students engage in reading and discussion of texts similar to those they are planning to write, and they examine and identify a range of text structures. They are guided to assess the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing. Students are instructed on the nuances of the different types of writing during the ELA Lessons, using checklists and rubrics. During Shared Reading, students write in response to reading with question prompts in opinion, narrative, and informative genres. The “Writing” Appendix in the Teacher Manual explains the design of writing instruction, stating it is intentionally “structurally repetitive”. Students engage in the same sequence with different content throughout the year as follows:

  • Learn the characteristics of the genre
  • Evaluate good and poor examples of the genre
  • Learn to plan the genre
  • Learn to draft the genre
  • Learn to revise, both with peers and independently


For example:
Opinion Writing

  • In Week 2, ELA Lesson, students are introduced to their initial opinion writing instruction for the year. After reading Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech, the teacher models using a checklist and a graphic organizer, and students respond to the prompt, “If you were going to dinner with a friend, would you rather eat at Sal’s grandparents’ house or Phoebe’s parents’ house? Why? Support your opinion with details.”
  • In Weeks 23-25, ELA Lesson, students use the opinion writing checklist and graphic organizer to build an argument about whether or not it’s ever acceptable to tell a lie. Students use the writing to participate in a debate.

Narrative Writing

  • In Week 1, ELA Lesson, students are introduced to narrative writing and write their own personal narrative with minimal guidance and support from the teacher. After writing, students work in groups to write narrative pieces and learn the writing process. The learn to use the graphic organizer and narrative checklist.
  • In Week 6, ELA Lesson, students learn that all different types of fiction can be narrative texts, such as mysteries, survival stories, humorous stories, and adventure stories. Then students write a realistic or fantasy adventure story.  This lesson builds from instruction in Week 1.

Informative

  • In Week 9, ELA Lesson, Days 4-5 students learn about the point-by-point structure, transition and linking words for a compare and contrast essay. Students then work through the stages of the writing process to write a draft explaining how plant and animal cells are the same and how they are different.
  • In Weeks 13-15, ELA Lesson, students research in order to write a newspaper article in response to the prompt, “What was it like to live in the Civil Rights Movement?” Students are expected to meet several criteria, including the use of three sources.
  • In Weeks 29-30, ELA Lesson, students conduct a research project on the Trail of Tears. Students use the informative writing graphic organizer and checklist, and respond to the questions, “Why were the Native Americans forced to leave their land? What dangers or struggles did the Native Americans face on their journey? What impact did the relocation have on the Native Americans after they arrived on their new land? How were the experiences of the various tribes on the Trail of Tears similar and different?”

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. Students have some practice to analyze different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.


ELA lessons are built around interactive read-alouds, text-based writing prompts, and a wide range of brief writing tasks. Longer writing pieces during the ELA lessons are focused more on genre and sometimes combine the genre writing with research around a topic. Shared Reading lessons ask students to write in direct response to the texts, however, they have some opportunities to write short responses using information learned from multiple texts. Teachers build students’ early research skills by modeling how to take notes, compose informative essays, and utilize resources for information. However, there are limited opportunities for students to engage in applying these learned skills in focused research projects using multiple texts and source materials for in-depth learning and to prepare them to engage in research work at the end of the year.


Examples include:

  • In Week 10, Shared Reading, students read Volcano by Patricia Lauber. After reading chapter 2 of the text, students complete a “short research project.” Rereading and using the illustrations, students write a short front-page news story about the events of the volcano eruption.
  • In Week 19, ELA Lesson, students compare and contrast information from an article about the Underground Railroad and Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold, to write a report.
  • In Weeks 29-30, ELA Lesson, students conduct a research project on the Trail of Tears, using the internet and The Porcupine Years by Louis Erdich. The teacher directs the students to use Google to search Trail of Tears and create a list of research questions using jot notes. The teacher guides students to think about what more they want to know about the topic, and to generate a broad research question that cannot be answered in a few paragraphs.


Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. Independent reading within the daily lessons is most often represented by re-reading text from instruction during Shared Reading. During the Differentiated Instruction block, self-selected reading is a task students can choose to complete after they have finished other tasks such as word work, text-based responses, and work with the teacher.


In the Teacher Manual, in Differentiated Instruction, there is a section titled “Self-Selected Reading.” This section explains that Bookworms was designed to maximize authentic, connected reading and writing every day and states, “For teachers who want to hold students accountable for their choices, we recommend a Book Recommendation Board.” The Teacher’s Manual also explains that Bookworms does not recommend restricting students’ book choices based on level and that students should be able to self-select books of interest from classroom libraries. This basic guidance does partially meet the expectations.


The Differentiated Instruction portion of the ELA block does not have specific daily lessons for the teachers to use. The Teacher Manual provides a reference to books used for curriculum development and brief overviews of parts of differentiated instruction.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

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Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

Implementation of the 90-minute instructional block, consists of three 45-minute blocks including Shared Reading, ELA Lessons, and Differentiated Instruction. Although there isn't a prescribed order for planning the three blocks, the Teacher Manual states the importance of the 45 minute-each time allocation.

Shared Reading lessons are designed as teacher supported lessons of fiction and non-fiction “intact” books, with repetitive routines for word study, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension.

ELA Lessons include narrative read-alouds with associated vocabulary instruction, grammar instruction, strategy-oriented, and genre-based instruction.

The Differentiated Instruction does not target instructional reading level. According to the Teacher Manual, differentiation is Tier II instruction, and students are placed in groups based on an informal reading inventory and Oral Reading Fluency data. An example routine includes 15 minutes with the teacher, and 30 minutes to complete written responses, word study, or vocabulary.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

Bookworms Reading and Writing Curriculum consists of three 45-minute daily instructional blocks with a complete span of 36 weeks. Appendix C of the Teacher Manual provides an overview of instruction for the year. According to the Teacher Manual, grade-level teams are expected to map out the curriculum weeks to align with the school calendar, accounting for school activities and testing. Within the 45-minute instructional blocks, teachers and students should have ample time to complete the entire lesson. However, while the materials include specific instructional sequences for the three blocks, no suggested time allotment or pacing for the various segments within the instructional block is included.

Additional notes in the Teacher Manual referring to time include:

  • “Do not use Bookworms Reading and Writing unless you make the time.”
  • Teachers need intact segments of time for Shared Reading and ELA blocks. They can be completed in any order, with interruptions limited to the breaks between blocks. Literacy instruction must include 90 minutes daily.
  • No outside worksheets will fit into the program because the time allocated for each instructional block is filled with the lesson curriculum.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (eg. visuals, maps, etc.)

Teacher materials include first-person scripts to support teacher and student understanding. ELA Lessons provide more resources, directions, and explanations for both the teacher and the student. Lessons include think alouds, graphic organizers, checklists, anchor charts, model writing, and directives for students to share in discussions.

Shared Reading planning notes, teacher explanations, and student supports are more brief. Student workbooks include space to complete written responses to prompts, bold vocabulary words with definitions, parts of speech, and sentences. There are also blank semantic maps, however no directions are provided about how students should complete and use these maps. “Engage in Comprehension” for example, is simply a list of questions. Teacher notes and sample student responses are not included for “Engage in Discussion”, “Assign Written Response”, or “Model Written Response” segments of the Shared Reading or ELA lessons.

Differentiation is not directly supported in the Bookworms materials beyond the brief overview in the Teacher Manual. An outside text for purchase is suggested for support with the note, “Teachers cannot implement our routines without the materials and explanations in that book. It is available cheaply.”

