Alignment: Overall Summary

The Grade 5 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment. The materials include include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Students have opportunities to build skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and they integrate language work throughout. Texts include a balance of genres and are appropriately rigorous and complex for Grade 5 students. Most tasks and questions are grounded in evidence. Materials address foundational skills where appropriate to support students' building their reading abilities to comprehend increasingly complex texts over the course of the school year. The instructional materials support the building of knowledge through repeated practice with appropriate grade-level complex text organized around a topic. Vocabulary is addressed in each module, though academic vocabulary is not built across multiple texts. Culminating tasks require students to read, discuss, analyze, and write about texts while students participate in a volume of reading to build knowledge. Writing instruction includes a year-long plan to support students' skills in on-demand and process writing. Modules are developed to support and build knowledge, integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening to demonstrate grade-level literacy proficiency at the end of the school year.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
38
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
30
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
33
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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-
Gateway One Details

The Grade 5 instructional materials meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. Most tasks and questions are grounded in evidence. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.Materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundationalskills and making meaning during reading. Materials also provide opportunity to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level.Overall, appropriately complex grade-level texts are are accompanied by quality tasks aligned to the standards of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language to build foundational skills and strengthen literacy skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
18/20
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials meet expectations for text quality and complexity. Central texts are of publishable quality and address topics of interests to Grade 5 students. Texts are at an appropriate level of rigor and complexity and include a balance of types to support Grade 5 students. The instructional materials include a text complexity analysis with rubrics and rationales for their purposes and placement.The materials support students increasing literacy skills over the year and provide students with many opportunities to engage in a range and volume of reading throughout each unit and module through anchor texts, supporting texts, and leveled libraries.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worth of careful reading and consider a range of interests.

Anchor texts and text sets encompass multiple themes and integrate content areas such as Social Studies and Science. Texts are examined multiple times for multiple purposes and are used to expand big ideas, build academic vocabulary, and facilitate access to future similar texts. Most texts are engaging, build knowledge, and facilitate access to future text while building towards independent grade-level reading.

Unit 1 Theme: Science Integration: Depending on Each Other

  • Unit 1, Module A: Night of the Spadefoot Toads by Bill Harley engages students with characters that are in the same grade. This realistic fiction book builds knowledge and understanding of analyzing characters and their traits to help better understand a text. This knowledge helps students to access other text in the module’s text set.
  • Unit 1, Module B: Washed Up by award winning author Payal Kapadia engages students with a book about a reality show. Students examine characters in the text and how the author describes the characters and their surroundings. Students use this text in connection with other texts to discover how different but related texts develop the big idea of the interactions between living things.

Unit 2 Theme: Social Studies Integration: Finding Courage

  • Unit 2, Module A: The Road to Freedom by Lesa Cline-Ransome has students examine the theme of finding courage with a text about the historical Underground Railroad. Students read the text for multiple purposes and gain knowledge to access other texts with similar themes.
  • Unit 2, Module B: Real-Life Superheroes by Alison Howes addresses the civil rights movement and historical events such as World War II. Students build academic vocabulary as well as domain-specific vocabulary to help access other texts in the module. Students determine main ideas and explain how they are supported by key details.

Unit 3 Topic: Science Integration: Understanding the Universe

  • Unit 3, Module A: Best seller George’s Secret Key to the Universe by Lucy and Stephen Hawking is a science fiction text in which students are asked to compare and contrast characters while drawing on specific details in the text. This text is used to expand on the big idea of asking and answering questions to better understand the world around you. Students gain knowledge in order to access future similar texts in the module.
  • Unit 3, Module B: Jess and Layla’s Astronomical Assignment by Lucy Courtenay builds knowledge about how scientists continue to study and reveal new information about the universe. Both academic and domain vocabulary introduced in this text help students build knowledge and access future texts. Students also use this text to continue to analyze characters and how an author describes the characters, setting, and events.

Unit 4 Topic: Social Studies Integration: Exploring New Worlds

  • Unit 4, Module A: Explorers: Triumphs and Troubles by Paul Mason is an informational text about world explorers and their journeys. The text includes academic vocabulary while introducing multiple topics that relate to explorers. The text includes illustrations, maps, captions and photos that aid in students building knowledge on topics including, but not limited to, Columbus, Vikings, European traders in China, John Cabot, Vespucci, and Cortes. Students use this knowledge to access other texts in the module’s text set.
  • Unit 4, Module B: Beyond the Horizon by Paul B. Mason is a narrative story about a girl sneaking onto an explorer ship and her journey. Students use knowledge about explorers gained in the first module of the unit to help better understand the characters and setting of this text. This text has a chronological story structure with multiple levels of meaning, including a challenging theme. Students build knowledge about the big idea about the benefits of studying the exploration of new places.

Supplementary texts included in each module’s text set also encompass the Unit themes and help to integrate content areas while expanding big ideas and academic vocabulary.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. There is an overall balance of informational and literary texts within the anchor texts and supporting texts. Of the 8 anchor texts, two are informational, and the rest are literary. The two informational texts focus on social studies topics (real life heroes and explorers). Other genres within the anchor texts and the supporting texts include historical fiction, poetry, and science fiction.

Below are some examples that represent the balance of text types and genres including anchor texts and supporting texts.

  • Anchor Text - Night of the Spadefoot Toads (Literary, Realistic Fiction)
  • Supporting Text - "Shells" from Every Living Thing (Literary, Realistic Fiction)
  • Supporting Text - Hatchet (Literary, Realistic Fiction)
  • Anchor Text - Washed Up! (Literary, Realistic Fiction)
  • Supporting Text - Pale Male (Informational)
  • Supporting Text - Rain Forest Food Chains (Informational)
  • Anchor Text - The Road to Freedom (Literary, Realistic Fiction)
  • Supporting Text - Operation Clean Sweep (Literary)
  • Supporting Text - Cesar Chavez (Informational)
  • Anchor Text - Real Life Superheroes (Informational)
  • Supporting Text - Angel Island (Informational)
  • Supporting Text - The Great Migration (Informational)

Drama is included in Unit 4, Lesson 18.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for text complexity, according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task(s).

The materials include quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task information in the Teacher Resources section. Most texts are aligned to the complexity requirements outlined in the Common Core Standards with text complexity rubrics appearing at the back of each ReadyGEN Teacher’s Guide.

  • Unit 1 Module B Washed Up! by Payal Kapadia 910L (Literary): This text contains chronological chapters with several storylines and conversational dialogue with a combination of simple, compound, and complex sentences. There is some challenging vocabulary.
  • Unit 2 Module A The Road to Freedom by Lesa Cline Ransome 780L (Literary): This text has a challenging concept with challenging vocabulary. There is a combination of simple, compound, and complex sentences.
  • Unit 3 Module A George’s Secret Key to the Universe by Lucy & Stephen Hawking 850L (Literary): This text contains an accessible concept with advanced vocabulary. There are a series of chapters with occasional text boxes of related facts.
  • Unit 3 Module B Jess and Layla’s Astronomical Assignment 910L (Literary): This text contains an accessible concept with scientific vocabulary. There are a series of scenes with artwork, captions, and supplemental information.
  • Unit 4 Module A Explorers: Triumphs and Troubles by Paul Mason 1000L (Informational): This text contains an accessible concept with a somewhat challenging topic. There is specific and academic vocabulary as well as a combination of compound and complex sentences. There are many text features.
  • Unit 4 Module B Beyond the Horizon 890L (Literary): This text is a narrative with chronological story structure. There are multiple levels of meaning as well as cultural vocabulary, figurative language, and a dialect.

Of the anchor texts that are not within the grade-level stretch band, a qualitative feature analysis provided gives additional insight as to the appropriateness of their placement in the curriculum. The following texts have Lexile levels below or above the grade level stretch band.

  • Unit 1 Module A Night of the Spadefoot Toads by Bill Harley 610L (Literary): This text is an accessible concept with general vocabulary. There are compound and complex sentence structures. The text complexity of this text is below Grade 5.
  • Unit 2 Module B Real-Life Superheroes by Alison Hawes 1030L (Informational): This text contains information about three real-life superheroes that students most likely have not learned about previously. The vocabulary is challenging with academic and domain-specific words. Students would need background knowledge about World War II and the Civil Rights Movement. The teacher would need to pre-teach background knowledge and vocabulary. The text complexity is above Grade 5.

Every text in the close reading materials (Sleuth) is within the Lexile band outlined in the standards.

The Leveled Text Library includes readers for each unit. The books in the library begin at the Lexile band at 450L (Egg Watching and The Best Community Service Project Ever) and go slightly above the Lexile band to 1200L (Greetings for the Four Corners! and The Mysteries of Space).

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for this indicator in that the complexity of the text does not increase throughout the course of the year when quantitative and qualitative measures are reviewed. As seen in the quantitative and qualitative analyses of the included texts, there is not clear, defined scaffolding of the texts to ensure that students are supported to access and comprehend grade-level texts at the end of the year. Students will engage with texts at varying levels Unit to Unit and quarter to quarter in a structure that may not provide support for accelerating their literacy growth.

Teachers are directed to use the text complexity rubrics to determine the support students will need to overcome challenges in the text as well as how to support accelerated learners. However, in the first and second units, the texts suggested for use are towards the end of the band. Three of the stories are in the very highest Lexile bands for fifth grade in the first and third quarters of the school year. Unit 4's supporting text seems to go back toward the beginning of the band which would provide students a less rigorous text instead of increasing the rigor.

