Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Kindergarten meet the expectations of alignment. The materials include high quality, rigorous texts for students to engage with questions and tasks. The materials support development of foundational skills and provide support for teachers to attend to students' literacy growth. The materials also support building knowledge and growing academic vocabulary as student demonstrate their integrated skills.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
57
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
30
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
33
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

EL Language Arts Curriculum for Kindergarten meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and that support students’ advancing toward independent reading. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Materials meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills and provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
19/20
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests and reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Materials have the appropriate level of complexity and support students’ literacy skills over the course of the school year. Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.

The texts provide content that is relevant and interesting to students. Anchor texts across the yearlong curriculum are of publishable quality. Anchor texts consider a range of student interests and are well-crafted and content rich. Examples include:

  • Module 1:
    • Llama Llama Time to Share by Anna Dewdney is a playful rhyming book that teaches an important lesson about sharing. Llama Llama is a well-loved book character that Kindergarten students will find engaging and entertaining.
    • Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon by Patty Lovell and David Catrow has vibrant illustrations throughout the book. This story is exciting and engaging for students because of the sentence structure, adjectives, and illustrative techniques.
  • Module 2:
    • Weather Words and What They Mean by Gail Gibbons uses bright and colorful illustrations. This informational book teaches vocabulary about weather in an easy to understand format for young students.
    • Come On, Rain! by Karen Hesse has simple sentences to help the students be engaged in the story. The story focuses on an African American character, which provides students an opportunity to read a story with diverse characters.
  • Module 3:
    • Be a Friend to Trees by Patricia Lauber provides students with information about different types of trees. It is an interesting topic for students and the text helps students to understand tree purposes and products.
    • What’s Alive by Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld is an informational book that demonstrates the qualities that people have in common with other living things, including cats, trees, and birds. It provides an early step in scientific classification and has vivid illustrations.
  • Module 4:
    • Oliver’s Tree by Kit Chase is about three friends and friendship, which is a relatable topic for kindergarten students. This engaging text informs readers that there are a variety of trees and that trees are important.
    • A Tree is Nice by Janice May Udry engages students by showing how trees provide comfort to people and animals. The text allows children a chance to open up their own imaginations about the value of trees.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

The required texts for the Kindergarten Modules provide a balanced mix of literary and informational texts including riddles and poetry. The Reading Foundational Skills lessons include poems, chants, and rhymes. To supplement the texts types and genres, educators can use Kindergarten Recommended Texts and Other Resources List. According to the Module 1 Teacher Guide, “Throughout the module, to support a volume of reading on this topic, see the Recommended Texts and Other Resources list” (p. 43). During the Labs, there are recommended texts for Storytime. Examples of the Module required texts include:

  • Literary Texts:
    • Module 1: Llama Llama Time to Share by Anna Dewdney and Toys Galore by Peter Stein
    • Module 2: One Hot Summer Day by Nina Crews and Come on Rain by Karen Hesse
    • Module 3: The Tree in the Ancient Forest by Carol Reed-Jones and Are Trees Alive? by Debbie Miller
    • Module 4: Gus is a Tree by Claire Babin and A Tree for Emmy by Mary Ann Rodman
  • Informational Texts:
    • Module 1: Playing with Friends by Rebecca Rissman and “Attributes of Toys” by EL Education
    • Module 2: Weather Words and What They Mean by Gail Gibbons
    • Module 3: What’s Alive? By Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld
    • Module 4: A Tree is Nice by Janice May Udry and “Tree Texts” by EL Education

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task.

Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently. Kindergarten read-aloud texts are two to three grade levels higher in complexity, according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task. Anchor texts are placed at the appropriate grade level. Examples of text that demonstrate the appropriate complexity include:

  • Module 1:
    • Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon by Patty Lovell falls in the Lexile band for Grades 4-5 and has a Lexile score of 820. Meaning/purpose and language features are moderately complex. The text contains multiple levels of meaning that are fairly easy to infer. The language is easy to understand with some occasions for more complex meaning. Text structure and knowledge demands are slightly complex. The story line is clear and easy to predict. Repeated language signals the pattern of the plot. The illustrations support students in comprehending the text and also extend the text by showing the detail of Molly Lou’s Imagination.
  • Module 2:
    • The Snowy Day by Ezra Jacks Keats has a Lexile score of 500. The meaning/purpose of the text is slightly complex and the meaning will be apparent to students early in the text. The text structure is slightly complex and the story is “predictable and chronological,” so student understanding of the story will also be enhanced through the illustrations. The language features of the text are moderately complex as students should be familiar with most of the vocabulary words used throughout the story. The knowledge demands are moderately complex, and the story will likely be easier for students to understand who live in a snowy area or have had experience with snow.
  • Module 3:
    • Be a Friend to Trees by Patricia Lauber has a Lexile score of 500. The meaning/purpose is slightly complex with the purpose explicitly stated. The text structure is slightly complex with explicit connections between ideas and examples. The language features are moderately complex with simple and compound sentences.
  • Module 4:
    • A Tree is Nice by Janice May Udry has a Lexile score of 420. The central message of the text is clearly stated in the text. The text structure has explicit ideas. The language features are moderately complex since most of the vocabulary is familiar to students. Most sentences are simple and compound. The knowledge demands are slightly complex because some of the experiences are common to young readers.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

Complex texts are read aloud to Kindergarten students during the Module lessons to guide students to understand the Guiding Questions and Big Ideas. Students are guided to understand increasingly complex texts to develop independence of grade level skills.

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, students have the opportunity to explore classroom toys in order to develop language about playing toys. The teacher reads aloud Llama Llama Time to Share, and the teacher uses a Llama Llama puppet and Nelly Gnu puppet to help students understanding Llama Llama’s feelings. In Unit 2, the teacher reads aloud Attributes of Toys and displays the illustrations in order to scaffold student understanding of toy characteristics.
  • In Module 2, the teacher uses read aloud and close reading strategies to support students’ understanding of the complex texts. In Unit 1, science experiments are utilized to help develop students’ vocabulary. As the teacher reads aloud Curious Sofia, the teacher asks text-dependent questions. In Unit 2, students participate in Partner Role-play in order to understand the focused read-aloud text, On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.
  • In Module 3, the teacher uses read aloud, science talk, and note-taking strategies to help students understand the complex texts. In Unit 1, to help students' understanding of plant development, students are to observe three plants over the course of the unit. In Unit 2, students learn how to participate in group note-taking and individual note-taking to help them comprehend the complex texts.
  • In Module 4, the teacher uses focused read-aloud texts, shared reading, close read-aloud, and role-playing. To help students access the texts, there are suggested scaffolds such as in Unit 1, Lesson 1, the language and structure of Gus is a Tree may be too complex. The suggested support is to stop and define words in context. To help students understand the text, the teacher and students act out parts of the texts. Throughout the module, there are anchor charts created with student input. As students learn new words from texts, those words are added to the Word Wall for student reference.

During Storytime in the Labs, students hear texts read aloud for an additional 10 minutes. These read-alouds and Labs help scaffold student learning of the module topics and texts.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

Text complexity analyses and rationales are included in the program in the Curriculum Tools. However, text complexity analyses and rationales are not provided for each anchor text. For the read-aloud texts used during the Labs, there are no text complexity analyses provided.

Most anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale. Examples include:

  • In Have Fun Molly Lou Melon by Patty Lovell, the analysis includes text description, placement, quantitative measures, qualitative measures, considerations for reader and task and rationale. The analysis includes a summary of the text within the text description. Within the placement, the analysis includes the following information: “Because of its high quantitative measure, this book is used as a read aloud. Complexity in meaning and language features are balanced by repetitive sentences, predictable plot structure and richly detailed illustrations.” The quantitative measures for this text are AD 820L and associated grade band level is 4-5. The qualitative measures include meaning/purpose, text structure, language features, and knowledge demands. The following guidance is provided for considerations for the reader and task: “Since students are asked to explain their thinking using details from a text they cannot read themselves, tasks are designed to support recall and the location of specific details through multiple readings. Students may need additional support in recognizing repeated language, connecting events, and noticing detail in the illustrations as the story is read.” The rationale explains that this text deepens the students’ understanding of citizenship skills and teach them about how people’s perspectives can change. In addition, it prepares them for the performance task assigned.
  • In Mama Miti: Wangari Maathai and the Trees of Kenya by Donna Jo Napoli, the analysis includes text description, placement, quantitative measures, qualitative measures, considerations for reader and task, and rationale. The analysis includes a summary of the text within the text description. Within the placement, the analysis includes the following information: “The simple, repeated structure of the book, along with students’ previous work with simpler texts on the same topic make this text appropriate for Kindergarten.” The quantitative measures for this text are AD 710L and associated grade band level 2-3. The qualitative measures include meaning/purpose, text structure, language features, and knowledge demands. The following guidance is provided for considerations for the reader and task: “The language of this text is fairly complex, but comprehension is supported by the repeating pattern of the story, and by activities designed to connect Mama Miti with more simplistic text, A Tree is Nice, read earlier in the module. Using the Kenyan glossary at the end of the book, as well as details in the illustrations, should provide any cultural context needed to follow the story and determine its message.” The rationale states that this text is part of the study of trees and that students read the text to continue to gather information, compare and contrast, and form an opinion about planting trees.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

There is a Required Trade Book Procurement List and a Recommended Texts and Other Resources List. These lists contain a range and volume of informational and literary texts that students read or have read to them during Module lessons. Other opportunities for engaging in reading include daily ten-minute read-alouds in the Labs, decodables and shared texts in the Skills Block, and Accountable Independent Reading in the Skills Block. The instructions for Kindergarten independent reading are not explicit, teachers will need to plan for independent reading .

Instructional materials identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in reading (and read-aloud) a variety of texts to become independent readers and/or comprehenders and a volume of reading as they grow toward reading independence at the grade level. Examples include:

  • During Module 1 lessons, students hear a variety of read-aloud texts about the following topics: toys and play, weather, and trees. Students hear texts read aloud by the teacher. Read-aloud texts include Toys Galore, The Tree in the Ancient Forest, One Hot Summer Day, We Planted a Tree, and Mama Miti: Wangari Maathai and the Trees of Kenya.
  • During the K-2 Reading Foundations Skills Block, students have the opportunity to read shared poetry. For example, in Module 2, Part 2, Cycle 8, Lesson 41, students read “Can a Yak Jump Up?”
  • During the K-2 Reading Foundations Skills Block, students have the opportunity to read decodable readers. For example, in Module 3, Part 2, Cycle 15, Lesson 76, students read “The Milkshake.”
  • During Independent Rotations, students participate in Accountable Independent Reading (AIR), which requires students to choose books to read independently. AIR is a time for “students to apply the skills and build stamina, automaticity, and comprehension by reading a large volume of texts of their own choice, with a specific focus on their own personal reading goals.”
  • During the Lab Storytime, students hear ten minutes of a read aloud text at the beginning of the Lab. The teacher selects a read aloud text from the Recommended Texts and Other Resources List, and the teacher provides a focus question for students to consider as the teacher reads the text aloud.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly. Materials offer many opportunities for students to engage with text-based questions and activities that build to a culminating task and meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. There are many opportunities for students to discuss what they are reading by asking relevant follow-up questions and providing teacher support, as well as for on-demand writing, process writing, and short, focused projects through a variety of instructional tasks. Materials offer opportunities for students to engage in writing tasks across the text types required in the standards and regular opportunities for evidence based writing. Opportunities to learn language standards are in the Module Lessons and in the Foundational Reading Skills Block. Grammar and convention standards are predominantly taught and learned through context instruction.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

The Kindergarten materials contain questions and instructional tasks designed to encourage understanding of key ideas of texts and determine the most important learning from the readings. Text-dependent questions and tasks are specifically included in the anchor text and through close reading sessions that occur in lessons and support explicit as well as valid inferences. As stated in the Your Curriculum Companion on page 275, “In each session, students are lifted to greater understanding of the text through purposeful text-dependent questions and activities” These text-dependent questions are typically found in activities with structured protocols requiring discourse such as: Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face, Think-Pair-Share, and Pinky Partners. Additionally, text-dependent questioning is found in Unit Assessments and Student Response Sheets. Text-dependent questions would be stronger if they prompted students by asking, “What evidence from the text helped you answer this question.”