  • ELA Lesson, Week 2, “Learning About Opinion Writing,” students review sample opinion texts using the Opinion Writing Checklist. The teaching notes give detailed instructions for the teacher to explicitly teach the checklist by modeling how to use it.
  • Shared Reading, Week 13, students read The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin. During the “Teacher Text Structure Anchor Chart” segment of the lesson, the teacher tells students they will need two anchor charts; one to keep track of character information and one to keep track of clues. The teaching notes do not provide an example or model anchor chart.
  • ELA Lesson, Week 30, students read Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt. During the “Engage in Discussion” segment of the lesson, there is a list of comprehension questions with no model responses or teaching notes provided.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

ELA and Shared Reading block lessons specifically denote the standards to which the lesson tasks align. There is no scope and sequence document provided in the materials. Therefore, teachers need to refer to each individual lesson to determine which standards are being taught, and map them out to determine the frequency with which they are being taught.

  • ELA Lesson 3, Day 5, in “Learning About Informative Writing” the standards addressed are SL.5.1b, SL.5.1d, W.5.2. Students learn the elements of informative writing by analyzing sample texts for informative criteria.
  • Shared Reading, Week 11, Day 4, students read Oceans by Seymour Simon. The standards addressed in the lesson are W.5.2 and W.5.9. Students respond to a series of three prompts about the text and using vocabulary from the text.
  • ELA Lesson 21, Day 4, students read A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park. The standards addressed in the lesson are RL.5.1, RL.5.3, RL.5.4, and RL.5.5. Students practice and apply these standards through discussion, use of an anchor chart, vocabulary instruction, and sentence composition.
  • Shared Reading, Week, 30, Day 5, students read The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrick. Standards addressed in this “Provide First Focus” lesson are RL.5.10, RL.5.3, RL.5.5, and RL.5.6. Students practice and apply these standards when engaging in choral reading, and comprehension discussion with peers.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

Print material for students is a set of Shared Reading workbooks, organized by weeks. Workbooks are clearly labeled by weeks, days, lessons, and lesson segments. The workbooks are consumable, so students are able to write directly in the book. Standards are not labeled in the workbook. There are no digital student materials.

  • Pages are labeled on the sides with Shared Reading weeks.
  • Pages are labeled at the top with the day and name of the text from Shared Reading.
  • Segments of the Shared Reading lessons are clearly labeled: Meaning Vocabulary; Written Response; and Word Sort.
  • Each page has ample space with lines for students to write.
  • Font is clear and large, and there are no unnecessary distractions on the pages.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

ELA lessons and Shared Reading both contain instructional notes and annotations. This is mostly done through the use of first-person teacher think aloud annotations. The ELA lessons provide more notes and suggestions than the Shared Reading lessons. In both parts of the literacy block within the Teacher Manual, sample answers to discussion questions and assigned writing are not included. There are samples that accompany the rubrics and checklists for the overall curriculum in the Teacher Manual tab, but they are not provided as support within each lesson. Periodically there are mentions of technology components, such as videos and websites that are integrated or referenced for use during the lesson.

  • Week 3, ELA Lesson, Day 1 “Planning Notes” to accompany the text Keep On! The Story of Matthew Henson by Deborah Hopkinson. “A globe will be useful for showing the Arctic region that Henson explored. Photographs can complement the story, such as the commemorative stamp issued that shows Henson and Peary, and actual photograph of Matthew Henson, and the classic photo taken at the Pole, which was the basis of the final illustration. These images can be found online.”
  • Week 13, ELA Lesson, students work to complete a research project on Civil Rights. On Day 5, the teacher shows students how to utilize the website duckster.com. Later in Week 14, the teacher models how to use factmonster.com to gather information for the research paper.
  • Week 30, Shared Reading, Day 1 teaching notes to accompany the text The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrick. After reading page 155 and chapter 28, “Professor Fleabottom has just been accused of being a spy! This makes me think about all of the things Professor Fleabottom has been doing. Do you think he is?”

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The Teacher Manual provides information regarding the research behind the design of the curriculum, rationale on text selection, explanations for differentiated instruction design, and the structure of writing instruction. The Teacher’s Manual refers to several other texts as the research-based design of the program. Teachers need to read the additional texts to deepen their learning.