The literacy skills required for students to access these texts are not consistently challenged across these selections; rather, the text placement moves from more rigorous to less and back again over the course of the year. Examples include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, students read Night of the Spadefoot Toads. This literary text has a quantitative measure of 610 Lexile, an average sentence length of 9.57 words, and a page count of 220. In Unit 1, Module B, students read Washed Up! This literary text has a quantitative measure of 910 Lexile, and average sentence length of 12.31, and a page count of 56.
  • In Unit 2 Module A, students read The Road to Freedom. This literary text has a quantitative measure of 780 Lexile, an average sentence length of 13 words, and a page count of 56. This text also has a challenging concept and some challenging vocabulary. Students are challenged with a more rigorous text in Unit 2, Module B with the informational Real-Life Superheroes, which has a quantitative measure of 1030, an average sentence length of 15.10 words, and a page count of 32. This text includes challenging domain-specific and academic vocabulary, and students must understand historical events such as the Civil Right movement and World War II.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, students read the literary text George’s Secret Key. This text has a quantitative measure of 850, an average sentence length of 13.27 words, and is 336 pages long.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, students read the informational text Explorer’s: Triumphs and Troubles, which has a quantitative measure of 1000, an average sentence length of 15.17 words, and is 32 pages. This text has an accessible concept and some challenging topic-specific and academic vocabulary. It is notable that while this is an appropriate text for 5th graders, the level of rigor with this text is similar to Real-Life Superheroes in Unit 2. Also in Unit 4, Module B is the literary text Beyond the Horizon, which has a quantitative measure of 890, an average sentence length-13.67 words, and is 64 pages long.

Overall, there are many appropriately rigorous texts for students to engage with and learn from over the course of the year, but the complexity of texts do not consistently increase over the course of the four units. The teacher will have to attend to this variation in complexity to support students' literacy growth.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation that anchor texts and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

The anchor texts and supporting texts have a "Text Complexity Rubric" page in the Teacher Resources section that covers quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task measures.

Quantitative metrics are provided for each anchor text in four categories: Lexile Level, Average Sentence Length, Word Frequency and Page or Word Count. Qualitative measures are provided for each anchor text and supporting text in four categories: levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and theme and knowledge demands. Metrics provided for qualitative measures are in list form. Reader and Task Suggestions are in narrative form and provide teachers with suggestions for preparing all students to read the text as well as leveled tasks. For example, the following contains the Text Complexity Rubric for the supporting text The Man Who Went to the Far Side of the Moon (Unit 2, Module A):

  • Quantitative Measures- Lexile: 810L; Average Sentence Length: 13.18; Word Frequency: 3.26; Page Count: 12
  • Qualitative Measures- Levels of Meaning: accessible concept (a story of an astronaut who flew a space capsule while others walked on the moon); Structure: series of scenes with artwork, captions, and supplemental information; Language Conventionality and Clarity: basic scientific vocabulary; Theme and Knowledge Demands: a basic knowledge of space exploration and travel
  • Reader and Task Suggestions: Preparing to Read the Text: Provide an overview of the 1960s American space program; Leveled Tasks: Discuss astronauts’ duties and living habits during space missions

At the beginning of each Module, teachers are provided with a Lexile and genre reminder about the upcoming text set. Lexiles and genres are listed for the anchor text and supporting texts. Lexiles are provided for the Sleuth texts and the Leveled Text Library. Following the Text Set information, teachers are also provided with more information about vocabulary in a section called Vocabulary to Unlock Text. This provides the teacher with Benchmark Vocabulary and Tier II and Tier III Words for the anchor text and supporting texts.

Within each unit and module, the texts are focused on a theme, which provides some rationale as to why the text was chosen.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet the expectations of indicator 1f. The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading, and there are supports to build students’ comprehension of grade level texts in oral and silent reading.

Resources are provided to offer students texts to engage in a range and volume of reading. The eText Library includes leveled readers. The database is searchable by Lexile, Guided Reading, DRA, and Reading Maturity Matrix for initial search. Then, as a secondary search, texts can be chosen by grade level, language, comprehension skill, text feature, genre, and content area. Each unit has trade books which are authentic literary and informational texts. These trade books are available in digital format. In addition to texts, there are independent reading activities that students can access online.

Structures are built within the day to provide students with opportunities to practice silent and oral reading. Each day students engage in independent reading with a specific focus including building stamina and becoming independent readers. In addition, small group instruction each day either focuses on vocabulary, fluency, critical thinking or comprehension (Implementation Guide). Comprehension and vocabulary instruction dominates the small group instruction, but the few fluency lessons focus on a specific aspect of fluency such as phrasing, expression, and pacing. Students hear and see the teacher model reading the text and then practice using the same text.

A scaffolded strategies handbook is also provided, which gives teachers additional ways to teach the concepts to struggling learners and English language learners. In addition, throughout the teacher’s guide there are "if/then" sections which provide the teachers with concrete things to do when students do not understand the concept.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The Grade 5 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent and build towards a culminating tasks to integrates skills. The instructional materials provide multiple opportunities for evidence-based discussion that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and support student listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching. The materials include frequent opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Materials meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials reviewed provide many tasks and opportunities for evidence-based discussions and writing using evidence from texts to build strong literacy skills.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations of most questions, tasks, and assignments being text-specific and requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

Some explicit question examples include:

  • "What is the difference between how Ben feels when he is alone and how Ben feels when he is with people?” (Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 2)
  • What are the main events in this part of the story?” (Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 5)

Some implicit question examples include:

  • "What does the picture add to your understanding of the Liu family?” (Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 1)
  • "Michael Collins is ‘the man’ in this text’s title. What can you infer about why he did not land on the moon?” (Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 13)

Many lessons have a Reading Analysis section where students are working toward a specific standard and engaging in either independent work or small group work to complete a task involving the text. The majority of lessons have a turn and talk after the students read, which requires the students to discuss something from the text. Some of the questions are about the text itself while some are questions that focus on author’s craft, but the majority of them require students to be engaging with the text.

  • For example, In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1, students complete a graphic organizer using evidence from the text to support the narrator's point of view. “Ask students to reread Chapter 1 (The Road to Freedom) and provide the Web B graphic organizer on p. TR45.”

Each lesson has small group options, which include several options for students to answer text-dependent questions.

  • For example, some options are extensions of the Close Reading or Reading Analysis sections. Students will: read pieces of text, find evidence in order to answer specific questions, ask questions related to what they have read, and prove their case with evidence from the text. Depending on students’ readiness, questions are modified to meet students’ needs still addressing the standards.
  • For example in Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 17, it is suggested that students who are adept or excel at close reading, they can continue to have an evidence-based discussion on an additional passage in the Sleuth text. Students first have to gather evidence to answer the question “How do trees make a home for other living things”. Then they have to address, “What question might Mei Li ask about the smells and signs in a rain forest?” Then they have to make their case by answering “how do humans change their environment?”

All lessons have a Close Reading section that includes 3 - 4 text-dependent questions.

  • For example, “On page 13, the author says that the Tlaxcalan leaders joined the Spanish conquistadors. What does this suggest about the relationship between the Tlaxcalans and the Aztecs? On page 14, what evidence does the author provide to support the heading ‘Badly Behaved Guests’?” (Unit 4 Module A Lesson 3)

Additional materials that support students engaging with the text include:

  • In the Sleuth materials (close reading texts), there is a gather evidence section for each close read which requires students to find evidence from the text.
  • The Reader's and Writer's Notebook provides evidence-based questions.
  • The Baseline Assessment also includes evidence-based questions.

There is the Reader/Writer Journal which asks students to answer text-dependent questions in writing for each lesson.

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 5 materials partially meet the expectations for this indicator. The end- of- unit culminating assessments include text dependent questions from new texts. The text dependent questions in the close reading section as well as some of the reading analysis sections should help students in completing the end of unit assessment successfully. However, not all Performance Based Assessments (PBAs) or end- of- unit assessments require text evidence. In addition, not all of the lessons leading up to the PBA will support the student's ability to successfully complete it.

Representative culminating tasks that meet the expectations of this indicator include (but are not limited to) the following examples:

  • Unit 1 Module B students are writing about the courage exhibited by one of the people in the text. Questions in the Building Understanding section for the first read are more broad (e.g., “By the end of Chapter 2”) and allow for turn and talk, while the questions as a part of the Close Read section are more specific (e.g., “on page 24-25”) (Unit 4 Module B Lesson 3). Many questions follow a sequence that builds to student comprehension, such as having students identify emotion based on evidence in the text, infer what the characters’ situation tells the reader, and explain how the mood changes in the final pages of the selection (Unit 4 Module B Lesson 6).
  • In Unit 2 Module B, students write about the courage of one of the people in Real Life Super Heroes. There are text based questions throughout the unit to support this task. For example, in Lesson 1, students are identifying details to support why Richard Martin had inner strengths that made him a superhero, or in Lesson 3 students are asked why Thomas Barnardo's work was dangerous.
  • Unit 3 Module A's PBA is not evidence based as students are required to write a narrative science-fiction piece using the texts from the unit as anchor texts. However, there are text dependent questions and activities throughout the unit that will support the students successfully completing the PBA. For example, in Lesson 1, students are comparing and contrasting characters using evidence, which can help students develop their own characters. In Lesson 2, students are identifying the point of view of the main character. In lesson 6, students are working with dialogue and using dialogue from the anchor text to analyze the story.

Representative examples of culminating tasks that do not meet the expectations of this indicator include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Unit 1 Module A, students are writing speeches about inequalities. They can choose to use the text to help them select the inequality, or they can use their own lives or the world around them to choose the inequality, making the task less text-dependent.
  • In Unit 3 Module B, students are writing a science journal based on research they will conduct. In this Unit, many of the reading lessons and text dependent questions support understanding fiction, which does not prepare students to complete this PBA. However, many of the writing lessons are focused on supporting the student's understanding of and ability to conduct research.
  • In Unit 4 Module A, students are writing an opinion piece for the PBA, though students are not required to use text evidence. However, there are some text dependent tasks throughout the reading lessons that will prepare students for this task. For instance, in Lesson 5, students are gathering details from the text to analyze and determine the author's point of view. This will be important for students to be able to do this in their own writing. There are other similar lessons in this module, including Lessons 1, 9, and 15.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 5 materials meet the expectations for this indicator. There are structures throughout the course of the year to support students' growing their speaking and listening skills as they learn new academic vocabulary.