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2 students listen to the story, Llama Llama Time to Share. After listening to pages 1 and 2 the teacher asks, “Who is visiting Llama and his family?” After listening to pages 3 and 4, the teacher asks, “What do you see both Llama Llama and Nelly holding in the picture?” After reading pages 5 and 6 the teacher asks, “What does Llama Llama’s mom say to him?” In addition, after reading pages 5 and 6, students are asked to make an inference. The teacher asks: “What do you notice about his face?” and students are expected to respond, “His eyes are wide. His mouth is in a big “O” shape. He looks worried.”
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Session 2 during the Close Read of Weather Words and What They Mean, the teacher rereads pages 2–5. The teacher is instructed to first read the text at the bottom of the page, read the text in the bubbles, and read the text included in the illustrations. The teacher then asks students, “What are the four things the author says make up the weather?”
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 2, during the Read Aloud of What’s Alive, the teacher leads students through pages 4-7. The teacher asks students to keep the guiding question, “How do we know if something is living?”, in their minds and to gather specific information from the text as they read. The teacher stops to offer turn-and-talk experiences, asking questions, “What information does this page tell us about how to know if something is living or alive?” On page 7, there is a picture of a plant with the vocabulary words, "leaves" and "root", to aid in student response. The teacher follows the protocol for actively teaching new vocabulary. After reading page 7, the teacher asks, “Was anything the same about the (cat, bird, flower, and tree)?” Students are expected to respond with one of the following responses: "they all grow or they all need water." They will use this information as they complete a Living Things Research Notebook.
  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 3, during a Focused Read Aloud of A Tree is Nice, the teacher reads pages 1-14. The teacher reminds students of the learning target “I can identify and discuss the reasons the author gives to support points in A Tree Is Nice.” After reading page 6, the teacher stops to ask, “On page 6, what is a reason the author gives that makes you think trees are nice and that people should plant trees?” Students are expected to respond, “They make everything beautiful.” The teacher adds this opinion to the Reasons to Plant a Tree anchor chart. The teacher follows the same routine in having students assist in adding the opinions to the anchor chart as they read by posing the same question, “Using the illustrations and text, what is one reason that trees are nice and that people should plant trees that the author gives us on this page?” Students are expected to respond, “trees have leaves you can play in,” for pages 7-10, “you can climb on trees, sit on tree limbs, and pretend” on pages 11-12, and “you can eat apples from apple trees” for pages 13-14.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

The curriculum offers many opportunities for students to engage with text-based questions and activities that build to a culminating task. The close reading/read aloud sessions in the Module lessons, are taught across five lessons to support comprehension and knowledge building from the text. Following these lessons, students demonstrate their understanding of the text through a variety of activities involving writing, drawing, and speaking. Students also have daily opportunities to participate in collaborative conversations and the teacher records ideas on an Anchor Chart which is displayed in the classroom. In addition, students complete written responses in notebooks and journals that require reference back to the text and give the teacher usable information about students’ readiness to complete the culminating task. The culminating task for each Module is found in Unit 3 and is called a Performance Task. This task provides students the opportunity to demonstrate their content and literacy knowledge through a combination of literacy skills including reading, writing, drawing, and speaking and listening.

The Module 1 Performance Task requires students to incorporate their knowledge about toys to write an informational piece about a classmate’s preferred toy. Students utilize information from collaborative conversations, anchor charts, and information that they obtained from interviewing their classmate. Students draw and label their classmate’s preferred toy and write an accompanying sentence. Then, students create a drawing and sentence about how their classmate plays with their preferred toy. Lessons throughout the Module prepare students to complete the culminating task. In the Unit 3, Lesson 1, Session 2, Close Read/Read Aloud, after rereading page 1, the teacher asks the following question: “According to the pictures and the words, what does Molly Lou Melon have a lot of?” In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Session 4-5, the teacher uses the Toys Molly Lou and Gertie Prefer Anchor Chart to record student responses to a series of questions that include the following: “What toy is Gertie choosing to play with? How does a battery help Gertie’s car? What toy is Molly Lou Melon choosing to play with?”

The Module 2 Performance Task requires students to incorporate their knowledge about weather to write an imaginary narrative about a character’s experience with the weather, using The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats as a mentor text. Students’ narratives reflect how the weather affects the choices the character makes about what to wear and what to do. Students use group notes, puppets, and oral planning as scaffolding to illustrate their stories. Students revise, edit, and practice reading their original narratives in preparation for sharing them. Lessons throughout the Module prepare students to complete the culminating task. In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Session 4, Close Read/Read Aloud, the teacher rereads pages 16–17 and asks the following question: “What does the author tell us are one or two more examples of moisture?” A total participation technique is used to generate student responses. In Unit 1, Lesson 7, Close Read-aloud Culminating Task, students work independently to write and draw about the three components of weather that they learned about while reading Weather Words and What They Mean.

The Module 3 Performance Task requires students to incorporate their knowledge about trees to create an informational collage to demonstrate their expertise about a tree, its needs, and the animals for which it provides food. Students create a tree collage, write an informational writing piece that describes the tree and its needs while sharing information about one animal that depends on the tree for food, and create an accurately colored animal puppet that represents the animal from students’ writing. Lessons throughout the Module prepare students to complete the culminating task. In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Work Time B, students use the information gathered during the read-aloud to write and draw about how living things depend on trees to meet their needs. Students use the Be a Friend to Trees Response Sheet and include details in their writing and labels in their drawings. In Unit 2, Lesson 8, students participate in a game of charades about animals and how they get their food from trees. The information learned from the game supports students to complete a component of the culminating task on how animals get food from trees.

The Module 4 Performance Task requires students to incorporate their knowledge about enjoying and appreciating trees to create a piece of artwork and write an opinion piece. Student opinion writing begins with, “Trees are nice because...” Students create a piece of artwork showcasing a specific part of a tree to match their writing. These two components (opinion writing and high-quality artwork) come together to create a Tree Appreciation card. Lessons throughout the Module prepare students to complete the culminating task. In Unit 1, Lesson 2, students participate in a close read aloud of A Tree for Emmy and complete their journal page answering the following prompt: “Sketch the picture and write sentences to describe how the person in the photograph is enjoying the tree.” In Unit 1, Lesson 7, Work Time A, students focus on the important events that occur in the middle and the end of the story. After reading the text, Oliver’s Tree, the teacher uses total participation techniques and asks the following questions: What do the illustrations show the characters doing with trees on this page? How does Oliver feel in the middle of the story about trees? What does Oliver do in the middle with trees?”

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Protocols are provided for evidence-based discussions. These protocols give each task structure and provide supportive scaffolds. The Curriculum Companion Guide provides the rationale for program protocols and the importance of modeling and using sentence frames to deepen student discourse for all students, including ELL and struggling students. Protocols are provided for Think-Pair-Share, Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face, and Pinky Partners discussion activities. Several protocols also exist to promote language and academic vocabulary development such as the Frayer Model, Interactive Word Walls and Contextual Redefinition. Students utilize these protocols to analyze and synthesize author’s intent and understand the syntax of the text. The teacher is provided multiple anchor charts and answer keys to support teaching the protocols effectively. A companion book, Classroom Protocols, provides protocols for facilitating evidence-based discussions, encouraging the modeling and usage of academic vocabulary, emphasizing the learning and usage of new vocabulary, and conducting informal checks of understanding. While these strategies are utilized throughout the program they are listed in one area as an efficient tool for educators to use to differentiate instruction.

Text-based discussions are emphasized in the Close Read/Read Aloud lessons. Each of these sessions provides an opportunity for students to discuss their responses to questions that are largely based on the text itself, looking closely at words, sentences and ideas presented in the text. Language Dives help guide conversations among students about specific words, phrases, and sentences to better understand complex syntax. Total participation techniques such as Turn-and-Talk, Cold-Call and Equity Sticks are also utilized to engage all students in responding to text-based questions and prompts.

Examples of protocols and opportunities for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Teacher Guide Overview, students practice norms and behaviors for sharing and caring for classroom toys and interacting with peers. Students consider the unit’s guiding question, “What can we do to make playing together fun?” as they explore classroom toys, engage in structured conversations, and read about playing together. During the second portion of the unit, students document and synthesize their learning through structured discussions and shared writing experiences. Throughout these activities, students generate the Commitments for Playing Together anchor chart, which is a resource that guides their play and interactions throughout the year.
  • In Module 1, Unit 1 Assessment, Responding to Text: Thinking about Illustrations and Speaking, the focus is students’ comprehension of a literary text read aloud. After being presented with a variety of scenes from the text Llama Llama Time to Share, students choose the illustrations that best answer the focus question: “What does Llama Llama learn about playing with others?” Then, using the pictures that they chose, students engage in a conversation with a partner to explain their work. Data is collected using the Speaking and Listening Checklist.
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 6, Close Read/Read Aloud Session 2, for the text, Come On, Rain!, students have a text-based discussion using Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner. Students discuss the following prompts: “Think back to what we have learned about the weather. What science clues make Tess believe it will rain soon? How do you know?”
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 6, after completing a sorting activity classifying pictures that are living and non-living with a partner, the teacher re-reads pages 22-25 of What’s Alive? aloud. Students gather information to assist with a research project. The teacher stops on page 24, prompts a turn and talk protocol, and inquires, “What information does What’s Alive? give us that would help us confirm what we know about living things?” The teacher has the option to extend the conversation by asking, “Who can add on to what your classmate said? I’ll give you time to think.” Students utilize the information and research obtained during the sort, read aloud, and classroom discussion to cite evidence of living and non-living things in their Living Things research notebook.
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 4, the teacher purposefully guides students through a close reading of A Tree for Emmy focusing on asking and answering questions about the story elements. During an independent writing activity, the teacher displays an image (Enjoying Trees image 3) and prompts the turn and talk protocol by asking, “How are the people in this picture enjoying trees?” Suggested responses include the following: “The kids are hiding” and “The kids are playing hide and seek.” The teacher extends the conversation by prompting, “Who can explain why your classmate came up with that response? I’ll give you time to think.” As students share, the teacher uses the Speaking and Listening Checklist to make anecdotal notes. Students work independently on a writing task concluding the session with a Face-To-Face protocol, which includes sharing their writing with a partner in a structured format.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

There are many opportunities for students to discuss what they are reading by asking relevant follow-up questions and providing teacher support. The Focused Read Aloud and Close Read/Read Aloud sessions incorporate numerous opportunities for students to listen to their teacher, listen to their peers, and speak about what they are thinking and have learned about the text. Think-Pair-Share, Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face, and Pinky Partners are lesson strategies used to encourage these collaborative discussions. Specific Speaking and Listening lessons are strategically placed before and after Read Aloud or Close Reading lessons. While all lessons provide opportunities for student discourse, these lessons are focused on providing structured opportunities for students to use new vocabulary, gain background knowledge prior to reading, and engage with text that has been read independently and then shared with a partner or read as a class and then shared with a partner or group. Research is implemented in the Read-Think-Talk-Write Cycle and begins as shared class research discussed by all. K-2 Labs, which are scaffolded experiences connected to the Module Lessons, place an emphasis on research to help students expand their content knowledge.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 2, the teacher reads aloud Toy Riddles and extracts meaning from the text through whole group discussion. The teacher asks students to guess the meaning of the riddle on page 5. Then asks, “What attributes did you hear that helped you to solve the riddle?” Teachers are provided with correct student responses such as, “brown, soft, colorful, small.”
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 1, after reading the text Have Fun Molly Lou Melon, two students go to the front of the room to act out pages 21–22 playing the roles of Molly Lou and Gertie. The teacher rereads the passage, if needed, and explains that an operator was a person who helped people to make phone calls long ago. Students paraphrase what the characters said and/or did using dialogue and physical movement.
  • In Module 2, Labs, Practice Stage, Teacher Guide, pages 112-114, students work collaboratively with a research partner to study photographs of extreme weather events. Students notice details, take notes, and discuss with their partner. The teacher asks, “What kind of weather is the most powerful?” Students use single words, phrases, or images to capture notes about what they see for their weather research.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 5, the teacher initiates a shared writing activity circling around their research on how people depend on trees for food. Prior to writing, the teacher initiates conversation through a turn and talk protocol by asking, “What is the big idea that we should share about what people get from trees?” Students are expected to respond with, “People get food from trees.” The teacher provides students ten minutes to write a focus statement that shares the big idea independently. The teacher asks, “What picture should we draw that will show the big idea about how people depend on trees?” Responses vary, but may include a picture of a person eating food from a tree. The teacher completes a model drawing of matching a picture to text. The teacher encourages students to think of a sentence that matches the drawn picture and to utilize the word “eat.” Students use their writing as they answer the following questions: “Now we need to write a sentence that matches our drawing. What can we say that answers the question ‘How do people depend on trees for food?’ without giving away details?” Students use the ideas and themes discussed in this session to complete the focus statement in their People Depend on Trees booklet.
  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 3, the teacher completes a Read Aloud for pages 1-14 of A Tree is Nice. As the teacher reads, students identify and discuss the reasons the author gives to support his points. After reading page 6, the teacher stops to ask, “On page 6, what is a reason the author gives that makes you think trees are nice and that people should plant trees?” With a suggested student response derived from the text, “They make everything beautiful.” After reading multiple reasons why people should plant trees throughout the book, the teacher stops and prompts the Turn-and-Talk protocol, “Using the illustrations and text, what is one reason that trees are nice and that people should plant trees that the author gives us on this page?” Student responses should be text-based and can include “trees have leaves you can play in,” “you can climb trees,” “sit on tree limbs, and pretend,” and “you can eat apples from apple trees.”