  • “The most important thing to know about Bookworms Reading and Writing from the start is that research informs the design. We began with a small-group multiple entry skills curriculum. That curriculum is included in How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3 Wapole, S., & McKenna, M.C. (2017). How to plan differentiated reading instruction: Strategies for grades K-3 (2nd ed). New York, NY: Guilford Press. and in Differentiated Reading Instruction in Grades 4 and 5: Strategies and Resources Wapole, S., McKenna, M.C., & Phillapakos Z (2011). Differentiated reading instruction in grades 4 & 5: Strategies & Resources. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
  • "We drew upon three specific resources, identified below, and each of them is worth consideration as a book study on its own Coker, D. L., & Ritchey, K. D. (2015). Teaching beginning writers. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Philippakos, Z. A., MacArthur, C. A., & Coker, D. L. (2015). Developing strategic writers through genre instruction: Resources for grades 3-5. New York, NY: Guilford Press.Owocki, G. (2013). The Common Core writing book: Lessons for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. The first two texts distilled the cognitively-oriented research in writing (most of which was conducted with students with disabilities) and presented that research for a teacher audience and for a wider range of students. The third text includes extensive support for developing the craft of writing.”
  • “To support teachers to develop their skills in the teaching of writing, we have constructed the lesson plans in first person. Our goal is that you read these plans as if you were watching a master writing teacher teach. Over time, as you build your own skills and see the opportunity for connections and repetitive language, you will be able to make the language your own. At the start, you may want to use the lesson plan language more closely, but you will never be able to simply read it aloud.”

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

The Teacher Manual includes an explanation of how the ELA/Literacy standards align to the curriculum, and are used within the different parts of the literacy block. However, the curriculum does not provide a scope and sequence to show when the ELA/Literacy standards are taught throughout the year, or correlations to ELA or Shared Reading lessons. The curriculum includes an ELA/Literacy table, and it is up to the teacher to determine which parts of the lesson are connected to each standard.  

  • “We define Shared Reading as teacher-supported grade-level reading, similar in purpose to the whole-group portion of a traditional core program. However, our curriculum is different from a traditional commercial core in three ways: (1) it uses only intact books, and (2) it is calibrated to the Common Core State Standards for text difficulty, and (3) the lesson plans and manual are available for free.”
  • “The nature of standards influenced by the Common Core State Standards and the high-volume design of Bookworms Reading and Writing interact to produce daily opportunities for addressing multiple standards. We have identified those opportunities for teachers who want to track their work and for those who post standards each day. We have referenced word recognition and decoding standards as they are addressed each week in word study. Fluency standards are referenced in Shared Reading, as are text difficulty standards. Grade level reading literature and informational text standards are referenced daily in Shared Reading and interactive read aloud plans, as are speaking and listening standards. Language standards are referenced during sentence composing. Writing standards are referenced during text-based responses to Shared Reading and during genre-based writing instruction, and then practiced daily in text-based responses. Research standards are marked in our research units.”

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies.

Throughout the Teacher Manual, the Bookworms curriculum provides explanations of the instructional approaches and the research behind the strategies and development of the curriculum. For Shared Reading, ELA Lessons, and Differentiated Instruction, rationales are provided with the titles of the additional texts, and research for teachers to reference for additional information.:

  • ELA Lesson Read-Alouds: “About half of the days, the ELA block uses an engaging book as a means of exposing students to rich language, developing comprehension ability, expanding vocabulary, and building knowledge Santoro, L. E., Chard, D. J., Howard, L., & Baker, S. K. (2008). Making the very most of classroom read-alouds to promote comprehension and vocabulary. The Reading Teacher, 61, 396-408.Teale, W. H. (2003). Reading aloud to young children as a classroom instructional activity: Insights from research and practice. In A. van Kleeck, A. A. Stahl, & E. B. Bauer (Eds.), On reading books to children: Parents and teachers (pp. 114-139). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. The practice of reading aloud to students should be a mainstay throughout the elementary years, not just in the primary grades. Their advantages exist well after students have learned to decode Cunningham, A. E. (2005). Vocabulary growth through independent reading and reading aloud to children. In E. H. Hiebert & M. L. Kamil (Eds.), Teaching and learning vocabulary: Bringing research to practice (pp. 45-67). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.”
  • Writing Instruction: “That approach, like the rest of the program, is informed by research. We drew upon three specific resources, identified below, and each of them is worth consideration as a book study on its own Coker, D. L., & Ritchey, K. D. (2015). Teaching beginning writers. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Philippakos, Z. A., MacArthur, C. A., & Coker, D. L. (2015). Developing strategic writers through genre instruction: Resources for grades 3-5. New York, NY: Guilford Press.Owocki, G. (2013). The Common Core writing book: Lessons for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. The first two texts distilled the cognitively-oriented research in writing (most of which was conducted with students with disabilities) and presented that research for a teacher audience and for a wider range of students.
  • Differentiated Instruction: “Teachers may be familiar with definitions of differentiation that include choices about differentiating products, processes, or content Tomlinson, C. A. (1999). The differentiated classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Our Differentiation block is a type of content differentiation, but it is very different from the guided reading model Fountas, I. C., & Pinnell, G. S. (1996). Guided reading: Good first teaching for all student. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. that is commonly used for differentiation.”

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

In the Teacher Manual, there is a section titled, “Family Connections”. This section explains the importance of communicating with families at the beginning of the year to inform them about the design of the curriculum and provide information about word study. The publisher includes two sample letters for teachers to use to communicate with families. In addition, there is a section titled Homework. This section provides an explanation to teachers on the Bookworm philosophy of homework and provides suggestions to teachers about how to design homework. Information about homework for families is not provided.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

The Evaluation tab in the Teacher Manual, explains how Assessments are used to support teachers in monitoring progress throughout the year. Weekly word study tests and bi-weekly on-demand written responses are used to assess comprehension, and longer writing tasks are used to assess composition and mechanics. Foundational skills assessments, such as an Informal Decoding Inventory, are provided by the publisher to support diagnostic data. Writing assessments assess student competency in narrative, opinion, and informational writing. Standards-based rubrics are included for evaluation of written responses.

Bookworms also recommends the use of additional holistic assessments in reading and writing, including Achieve the Core for on-demand writing tasks and reading mini-assessments. The reading mini-assessments include text-dependent questions and constructed response questions. Bookworms recommends that for each nine-week grading period, schools choose either a writing or reading assessment to track student progress over time.

The publisher does not include an assessment scope and sequence for teachers to see exactly where different assessments fall during the course of instruction. Appendix C shows assessments as it pertains to the Differentiated Instruction part of the literacy block. Assessments during Shared Reading and ELA Lessons are not included in this appendix. Teachers would need to go through each lesson to find where the assessments are located in Shared Reading and ELA Lessons.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

Assessments in the Bookworms Reading and Writing curriculum come from publisher created assessments and holistic assessments from Achieve the Core. Assessments from the publisher do not include clearly denote standards on the assessments. Spelling and word study assessments are listed within a lesson, but they do not include which standards are assessed. Assessments for writing found within the lessons include a table with standards. The writing grading rubrics provided in the Teacher Manual, reference the standards in the explanation of the rubric, but the rubric does not include clearly denoted standards. Holistic assessments from Achieve the Core include clearly denoted standards, and correlations between the questions asked and the standard.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

The Bookworms Reading and Writing curriculum provides guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance through the use of rubrics and checklists. However, the curriculum does not include suggestions for follow up with students based on the outcome of the data. The curriculum does not provide guidance for teachers to support students who do not show proficiency, or for students who need extension. Materials provided:

  • Checklists and Rubrics for Narrative, Opinion, and Informative Writing
  • Super Sentence Rubric
  • Writing Response Rubric
  • Sample Responses for daily formative tasks.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Instructional materials provide some routines and guidance to monitor student progress. These include informal checklists, constructed response rubrics, daily writing in response to reading, use of graphic organizers, and daily discussion questions. There are limited sample student responses within the daily lessons. The daily discussion questions and writing in response to reading assignments, do not include sample student responses to help support the teacher in determining if students are meeting the level of expectation as required by the literacy standard and the curriculum. Bookworms provide checklists and rubrics for longer writing assignments. Although it is not explicitly stated, these tools can be used to gather data on student progress in writing. The Teacher Manual, Evaluation tab includes the following:

  • Grading: Provides teachers with rubrics for Super Sentences, Written Responses, Word Study assessments, example student responses, and example grading responses. These rubrics are referred to during daily lessons in ELA Lessons and Shared Reading.
  • Writing: Provides teachers with checklists for Conventions and rubrics for Narrative, Informational, and Opinion writing.
  • Speaking and Listening: Provides a speaking and listening checklist where the standards are listed and the teacher can mark “consistently, sometimes, or rarely” for how students demonstrate the speaking and listening standards.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

The Bookworms Reading and Writing curriculum does not include independent reading or accountability for independent reading as a focus of the curriculum. Self-selected reading is an option, not a requirement, within the Differentiated block. One of the options students can choose during the three 15-minute rotations is self-selected reading. Accountability, stamina, and building motivation towards independent reading are done through student choice to read independently, and from teachers intentionally creating these opportunities. The Teacher Manual, Differentiated Instruction tab, section Self-Selected Reading includes the following notes:

  • “The bookworms we know are not forced to read; they choose to read. For teachers who want to hold students accountable for their choices, we recommend a Book Recommendation board. When students finish reading a book from the classroom library, they can recommend it (or not!) by posting a card on the board.”
  • “The classroom library should be the source of self-selected reading, and we do not recommend restricting student choices. That means that students will have the experience of selecting books by their own criteria, by author connection, by theme or topic, or by perceived difficulty.”

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

The Teacher Manual includes a document titled “Opportunities,” located in the Evaluation tab. Within this document, teachers are given suggestions for differentiated instruction during Shared Reading and ELA Lessons. The charts and information include suggestions for both intact classrooms and push-in supports for “Weak Readers, English Learners, and Strong Readers”. The suggestions are not specific to daily lessons and provide general guidance for teachers on how they can differentiate instruction in grades 3-5. The charts do not address tiered levels of support with specific information for supporting the range of learners within the context of the lessons. There are no interventions or extensions that connect to literacy standards or content.

  • Weak Readers Differentiation Interactive Read Aloud, “During tier 2 word instruction, select the easiest sentence frame for students who are struggling to complete sentences orally, reserving the more complex ones for students with richer language knowledge.”
  • Weak Readers Differentiation for Shared Reading, “During choral reading, allow students to track print rather than read. Then during partner reading, pull students together to engage in choral reading.”
  • English Learners Shared Reading, “Teacher can add additional pictures or realia to support understanding.”
  • English Learners ELA: Interactive Read-Aloud, “Fluent reading is modeled every day; picture books provide visual support. Teacher has specific support for text explanation.”
  • Strong Readers Shared Reading, “Diagrams and charts support meaning by showing relationships among words. Even high-achieving students benefit from building these semantic networks.”

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

All students are exposed to grade level texts through daily lessons that include read alouds, independent reading, and partner reading. The Teacher Manual includes a document titled “Opportunities,” located in the Evaluation tab.  Within this document, teachers are given suggestions for weak readers and English learners. A chart lists the routine from the lesson and the suggested supports. For weak readers, the manual suggests allowing access to assistive technology, parallel teaching Tier II words, and providing additional think time.  

The information includes suggestions for both intact classrooms and push-in supports for English Learners. The daily plans for ELA and Shared Reading do not include any specific notes about differentiation or instructional strategies for English Language Learners within the context of the lesson. According the the Teacher Manual, the supports provided in Bookworms may not be enough for “newcomer” English learners, and these students may need basic oral English instruction as a substitute to the ELA or Shared Reading block.