  • Every lesson contains a close reading structures which include 3 - 4 evidence based questions where teachers have discussions with students regarding the answers (Implementation Guide p. 41).
  • Many of the lessons contain a Turn and Talk. Some of the questions to be discussed are evidence based such as "What problems or challenges are helped or solved in this chapter" (Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 4). Some questions state that students should use text evidence, but the student could answer the question without reading the text such as "If you had lived at the time the author describes, would talking about the Great Migration have made you want to go north" (Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 9). Some questions are more focused on language and the author's writing style such as "Why do you think the writer chose a conversational tone for this text" (Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1).
  • At the beginning of the units there are a list of academic benchmark vocabulary. There are several words for each text, and the Teacher’s Manual states that the "students should demonstrate a deep understanding of vocabulary by using those words and words generated from them in conversation, writing practice, and the Performance - Based Assessments."
  • In the whole group lessons, there is often a reading analysis section. In these sections, it is suggested that students either engage in independent or small group work. There is a Small Group Discussion Protocol to help facilitate this discussion.
  • Structures are included for students to gather evidence, ask questions regarding the text, use evidence to make a case, and prove their case to other students within their team, with all team members having a voice (Sleuth).
  • Students complete Performance Based Assessments where students writing using evidence from the text and their notes and share that writing with the class. They respond to questions and constructive comments from peers during the presentation portion of the Performance Based Assessment (Unit 1 Module A and Module B).
  • In the think–pair–share routine, teachers are expected to model how to respond to a partner with sentence starters such as “I agree with you and would like to add _____ or I disagree with you because the text states.
  • There is a small group language analysis support section during small group time. For example in Unit 2 Module A Lesson 15, students analyze the transition words in the text and are asked questions such as “What other transition words and phrases did you find on page 85”.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet indicator 1j for supporting students listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

The materials reviewed provide opportunities for speaking and listening that include whole group discussions and small group discussions. There are protocols in the Teacher's Guide that explain how to implement all of these discussions and how to model best practices for speaking and listening.

  • For example, the Small Group Discussion Routine includes referring to the text or topic in the discussion and posing and responding to questions to check and clarify understanding.
  • Text Club routines for independent reading with student roles and group discussion structures are included.

In Sleuth (Close Reading materials), structures are included for students to gather evidence, ask questions regarding the text, use evidence to make a case, and prove their case to other students within their team, with all team members having a voice.

In the writing workshop component, students are asked to share their writings. There are directions for both the speaker and the listener.

The Performance Based Assessments at the end of each module, provide an opportunity for students to share their writing.

  • In Unit 1 Module A and Module B, students complete Performance Based Assessments requiring students to write using evidence from the text and their notes and share that writing with the class. They respond to questions and constructive comments from peers during the presentation portion of the Performance Based Assessment.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet the expectations for this indicator. There is a mix of both on demand and process writing, but there is limited support for implementing and supporting teaching of the whole writing process.

On-demand writing occurs throughout the materials consistently. On-demand writing occurs each day and varies from short answers to paragraph instruction. On-demand writing occurs in high stakes environments (e.g. assessments) as well as frequently in low-stakes writing (e.g. Lessons have been structured so that by the end of the module students have addressed all components of the writing process).

Performance Based Assessments include writing projects where students use the anchor text and the major writing skill from the module in order to respond to questions to synthesize learning. The end-of-unit assessments involve a writing assignment that aligns to the writing focus of the module. For example, in Unit 2, Module A, students write an opinion piece on an injustice that they have read about throughout the unit and/or an injustice they have experienced in their own Iives.

Students get scaffolded lessons and practice with the writing process over the course of the year. Students apply the writing process to research projects and culminating writing tasks. There may be lessons during the year where the teacher will need to differentiate the writing process work to accommodate for time constraints, but there are supported resources included to do so. Each lesson includes some guidance on how to incorporate digital resources including opportunities to edit/revise with a peer.

The process writing includes days of brainstorming, drafting, and direct instruction of revising and editing. There are also specific days for publishing and sharing in each unit. However, the structured nature of the lessons may require modification for some students.

Process writing examples include, but are not limited the following examples:

  • In Unit 3, Module B, students draft and then revise an informative journal article. After this, they get instruction on editing and apply editing skills to their article. Then they write or type an updated version by incorporating the suggested edits and revisions and publish their work. While there are opportunities for two drafts, students do not have explicit opportunities to work through multiple edits and revisions and create multiple drafts; the teacher will have to differentiate to support any needed extra revisions.
  • In Unit 4, Modules A and B, students conducting research projects using multiple sources on a historical topic, engaging in learned protocols for conducting research, synthesizing research, drafting an opinion essay, revising an opinion essay, editing an opinion essay, and publishing/presenting an argument.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for indicator 1l. Materials provide opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards. Students are given opportunities for instruction and practice in a variety of genres addressed in the standards over the course of the school year. Examples of text types practiced include short story, informative essay, opinion speech, explanation essay, science-fiction story, journal article, and opinion essay. Students get practice repeated throughout the year to strengthen skills in each genre.

Examples of different writing types and genres include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Unit 1, Module A- Narrative writing and opinion writing
  • Unit 1, Module B- Informative writing about the relationship between a habitat and the organisms that live there
  • Unit 2, Module A- Opinion writing about inequality or injustice in students' own lives
  • Unit 3, Module A- Narrative science fiction writing
  • Unit 4, Module A Lessons 10-16- Opinion writing

Writing tasks are teacher supported and offer multiple opportunities for students to revisit previous writing tasks and edit as their skills develop. Writing Rubrics are provided for all types of writing (aligned to the standards) in the Teacher's Edition.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for the materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.

Students are taught each day to carefully analyze and synthesize sources, write to sources, and defend claims as part of Whole Group Writing instruction. Students are given frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing instruction where they are required to connect what they are offered opportunities to write, edit, or present information referencing the text.

The Reading and Writing Journal (RWJ) frequently provides “Write in Response to Reading” prompts. Students are required to gather and use evidence from the text to support their responses.

Some examples of opportunities for evidence-based writing in the instructional materials include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, lesson 1, students compare and contrast two characters in Night of the Spadefoot Toads. Students must support each paragraph by including descriptions of character traits, thoughts, feelings, words and actions.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 10, students are expected to write about an important historical milestone in The Road to Freedom using text evidence.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lessons 10-16 and Unit 4, Module B, lessons 10-17, students work on conducting research projects using multiple sources on a historical topic with protocols for conducting research, synthesizing research, drafting an opinion essay, revising an opinion essay, editing an opinion essay, and publishing/presenting an argument.

Performance-Based Assessments (PBA) are assigned at the end of each module. These include writing projects where students use the anchor text and the major writing skill from the module in order to respond to questions to synthesize learning. These projects lead students to analyze and synthesize the texts they have read.

  • For example, in Unit 2 Module A Performance-Based Assessment, students use evidence from sources to support an opinion.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 5 materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context, and therefore meet the expectations of this indicator. Grammar and conventions lessons are included throughout each Unit with opportunities for students to learn grade-appropriate skills that build in difficulty throughout the course of the year.

  • Conventions are included in the writing rubrics within each Unit (Unit 1 Module A Narrative Writing Rubric)
  • Each lesson contains a conventions section where most of the lessons focus on conventions appropriate for the grade-level Standards (nouns, verbs, subject-verb agreements, capitalization, punctuation, fragments, etc). Overall, the complexity of the convention skills are increasing in difficulty, beginning with convention skills that are below grade level.
  • Lessons on conventions incorporate the text for that day. For example, students go through specific pages of the anchor text, Night of the Spadefoot Toads, to find proper and common nouns (Unit 1 Module A Lesson 1).
  • Each module has one specific lesson dedicated to editing writing. Some of the edits students are expected to look for are connected to the lessons in the unit and others are not. (Unit 1 Module B Lesson 15, Unit 4 Module A Lesson 15).
  • In Unit 1 Module A Lesson 6, the lesson focuses on possessive pronouns. Students are instructed to check their own narratives for the use of possessive pronouns (in context). Then they are given additional practice in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal on page 18 (out of context).
  • Another example is in Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 2. Students work in pairs to practice simple tenses by writing three paragraphs, each of which uses a different simple tense (in context). There is additional out of context practice in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal on page 264.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
5/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks addressing grade-level CCSS for foundational skills to build comprehension by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, syntax, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression. Materials provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading while providing students ample opportunity to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations that materials, questions and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills that build comprehension by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression.

The materials meet the expectations for this indicator in that each daily lesson has a foundational skills mini–lesson. There are lessons directly in the Teachers’ Guide, as well as additional explicit instruction in the Foundational Skills section. Word analysis mini lessons within each whole-group lesson include an introduction to an isolated foundational skill, practice with the skill, and application of the skill with specific words/sentences/phrases.

  • A scope and sequence of Reading Foundation Skills and alignment to Common Core Standards are included in the Implementation Guide (p.67).
  • Lessons include the teaching of words from other languages, including Spanish and Russian (Unit 2 Module A Lessons 1-3 and Unit 4 Module A Lessons 16-18).
  • Lessons focus on teaching word analysis skills to help students define words, but include limited explicit instruction on how to read the words. Explicitly teaching students how to read words shows up in Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 9.
  • Word Work Center (Options) are included for daily lessons (Implementation Guide).
  • There is no set time within the daily schedule for foundational skills lessons (Implementation Guide p. 19).
  • There is not a clear cohesive sequence to build towards application. Some skills are repeated in multiple units and others are not.

For the lessons that use words found within the text, students are given opportunities to practice.

  • Unit 1 Module A Lesson 6, students are taught the Latin root geo which is on page 117 of the text and then they are asked to define the word geography;
  • Unit 1 Module A, students are taught a mini-lesson on –ly and students find words within the Anchor Text and describe how adding the suffix previously taught changes the meaning of the words;
  • Unit 3 Lesson 7, students are taught a skills mini-lesson on the suffix -ize and asked to use context to define the word organize;
  • Unit 4 Module B Lesson 6, students using context clues to define the word.

Lessons that do not include words from the text have no relationship to the text. For instance Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 16 teaches students about words in Russian, and many have to do with cold climate (tundra, taiga, beluga). The text for the lesson is “Secrets of the Canyon Cave,” which has nothing to do with the foundational skills lesson of the day.