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials, including a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

There are opportunities for on-demand writing, process writing, and short, focused projects through a variety of instructional tasks. On-demand writing addresses a variety of text types and purposes and is included in each module’s end-of-unit assessment. To demonstrate understanding of the text, students write on-demand and draw in response to text through instructional tasks in the Module Lab Lessons.

The Skills Block lessons provide more opportunities for on-demand writing utilizing content that is directly related to the phonic skills/spelling skills that are being taught. Shared writing activities address several genres and are completed during whole group instruction time with students doing the thinking and the teacher doing the writing and modeling of the Revising and Editing Checklist. Writing of research projects is supported through the Read-Think-Talk-Write Cycle and the Writing for Understanding Framework and students engage with text to identify information that will help them answer a research question. The curriculum recommends the use of a variety of digital resources throughout the Module lessons. Additionally, the curriculum provides anchor charts and exemplar writing samples to support instruction.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 7, students use drawing apps or software, such as Kids Doodle, to draw the response of their personal playing commitment using the My Playing Commitment Student Response Sheet. Students are encouraged to add words/labels to their drawing.
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 7, students complete a reflection responding to the prompt, “Write the name of the three weather components you have learned about. Then, draw a picture and label to show what you learned about each one.”
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 11, students identify the characters and setting of the story, while the teacher records the information on the Brave Irene anchor chart creating a shared class writing piece.
  • The Module 2 Process Writing Tasks include a narrative piece, “My Weather Story,” and an information piece, “Weather Journals.” Students write an imaginary narrative about a character’s experience with the weather, using The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats as a mentor text. Students’ narratives reflect how the weather affects the choices the character makes, about what to wear and what to do. Students use group notes, puppets, and oral planning as scaffolding to illustrate and write their stories. They also revise, edit, and practice reading their original narratives in preparation for sharing them.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 4, students complete an on-demand writing task where they draw a picture and label using the Fruit and Nut Reference Sheet and their People, Trees, and Food: Class Notes. After adding notes about their assigned item (fruit, nut, or seed) they complete the sentence frame, “People eat ______ from trees.”, with their notes as reference.
  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 3, students are asked to complete a performance task drawing a detailed picture to match writing about why trees are nice. In lesson 6, students add more to their sentence by including two reasons why trees are nice. Students are simultaneously practicing speaking and listening skills (Lessons 4-6) as they sketch pictures of trees, draw and label pictures of trees, and talk about why trees are nice.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

The curriculum offers opportunities for students to engage in writing tasks across the text types required in the standards. Students use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose many types of writing including opinion, informational and narrative utilizing the writing process. Writing opportunities are scaffold so students move from drawing to labeling to writing. There is a balance of short writing pieces and longer writing pieces that are worked on over the span of a unit. By incorporating a variety of writing tasks in multiple formats, students experience independent writing, partner writing, the writing process, and a balance of genres. The Writing for Understanding framework and the Read-Think-Talk-Write Cycle support students as they engage in writing tasks throughout the Module Lab lessons. To provide instructional support Writing Checklists are available for informational, narrative, and opinion writing in the Teacher Guide Supporting Materials. Opportunities to address text types of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards, include but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, students write an opinion writing piece about their preferred classroom toy along with an informational writing piece about the preferred classroom toy of a classmate. Students interview a classmate about their favorite toy then draw, label, and write a sentence about the toy. Students then draw, label, and write a sentence about how this classmate likes to play with their toy.
  • In Module 2, students write a narrative writing piece about a weather story along with an informational writing piece about keeping a weather journal. Students write an imaginary narrative about a character’s experience with the weather, using The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats as a mentor text. Students’ narratives reflect how the weather affects the choices the character makes about what to wear and what to do. Students use group notes, puppets, and oral planning as scaffolding for illustrating and writing their stories. Students revise, edit, and practice reading their original narratives in preparation for sharing them.
  • In Module 3, students prepare to write an informational writing piece through keeping a living things research notebook. Students then write about how animals depend on trees.
  • In Module 4, students write an opinion piece about where they would plant a tree along with an informational writing piece about enjoying trees.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials including regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence based writing. Activities require students to participate in collaborative conversations about text while the teacher records the ideas from these conversations on anchor charts. As students move through the module units, these charts are utilized during independent writing and drawing. Unit 1 of each Module builds background knowledge on the specific topic, and students are engaged in tasks that require writing with evidence. Materials provide opportunities for students to recall information from the text by drawing, dictating their understanding of the text in their own words, detailing elements of the text, and engaging in other writing tasks that represent each of the writing text types.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, students document and synthesize their learning through structured discussions and shared writing experiences. Through these activities, students generate the Commitments for Playing Together anchor chart, which is a resource that will guide their play and interactions throughout the year. At the end of the unit, students collectively write a letter back to their principal and individually illustrate one of the Commitments for Playing Together as a way to share their learning from the unit.
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 12, students have an opportunity to read and role-play portions of Brave Irene and identify the events of the story using the Brave Irene Anchor Chart. Students respond to the following prompts as the teacher records on the anchor chart, “What is the first very important thing that happens in the story? What are two or three other important events that happened in the story after Irene left her house with the dress? What are the important events at the end of the story?”
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 5, students complete a shared read with the book, Be a Friend to Trees, and utilize their People Depend on Trees booklet to complete a shared writing experience. The teacher prompts students to think about the question, “How do people depend on trees for food?” Students then draw a picture that will show the big idea of how people depend on trees. Students then write a sentence to match their drawing.
  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 1, students are beginning a new unit with the guiding question: "How are trees important to us and our community?" After a brief mini-lesson in Part A about opinions and reasons and back to back protocol about how trees are important to us and our community, students open their new journal titled Enjoying Trees Journal, Part II. This journal is different than Enjoying Trees Journal, Part I, as this one contains pictures and requires students to write the sentences. The teacher turns to page 1 and asks students, “How would you describe where the trees are in this picture?” The teacher then encourages students to look at the picture and write a sentence in their journals using evidence from the picture.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Opportunities to learn language standards are in the Module Lessons and in the Foundational Reading Skills Block. Grammar and convention standards are predominantly taught and learned through context instruction.

  • L.K.1a
    • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 1, Lesson 7, students participate in the instructional practice: Getting to Know Letters: Printing Lowercase and Uppercase “a”. The teacher traces the letter ‘a’. The teacher skywrites the letter and says the sound of the letter. The students echo the sound and say the name as they skywrite the letter. The teacher models proper letter formation on a demonstration board. Students practice writing the letter using handwriting paper and with teacher guidance.
  • L.K.1b
    • Throughout Module 4, students are reminded to use a noun and verb in their sentences. In Unit 1, Lesson 2, during Closing Assessment, the teacher is to remind students that their writing should include a noun, the person or people in the picture and a verb that says what the person or people are doing. “Remind them that all complete sentences use a noun and a verb. Provide examples as needed.”
  • L.K.1c
    • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 3, the teacher reviews the definition of noun (a person, place, or thing). Students learn to wiggle one finger for the word singular and many fingers for plural. The teacher reads “What’s Alive and What’s Not” Version 1. Students use the gestures for singular and plural to when they hear those nouns. With a partner, students tape nouns from the poem onto Singular and Plural Nouns anchor chart.
  • L.K.1d
    • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 1, during the Closing and Assessment on page 215, the teacher asks “What are questions?” and provides examples of sentences that ask for answers. Students then focus on the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart. The teacher reads and explains the chart. Working with a partner, students ask each other questions about a toy from long ago that is displayed in a photograph.
  • L.K.1e
    • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 2, students are introduced to prepositions. During the Opening, students learn prepositions explain where a person, place, or thing is, or its position. Students listen for words that might be a preposition in a song. In Lesson 3, students find prepositions in “Trees in Our Community.” The teacher asks, “Where does the song say the oak tree is located?”
  • L.K.1f
    • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 5, during Work Time B, Building Vocabulary, students are given two choices from the Would You Prefer? Index cards. The teacher models providing a reason behind the chosen preference that expands the sentence. For example, the first card asks if you prefer cheese pizza or pepperoni pizza. The teacher answers, “I prefer cheese pizza because l like my pizza to be plain and I love cheese.” Students answer using the sentence frame “I prefer ____ because ____.”
  • L.K.2a
    • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 11, during Work Time B, Independent Writing: Describing a Classmate’s Toy Preference, teacher models writing the sentence that describes the pictures and labels, beginning the sentence with a capital letter while thinking aloud.
  • L.K.2b
    • The teacher models using a period at the end of sentences. Other ending punctuation marks are not explicitly taught. In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 1, the teacher models using a period as end punctuation. In Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 3, the teacher purposely does not use a period, so students can learn how to edit the sentence.
  • L.K.2c
    • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 2, Lesson 6, students participate in the instructional practice: Introducing Writing the Letter to Match the Sound for “p,” “t,” “a,” “c,” “h”. The teacher pronounces the phonemes for the word cat. As the teacher writes the letters he/she explains the motions of letter formation as it is written. The students skywrite the letter.
  • L.K.2d
    • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 4, Cycle 23, Lesson 120, During Opening A, students work through a series of scaffolded steps to spell single-syllable CVC words. They first isolate and identify the individual phonemes in the spoken word. Students then apply their growing knowledge of letter-sound connections to identify the grapheme (letter) that matches each individual phoneme. Finally, they use that information to encode (spell) the word.
  • L.K.6
    • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 6, students use details from the text, Toys Galore, to describe the ways they can play. The teacher reads aloud the text and the students find words that describe ways they can play with toys. Students share the words they hear. The words are used to create attributes anchor charts, Classroom Toys chart, and Toys and Play Word Wall. Students are reminded to use these resources to help with labeling and adding details to their drawings in Lesson 7.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
22/22
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context. Materials meet the criteria that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words and having questions, and tasks that provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.Materials meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills and provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, alphabetic principles, phonological awareness and phonics are explicitly and systematically taught through the Work Time activities. Consonant Vowel Consonant are introduced in Module 3. Opportunities to practice and produce rhyming words occur during the Rhyme Time Instructional Practice. Syllables are introduced and practiced during the Feel the Beats Instructional Practice that includes counting, pronouncing, segmenting and blending of the syllables in words. Each skill becomes more complex in subsequent lessons and as skills are obtained the next skill in the staircase of the learning progression begins. Explicit instruction of long vowels is not until Module 4.