  • Shared Reading
    • “Student hears a review of previous content from a peer, in child-friendly language.”
    • “Initial comprehension is monitored through a brief discussion.”
    • “Teacher can add additional pictures or realia to support understanding.”
    • “Teacher can add sentence frames to support answers for selected questions.”
    • “A summary of the text is always displayed in the classroom, providing opportunity for review.”
    • “Student can listen and track print rather than read chorally.”
  • ELA: Interactive Read Aloud
    • “Teacher can choose to use the text anchor chart for review for some students while others share, with repetition and frame sentences.”
    • “Fluent reading is modeled every day; picture books provide visual support. Teacher has specific support for text explanation.”
    • “Teacher can divide the class into groups, with some students completing the response without support and others engaged in shared writing with the teacher.”
    • “Teacher can add additional explanation and visual support.”

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

The “Opportunities” section of the Teacher Manual contains a chart of suggestions for strong readers. Many of the suggestions include pairing two high achieving students together. Frequently throughout the document, the suggested extension support is listed as “none necessary”. Within the daily lesson plans for both ELA and Shared Reading plans do not include guidance for teachers on differentiation or instructional strategies for students that require enrichment. The chart also recommends engaging students to assist in certain components of the lesson such as updating the anchor chart.

  • Shared Reading
    • “Ask two high-achieving readers to share their responses with one another, ensuring that both get an additional example of a high-level response.”
    • “Comprehension is extended through inferential discussion. Pair two high-achieving students together so that they can challenge one another’s evolving comprehension. Look through the day’s questions and reserve an especially difficult one to ask a high-achieving student.”
    • “Repeated reading deepens comprehension and builds fluency. There is nothing damaging for high achieving students to do this. If you have students who have absolutely no issues with fluency and do not like to read aloud, you might pair them together and ask them to read silently during this time. If a very high-achieving student does enjoy reading aloud, consider pairing that student with a student with a read aloud accommodation; the high achieving student can read to the student who needs that help.”
  • Differentiation
    • “These students will be in vocabulary and comprehension groups, so you will already be differentiating the process (to a single silent reading) and the content (by selecting texts). Consider using more information texts targeting unknown, interesting content knowledge rather than using narratives well above grade level unless you are certain that their content is developmentally appropriate.”
    • “These responses are naturally differentiated. You can keep the task the same and still communicate very high (above grade level) expectations for written work to students who can handle them.”
  • ELA Lessons
    • “Teacher writes a brief summary of text meaning every day. Engaging students with especially strong summarizing abilities to help decide what to write provides some additional challenge.”
    • “Grammar lessons use meaningful selections from text. Teachers provide direct explanation and manipulate sentences visually. Higher achieving students are likely to participate more in these sessions.”
    • “Students are assigned to work on the day’s task, often in partners, with the support of graphic organizers and checklists. This work is naturally differentiated, but partners can be assigned strategically to link two strong writers.”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. The Bookworms Reading and Writing curriculum uses a repetitive approach to routines and instruction. This includes the grouping strategies that are used during instruction. In the ELA Lessons that focus on writing, grouping strategies include students working collaboratively in partners and small groups. ELA Lessons that include an interactive read aloud do not provide specific grouping strategies, other than stating “Engage Students in Discussion”. Shared Reading lessons include rereading with partners and sharing with partners. The Differentiated Instruction block groupings are explained in the Differentiated Instruction section of the Teacher Manual. This section explains how the 45-minute block students would have 15-minutes of time with the teacher and 30-minutes to complete their written responses to Shared Reading and when finished, students could engage in self-selected reading from the classroom library.