Some lessons provide students limited time and opportunities to engage with words. For instance, Unit 2, Module A Lesson 2, teaches students about words that come from Spanish and asks students to identify one word in the text that is close to norte. No other opportunities are suggested.

Foundational skill tasks include partner work to discuss words used to complete sentences, matching word roots, reading in Practice Readers, worksheets, leveled readers with words in context, and online games.

Suggested center work is a word work center that includes opportunities to identify words with similar prefixes and suffixes from their independent reading and to add to classroom lists and creating word families of related vocabulary and domain specific words.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks guiding students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading. There are limited opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in the context of their reading.

Materials include Language Analysis mini lessons as a part of some lessons. Language Analysis mini lessons are sometimes about word analysis, and Language Analysis lessons are not in every lesson.

The following Language Analysis mini lesson topics are about practicing word analysis: Unfamiliar Words and Domain-Specific Words. For example, in Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 12 of the small group options, the teacher’s edition instructs the teacher to model the relationship of two words and their meanings. “If I want to understand the relationship between a red giant and a white dwarf, I first need to know the meaning of both these terms.” In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 6 of small group options, the teacher’s edition instructs the teacher to tell the students that readers can use context clues and prior knowledge to find the meaning of unfamiliar words. The teacher provides a Word Web graphic organizer to model squabbling.

During Close Reading instruction, the teacher’s edition contains Scaffolded Instruction to help students use context clues. For example in Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 7, the instructional materials suggest reminding students of identifying and defining military terms such as arms (p. 56), order (p. 56).

In the Teacher Materials for helping students with Benchmark Vocabulary in Close Reading, the teacher is reminded to use the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine for Literary or Informational Text. This protocol lists steps to help students pronounce unknown words, read the paragraph in which the word is found, discuss the meaning of the word in context, use the word in a sentence, and discuss synonyms and antonyms. A Tips and Tools section suggests helping students recognize context clues and make word webs (Unit 2, TR30).

Students are given opportunities to apply word analysis learned in the foundational skills lessons by participating in Foundational Skills lessons or reading Practice Readers. For example in Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 1 of Foundational Skills, students learn complex spelling patterns (-ious). Students learn the meaning of -ious and practice identifying suffixes. Student apply the suffix to words such as ridicule. Students practice the skill in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal on p. 310. Other lessons have students practice word analysis skills with Practice Readers. However, the content of the Practice Readers are not connected to the anchor texts.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

The materials meet the expectations for this indicator. Opportunities for fluency practice during small group instructional time is included in almost all lessons.

  • Teacher reads text from whole group lesson as the model. Student practice is a mix of an on level reader or the whole group text. For example, in Unit 3 Fluency p, 187, Students choose a passage from a level-appropriate text, and draw students' attention to the length of the sentences.
  • Fluency checks are included as a “quick check” for the teacher, which provides the teacher with If/Then scenarios to improve fluency.
  • The fluency lessons address different skills including rate, accuracy, phrasing, and expression.
  • Fluency practice is included in the foundational skills sections in lessons for days 3 – 5 of the skill. Students are given words that match the skill and an isolated passage to practice.
  • Assessments are included in the form of daily reading logs, baseline assessments, end of unit assessments, Oral Ready Fluency Quick Checks, Independent Reading Rubrics, and Running Records.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet expectations for Gateway 2, as they do support building students' knowledge with texts, vocabulary, and tasks. The instructional materials support the building of knowledge through repeated practice with appropriate grade-level complex text organized around a topic. Vocabulary is addressed in each module, though academic vocabulary is not built across multiple texts. There is evidence of the materials providing coherently sequenced questions and tasks to support students in developing literacy skills. Culminating tasks require students to read, discuss, analyze, and write about texts while students participate in a volume of reading to build knowledge. Modules are developed to support and build knowledge, integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening to demonstrate grade-level literacy proficiency at the end of the school year.

Criterion 2a - 2h

30/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for texts being organized around a topic to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. Anchor texts, supporting texts, daily tasks, and Performance Based Assessments are built around a topic(s) for some units.

Some Units and modules are not clearly organized around topics.

  • Unit 1 centers around the idea of "Depending on Each Other."
    • In Module A, texts help readers understand that themes in literary texts are developed through the characters, settings, and events. A goal of the module is to help readers determine themes in literary texts by comparing and contrasting characters, settings, and events. Although the module explores how people change in reaction to their surroundings, the module is built around the theme of Depending on Each Other.
    • In Module B, texts help readers understand the relationships between individuals, concepts, and events based on information provided in texts. A goal of the module is to explain the relationships between scientific concepts presented in texts. Although in this module students are expected to explain how living things interact with and affect one another, the module is built around the theme of Depending on Each Other.

Some modules in each unit are built around a unit topic. In each module the anchor text and supporting texts center around the topic.

  • Unit 2 centers around the topic of Finding Courage.
    • In Module A, students are expected to demonstrate understanding of ways in which people respond to inequality and injustice.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand various social movements and how they have affected large groups of people.
  • Unit 3 centers around the topic of Understanding the Universe.
    • In Module A, students are expected to use literary and information texts to understand various complexities about the universe.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand that scientists continue to discover new information about the universe.
  • Unit 4 centers around the topic of Exploring New Worlds
    • Module A, students are expected to explain both positive and negative effects caused by various explorations.
    • Module B, students are expected to explain how exploration and settlement changed people's views about the world.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for containing sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.

Each lesson includes an Analysis section in which students analyze language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Language Analysis is also included in some small group lessons.

  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 11, students analyze the use of text features. Students answer questions and tasks that include the following: “Why is the word organisms boldfaced?”, “Why is this word important in this text?”, and “Find another example of a domain-specific word or phrase. Explain how you found it.”
  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 2, students analyze author’s craft by rereading to better understand the author’s word choices and how they shape meaning. Students work individually or in small groups to create a word choice web to map how an author brings a scene to life by choosing specific words and phrases that create a clear picture in the reader’s mind.
  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 14, students analyze sentence structure and figurative language. Students discuss how an author may choose to vary sentence length to emphasize ideas or use figurative language to help readers visualize a text. Students meet in teams to discuss details and examples from the text.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 3, students analyze the writer's use of story structure to better understand what is happening in the chapter. Students discuss details and examples from the text that support their own text analyses.
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 14, students analyze craft and structure of a text and answer questions that include the following: “What mood do these words and phrases create?” and “Why do you think the author used these words?”
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 11, students discuss the details and examples from a text that show how the author used imagery to show how something looks, sounds, feels, smells, or tastes.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 16, students analyze words choice and structure. Students answer questions that include the following: “How are the scenes in this narrative organized?” and “What examples of transitions help make the text structure clear for readers?”
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 6, students use key details to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words. Students use contexts clues from the text to determine meanings and complete a web organizer to display the connection.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 3, students analyze word choice and sentence structure and their effect on the text. Students complete a four column graphic organizer to show examples.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 6, students search for transitional words and phrases in a text to understand how an author uses transitional words to organize information in a way that readers can easily understand and follow.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 11, students analyze word choice and descriptive details. Students answer questions and tasks that include the following: “Does the author believe El Dorado existed?”, “What details in the text suggest that?”, “Find word choices on pages 18 and 19 that support the idea that the Aztecs were rich and prosperous.”, and “What effect does the similar wording 'They did not live and 'They lived' have?”

The Scaffolded Instruction Handbook also includes lessons to support the unit lessons.

  • On page 17 of the Scaffolded Instruction Handbook, students discuss the use of imagery and figurative language in the text.
  • On page 87 of the Scaffolded Instruction Handbook, students look closely at the sentences and words of a text. Students answer questions that include the following: “What does it mean when the text says, 'Graham’s punished himself'?”, “What does the word 'already' imply?”, “What does the word 'best' suggest in the second sentence?”, and “What does it mean to cross paths with someone?”
  • On page 109 of the Scaffolded Instruction Handbook, students look closely at the sentences and words of a text. Students answer questions that include the following: “Who do the pronouns she and him refer to?”, “What does it mean when the author says 'Alicia shot him a sideways look' in the first sentence?”, “Why is the word Mayday in quotes?”, and “In the context of this sentence what does it mean to call Mayday?”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet the expectations that the materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

The majority of questions in a module require students to analyze text. Many of the questions measure at levels 2 and 3 on the Depth of Knowledge scale. Students reason, analyze and evaluate the text or texts, and questions and tasks are sequenced so that students analyze and integrate knowledge during each lesson.

  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 3, students read the text The Road to Freedom. Students analyze story structure and summarize the text. Students answer questions such as the following: “What do you think Emma and her mother are thinking as the rain begins to fall?", “ How does the illustration help support the text?”, “Why did the author include this detail?”, and “ What evidence from the text supports this?”
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 5, students read the text Beyond the Horizon to see how the scenes work together to support the structure of the narrative. Students answer questions such as the following: “What communication problems do Sarah and Priya’s family face? How are they able to overcome some of these difficulties?” and “ How does the scene between Sarah and Priya’s father reflect and earlier scene between Sarah and her own father?”

Multiple lessons in each module require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 18 students analyze and answer questions across the texts Night of the Spadefoot Toads, “Shells,” and Hatchet. Students compare how characters in three stories change in reaction to their surroundings. Students discuss how the characters change and answer questions that include “Which themes do the text share?”
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 14 students analyze and answer questions across the texts Jess and Layla’s Astronomical Assignment and Our Mysterious Universe. Students compare and contrast information about the universe in the two texts. Students answer questions that direct students to scan the visuals and compare how they are used in each text. Students answer questions that include “ What is an advantage of each type of visual?”