Students have frequent and opportunities to learn and understand phonemes (e.g., produce rhyming words, segment syllables, blend onsets and rimes, pronounce vowels in CVC words, and substitute sounds to make new words). Examples include:

  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 1, Lesson 8, the teacher points to the Keyword Picture Card: “t” on the anchor chart and says: “‘t,’ tern, /t/.” Students repeat: “‘t,’ tern, /t/.”
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 1, Lesson 9, the teacher recites the first line of the Alligator/Tern poem again, tapping the beats while students listen: “All-i-ga-tor went to the an-i-mal zoo.” Students recite the line, tapping the beats just as teacher just did and to say the word “all-i-ga-tor” aloud, holding up a finger each time they hear a beat.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 4, Lesson 21, the teacher says: “We are going to learn the story of two new letters today: ‘m’ and ‘r.’ We will learn the names, the sounds, and keywords for these two letters.” Teacher holds up a Keyword Picture Card: “m,” showing only the picture, and asks: “Who knows the name of this landform that we just learned?” (“mountain”) “What sound do we hear at the beginning of the word: ‘mountain’?” (/m/) 3. Teacher says: “Let’s all say that sound together: /m/.” Students repeat sound: /m/.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 4, Lesson 24, the teacher says, “We noticed that some words have one syllable, like the words ‘run’ and ‘top’, and some words have more than one. The word ‘mountain’ has two syllables: ‘moun’ and ‘tain.’ Each syllable is one beat.” Teacher says: “Now let’s play a game: I’ll say each syllable in a word, and you blend them together to say the word they make.” Teacher says: “crack-ers.” Students say: “crackers.”
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 14, Lesson 75, students use chaining to distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters. Students write "rip" on their sound board. The teacher states, “Now we’re going to make a new word, just by changing the letter for one sound! Let’s replace /r/ with /s/.” Students read their new word by running their fingers under each box and make each sound and blend the sounds to say “sip.”
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 2, Lesson 14, students blend the word after the teacher says the word in segmented syllables. Teacher says: “sur-prised” and the students say: “surprised”
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 4, Lesson 24, students segment syllables in spoken words. The students identify the number of beats or syllables in the word: mountain. Then the students identify the first syllable and the second syllable that they hear in the word mountain. Students then are given the two syllables: crack-ers and they blend the syllables to make the word: crackers. This is repeated 2 to 3 more times with other multisyllabic words take from the poem: “Mouse and Rabbit Share a Snack”.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 9, Lesson 49, students segment and blend onset and rime. The teacher models segmenting fox into the onset /f/ and rime /ox/. The students practice segmenting onset and rime with the words “rain” and “down”. The teacher then gives the students the onset and rime to blend: /f/ /ix/. The students say “fix”. This is repeated with the words “quick” and “chat”.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 12, Lesson 62, students segment phonemes in CVC words. The teacher models how to segment the phonemes in the word ‘ship’ using the thumb-tapping technique. This is repeated with the words: thin, rich, wish, with, chop. The teacher asks the students to identify the beginning sound, the middle sound and the ending sound in each word.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 12, Lesson 65, students segment onset and rime. The teacher and students read a poem: “What Do You Want to Do?”. The teacher asks students to choose words from the poem and asks students to segment the word into its onset and rime.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 13, Lesson 67, students tap the sounds in CVC words to identify the beginning, middle and end sounds in words. The teacher practices segmenting the CVC words (cat, bat, gap, sag, mad) and guiding students to do the same. The teacher segments the word ‘zap’ and then asks the students to identify the beginning sound, middle sound, and ending sound.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 13, Lesson 70, students substitute individual phonemes to make new words. The teacher models how to replace the initial phoneme in ‘map’ to make the word ‘tap’. The teacher provides guided practice for the students by presenting them with the word tap. Then the teacher asks the following questions: "What is the last sound in ‘tap’? Let’s change the /p/ to /g/. What word do we have now?" This is activity is repeated with changing rat to mat.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 14, Lesson 75, students substitute individual phonemes to make new words. The teacher models how to replace the initial phoneme in ‘lip’ to make the new word ‘sip’. Then the teacher asks students to identify the last sound in ‘sip’. The teacher asks students to change the /p/ to /t/ and asks “What word do we have now?”. This process is repeated with fit, jig and rib.

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g. one-to-one correspondences, long and short sounds with common spellings, and distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying sounds of the letters). Long vowel instruction does not occur until Module 4. Examples include:

  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 6, Lesson 31, students identify the sound that is heard at the beginning of the word ‘goose’. The students then identify the letter that makes the sound /g/ at the beginning of the word. Then students share words they know that begin with /g/. The students again identify the name of the letter that makes that sound. The teacher writes the words on the board and circle the letter ‘g’ in each word.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 6, Lesson 35, students participate in the Letter-Sound Chant for the following letters: h, p, a, t, n, c, m, r, v, s, i, and g. The teacher and students say the Letter-Sound Chant for each letter, example: i, iguana, /i/.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 9, Lesson 46, students participate in the Letter-Sound Chant for the letter u. The teacher models: u, umbrella, /u/. Students join in and complete the chant as a class.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 13, Lesson 70, students make new words by changing the letter for one sound in a CVC word. The teacher and students work together to change map to mat. The teacher and students write the word map. The teacher asks students to change the /p/ with /t/. The teacher asks: “What letter do we need to erase? What letter do we need to replace it with?" The students read the new word by blending the sounds. This process is repeated to make the words: rat, rap, nap, tap, tag.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 14, Lesson 75, students make new words by changing the letter for one sound in CVC words. The teacher and students work together to change rip to sip. The teacher writes "rip" on the board. The teacher says, “Let’s replace /r/ with /s/.” The teacher asks: “What letter do we need to erase? What letter do we need to replace it with?” The teacher invites students to read the new word by blending the sounds. This process is repeated with nip, nip, fig, big, bit, it, fit, hit, sit, sat, mat, rat.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 1, Lesson 4, students learn the t and /t/. The teacher states: “The /t/ sound at the beginning of the word ‘tern’ was shown by this letter hidden in the picture of tern.” The teacher traces “t” in the image of the tern. “This is the letter ‘t’ and it shows the sound /t/.” (3a)
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 1, Lesson 6, students learn a /a/. The teacher says: “The /a/ sound at the beginning of the word alligator has shown by this letter hidden in the picture of the alligator.” The teacher tells students that a makes /a/. Students skywrite the lowercase letter a.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 1, Lesson 8, the teacher points to the Keyword Picture Card: “t” on the anchor chart and says : “‘t,’ tern, /t/.” Students repeat: “‘t,’ tern, /t/.”
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 1, Lesson 9, the teacher recites the first line of the Alligator/Tern poem again, tapping the beats while students listen:“All-i-ga-tor went to the an-i-mal zoo.” Students recite the line, tapping the beats just as teacher just did and to say the word “all-i-ga-tor” aloud, holding up a finger each time they hear a beat.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 4, Lesson 21, the teacher says, “We are going to learn the story of two new letters today: ‘m’ and ‘r.’ We will learn the names, the sounds, and keywords for these two letters.” Teacher holds up a Keyword Picture Card: “m,” showing only the picture, and asks: “Who knows the name of this landform that we just learned?” (“mountain”) “What sound do we hear at the beginning of the word: ‘mountain’?” (/m/) 3. Teacher says: “Let’s all say that sound together: /m/.” Students repeat sound: /m/.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 4, Lesson 24, the teacher says “We noticed that some words have one syllable, like the words ‘run’ and ‘top’, and some words have more than one. The word ‘mountain’ has two syllables: ‘moun’ and ‘tain.’ Each syllable is one beat.” Teacher says, “Now let’s play a game: I’ll say each syllable in a word, and you blend them together to say the word they make.” Teacher says: “crack-ers.” Students say: “crackers.”
  • In the Readings Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 14, Lesson 75, students use chaining to distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters. Students write rip on their sound board. The teacher states, “Now we’re going to make a new word, just by changing the letter for one sound! Let’s replace /r/ with /s/.” Students read their new word by running their fingers under each box and make each sound and blend the sounds to say “sip.”
  • In the Skills Block, Module 4, Cycle 23, Lesson 118 students learn long a. The teacher displays “The Vowels Have Something important to Say.” The teacher asks, “What is the secret the vowels want us to know? What does ‘their names are the same as new sounds they make’ mean?” Students tap out the name Kate to learn the long a.
  • In the Skills Block, Module 4, Cycle 24, Lesson 125, students learn long o. The teacher uses Spelling to Complement Reading for students to learn long o. The teacher models stretching out the word cone, tapping the sounds, and using a sound board to model the role of “e” at the end of the word. Students practice figuring out how to spell hope and poke.

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonemic awareness instruction to build toward application. Examples include:

In Module 1, students learn the following patterns:

  • Cycle 1, students learn a and t.
  • Cycle 2, students learn h and p.
  • Cycle 3, students learn n and c.
  • Cycle 4, students learn m and r.

In Module 2, students learn the following patterns:

  • Cycle 5, students learn v and s.
  • Cycle 6, students learn g and i.
  • Cycle 7, students learn l, d, and f.
  • Cycle 8, students learn k and y.
  • Cycle 9, students learn x, q, and u.
  • Cycle 10, students learn b, o, w.
  • Cycle 11, students j, e, z.

In Module 3, students learn the following patterns:

  • Cycle 12, students learn sh, ch, th.
  • Cycle 13, students learn /a/ words.
  • Cycle 14, students learn /i/ words.
  • Cycle 15, students learn /u/ words.
  • Cycle 16, students learn /o/ words.
  • Cycle 17, students learn /e/ words.
  • Cycle 18, students compare short vowel sound words.

In Module 4, students learn the following patterns:

  • Cycle 19, all short vowels and digraph are reviewed.
  • Cycle 20, short vowels (/a/ and /i/) are reviewed. Decoding of -an and -am spelling patterns.
  • Cycle 21, short vowels (/e/ and /u/) are reviewed. Spoken words with -ank and -ink are introduced.
  • Cycle 22, short vowels (/o/) are reviewed. Decoding of words with double final consonants is taught.
  • Cycle 23, long vowels in spoken words are introduced (long a and long i).
  • Cycle 24, long vowels in spoken words are introduced (long o, long u, and long e).
  • Cycle 25, r-controlled vowels are introduced in spoken words.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, 2, and 3, students participate in Feel the Beats Instructional Practice for Lesson Work Time. During this activity students listen for and identify each syllable in a spoken word. They count the number of syllables in the word, pronounce each one, and segment and blend them.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, 2, and 3, students participate in Rhyme Time Instructional Practice for Lesson Work Time. During this activity students identify rhyming words and produce rhyming words.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3 and 4, students participate in Phonemic Blending and Segmentation Instructional Practice for Lesson Work Time. During this activity students segment and blend single-syllable words with three phonemes.

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application. Examples include:

In Module 1, students learn the following patterns:

  • Cycle 1, students learn a and t.
  • Cycle 2, students learn h and p.
  • Cycle 3, students learn n and c.
  • Cycle 4, students learn m and r.

In Module 2, students learn the following patterns:

  • Cycle 5, students learn v and s.
  • Cycle 6, students learn g and i.
  • Cycle 7, students learn l, d, and f.
  • Cycle 8, students learn k and y.
  • Cycle 9, students learn x, q, and u.
  • Cycle 10, students learn b, o, w.
  • Cycle 11, students j, e, z.

In Module 3, students learn the following patterns:

  • Cycle 12, students learn sh, ch, th.
  • Cycle 13, students learn /a/ words.
  • Cycle 14, students learn /i/ words.
  • Cycle 15, students learn /u/ words.
  • Cycle 16, students learn /o/ words.
  • Cycle 17, students learn /e/ words.
  • Cycle 18, students compare short vowel sound words.

In Module 4, students learn the following patterns:

  • Cycle 19, all short vowels and digraph are reviewed.
  • Cycle 20, short vowels (/a/ and /i/) are reviewed. Decoding of -an and -am spelling patterns.
  • Cycle 21, short vowels (/e/ and /u/) are reviewed.
  • Cycle 22, short vowels (/o/) are reviewed. Decoding of words with double final consonants is taught.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, 2 and 3, students participate in Getting to Know the Letters (Part I) Instructional Practice for Lesson Work Time. During this activity students "meet" each new letter for the cycle. Students are instructed on the letter’s name, the sound it makes, and a consistent keyword that represents the letter.
  • In the Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3 and 4, students participate in Chaining Instructional Practice for Lesson Work Time. During this activity, students identify each phoneme they hear in a CVC word and connect each sound to the letter. After encoding the word, they then decode it by making each individual sound and blending them to pronounce the word.