  • ELA Lesson, Week 1, “Students will work in partners or small groups to determine whether texts are narrative or not narrative. Students should be prepared to share why they labeled one text narrative or not narrative.” On Day 3, pairs pair up to defend which piece was the strongest and why using the narrative checklist.
  • ELA lesson, Week 16, Day 3 students read The Flu of 1918 by Jessica Rudolph. Students are asked to, “Review the book to this point, referring to the semantic map you have been constructing. Then ask partners to share their theories about why it took people different amounts of time to show symptoms.”
  • Shared Reading Lesson Plan, Week 23, Day 1, the teacher introduces the text, text structure anchor chart, and vocabulary to the whole group. Students engage in choral reading and then students reread the text with partner.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The Bookworms Reading and Writing curriculum digital platform is for teacher use only. On the digital platform, teachers will find a Teacher Manual which includes information including an overview of the curriculum design, suggested implementation routines, book lists, and grading rubrics. The digital platform also includes the lesson plans for both Shared Reading and ELA Lessons. The lesson plans are written in first-person and provide information for instruction, think alouds, and discussion questions. Assessments and answers to comprehension discussion questions are not available on the digital platform. The digital platform does not include any resources or lessons for Differentiated Instruction and does not include any materials for student access. The Bookworms Reading and Writing curriculum functions efficiently on all internet browsers. Chrome, Safari, and Firefox all launched the digital platform without any difficulty.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Technology and the use of technology is not a focus of the Bookworms Reading and Writing Curriculum. Within the Teacher Manual there is no mention of technology, or the philosophy of how the design of the curriculum uses or supports the use of technology. Although there is no explicit information about technology in the Teacher’s Manual, technology is included in both Shared Reading and ELA Lessons. Often times it is through a website or video link that teachers are encouraged to use to introduce students to a text, author, or concept. In the research projects students are encouraged and directed to use technology as a resource for information. It is in the research projects where technology is utilized more frequently in the lessons and by students.

  • ELA Lesson Plan, Week 13, Day 4, students begin the process of writing a research paper in the form of a newspaper article on the Civil Rights Movement. This research project is connected to the novel The Watsons Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis. Day 5, the teacher instructs students how to utilize Ducksters.com.  Week 14, Day 2, the teacher models the use of factmonster.com.
  • ELA Lesson Plan, Week 29, Day 2, the teacher suggests that students use three specific website urls to gather notes for the research project.
  • ELA Lesson Plan, Week 33, students use PowerPoint to create a book advertisement that will be shared with 4th graders.  Students select their favorite book from the year to create their presentation.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

The Bookworms Reading and Writing digital curriculum does not have an option for customization within the ELA Lessons and Shared Reading. The digital materials do not have the capability to be adapted, as all texts are accessed by reading full novels and books. The texts are not available to students digitally, and therefore no adaptive technologies are available while reading the texts. Teachers can view the lessons and curriculum, but they are not able to be downloaded and therefore the materials cannot be personalized for differentiation. The use of adaptive or other technologies are not supported in this program.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

In the Teacher’s Manual in the section titled “Planning,” the Bookworms Reading and Writing curriculum explains how districts, schools, and teachers should implement the curriculum. It specifically states in this document that “No outside worksheets will fit in this program.” The Teacher’s Manual also suggests since 36 weeks of instruction are planned, districts and schools would need to map the instructional days onto their own school year calendar in order to figure out how to build time for school or community activities, test preparation, and assessments required outside of the curriculum. It also states in the “Philosophy” section of the Teacher Manual there needs to be daily three- 45 minutes instructional blocks. Schools need to consider the time require for each daily block. “Please do not use Bookworms Reading and Writing unless you make the time.” “It is important for schools to understand the time requirements for Bookworms Reading and Writing and not to expect teachers to implement the lessons in a shortened format.”

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)

Integration of technology is limited within the Bookworms Reading and Writing curriculum and typically consists of references and links to videos and websites that can be used for additional information on the topic. Use of technology is for presentation and for research projects, however it is not used for student collaboration. There is one cumulative project at the end of the year when students are encouraged to collaborate on creating a book advertisement.

  • ELA Lesson, Week 33, Day 1, students begin the Cumulative Task: Book Advertisement. For the task, students are instructed to “Create an advertisement as a PowerPoint presentation, and you will need to include the elements of a book review.” The directions include the note, “If students are not familiar with PowerPoint, then they may use a different program.” On Day 3, partners revise and edit each other’s advertisements, and on Day 4, partners practice presenting their advertisement. On Day 5, students present their presentations to 4th graders.
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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 07/25/2019

Report Edition: 2018

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Bookworms Grade 5 Student Workbook, Beta Release: Add On Pack of 5 978-1-64311-039-4 Open Up Resources 2018

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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