Other examples of lessons that integrate knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 14, students analyze and answer questions across the the texts Night of the Spadefoot Toads and “Shells.”
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 18, students analyze and answer questions across the texts Real-Life Superheroes, The Great Migration, and Angel Island.
  • In Unit 3 Module B, Lesson 18, students analyze and answer questions across the texts Jess and Layla’s Astronomical Assignment and A Black Hole is NOT a Hole.
  • In Unit 4 Module B, Lesson 17, students analyze and answer questions across the texts Beyond the Horizon, Explorers of North America and New Beginnings:Jamestown and the Virginia Colony.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for questions and tasks that support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g., combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening). Tasks focus heavily on writing and do not consistently integrate reading, speaking, or listening. Speaking and Listening skills are included in the Performance-Based Assessment but are not integrated with reading and writing. Students present after each Performance-Based Assessment, but this presentation is often just a showcase of what the student created. Little guidance is given on how to prepare students for presentations and there are no rubrics or checklist to ensure students meet the speaking and listening standards.

Each Module ends in a Performance-Based Assessment that is broken into five parts in the Teacher’s Guide. Students are asked to Prepare, Create, and then Present. The teacher is also provided with Scaffolded supports and Reflect and Respond if… then.. statements to address students’ weaknesses at the end of the assessment.

The Performance-Based Assessments assess the three types of writing genres: informative/explanatory, opinion, and narrative. Each Performance-Based Assessment has students write to answer a prompt.During Independent Writing Practice, students practice the specific writing skills that will prepare them for the genre of the Performance-Based Assessment. The writing skills taught in each lesson build on previous lessons to provide students with the skills and practice they need to complete the culminating Performance-Based Assessment.

Most culminating task require students to demonstrate comprehension knowledge of a topic gained from module texts.

  • In Unit 1, Module B, students write a clear and logical informative essay that describes one of the environments they read about in the selections. Students use the module selections to choose an environment. Students use graphs, charts, definitions, and quotations from the texts to help support their work.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, student choose an example of inequality or injustice either from the selections, their own lives, or the world around them to write an opinion speech with facts, details and evidence from the text. Students then present their writings as speeches to the class.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, students conduct short research projects using various sources to create a science journal article about something in the universe that interests them. Students may use texts from the module, but are not required to. Students then present their writings during an astronomy conference.
  • In Unit 4 , Module A, students write an opinion essay stating whether the positive or negative aspects of exploration had a greater effect on societies. Students use information from module texts.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, students refer to Explorers of North America and use what they have learned about explorations in history and preparing for the unkown to write an opinion essay.

Some culminating tasks are not dependent on comprehension or knowledge gained from a text. These tasks ask students to use the texts of the module as a mentor text and emulate style or format. Students do not need to analyze a text or multiple texts to complete the tasks.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, students write a short story about a character who cares about his or her surroundings. They will describe the actions the character takes to show his or her understanding of the environment. Students are reminded that Night of the Spadefoot Toads can be used as a model for this writing. Students participate in a story circle to share their writings with the class.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, students use "George’s Secret Key to the Universe" and “Mayday on Moon of Jupiter” as models to write a science fiction story. Students then present their writings to the class.

During modules, the majority of speaking and listening comes in the form of small group discussion and at the end of Independent Writing Practice when students are asked to “Share Writing.” These shared writings do not focus on growing speaking and listening skills as much as they focus on the reading or writing instructional focus. Speaking and listening standards are not explicitly taught or assessed at any time during the modules. Most “Share Writings” ask for volunteers. Not all students are practicing these skills in preparation for the culminating task.

  • In Unit 2, Module A, the performance task asks students to share their opinion speech to the class. No guidance is given in how to present a speech prior to this assignment.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 10 volunteers are asked to share their chosen explorers with the class and to briefly explain why they were drawn to this choice.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

The materials use a generative approach to vocabulary instruction. In each module of the curriculum, there are Benchmark Vocabulary words that are, according to the Publisher's Guide, important for understanding concepts within the text. This vocabulary is addressed during Focused Reading Instruction where students find and read sentences from the text with the words. Students develop contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary words in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.

  • There are benchmark vocabulary routines for informational texts where students learn 2-6 words. Teachers write the sentence or display the passage that contains the unknown word. Then they encourage students to use context clues or go back in the text to help determine the word. The materials suggest that teachers have students create a semantic map as a class and give students time to talk with a partner using the word.
    • In Unit 1, Module B, benchmark vocabulary words include but are not limited to, civilization, reality, ultimate, predicted, frugally, ingenious, glum, murky, conclusions, precisely, notoriously, and dramatically.
  • There is a benchmark vocabulary routine for literary texts where students learn 2-6 new words. Teachers write the sentence or display the passage that contains the unknown word. Then students look up the word in the dictionary. Then the teacher uses the word in other ways, and the class discusses the word in more depth. Students compare and contrast the word with synonyms and have a conversation with a partner using the word.
    • In Unit 2, Module A, benchmark vocabulary words include, but are not limited to, debts, master, stumble, patrolled, screech, scent, conductor, whinnied, sluttered, drifted, scattered, pillars, abolish, and tremendous.

In each module of the curriculum, there are By-the-Way Words that are sophisticated or unusual words for known concepts that can be stumbling blocks to comprehending a text. The words are defined quickly during reading without interfering with the fluent reading of the text. These words are addressed during Close Reading.

  • In Unit 3, Module A, when reading the text George’s Secret Key to the Universe, By-The-Way Words include "expelled" and "eternal".

Students demonstrate their understanding of the generative vocabulary process by using words in conversations, in their writings, and in the Performance-Based Assessments.

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials including instruction in writing aligned to the standards, including well-designed plans, models, and protocols to support students writing.

Each writing lesson focuses on a standards-based writing type (narrative, opinion, or informative/explanatory). Students receive explicit instruction that guides them through the writing process. Students have writing models from anchor and supporting texts that they can use to examine writers’ styles and techniques. Student have the opportunity to apply writing skills during Independent Writing Practice and share their work at the end of each lesson. Students develop grammar, usage, and convention skills by practicing in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.

Each module has a writing goal.

  • In Unit 2, Module B, the goal of the module is for students to understand how to develop a topic with concrete, facts, details, and definitions. Many of the lessons throughout the module align to this goal and to the standard W.5.2 which states that students should be able to write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas.

Each module’s lessons include writing that is connected either by genre or topic to the texts being read in the lesson. Writing lessons align to the grade-level standards as seen in Unit 2, Module B:

  • Standard W.5.2a requires students to introduce a topic and is taught in lesson 1 of this module.
  • Standard W.5.2b requires students to develop a topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, etc. is taught in Lessons 3, 4, and 5 of this module.
  • Standard W.5.2c requires students link ideas and is taught in Lesson 7 in this module.
  • Standard W5.2d addresses domain specific vocabulary and is included in Lesson 5 of this module.
  • Standard W.5.2e requires students write a concluding statement and is taught in Lesson 8 of this module.

Teachers support students during writing and tasks offer multiple opportunities for students to revisit and edit writings edit as their skills develop.

Several of the lessons connect to texts or text sets. For example, in Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 9, student analyze the text features of the text read during reading and write about it. However, not all lessons are connected to texts. For example, in Unit 1, Module A, students write narratives that are not connected to a text they have read. Students are reading narratives and teachers can use the texts as models if desired.

End of unit and module performance based assessments involve a writing assignment that aligns to the writing focus of the module. For example, in Unit 2, Module A, students write an opinion piece on an injustice that they have read about throughout the unit and/or an injustice they have experienced in their own Iives.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 5 materials meet expectations for including a progression of focused research projects to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and materials. Students are given research opportunities throughout the year on various topics in a manner that building research skills. Students are led through the research process across the school year and the research requirements for students between Unit 1 and Unit 4 increase in complexity.

Some examples of how the program supports these skills include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Module B, students learn how to write informative pieces. In lesson 10, students have a research specific lesson where they evaluate sources based on what they want to research in both books and digital prints. In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 17, students take notes on a person from a variety of sources.
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 10, students have a lesson where they go to the library to conduct research on an inspirational person from the unit. In lesson 11 students evaluate sources and in lesson 12, they create a presentation based on the research.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 7, students learn how to research multimedia online for their own writing. In addition, in lesson 10, the lesson also focuses on research. Similar to other lessons, students must evaluate the sources before they begin.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, students conduct a short research project on something they find ferreting in the universe.

Several performance based assessments include research projects.

  • In Unit 1, Module B, students take the Information they have read throughout the unit to write an explanatory piece of writing.

Each module has a research center for small group time with several options for students.

  • In Unit 3, Module A, research topic choices include researching real celestial bodies, researching authors from the module, or researching some of the scientific inventions they read about in the module.

The level of complexity increases across the modules. By the last unit and module, students have to take what they have read, include research, and then write a persuasive essay on the five most important items needed explorers needed.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 5 meet the standards for providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. Independent reading is part of the daily reading instruction. A number of resources are provided to assist students as they engage in a volume of independent reading. Students are provided regular opportunities to apply their learning in the reading lessons to texts of their own choosing. The instructional materials provide students a number of opportunities to extend and apply what they have learned to a “just right” text of their choice.

  • The Independent Reading Routine on page TR14 of Teacher’s Guide provides teachers with support and a rationale for implementation.
  • Independent Reading Rubric is included on TR16 of the Teacher’s Guide.
  • Students are guided in how to apply the content of the day's Reading Analysis lesson to their self-selected text.
  • Students monitor their reading by recording it in their daily reading log. They gauge and record their engagement.
  • Students can review books they read on Pearson Realize as well as find an Independent Reading Activity that is appropriate for the text they are reading.
  • Each module includes 15 leveled texts which can be used for independent reading.
  • Each module includes center time which involves independent reading. During independent reading, the teacher can have the student focus on either a process focus or a strategy focus. A process focus is where students either focus on independence, stamina, or engagement. The strategy focus has students focus on fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, or critical thinking.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The materials reviewed meet the expectations for usability. Materials are well-designed and include support for implementation over the course of a school year. Materials include clearly labeled navigation and support to aid teachers to support students’ literacy growth. The design of the materials supports effective lesson structure and pacing. Student resources include review and practice problems, clear directions, and explanations, and correct labeling of reference aids. Visual design is not distracting to students and support students’ learning.