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge and directionality (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

Throughout the Modules 1 and 2 of the Foundations Skills Block, students are introduced to lowercase and uppercase letters. Explicit instruction includes identifying the letter and properly forming the letter. The teacher models and guides students through the print concepts of reading from left to right and top to bottom, as well as one-to-one correspondence. Throughout the modules, students are explicitly taught the phoneme and grapheme correspondence when writing and reading words.

Materials include frequent, adequate lessons and activities for students to learn how to identify and produce letters. For example:

  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1 and Module 2, Cycles 1 through 11, students receive explicit instruction in letter identification (name, sound, formation)
    • Cycle 1: a and t
    • Cycle 2: h and p
    • Cycle 3: n and c
    • Cycle 4: m and r
    • Cycle 5: v and s
    • Cycle 6: g and i
    • Cycle 7: l, d, and f
    • Cycle 8: k and y
    • Cycle 9: x, q, u
    • Cycle 10: b, o, w
    • Cycle 11: j, e, z
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 3, Lesson 17, students participate in a guided activity where they locate and circle the letter ‘c’ and the letter ‘n’ in the poem: “My Cat, Noodles.” The teacher uses ‘binoculars’ or a ‘magnifying glass’ to look closely at the words of the poem and encourages to students to do the same. The teacher models finding a ‘c’ and circling the word ‘cat’. During Work Time, the teacher models how to skywrite the letter ‘c’. The teacher directs the student in proper letter formation with directions that are from the Letter Formation Guidance document.

Materials include frequent and adequate tasks and questions about the organization of print concepts (e.g. follow words left to right, spoken words correlate sequences of letters, letter spacing, upper- and lowercase letters). For example:

  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 1, Lesson 8, students participate in a Shared Reading of the poem, “Alligator and Tern.” Students are invited to extend their arms and follow left to right and top to bottom as the teacher reads the poem aloud, pointing at each word as students listen.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 1, Lesson 8, students sing the ABC Song with the teacher. The teacher points to each letter on the chart as it is sung. The teacher explains that there are 26 letters in the alphabet and that each letter is important because each one of them has a sound. The teacher also shows the Key Word Picture Card ‘a’- ‘a’, alligator, /a/. Later in the lesson, during Work Time B, the teacher invites students to find and circle the letter ‘a’ in words. The teacher asks: “Is that a lowercase ‘a’ or upper case ‘a’? This is repeated for the letter ‘t’.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 3, Lesson 17, students search for the letter ‘c’ and the letter ‘n’ in their poetry notebooks or by using copies of the poem: “My Cat, Noodles.”
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 5, Lesson 26, students follow along chorally as the teacher reads the poem: “Victor the Sleepy Vulture” aloud, pointing to the words on their copy as they read. In the ‘Meeting Students’ Needs’, the teacher is prompted to consider providing support and/or practice with left-to-right directionality by inviting individual students up to the front to the enlarged poem to point to the words as the class chorally recites.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 9, Lesson 47, students participate in a shared read aloud of the poem, “A Fox and a Quail in the Rain.” The teacher uses the Key Picture Cards: “u”, “q”, and “x.” Later in the lesson, the teacher models searching for words that start with “u”. The teacher says: “The letter ‘u’ starts the word ‘under’. I can hear the /u/ sound at the beginning of the word ‘under’.” The students circle the letter in their copy of the poem.

For Standard RF.K.1c (Understand that words are separated by spaces in print), whole group lessons implicitly teach this concept during Interactive Sentence Building. Students do not explicitly identify that words are separated by spaces in print. For example:

  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 11, Lesson 59, students participate in an interactive poem activity. Students help to complete sentence by providing the missing words. When the sentences are completed the teacher rereads the two sentences, modeling one-to-one correspondence, while students follow along.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 12, Lesson 64, students help the teacher figure out a missing word in a sentence: “Do you want to make a wish? Or do you want to catch a ___?” A student finds the word fish from a Word Card. “Teacher rereads the two sentences, modeling one-to-one correspondence, while students follow along.”

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

Over the course of the year, students are provided with opportunities to read emergent readers and decodable texts. Lessons follow a consistent routine throughout the cycles. Mystery Word activities are done in each cycle with the high-frequency word(s) of the cycle identified through clues given that require students to use word analysis and apply their foundational knowledge of words. The high-frequency words are found within the context of a poem that students are asked to read either independently or with a partner. These poems also include words that contain the phoneme focus of the cycle. In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 13, students access decodable readers. These texts consist of decodable words and high-frequency words.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read emergent-reader texts. Students are provided a purpose for reading such as in Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 13, Lesson 66: “Now we are going to start reading books instead! This book is based on the story, ‘A Book of Animals.’ I will read the words first, just like we did with the poem, and then you will read the words with me. Look and listen for high-frequency words and for letter sounds that you know.” Beginning in Module 3, Cycle 13, students read a decodable text with a partner during each cycle. For each text, the teacher asks students to pay attention to and circle the high-frequency words learned and point to letters as they make the letter sounds.

  • In Module 3, students read “A Book of Animals,” “The Ham Sandwich,” “The Milkshake,” “Fun With Gum,” “The Mop is a Dog!” and “Josh’s New Home.”
  • In Module 4, students read “Chip Can’t Nap!,” “Josh Takes a Bath,” “Jash and Chip at the Farm,” “The Bowling ‘Alley’,” “Time to Bake,” “The Mystery Moth” and “The Jazz Trio.”

Materials support students’ development of automaticity and accuracy of grade-level decodable words over the course of the year. For example:

  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 13, Lesson 68, students are introduced to a poem. The poem includes the words that contain vowel phoneme /a/, which is the focus for this cycle. This poem also includes the two high-frequency words that are the focus of this cycle. Students practice chorally reading the poem with the teacher. The poem contains: fat, cat, at, has, can, nap, glad and snack, which contain the phoneme /a/.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 14, Lesson 71, students participate in a Decodable Reader activity. The teacher reads an enlarged copy of the Decodable Reader, “The Ham Sandwich.” The teacher reads the words first. The teacher highlights the high-frequency words with a highlighter. The students read the Decodable Reader, “The Ham Sandwich,” with a partner.

Students have opportunities to read and practice high-frequency words. For example:

  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 4, Lesson 23, students participate in a Work Time activity: Mystery Word. The teacher reads aloud the poem, “Mouse and Rabbit Share a Snack.” Students clap each time the teacher says a word with two letters. The students read their own copy of the poem either with a partner or independently. The students turn to a partner and point to the word they believe to be the mystery word.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 7, Lesson 38, students participate in a Work Time activity: Mystery Word. The first clue to the mystery word is that it has three letters. The teacher asks the students: “Can you find any other words with three letters?” The students search their copy of the poem, “An Afternoon Swim.” The students clap their hands each time the teacher says a word with three letters as she/he rereads the poem to them. The students turn to a partner and point to the word they believe to be the mystery word.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Beginning in Module 3, Student Decodable Readers are used as an instructional practice in each cycle. Texts consist of decodable words (one-syllable, regularly spelled words that include only taught phonemes) and high-frequency words. Texts provide opportunities for students to decode and recognize words in context. Encoding in context of graphemes, phonemes, and spelling patterns is addressed during Interactive Sentence Building.

Materials support students’ development as they learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g., one-to-one correspondences, syllable segmentation, rime and onset recognition, long and short sounds with common spellings and distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying sounds of the letters) in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 5, Lesson 26, during the Opening, the class reads the poem, “Victor, the Sleepy Vulture,” pointing to each word. During Work Time, students get to know letters v and s that were featured in the poem during the Getting to Know Letters task. The teacher holds up a keyword picture card for s only showing the picture of a snake and asks students to identify the animal and the sound heard at the beginning of the word. After making the /s/ sound, students identify the letter, say the letter s, and skywrite the letter s. Students share words that begin with s. This is repeated for the letter v with the picture vulture. To meet students' needs, students may have the opportunity to say the letter sound chant.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 14, Lesson 71, students apply knowledge of previously taught graphemes and phonemes as they decode simple one-syllable words with the Decodable Reader, “The Ham Sandwich.”
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 4, Cycle 19, Lesson 96, students apply knowledge of previously taught graphemes and phonemes as they decode simple one-syllable words with the Decodable Reader, “Chip Can’t Nap.”

Materials provide frequent opportunities to read high-frequency words in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 14, Lesson 71, students read high-frequency words in the Decodable Reader, “The Ham Sandwich.” The teacher displays and reads the Enlarged Decodable Reader. The teacher reads the text again and highlights the high-frequency words: I, see, the, in, he and a. The students work with a partner to find and circle these same high-frequency words in their own book. The partners read “The Ham Sandwich” to each other, in unison, or both.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 4, Cycle 19, Lesson 96, students read high-frequency words in the Decodable Reader, “Chip Can’t Nap!”. The teacher displays and reads the Enlarged Decodable Reader. The teacher reads the text again and highlights the high-frequency words: has, a, by, the, to, is and will. The students work with a partner to find and circle these same high-frequency words in their own book. The partners read “Chip Can’t Nap!” to each other, in unison, or both.

Lessons and activities provide students many opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 15, Lesson 79, students participate in the Interactive Sentence Building with an Enlarged interactive poem called “A Bug.” Students help fill in omitted words through rhyming and sounding out the spelling of the omitted word. Students skywrite the missing word, while a student writes the missing word on the poem.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 4, Cycle 20, Lesson 103, students participate in the Interactive Writing instructional practice. The teacher displays a picture of a character from the decodable readers. The students and teacher develop a sentence based on the picture. (Josh is in the mud.) The teacher and students count the number of words in the sentence. The teacher draws 5 lines, one for each word in the sentence. The teacher and students repeat the sentence and the teacher points to each line as they say each word. A student goes to the board to write the first word, Josh. The rest of the class writes the word on their own whiteboards or use skywriting. The teacher says, “Great job! I see (/j/ /o/ /sh/) written with the letters ‘j,’ ‘o,’ ‘s,’ and ‘h.’” Students tap out the sounds they see. This is repeated to complete the rest of the sentence.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

The Kindergarten materials provide teachers and students with frequent and ongoing assessment opportunities. The variety of assessment types (benchmark, informal, formal, summative, formative, daily, by cycle, etc.) demonstrates that assessment of K-2 foundational skills is necessary to determine student mastery, to see where students are struggling, and to differentiate the instruction needed by the students. For example, students take cycle assessments on a regular basis throughout the school year, based on a student’s performance on the test, the teacher and the student would set a goal for the student to work towards.

Multiple assessment opportunities are suggested and provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills. Examples include:

  • Benchmark assessments are administered at the beginning, middle, and end of the school year to assess Letter Name and Sound Identification, Phonological Awareness, Spelling, Decoding, and Fluency. These assessments help teachers group students based on whether or not students fall into the early, middle or late pre-alphabetic, partial alphabetic, alphabetic, or consolidated alphabetic stages.
  • The Benchmark Assessment Letter Name and Sound Identification assesses the ability to name the letter and sound of the 26 uppercase and lowercase letter symbols.
  • In the K-2 Resource Manual, Assessment Overview, Types of Assessments Chart contains the following information about Benchmark assessments:
    • “Beginning-of-Year: Provide diagnostic information to help the teacher:
      • Determine the phase at which a student currently is reading and spelling
      • Determine the approximate cycles in the K–2 Continuum that would best fit that student’s instructional needs
      • Gauge whether the student is approximately on grade level (as defined by the CCSS)
    • Middle-of-Year 2
      • Track students’ progress toward the end-of-year goals (as determined by the grade-level Scope and Sequence)
    • End-of-Year:
      • Measure students’ mastery of the end-of-year goals”
  • Cycle assessments are administered more often than Benchmark assessments and provide information about students’ progress toward mastery of skills taught up to a particular point. These assessments can be differentiated based on student need.
  • Daily Snapshot Assessments are conducted in K-1 that help a teacher quickly check on mastery of daily learning targets. For example:
    • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 8, Lesson 41, the teacher observes students during the Opening to determine whether they demonstrate one-to-one correspondence with words. The teacher observes students during Work Time to determine whether they can say the sounds for each letter correctly. The teacher records students’ progress on the Snapshot Assessment.
  • An Assessment Path is also provided for each grade level (Page 43 - Teacher Resource Manual). For example, for Kindergarten at the beginning of the year, the teacher should assess letter names and sound identification and administer a phonological awareness assessment as well. The suggested assessments for the middle of the year are as follows: “letter name and sound identification, phonological awareness, spelling (begin with Partial Alphabetic Word List), consider decoding (begin with Middle Partial Alphabetic Word List).” The recommended Assessments for the end of the school year are as follows: “letter name and sound identification, phonological awareness, spelling (begin with Partial Alphabetic Word List), decoding (begin with Middle Partial Alphabetic Word List).” Note: if students have already mastered letter name and sound identification and spelling then the assessments are not re-administered.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding. Examples include:

  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 7, Lesson 36, on page 157, the teacher observes students during Opening to determine whether they can identify the letters “d,” “f,” and “l” in the shared text and what their letter formation is. The teacher identifies this on the Snapsheet Assessment document.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 12, Lesson 65, the teacher shows students the stack of Question Cards. Teacher says, “Each card will ask you a question that will help you practice what you’ve been learning.” Students respond individually using white boards to the question cards, so that the teacher can see their current understanding.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 16, Lesson 81, there is an optional assessment in the Teacher Guide. The teacher documents using the Snapshot Assessment form: Demonstrate one-to-one correspondence when reading decodable text, follow left to right page order when reading decodable, map graphemes (letters) and phonemes (sounds) for consonants when reading decodable text, map graphemes (letters) and phonemes (sounds) for vowels when reading decodable text, and read the high-frequency word “the, is, up, see, he, and in.”

Materials support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in foundational skills. Examples include:

  • Based on how a student performs on the assessments, a student will be placed into the early, middle, or late stage of pre-alphabetic, partial alphabetic, full alphabetic, or consolidated alphabetic stages. This will help to guide the instruction a student receives over the course of the school year.
  • In Module 1, Cycle 6, Lesson 33 is used to determine whether students can say the sounds for each letter correctly. To help students, the teacher is to refer to the Articulatory Gestures chart as needed.
  • Based on how a student performs on the assessments, the teacher is directed to a chart in the K-2 Skills Block Resource Manual that provides lessons to use for additional supports based on whether a student in in the early, middle, or late range of the pre-alphabetic, partial alphabetic, full alphabetic, or consolidated alphabetic ranges. For example, a student that is Middle Partial Alphabetic should work on the following skills/lessons:
    • “GKM4, C19–22: decoding CVC words and beginning to decode CVCC; comparing long and short vowel sounds
    • C19: all short vowels; words with digraphs
    • C20: “-am” and “-an” words
    • C21: “-ank” and “-ink” words
    • C22: “floss” words (double consonants)”
  • A students in the Early Full Alphabetic range, should receive the following lessons for support:
    • “G1M3, C12–17: syllable types: closed syllable, open syllable, and CVCe syllable-type words
    • C12: two-syllable with closed syllables
    • C13: repeat C12 with double consonants in middle and compound words
    • C14: open syllables
    • C15: CVCe (mostly /ā/)
    • C16: CVCe (mostly /ō/ and /ī/)
    • C17: CVCe (mostly /ū/ and /ē/)”
  • A chart is provided in the Resource Manual with Activity Bank materials and their uses to help teachers choose what to use with students to improve students’ foundational skills. The chart contains activities aligned to CCSS and categories (rhyming, letter recognition, phonological manipulation, onset/rime, high frequency words, vowels, fluency, digraphs, syllables, affixes, question). For example, ABC Puppets allow students to demonstrate basic knowledge of one-to-one letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary sound or many of the most frequent sounds for each consonant. Students use puppets to say the sound of each letter of the alphabet.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.

Numerous differentiation opportunities are throughout the Kindergarten materials. During whole group lessons, teachers have the option to differentiate lessons through the Meeting Student Needs portion of the lessons. Students are provided with small group differentiation based on their needs. For students below level, small group differentiated instruction occurs on a daily basis. For students at or above grade level, small group differentiated instruction occurs once or twice a week. Students have multiple practice opportunities within each cycle to master grade level foundational skills. The same format for differentiation was present in all three grade levels, making for a coherent transition from grade level to grade level.

Materials provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills. Examples include:

  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block each day 40-45 minutes is allotted for small group differentiated instruction. “Teacher meets with two or three differentiated small groups, based on phase. Each group meets with the teacher for 10-12 minutes while other students do purposeful independent work.” Groups are formed based on how a student scores on the benchmark assessments.
  • For differentiation lessons and instructions, the teacher can refer to:
    • Reteaching or extending the whole group lesson
    • Activity Bank
    • Differentiation Pack
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 2, the differentiated small groups instruction begins.
    • In Lesson 12, the students in the Pre-Alphabetic group receive instruction on letter formation of h and p. The students in Early Partial Alphabetic students receive instruction on letter formation of h and p and hear the Letter Stories of h and p. The students in Late Partial and Early Full Alphabetic receive instruction on letter formation of h and p and hear the Letter Stories of h and p.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 12, Lesson 63, there are 3 different activities that the teacher does with students based on whether they are pre-alphabetic, partial alphabetic or consolidated alphabetic knowledge. For students who are pre-alphabetic students play a letter match game. For students who have partial alphabetic knowledge students, play a mystery word search game and students who know the alphabet independently complete the task of mystery word write. Instructions are very explicit as to how the teacher is to differentiate small group lessons. Instructions are clearly laid out for pre-alphabetic, partial alphabetic, full alphabetic and the consolidated alphabetic stages.

Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. Examples include:

  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Cycle 1, Lesson 4, teachers are provided with additional activities to use throughout the lesson such as, “Using body language and/or commentary while reading the story aloud supports comprehension of new information and vocabulary. For example, when reading 'the dirt path we were walking on started to loosen between our toes,' reach down and mime picking up soft dirt and commenting on how walking on it has caused the soil to break up.”
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 5, Lesson 26, Meeting Student Needs: “To provide support or practice with left-to-right directionality and one-to-one matching, consider inviting individual students to approach the enlarged poem and point to the words as the class chorally recites.”
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 9, Lesson 46, students who have pre-alphabetic knowledge the teacher guides students in sorting pictures sharing initial sounds with keywords (“u” and “q”) and final sounds with a keyword (“x”). While students who have early partial letter knowledge work on, sound sorting with the sounds u and q. Students who have late partial or full, work on sort and paste sound words on a sheet.

Students have multiple practice opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery. Examples include:

  • Each Module contains cycles, which provide sufficient opportunities for students to master skills taught. For example, in Kindergarten Module 1 (six weeks of instruction), Cycle 1 is ten days long. Students learn a and t during those 10 days.
  • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 1, Cycle 4, Lesson 22, students work with the teacher to say all of the letters in the alphabet and their sounds.
  • Starting in Module 3, students have Decodable Readers that the teacher downloads and the students read. The stories are centered around different letter sounds that students are working on.
  • Students have multiple practice opportunities throughout each module to master grade level foundational skills. For example:
    • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 2, Cycle 5, students focus on learning the phonemes /v/ and /s/. Students work on mastering this skill over the course of five lessons in the cycle. Examples of some of the activities students will complete in the cycle that focus on these phonemes include: a letter-sound chant for v and s, a poem letter search for v and s and writing the letters v and s.
    • In Reading Foundations Skills Block, Module 3, Cycle 13, students have five lessons that focus on CVC words with short a. Some activities students will complete to master this skill include phoneme blending, a letter sound chant, a word chain activity, and phoneme substitution activities.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

Kindergarten EL Language Arts instructional materials meet the expectations of Gateway 2. Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. Materials build an understanding of content in science, social studies, and literature. Students acquire an understanding of that content while they work to acquire the grade-level literacy standards of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics and contain coherently sequenced text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to rely on the knowledge built over the course of the module. The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening). Specific tasks are designed to build academic vocabulary within the curriculum during multiple readings of context-based texts. The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks and also provide opportunities for focused research and writing projects to support the development of knowledge and understanding of the Module topic. Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

30/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Materials build an understanding of content in science, social studies, and literature. Students acquire an understanding of that content while they work to acquire the grade-level literacy standards of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Within each Module, Unit 1 is designed to ensure students acquire content knowledge. In Unit 2 and Unit 3, teachers use close reading to engage students with complex text that deepens their knowledge of the Module topic. Lessons within the units provide complex text, students response pages, and anchor charts that support students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently in order to complete a culminating task.

The modules are based on topics with required and recommended text to support multiple reads for each topic. The K-2 Labs use of Storytime increases the amount of time that students spend with complex text through read-alouds while connecting to the content taught within the Module lessons. Vocabulary is introduced and reviewed throughout each module. Academic and domain-specific vocabulary are addressed through multiple reads of complex text along with the Language Dives. The words that have been selected fall into the categories of lesson specific, text specific, or vocabulary used in writing. The curriculum defines whether a word is newly introduced or is a review word, so that the teacher can adjust instruction to meet the needs of the students. Multiple texts are used to build student knowledge and vocabulary, and they support students’ ability to comprehend complex text independently and proficiently.

In Module 1, students engage in a study on the topic of “Toys and Play.” The Required Trade Books include the following titles: Llama Llama Time to Share by Anna Dewdney, Have Fun Molly Lou Melon by Patty Lovell, Toys Galore by Peter Stein, and Playing with Friends by Rebecca Rissman. In this Module, students build their literacy and citizenship skills as they engage in a study of toys and play. In Unit 1, Lesson 2, students listen to and read Llama Llama Time to Share and consider why one character, Llama Llama, shares a toy with another character, Nelly Gnu. Throughout the Module, students read texts that build their knowledge about toys and play, adding to a word wall that is referenced throughout the units. For example, the word “imagination” is added in Unit 3, Lesson 1.

In Module 2, students engage in a study on the topic of “Weather Wonders.” The Required Trade Books include the following titles: RI- Weather Words and What They Mean by Gail Gibbons, RI- Weather (National Geographic Readers Series) by Kristin Rattini, RI- On the Same Day in March by Marilyn Singer, RL- Come On, Rain! by Karen Hesse, RL- Umbrella by Taro Yashima, RL- One Hot Summer Day by Nina Crews, RL- Brave Irene by William Steig, and RL- The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats. In this module, students build their literacy and science knowledge as they engage in a study of the weather. In Unit 1, Lesson 3, students participate in a close read aloud of the text, Weather Words and What They Mean. The teacher informs students that now they are going to explore more closely one of the four components that make up weather. Then, the teacher reviews the definition of temperature with students. The teacher introduces the Weather Word Wall by saying, “Remember how we had a special place in the room to collect our toys and play words? We will have a special spot for our weather words, too. Let’s add our first important word: weather!”

In Unit 2, Lesson 6, students participate in a close read-aloud of the text, Come on, Rain!. The teacher directs students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first learning target aloud: “I can name the characters and setting in the text Come On, Rain!” Students review the definition of characters and setting. Then, the teacher shares that students will hear a story read aloud about a little girl, Tess, who is waiting for a rain shower to come in her city. The teacher reminds students that, in previous lessons, they have studied weather around the world and how people everywhere are affected by different kinds of weather. Today, students will begin learning about weather in one place and how it affects the people in that place. In Unit 3, Lesson 1, students listen to The Snowy Day, and the teacher reviews the definition of “meteorologist,” defines an “expert,” and shares that because students are becoming expert meteorologists now; they are ready to work together to create an expert meteorologist chart.

In Module 3, students engage in a study on the topic, “Trees Are Alive.” In this module, students explore the big ideas that all living things in the natural world have needs in order to survive and grow. In Unit 1, Lesson 3, students listen to a close read aloud of What’s Living and What’s Not and use the signal for food and water as they listen. Teachers fluently read each page and pause to define specific words in context. When reading page 20, the teacher shows students the Living Things Word Wall cards for “nutrients” and “sunlight.” Then, the teacher provides their definitions, claps out their syllables, uses them in a sentence, and places the Word Wall cards and pictures for them on the Living Things Word Wall.