The materials support teachers in helping students to learn and understand the concepts in the standards. Teacher’s editions explain the role of specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. Implementation Guides contain explanations of the instructional approaches of ReadyGEN and identify research-based strategies. However, the materials do not include are strategies for communicating with stakeholders about the program and how they can support students in their learning.

There are a variety of assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Not all assessments denote which standards are being assessed. There is sufficient guidance for interpreting student performance on assessments and suggestions for follow-up. Materials also provide routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress, including, Reading and Writing Keystones, Fluency Quick Checks, Check Progress, etc. Students are accountable for independent reading.

Materials meet expectation for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. There are clear supports for students who struggle as well as those who work above grade level. The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides extensive follow-up to support students who read, write, speak, or listen in a language other than English to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Instructional materials include useful technology to enhance student learning. They include materials to support students’ personalized learning via navigable online platforms. The digital platform offers opportunities to enhance student learning.

Overall, the materials meet the expectations for usability.

Criterion 3a - 3e

8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Grade 5 instructional materials meet expectations for being well-designed and including plans to support implementation over the course of a school year. The materials include clearly labeled navigation and supports to aid teachers in implementing the work to better support students' literacy growth. Visual designs for 5th grade students are not distracting and instead support students' learning.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Grade 5 instructional materials meet expectations for being well-designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Daily lessons include structures and resources for both whole group and small group literacy instruction.

  • Daily lesson structures include the components of the Literacy Workshop with 30-40 minutes for whole group reading instruction, 30-40 minutes for small group instruction, and 30-40 minutes for whole group writing instruction (Teacher’s Guide p viii).
    • Whole group instruction includes Built-In Foundational Skills Mini-Lessons, Building Understanding, Close Reads, Reading Analysis Lessons, and Focused Independent Reading.
    • Small Group Instruction includes Small Group Options such as additional instruction, practice, or extension as needed, Independent Literacy Work, and ReadyGen Intervention.
    • Whole Group Writing Instruction contains lessons focused on a specific writing type critical to college and career readiness and conventions mini-lessons.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 9 whole group reading lessons include sections for building understanding, close reading, and language analysis. Small group time includes resources for independent reading, word analysis, unlock the text, conferencing, language analysis support, language analysis extension and fluency. Writing lessons include an introduction to the lesson with the teacher modeling conclusions, developing a conclusion, writing a concluding paragraph, and a conventions mini lesson.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for the teacher and student reasonably being able to complete the content within a regular school year with the pacing allowing for maximum student understanding. The program allows flexibility for teachers to rely on professional judgment to modify pacing.

  • There are 4 units that are each broken into 2 modules.
  • Lessons are set up for 90 or 120 minute blocks that include Reading (Build Understanding, Close Read, Benchmark Vocabulary, Text Analysis) Small Group Time (Focused Independent Reading, Small Group Options), and Writing (Focused Writing, Independent Writing Practice).
  • Additional lessons are included for the Performance Based Assessment as well as other unit assessments. Time is built in for teachers to modify lessons to tailor to their student’s needs.
  • Pacing suggestions are provided in the Implementation Guide that suggests teachers can vary the lessons from day to day based on the text, needs of the students, and the amount of scaffolding necessary to delivery instruction appropriately.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the requirements that resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).

Materials provided include trade books, text collections, scaffolded strategy activities, Sleuth close-reading texts, performance tasks, Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, a leveled text library, and Ready Up! Interventions, as well as digital interactive tools such as Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Monster Word Mania, Pack Up the Skills, Envision It! Animations, Letter Tile Drag and Drop, and Grammar Jammers. Each of these resources include ample opportunity to review and practice, clear directions (in some interactive tools directions are also given orally), and correct labeling.

  • On page 53 of the Grade 5 Scaffolded Strategies Handbook, the directions provided for the Unit 2, Module A, Language Conventionality and Clarity are clear when it states, “For example, point to the paragraph on p13 beginning “Walk on your toes, Mama!” Have students reread the passage. Ask: What is the mood or tone of the passage? (suspenseful, urgent, fearful) Have students consider how the language the writer uses conveys this tone: for example , point to the phrase “ I stopped breathing” the repetition of words, and the use of multiple verbs close together. “
  • On page TR24 of the Teacher’s Guide, clear directions and explanations are given for the Informational Benchmark Vocabulary Routine.
  • On page 178 of the Grade 5 Scaffolded Strategies Handbook, a chart that breaks down story elements, the definition, and an example is provided. The chart is clear and is labeled correctly.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Grade 5 instructional materials meet expectations for including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. Daily lessons and Performance Based Assessments specifically denote the standards to which the lessons and tasks are aligned.

  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 9 publisher-produced alignment to standards is provided. Students compare two or more characters in a story, drawing on specific details in the text and explain how a series of scenes fits togethr to provide the overall structure of a story. RL.5.3, RL.5.5
  • In the Unit 4, Module A, Performance Based Assessment, standards being assessed are included. Students write an opinion essay stating whether the positive or negative aspects of exploration had a greater effect on societies. The standards W.5.1a, W.5.1b, W.5.1c, W.5.1d, W.5.6, W.5.8, and SL.5.1d are noted in the Teacher’s Guide.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Grade 5 instructional materials meet expectations for having a visual design that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

  • Units are color coded to allow for easy navigation through the units. Pages within the units are colored with Unit 1 purple, Unit 2 pink, Unit 3 green, and Unit 4 orange. (Teacher’s Guides)
  • Graphic organizers are free of any distracting words or pictures. They are very simple and clear. For example, in the Unit 2, Lesson 6 students complete a graphic organizer to help use details to summarize a text. The organizer does not include any distracting or chaotic features.
  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lessons 4 and 5, the Foundational Skills Practice includes an assignment in the Practice Reader 1B. This Practice Reader assignment is clear, includes a word bank, and is free of any distracting designs.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet expectations for teacher learning and understanding of the standards. including annotated teacher's edition materials with suggestions on how to present the content. The materials include adult-level explanations and examples and explanations of the role of specific standards in the context of the overall materials, including some instructional recommendations and supports. The materials do not include a strategy to engage all stakeholders in the ELA program to support student learning beyond the school day.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation for materials containing a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

Materials include a teacher’s edition that includes a clear outline of each unit as well as notes and suggestions of how to present content. The Teacher’s Edition also includes the objectives of the lesson, explanations of where to find descriptions of routine, and suggested ways to present content as well as possible questions to ask are noted in blue. Each question asked is followed by a sample student answer. The teacher’s edition includes scaffolded instruction boxes to address learners needs with suggestions and ideas on how to differentiate instruction for those students in need.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 12 the teacher is provided with a Teach and Model guide to guide teachers in presenting a conventions mini-lesson on using linking verbs.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 12 the teaching guide includes a Quick Check that suggests how the teachers should progress monitor as students are practicing Accuracy. The Quick Check states, “If students struggle to read with accuracy, then have them read at a slower pace and pause frequently when they come to words they are unfamiliar with.”
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 15 the Close Read section of the lesson gives directives and suggestions on students citing evidence. The Close Read section states, “Engage the class in a discussion about what they just read. Remind students that readers use details about people and events to help them better understand relationships and interactions in a text. Use these questions to guide the discussion, and ask students to support their answers with evidence.”
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 8 the Reading Analysis section of the lesson provides teachers with directions of how to model Three Sorting Circles Chart. Student example answers are also provided.

Materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

  • In Unit 1, Module B the performance based assessment has a digital option stating, “If you chose to incorporate technology into the Performance-Based Assessment, allow students to record screencasts of their presentations. ”
  • In Unit 3, Module A, page 210 a Digital Centerpieces section is included that list four ways that technology can be embedded throughout the Module.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 17 students complete an independent writing practice that has students use both print and digital sources to support their opinion.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 10 the teacher’s guide lists the digital publishing studio TikaTok as a resource for students to write and illustrate their own book.
  • In all Units and Modules Digital Centerpieces center options include Students as Authors, Students as Thinkers, Students as Word Workers, and Students as Readers. Each of these centers include an online technology piece provided.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation of materials containing a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary. The materials also include an Implementation Guide to provide specific explanations, rational, and examples of key concepts that are needed to improve knowledge of the subject.

  • In Unit 1, Module A on page 2, Generative Vocabulary is explained and examples are given for Module A.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1, students are preparing to write and opinion writing. The term, point of view, is explained and questions to consider listed. The teacher’s edition states, “Explain to students that in writing about point of view, one should consider the following: Who is telling the story? What is the narrator’s relationship to the events in the story? How does the narrator express his or her thoughts about the subject? What details tell about the narrator’s point of view on the subject?”
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 8 the Conventions Mini-Lesson gives detailed explanation, definitions, and examples of subordinate clauses.
  • On pages 8 and 9 of the Implementation Guide, vocabulary instruction of the curriculum is outlined including detailed definitions of the multiple types of vocabulary found throughout lessons.
  • On page 10 of the Implementation Guide, text complexity measures definitions and uses are explained.
  • Modeling videos are also provided including Close Reading Modeling Videos and Independent Reading Modeling Videos to aid teachers in implementation of these strategies.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

  • On pages 66-71 of the Implementation Guide, a scope and sequence chart includes all Common Core Standards and the Unit and Module they are addressed.
  • On pages 74-81 of the Implementation Guide, Standards maps are provided for each Module. These maps include a description of the performance based assessment, essential questions that are linked with standards, a list of anchor and support texts, a list of all standards covered, Module goals that are linked to standards, and enduring understandings that are linked to standards.
  • On pages 84-94 of the Implementation Guide, a Common Core Correlations Chart is included that lists all Grade 5 Common Core Standards and then gives the Unit and page number on which the standard is addressed.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies.

Materials include an Implementation Guide that provides walkthrough of the curriculum citing and explaining the rationale and research-based strategies including but not limited to the principles of backwards design and the design principle of backward mapping.