In Module 4, students engage in a study on the topic of “Enjoying and Appreciating Trees.” In this module, students build on their scientific knowledge of trees from Module 3 through exploring the importance of trees to people and their communities. In Unit 1, Lesson 4, students continue the close read-aloud of A Tree for Emmy and use the information gathered about the characters, setting, and major events to compare and contrast the experiences of Emmy and her family. The task of comparing and contrasting is in preparation for the Unit 1 Assessment, during which students compare and contrast the experiences of characters in Oliver’s Tree. In Unit 1, Lesson 4, teachers ask students to look at the Word Wall card for “relax” and follow the protocol for adding it to the Trees Are Important Word Wall. Students are told that they may want to use this word as they write in their Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

During every session of the Close Read Aloud, teachers utilize a variety of techniques to engage students in answering text-dependent questions such as Think-Pair-Share and Back to Back-Face to Face. Conversation Cues encourage conversations about the text. Language Dives explore chunks of text to determine author’s meaning. Additionally, students are taught how to use text features to locate information and strategies to determine the meanings of words.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 6, while reading Have Fun Molly Lou Melon, the teacher places a finger by the following sentence from page 25: “On Friday, Gertie brought over a homemade doll with a frilly hollyhock skirt and violets for hair.” The teacher states, “There is a word in this sentence you might not know: hollyhock. Place your finger on hollyhock. A hollyhock is a kind of flower.” Then, the teacher states, “Next, we take the sentence apart, chunk by chunk. We figure out what each chunk means, and why it is important. Let’s talk about the first chunk of this sentence.”
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 6, the teacher reads Come On, Rain! with minimal interruptions, stopping to provide word meanings as needed. The teacher reviews the main characters and setting in the story, helps students to make the connection that place in this text is local rather than global and shares that this text is set in a large city in America. Teachers are instructed to use Think-Pair-Share and have students discuss the following questions with an elbow partner: Who are the main characters in this text? Where is the setting, or the place, that the story happens?”
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 3, the teacher completes a read aloud of pages 18-32 in Be a Friend to Trees with student assistance. The focus of this read aloud is to identify the main idea of the text. After reviewing the main idea, the teacher asks, “What information did we learn from this text when we read it in the previous lesson? So far, based on what we have read, what is this text mainly about?” Student answers vary based upon their chosen text example. During work time and prior to writing to respond, the teacher initiates a turn and talk experience, asking partners to discuss the following question: “How do living things depend on trees to meet their needs?”
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 2, the teacher reads aloud the poem, “The Many Meanings of Words.” At the end, the teacher asks, “What type of text is this?” Students are expected to answer, “A poem.” The teacher then asks, “How do you know?” After looking back at the poem and explicitly teaching vocabulary, the teacher ends the session with asking, “What is this poem about?”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Materials contain coherently sequenced text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to rely on the knowledge built over the course of the module. Text-dependent questions and tasks are specifically included in the anchor text and throughout close reading sessions that occur in lessons. “In each session, students are lifted to greater understanding of the text through purposeful text-dependent questions and activities” (Your Curriculum Companion, page 275).

Unit 1 of each module builds the foundational knowledge for the topic, Unit 2 requires students to analyze and synthesize information, and Unit 3 requires students to apply their learning to complete a culminating task which requires reading, writing, listening, and speaking as well as reflecting on the learning that has occurred. Each close read aloud text and questions creates an understanding of the text and the module topic. Each module has a topic focus with required and recommended text to support building knowledge on that topic.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, the Close Read/Read Aloud prompts teachers to introduce the text and say, “Today we are going to read a new book, and in it you are going to meet two animals. The two animals are the main characters in the book. Characters are the people in a book. Sometimes characters are humans, like us, and sometimes they are animals. In this book, the animals are characters.” Next the teacher shows a photo of a llama and a gnu and asks, “Does anybody have any experience with these animals? What do you call these animals in the languages you speak at home?” Then in the Unit 1 Assessment, after students have been presented with a variety of scenes from the text, Llama Llama Time to Share, students choose the illustrations that best answer the focus question, “What does Llama Llama learn about playing with others?” Then, using the pictures they chose, students engage in a conversation with a partner to explain their work. This assessment builds on experiences of reading, speaking, and listening from previous lessons.
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 2, the Close Read/Read Aloud of Weather Words and What They Mean instructs teachers to read pages 2–5, first reading the text at the bottom of the page, then reading the text in the bubbles, and then reading the text included in the illustrations. Teachers then ask, “What are the four things the author says make up the weather?” The teacher explains that we can observe temperature, moisture, and wind in our own weather and the class will use this book to learn more about each of them over the next few days. Then in the Unit 2 Assessment, students listen to and answer questions about basic story elements in the text, One Hot Summer Day by Nina Crews. Students are expected to use words and pictures to demonstrate their understanding of character, setting, and major events using a storyboard graphic organizer.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 4, teachers conduct a Close Read/Read Aloud of the text, “Who Depends on Trees?” After the text is read aloud, the teacher is prompted to reread each riddle and the students are asked to point out any adjectives they hear that describe the living things in the riddles. Then in the Unit 2 Assessment, students use their unit learning to write an informational booklet stating researched facts about different animals that get food from trees.
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 4, Close Read/Read Aloud of the text, “A Tree for Emmy,” the teacher asks questions about the characters, setting, and major events in the text. Then in the Unit 1 Assessment, students listen to the read aloud of Oliver’s Tree and then discuss key details to compare and contrast Oliver to his friends Lulu and Charlie. In the first part of the assessment, students complete a note-catcher to gather key details from the text and compare and contrast the characters. In the second part of the assessment, students use their notes to engage in a small group, structured conversation to share ideas about how the characters in Oliver’s Tree are similar to and different from one another.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Materials offer opportunities for students to demonstrate their content and literacy knowledge through questions and instructional tasks across the three units within each of the four modules. Students participate in close reads, collaborative conversations, and journal and notebook tasks related to texts they have read. Students engage in tasks that require a combination of literacy skills including reading, writing, drawing, and speaking to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic. These tasks are consistently placed at the end of each close read/read aloud session, referred to as a culminating task. The performance task for each module is found at the end of Unit 3 and includes completion of narrative, informational writing, and opinion writing which is shared with peers or families. The culminating tasks in Module 1, which represents one quarter of the school year, do not demonstrate the same quality as the tasks in Modules 2-4, and therefore do not meet the criteria for this indicator.

In Module 1, students build their literacy and citizenship skills as they engage in a study of toys and play. Students consider norms and behaviors for sharing toys and interacting with peers through structured conversations, learning experiences such as role-play and guided discovery of toys, and an analysis of the module texts. Students learn more about toys as they consider what makes something a toy and what makes toys fun. They learn to sort and describe toys by specific attributes. They also discuss and write about their own toy preferences. Finally, students interview a classmate about his or her preferred classroom toy. The Module Culminating Task follows the close read of Llama Llama Time to Share. Students complete the Llama Llama Learns about Playing Response Sheet. Students circle one (or two) scene(s) that represent what Llama Llama learned about how to play with others. Partners take turns explaining their work, saying more about which picture they chose and describing the scene in the book. The Module 1 Performance Task requires students to write an informational piece about a classmate’s preferred toy. Students use information from collaborative conversations, anchor charts, and information they obtained from interviewing their classmate. Students draw and label their classmate’s preferred toy and write an accompanying sentence. Then they create a drawing and sentence about how their classmate plays with their preferred toy. Though this Module has student integrating skills, the culminating task does not demonstrate that students build knowledge of a topic.

In Module 2, students build their literacy skills and science knowledge as they engage in a study of the weather. Students study the science of weather through various informational texts. They create a class weather journal and track their individual learning in a meteorologist’s notebook. Students then broaden their study of weather as they think about how weather affects people in different places around the world. They move on to further explore how weather affects people by reading a variety of narratives where the characters are affected by a weather event. Students are prompted to think about how the weather affects the choices people make about what to wear and what to do each day. In Unit 1, Lesson 2, following the close read of Weather Words and What They Mean, students complete an independent writing culminating task. On the Culminating Task Response Sheet, students write the name of each of the three weather components, draw a picture, and add labels to show understanding of that component. The Module 2 Performance Task requires students to incorporate all their module learning about weather to write an imaginary narrative about a character’s experience with the weather, using The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats as a mentor text. Students’ narratives reflect how the weather affects the choices the character makes about what to wear and what to do. Students use group notes, puppets, and oral planning as scaffolding to illustrate their stories. They also revise, edit, and practice reading their original narratives in preparation for sharing them.

In Module 3, students explore the big ideas that all living things in the natural world have needs in order to survive and grow. Through a close study of trees and the living things that depend on them, students take on the roles of researchers and scientists to make observations of the natural world. From those observations, they determine patterns that explain how living things live and grow. Students learn what makes something living or nonliving, about different types of living things, and the common needs of all living things. They develop this understanding through research reading and hands-on investigations then record their observations in a Living Things research notebook. Students then engage in whole group and small group research on how trees provide food for animals. Finally, students engage in supported small group research of a particular tree, its needs, and how it supports other living things. In Unit 1, the teacher tells students they are going to be curious about these questions, Is a tree living? Why or why not? After observing outside, students share their observations and thinking about the questions with a partner. Students are asked to “Look at the whole tree and each of its parts. What do you notice about them? Look at the top and bottom of the tree. What do you notice about it?” Students then use the Closely Observing Notice/Wonder Graphic Organizer to draw and label the things that they notice and wonder about the tree. The Module 3 Performance Task requires students to incorporate all their module learning about trees to create an informational collage to demonstrate their expertise about a tree, its needs, and the animals for which it provides food. They create a tree collage, write an informational writing piece that describes the tree and its needs while sharing information about one animal that depends on the tree for food, and create an accurately colored animal puppet that represents the animal from students’ writing. In Module 3, students build deep knowledge about the scientific topic of living things and trees, specifically. In Module 4, they then apply this knowledge to make a meaningful contribution to their community.

In Module 4, students build on their scientific knowledge of trees from Module 3, by exploring the importance of trees to people and their communities. Students learn how different people, both real and imaginary, enjoy and appreciate trees. They consider how real people and characters have used trees to fill a need in their community. Students first learn about the different ways people enjoy trees through reading literature and considering how characters appreciate trees. They write about the different ways trees can be enjoyed in their Enjoying Trees journal, Part II. They then read about the ways planting trees can contribute to a community through reading informational text, and learn to form and write opinions about where they would choose to plant a tree. In Unit 1, Lesson 2, following the close read of A Tree for Emmy, students draw and write about one thing that Emmy and her family did that was the same in the story. Then they draw and write about one thing that Emmy and her family did that was different in the story. The Module 4 Performance Task requires students to incorporate all their module learning about enjoying and appreciating trees to create a piece of artwork and write an opinion piece. Student opinion writing begins with the sentence frame, “Trees are nice because...” Students create a piece of artwork showcasing a specific part of a tree to match their writing. These two parts (opinion writing and high-quality artwork) come together to create a Tree Appreciation card.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

Specific tasks are designed to build academic vocabulary within the curriculum during multiple readings of context-based texts, such as unpacking learning targets, interactive word walls, collaborative conversations, use of Frayer Models, language dives, writing tasks, and explicit teaching of habits of character language. The Labs also provide opportunities for students to use content-specific and academic vocabulary while applying the speaking and listening skills taught in the module lessons. Additionally, vocabulary is highlighted at the beginning of each lesson with reference to whether it is new or review, and whether it is taught within the lesson or with the use of text. Students are given opportunities to learn vocabulary using strategies that target all learning modalities through the use of movement, song, poetry, drawing, and writing.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Unpacking Learning Targets: In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, The Magic Bow, teachers direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud, “I can participate in conversations with my classmates.” Teachers point out the word “participate” and explain that “to participate” means “to take part in a group activity; everyone takes a turn.” Teachers note the word “conversation” and explain that when you have a conversation, you talk to others. Teachers explain that “participating in a conversation” means that everyone gets a turn to talk and listens to others when they talk.
  • Interactive Word Walls: In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 5, teachers read pages 1–4 of Toys Galore. Then, teachers say, “I notice that the author doesn’t really use that many color words or shapes to describe these toys. He uses words that describe how the toys are played with. For example, here it says ‘bouncing-ball toy.’ The phrase he uses to describe the ball is ‘bouncing-ball’ because a ball bounces. Bounce means to go up and down, like a ball after it hits the ground.” The teacher places the word card and picture for “bounce” on the Toys and Play Word Wall.
  • Collaborative Conversations: In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 4, the teacher rereads page 13 in the text, Be A Friend to Trees. Students are shown the Living Things Word Wall cards for the following words: fruit, nut, and seeds. Students are provided definitions, clap out their syllables, use them in a sentence, and the word cards and pictures are placed on the Word Wall. Then, using a total participation technique, teachers invite responses from the group to answer, “How do the labels help us understand the pictures?”
  • Language Dives: In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 2, students learn about words with multiple meanings using the poem, “The Many Meanings of Words.” The teacher tells students that the poem teaches us that some words have more than one meaning. For example, bark covers a tree, but it is also the sound a dog makes.
  • Writing: In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 9, students begin their final writing performance task. In this task, students take what they have learned about various toys, including vocabulary words from the unit, and interview a classmate about their favorite toy. Vocabulary words taught in the module such as ”imagined,” “preference,” and “create” are expected to be used in the final writing project about their classmate’s favorite toy.