  • Page 22 of the Implementation Guide states, “ReadyGEN uses the principles of backward design to help teachers deliver instruction based on learning goals.” This is connected to the quote on the bottom of the page from the research of Wiggins and McTighe.
  • Page 24 of the Implementation Guide states, “ReadyGEN offers a robust range of assessments.” This is connected to the quote on the same page from the research of Peter Afflerbach about formative and summative assessments.
  • Page 45 of the Implementation Guide states, “Quick Checks provide formative assessment opportunities to monitor student’s fluency progress.”
  • Page 50 of the Implementation Guide states, “Performance-Based Assessments emphasize integration of reading, writing, and speaking and listening as students draw from the texts sets to demonstrate their knowledge of core understandings,” which is connected to the quote on page 51 from the research of Linda Darling-Hammond and Frank Adamson.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet expectations for providing teacher resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the standards. Formative and summative assessment opportunities are provided throughout the materials. All assessments clearly indicate which standards are being emphasized, and teachers are provided guidance on how to interpret student performance and suggestions for follow-up, with exception of end-of-unit work, where standards are not consistently highlighted. Routines and opportunities to monitor student progress are included throughout the materials.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 5 meet expectations for regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Materials include a baseline assessment, multiple formative assessments, performance-based assessments, and end-of-unit assessments. Each of these assessments are included in the Assessment Book along with an overview, directions, passages, running records, student tests, test administration information, answer keys, and rubrics.

  • Opportunities are provided during daily lessons for monitoring student progress in reading and writing, as well as opportunities are provided to assess oral reading fluency.
  • Reading Keystones and Writing Keystones formative assessments are included in daily lessons with sections titled “practice” or “application” and through Writing Keystone Checklists. For example, In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 15 students use a Writing Keystone Checklist to provide feedback to peers who volunteer to share their writings.
  • Oral Reading Fluency Quick Checks are included in the Small Group Options for daily lessons. For example in Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 17 students read aloud from a passage and the teacher assesses accuracy.
  • Oral Reading Fluency can be assessed using text and guidelines provided for Running Records (Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide).
  • Performance Based Assessments are included with each Module where students complete a task that requires analysis and demonstrating knowledge in writing.
  • End-of-Unit Assessments are provided that include both constructed-response items and extended-response items with checklists and rubrics to use in scoring (Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide).

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Grade 5 instructional materials partially meet the expectations for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized. While standards are clearly labeled in the daily lessons and are found on the performance based assessments for each unit, standards are not noted on the End-of-Unit Assessments.

  • Daily lessons that include formative assessments clearly denote standards being taught, along with opportunities for students to practice. For example in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 15 on page 154 of the Teacher’s Edition, students use the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Standards RL.5.4 and L.5.6 are clearly labeled.
  • Performance Based Assessments denote standards being assessed in the objectives box in the Teacher’s Edition. For example in Unit 3, Module B, the Performance Based Assessment includes the standards W.5.2a, W.5.2b, W.5.2c,W.5.2d, W.5.2e, SL.5.3, and SL.5.5 that are provided in the Teacher’s Guide.
  • On pages 74-81 of the Implementation Guide, a standards map is provided that lists all standards in a module along with the Performance-Based Assessment Task.
  • End-of-Unit Assessments do not provide standards being emphasized in student facing material or the Assessment Teacher’s Guide.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Grade 5 instructional materials meet the expectations for assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments and interpreting results through rubrics and scoring guidance documents.

  • Performance Based Assessments provide teachers with notes and guidance regarding administration of assessments. Information is provided which guides teachers to allow students to complete the assessment over multiple lessons, to review the Essential Questions, and revisit the mail selection texts. Also provided are scaffolded supports for students as they are completing the assessments and follow-up support for students scoring a 0, 1, or 2 on the assessment with “if…then…” statements.
  • Guidance is provided for teachers in administering and scoring assessments, along with interpreting student assessment scores on End-of-Unit Assessments. For example, in the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide on page T65, guidance is given on scoring of constructed response items using a rubric. A rubric is also provided for scoring the extended response items of the End-Of-Unit Assessment.
  • The Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide provides guidance on what to do with assessment results. Teachers are directed to examine results and then use the results to inform their instruction. On page T52 of the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide, it provides this guidance.
  • Instruction and guidance are provided for administering Running Records with the fluency passages used for the assessments. Information is also provided for teachers in interpreting student scores and specific miscues in the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Grade 5 instructional materials meet the expectations for including routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Ongoing progress monitoring formative assessments are integrated within every module.

Progress monitoring opportunities include:

  • Reading and Writing Keystones assess students’ reading and writing and their understanding of key language, structure, and ideas. For example, in Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 9 a writing keystone provides an editing checklist for a narrative writing.
  • Fluency Quick Checks that offer "If. . ., then. . ." suggestions to monitor students’ fluency progress; Check Progress assessments in each unit that assess students’ phonics and word analysis skills. For example, in Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 16 the teacher models appropriate phrasing. The Monitor progress box gives "If. . ., then. . ." suggestions for students who need more support.
  • Teachers are prompted to use ReadyUP! Intervention for students who require additional instruction with the lesson’s reading and foundational standards. An example of this is found in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 10 on page 2.106 of the Teacher’s Edition.
  • "If. . ., then. . ." suggestions are provided for monitoring progress in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

  • Pages TR 14-19 of the Unit 1 Teacher Resources include the rationale behind the Independent Reading Routine as well as an independent reading rubric and reading log.
  • Small Group Time includes a Focused Independent Reading Time. During this time, students focus on a process such as Engagement and Identity, Independence, or Stamina. Students also focus on a Strategy such as Vocabulary Knowledge, Critical Thinking, Fluency, or Comprehension.
  • During Small Group time, students are guided to apply the content of the Reading Analysis lesson to their self-selected text.
    • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 3 students note how details are presented and organized.
    • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 8 students analyze the structure of the text in the independent reading.

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Grade 5 meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. There are clear supports for students who struggle as well as those who work above grade level. Grouping strategies included are inclusive of multiple opportunities.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for providing strategies to meet the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and support them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standard.

The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook addresses English Language Learners, students with disabilities, struggling readers, and accelerated learners.

  • The handbook provides models of scaffolded instruction, useful strategies, and practical routines to employ during reading. The lessons provided are intended to be used during small-group time with students the teacher determines to need additional scaffolded instruction.

Small group instruction is provided based on student need with options such as:

  • Unlock the Text which supports students in accessing ideas, key language, and key structures.
  • Word Analysis which supports students with their foundational skills.
  • Conferencing which helps students to grow their independent reading accountability as they discuss their self-selected texts with the teacher.
  • Support Instruction which targets students who need additional scaffolding for the instructional focus of each lesson.
  • Extensions which are intended for students who understand the lesson focus and would benefit from opportunities to extend the lesson and enhance learning.
  • Sleuth which is used three to four times each unit for small group lessons to reteach, practice, and refine close-reading skills and strategies.

The Scaffolding Strategies Handbook is organized into four parts.

  • Within Part 1, titled Unlock the Text, every anchor and supporting text is supported with scaffolds and strategies. The lessons are divided into Prepare to Read, Interact with Text, and Express and Extend.
  • Part 2 is titled Unlock the Writing. These lessons work to scaffold the module-level Performance Based Assessments and it also provides additional lessons to teach the writing types required by the standards.
  • In Part 3 of the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook routines, graphic organizers, and activities are provided to support students.
  • Part 4 is titled Unlock Language Learning and focuses on supporting English Language Learners construct the meaning and explore vocabulary of a text. This section provides support to build background, talk about sentences, speak and write about the text, expand understanding of vocabulary, and write about the anchor and supporting text.

The Teacher’s Guide includes Scaffolded Instruction notes throughout all lessons.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 3 on p. 33 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for Strategic Support. The note states, “Character Motivation: Students may have difficulty understanding the motivation Ben’s actions on pp. 37-39. Read the scene aloud, and ask students to write each new action. Next, call students’ attention to Ben’s reactions by asking questions such as Why does Ben try to get the frog back? (He doesn’t trust Ryan to hold on to the frog since Ryan dropped the mouse before.”
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 7 on p. 273 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for Strategic Support. The note states, “Background: Reading p. 0, students may think Parks lost her job at the NAACP, since “secretary’ is one of the jobs listed on p. 25 and readers are told on p. 28 that she was a secretary for the NAACP. Explain that the NAACP strongly supported her; she worked with them as a volunteer. The paying job she lost after her arrest was doing tailoring at a department store.”
  • Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 2 on p. 23 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for Strategic Support. The note states, “Verbal Irony: Point out the sarcasm, or verbal irony, in Dr. Reeper’s statement on p. 59, beginning, “AFter all, I’m just the teacher… “Explain that Dr. Reepr does not mean to be taken literally; he is using sarcasm to emphasize his point that students should pay attention in class. ”
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 7 on p. 273 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for Strategic Support. The note states, “Military Language: Remind students that Booth and Armitage use many military terms as they discuss their plans. Have partners use dictionaries and context clues to identify and define military terms such as arms(p.56), order(p.56), march(p.56), stand fast(p.57), retreat(p.57), and lower your swords (p.58).”

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.The Teacher’s Guide provides daily scaffolding for immediate feedback during lessons, and the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides more extensive follow up to support English Language Learners.

The Teacher’s Guide provides on-the-spot scaffolds in each lesson. These address common stumbling blocks encountered by English Language Learners and struggling readers and writers. They are highlighted at the bottom of each lesson in blue.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 7 on page 73 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for English Language Learners. The note states, “Idioms: Help students understand the idiom on p.137: “And I’m tired of jumping through their hoops.” Explain that jumping through hoops usually refers to extra steps in a process to achieve a goal. Help students understand that often these steps are seen as unnecessary or a waste of time.”
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 6 on page 263 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for English Language Learners. The note states, “Vocabulary: Students may be unfamiliar with the word bluff (p. 23). Explain that , in this context, a bluff is a kind of trick that involves pretending something is true when it is not. The word can also be used as a verb to describe the action of carrying out a bluff.”
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 4 on page 243 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for English Language Learners. The note states, “Vocabulary: Explain that a van can be a big truck, such as a moving van, and it can also be a kind of passenger car. When it is a passenger car like the van in the story, the word van is a shortened form of the word minivan, or small truck. Minivans are similar to cars but have the engines of light trucks. If possible, draw the two meanings of van to illustrate.”
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 1 on page 13 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for English Language Learners. The note states, “Idioms: Help students understand the word hit on p. 7 “ The book… was a hit throughout Europe.” Explain that hit is a word with multiple meanings. IN this case, it means that the book was very popular.”

The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook has a number of resources for teachers to assist English Language Learners, struggling readers and writers as well as students with disabilities. These are intended to be used during small group time.

The handbook has four sections of resources that include:

  • Unlock the Text: This section includes text complexity rubrics that offer insight into the quantitative, qualitative and reader and task measures of text. The qualitative measures provide strategies for levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands. Cognate charts are provided for each anchor text and supporting text in this section of the handbook as well.
  • Unlock Writing: This section provides scaffolded lessons for the Performance-Based Assessments and grade level support and guidelines for teaching the standards based writing types.
  • Routines and Activities: This section includes routines, reproducible graphic organizers, and activities that can be used to support teaching the standards.
  • Unlock Language Learning: This section provides specific resources for English Language Learners to construct meaning in the selections as well as explore vocabulary of texts. The strategies and activities are designed to develop mastery of reading, writing and speaking around the areas of Building Background, talking about Sentences, Speaking and Writing about the Texts, and Expanding Understanding of Vocabulary.

If/then sections are provided in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook to support students.

  • In the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook on page 181 students Unlock the Task: Write About Environments. Students break apart the task, answer questions about the task, and then restate the task. If/then statements are provided to monitor and support struggling students. For example, “If …. students are not sure how to make an observation about an environment, then…. Remind them that an observation is a statement about somethign that one sees or notes….”

To build speaking and listening skills the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook lists a Listening Skills Log on pages 301-302 and a Prepare for Discussions Routine and Rating Sheet pages 304-305.

  • The Leveled Text Instructional Plan addresses speaking and listening skills in the section titled After Reading on page TR65. During the Talk About It section, it states, “The activities in this section are designed to help students develop their understanding of the unit topic and enhance their listening and speaking skills by engaging in a group discussion.” Discussion questions are provided to help students express their ideas.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 1 students use the Think-Pair-Share Routine to practice speaking and listening.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for including extensions and /or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Each lesson offers support for accelerated learners in Small Group Options. The small group options provided in the Teacher’s Guide offers teachers opportunities to direct their instruction to the needs of their students. Teachers are encouraged to gather formative assessment information from whole group instruction to help determine student needs during small groups. Opportunities within small groups that include:

  • Independent Reading Conferences: Opportunities for students to discuss self-selected texts can be found in the Teacher Resource Book. Independent reading rubrics are also provided for students to self-assess reading preferences and behaviors.
  • Close Reading Extension or Language Analysis Extension are provided for students who are adept or excel at the skill or lesson.
  • Mini-lessons can also be found in the Sleuth materials that offer extensions for students who excel at close reading or language analysis.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 7 the Reading Analysis Extension on page 77 asks students to identify cause-effect relationships in the text by asking questions to deepen students’ understanding.

The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook included opportunities outside of the teacher guide for extensions for students who are above grade level. These sections are titled Extend, Accelerated, and Going Deeper.

  • There are four parts in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook. Including Unlock the Text, Unlock the Writing, Routines and Activities, and Unlock Language Learning. Within each part, there are extensions activities and strategies.
  • In Unit 2, Module A on page 18 of the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook, students Unlock the Text to Express and Extend after reading The Road to Freedom. The Extend section states, “Have students research Harriet Tubman or another historical figure who was involved with the Underground Railroad. Have students summarize the individual’s role and use evidence from the text to explain the risks he or she took in helping people escape slavery.”
  • In Part 2, Unlock the Writing on page 235 students are provided with a practice and a deeper practice when working with informative/explanatory texts. Students work individually , using the group’s graphic organizer, to write an introduction to the topic. Ask them to start with a general observation about the topic without giving an opinion about the animal. Have students compare their work.
  • On page 261 in the Routines and Activities section students are completing a three-column chart. The Extend section states, “Students can use the organizer to record events or happenings that follow the before, during, and after format in a selection. Students can use the organizer to compare a variety of selection elements, such as characters within or across selections, or themes across selections. For example, ask students to record how the topic of government is covered in three texts. Help students identify where the similarities and differences occur among the texts. After completing the class activity, have students use the chart in pairs or individually with another. Then, have them share their charts in small groups.”
  • On page TR7 in the Unit 1 Small Group Discussion Routine, teachers are provided with a Going Deeper activity once students are familiar with the routine. The directions state, “Incorporate paraphrasing. Provide time for students to restate in their own words what their partner has said. During the sharing state, ask students to speak in complete sentences to present their partner’s ideas with paraphrasing.” It also states, “Provide the Elaborator with a list of questions that will encourage higher-level thinking.”
  • On page TR23 in the Unit 2 Text Club Routine directions, teachers are provided with a Going Deeper activity for when students become comfortable with routine to help them explore Text Clubs more deeply. The directions state, “Have students from each group “jigsaw” with students from other group to share an element of the text they read. This engages all students in all texts being read in the class.” It also states, “Ask students to prepare a Discussion Guide that may be used in future Text Clubs. They can use their own discussions to guide other groups as they read the text.”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for providing opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. Students participate in partner and small group Think/Pair/Share, Whole Class Discussion, Small Group Discussion, Read Alouds, Shared Reading, Independent Reading, Text Clubs, and Benchmark Vocabulary Discussions for both Informational and Literary texts.

The Teacher’s Guide provides small group options for teachers to meet the needs of their students. Teachers are encouraged to use information gained from whole group instruction to help determine where students need additional supports or extensions during small groups.

  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 5 the Teacher’s Guide states, “Have students work independently or in small groups to complete the graphic organizer. Use the Small Group Discussion Routine on pages TR6-TR7 to have students discuss how finding specific details in the text helped them answer the questions. Check understanding by asking students to share or by circulating among students or groups.”
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 1 the Teacher’s Guide has students Turn and Talk, “Why do Ringo and his friends follow George?” Use the Think-Pair-Share-Routine on pages TR2-TR3.

Routines and protocols for grouping strategies are provided in the Teacher Resources section of the Teacher’s Guide. Routines for grouping can be found in the Teacher’s Guide.

  • On page TR6 Unit 1, Small Group Discussion Routine suggest that groups contain 3-6 students and includes rationales for grouping students such as ability grouping, interest grouping, or random grouping.
  • On page TR22 Unit 4, Text Club Routine suggest that groups be fluid and can be formed in a variety of ways with each variation centering on a different aspect of reading.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 include useful technology tools to support teacher understanding of the material to support and implement the curriculum. They include materials to help teachers support students' personalized learning via navigable online platforms for students and teachers. The digital platform offers opportunities to enhance students learning.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Materials are available to access with a login and password at www.pearsonrealize.com. Once signed in, an educator can access materials such as the Teacher’s Guide for each Unit, Teacher Resources, Standards, Baseline Assessments, Practice Test, Scaffolded Strategies Handbooks, Unit Modules, each unit’s Leveled eText Library, Text Collections, Sleuth, printable resources, a link to the digital publishing tool: Tik a Tok.

On the website teachers can create classes to assign work, check on the status of assignments, create groups, and post class calendars. There is also a Data tab to gather and display and use data to promote student mastery of the standards. Also included on this website are Close Reading Modeling Videos, Independent Reading Modeling Videos, Accessible eTexts, and the customizable lesson planning tool: MyGen.

Accessibility was tested on Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Windows, Apple, Android mobile device, Safari, an iPhone. All access was successful. The eTexts are flash based. You will be unable to access eTexts on an iPad since they don’ support Flash. It is recommended to download the eTexts for Schools App if your device does not support the Flash player.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Materials provide students with the ability to continue learning at home with activities aligned to unit texts, writing modes, and Enduring Understandings. Anchor texts are interactive to build background knowledge and help students access complex texts. Teachers have the option of assigning an e-text or interactive version of the anchor text to students on Pearson Realize. Interactivities can be displayed on an interactive whiteboard for use as part of whole group instruction, or students can access whatever texts have been assigned to them on an individual device. Tik aTok allows students to write, illustrate and publish their own digital storybooks and projects. There are also Interactive graphic organizers that allow students to record as they read independently.

Online interactive tools such as Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Monster Word Mania, Pack Up the Skills, Envision It! Animations, Letter Tile Drag and Drop, and Grammar Jammers are provided and can be assigned by the teacher, as well as Close and Independent Reading Videos to support students’ learning.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. An online Baseline Assessment is used to pinpoint students struggles while assessing the standards with complex text. Digital materials provide program-agnostic College and Career Readiness assessments, Balanced Practice Test, and Performance Tasks. Technology-Enhanced Items appear on the Baseline Assessment in Grades 2-5, on all End-of-Unit Assessments, and on program-agnostic Balanced Performance Tasks. Teachers can also build their own assessments.

The DATA tab of Realize provides class and student data, including standards mastery, overall progress, and time on task. Teachers can also view data individually by student from the class assignment list. Teachers can use this data to create assignments based on an individual student’s needs.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, MyGen, allows teachers to adapt any unit module. Teachers can replace any anchor or supporting text with another selection, create their own essential questions and enduring understandings, and identify lesson standards. Teachers can also develop Performance-Based assessments that are customized to their classroom.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

Professional development is available online through tutorials, onsite orientations, in-depth workshops, and online trainings. Access to professional development can be found on the Pearson website. Teachers can assign work to students and can connect with individual students through a chat feature on the Dash site.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 04/04/2017

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
978-0-328-81947-8 Copyright: 2016
978-0-328-85202-4 Copyright: 2016
978-0-328-85203-1 Copyright: 2016
978-0-328-85204-8 Copyright: 2016
978-0-328-85205-5 Copyright: 2016
978-0-328-85284-0 Copyright: 2016
978-0-328-85285-7 Copyright: 2016
978-0-328-85300-7 Copyright: 2016

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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