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

In Unit 1 of each Module, background knowledge is built on the specific topic. In Module 2, students are engaged in more reading, writing, and research opportunities around the Module topic. In Module 3, the extended writing is more extensive and scaffolded support is provided for students.

Throughout the Modules, students have multiple opportunities to use text-based evidence to respond to prompts about the text that they are reading in notebooks, journals, and response sheets. Students participate in daily collaborative conversations about texts and teachers compile the knowledge and information gained from those conversations on Anchor Charts. The smaller writing tasks throughout the Module lead the student to use the compiled information to complete the writing performance task at the end to demonstrate understanding of the topic. Each unit has a standards-based assessment, allowing students to read, write, or speak with increasing independence about the texts that they have read.

Examples from each Module include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, students draw a picture that presents their idea for how to make playing together fun using the Making Playing Together Fun Response Sheet. In Unit 3, Lesson 5, students use pictures and words to draw an imagined toy on paper.
  • The Module 1 Performance Task requires students to incorporate their Module learning about toys to write an informational piece about a classmate’s preferred toy. Students use information from collaborative conversations, anchor charts, and information they obtained from interviewing their classmate. Students draw and label their classmate’s preferred toy and write an accompanying sentence. Then, they create a drawing and write a sentence about how their classmate plays with their preferred toy.
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 3, the teacher engages the students in a collaborative conversation about the text, New York City and China, to create an anchor chart. While the teacher records, students discuss the following questions: “What is the weather like in this place? What do the people wear and do because of the weather?”
  • The Module 2 Performance Task requires students to incorporate their Module learning about weather to write an imaginary narrative about a character’s experience with the weather, using The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats as a mentor text. Students’ narratives reflect how the weather affects the choices that the character makes about what to wear and what to do. Students use group notes, puppets, and oral planning as scaffolding to illustrate their stories. They revise, edit, and practice reading their original narratives in preparation for sharing them.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 6, the teacher engages students in a read aloud of a portion of Be a Friend to Trees. The teacher encourages students to use the predetermined signal for food and water as the teacher reads. After reading, the teacher engages students in the turn and talk protocol by asking, “How do animals depend on trees for food?” As students discuss the question with their partner, the teacher encourages them to take notes.
  • The Module 3 Performance Task requires students to incorporate their Module learning about trees to create an informational collage to demonstrate their expertise about a tree, its needs, and the animals for which it provides food. The students create a collage, containing an informational writing piece that describes the tree and its needs while sharing information about one animal that depends on the tree for food, and an accurately colored animal puppet that represents the animal from students’ writing.
  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 3, the teacher and students work to identify and discuss the reason that the author gives to support points in pages 7-14 of the text, A Tree is Nice. As the teacher completes a focused read aloud, the teacher stops to engage students through the turn and talk protocol: “Using the illustrations and text, what is one reason that trees are nice and that people should plant trees that the author gives on this page?” Students can refer back to any of the pages discussed during the focused read aloud.
  • The Module 4 Performance Task requires students to incorporate their Module learning about enjoying and appreciating trees to create a piece of artwork and write an opinion piece. Student opinion writing begins with the sentence frame “Trees are nice because...” Students create a piece of artwork to showcase a specific part of a tree to match their writing. These two parts (opinion writing and high-quality artwork) come together to create a Tree Appreciation card.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

Materials provide opportunities for focused research and writing projects to support the development of knowledge and understanding of the Module topic during the K-2 Labs, which are designed to extend student learning from the Kindergarten Module Lessons. There are opportunities in the Research Lab for students to engage with materials and increase their skills in order to pursue answers to questions related to the content in the Kindergarten Module lessons. Students expand their understanding and knowledge of the topic through a range of research activities. As stated in the Your Curriculum Companion, page 77, “students study pictures and photographs, watch videos, and conduct original research based on their own questions.” Also, each unit within the modules contain lessons that require students to answer text-based questions and demonstrate knowledge of the topics using total participation techniques, anchor charts, language dives, notebooks, journals, and student response sheets. The artifacts produced during each lesson are compiled throughout the modules to complete a culminating project.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 2, K-2 Labs, the guiding question is “What kind of weather is the most powerful? How can I use photographs to research extreme weather events?” In the Research Lab, students learn about extreme weather by studying photographs and asking and answering questions about the extreme weather events. Students further their understanding of the science of weather and how weather affects people as they learn in the module lessons about extreme weather events and the impact these events can have. Students should connect their learning about extreme weather to the Module 2 performance task when they write a narrative about a character’s experience with weather.
  • In Module 4, K-2 Labs, the guiding question is “How can I discover more about the trees near me?” In the Research Lab, students apply their research skills and use a variety of resources (realia, images, texts, and technology) to learn more about local trees. After researching the trees, students create surveys to learn more about how the people in their school community interact with those trees. Students then analyze the data from their surveys. During the module lessons, students study how and why trees are important to communities in a broad way. Students extend their learning about how and why trees are important to communities and apply it by studying trees specific to their local context. Students should connect their learning about trees to the Module 4 performance task requires them to incorporate all their module learning about enjoying and appreciating trees to create a piece of artwork and write an opinion piece.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Materials provide opportunities for the teacher to incorporate 45 minutes of independent reading time during the Skills Block portion of the lesson while other students are completing differentiated tasks or working with the teacher. The curriculum provides the teacher with a document titled, K-5 Recommended Texts and Other Resources, that lists multiple books per grade level and module that students can utilize during independent reading time. This list provides a variety of texts based on student interest and reading goals.

During the independent reading rotation, students choose books to read independently and complete Reading Response sheets. The focus of this independent reading time is to build stamina, automaticity, and comprehension by reading a large volume of student selected texts, with a specific focus on personal reading goals on page 7, Grades K-2: Reading Foundations Skills Block Resource Manual. Teachers are encouraged to observe and confer with students around their reading goals. Accountable Independent Reading is the only time set aside (other than during the Reader’s Toolbox instructional practice) for students to apply all they are learning in both the Skills Block (decoding and fluency skills) and Integrated Block (comprehension and vocabulary skills) while independently reading a wide range of texts of their choice on page 8, Grades K-2: Reading Foundations Skills Block Resource Manual. The Kindergarten decodable reading routine also includes an independent whisper read, followed by an echo or choral read and student responses to comprehension questions and questions about individual words.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Independent Reading: Students choose a text (book, poem, magazine, etc.) and read independently. Students track books read, connect to their goals, and demonstrate comprehension by filling out a Reading Response Sheet.
  • Conferences: Teachers observe students reading and/or go over reading response sheets with the student. Teachers provide guidance, teaching points, encouragement, or celebrations based on observations and student response sheets.
  • Accountable Independent Reading Resources: Teachers create a collection of decodable texts, texts that approximately align to a group’s current phase, required complex texts from integrated Module lessons, and recommended texts on the module topic. Lists to complete these text collections are provided.
  • Decodable Student Reader Routine: Students learn to whisper-read the text independently while teacher listens in and notes who might need more support. If the teacher notices that the majority of the group needs more support reading some words or pages with automaticity and fluency, the teacher might choose to echo read the text, choral read as a group and/or revisit a specific word or group of words in the text and remind students of the spelling pattern and pronunciation of the high-frequency word. Students then respond to basic comprehension questions and respond to questions about individual words in the text.
  • Reading Response Sheets: Teachers are given a Reading Response Sheet template to provide for students to complete during their independent reading on page 22-25 in the Grades K-2: Reading Foundations Skills Block Resource Manual.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

Kindergarten EL Language Arts Curriculum materials meet the criteria for being well designed. Materials take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Materials can reasonably be completed within an academic year. There are ample resources as well as publisher produced standards alignment documentation.

Criterion 3a - 3e

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8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials meet the criteria for being well-designed and utilize effective lesson structure and pacing. Daily lessons include structures and resources for both whole group and small group literacy instruction. The program allows flexibility for teachers to rely on professional judgment to modify pacing. Materials include trade books, text collections, scaffolded strategy activities, performance tasks, a Life Science Module, homework that includes additional strategies for family support and practice, and the ALL Block that contains Modules for study and practice in independent reading, fluency, grammar/usage/mechanics, writing practice, word study/vocabulary, and additional practice with complex text. Daily lessons, tasks, and assessments specifically denote the standards to which the lessons and tasks are aligned. The student materials have clear instructions and have simple designs that do not distract the student.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The Kindergarten instructional materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing that span a school year. The materials include a Curriculum Plan and a Curriculum Map containing four content-based modules, each with three units that are designed for eight to nine weeks of instruction. Module 1 provides six weeks of instruction to allow for the development of classroom routines and procedures.

The materials utilize three hours of instruction per day. Module Lessons provide one hour of content-based literacy instruction built around close read-alouds of complex text, explicit focus on the listening and speaking standards, daily goal setting and reflection, and a culminating performance task. Lab lessons, also part of the content-based literacy block, contain one hour of instruction to deepen and enhance learning and foster student independence by giving students an opportunity to explore, engineer, create, and imagine. Labs also contain two weeks of Flex Days if additional time is needed to best meet student needs. The Reading Foundations Skills block provides a third hour of instruction with five components including independent reading, additional work with complex text, reading and speaking fluency, writing practice, and word study and vocabulary.

All modules are designed around the Four T’s framework (topic, task, targets, and text). Compelling topics are chosen that bring the content to life. Learning targets are centered around ELA standards. On-demand tasks are scaffolded to support the culminating performance task. Each of four Modules contains three units with lessons spanning 1-2 weeks. Each unit contains A Key Understanding, A Focus Question, Supporting Language and Engagement, and a Culminating Task. Each Lesson includes an Opening (5 Minutes), Work Time (45 Minutes), Closing and Assessment (5 Minutes).

An Additional Language and Literacy Block (ALL Block) operates parallel to the three units of the Module and has five components, including independent reading, additional work with complex text, reading and speaking fluency, writing practice, and word study and vocabulary. Two hours per day of content-based literacy includes one hour for module lessons and one hour for Labs, plus one hour of structured phonics.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Kindergarten meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding. The Curriculum Plan and Curriculum Map consists of three hours of instruction per day. Module and Lab Lessons contain two hours of content-based instruction. A separate Reading Foundations Skills block provides a third hour of instruction. There are four content-based modules, containing a total of twelve Units, which account for approximately 32-36 weeks of instruction.

The Kindergarten Lab lessons complement the Module lessons and are designed for six weeks of instruction within the eight to nine week module, giving teachers flexibility in meeting the needs of all students. This flex time may be utilized to reteach skills and concepts, solidify routines and structures, support ELL students, and/or provide time to confirm understanding of the module topic. The one hour Lab lesson is intentionally designed to allow more time for students to increase their content knowledge and literacy skills and to build student independence.

Each module contains a culminating performance task that allows students to synthesize their content learning. Each module contains three assessments, one per unit, that scaffold to the culminating task. The reading assessment is based on ELA standards, the writing assessment is based on K-5 writing rubrics, and the speaking and listening assessment is based on checklists.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Kindergarten meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (eg. visuals, maps, etc.)

The student materials offer students opportunities to demonstrate thinking and learning through a variety of tasks such as Guiding Question Response Sheets, Module Reflection Response sheets, Journals, Notebooks, Note-Catchers, Graphic Organizers, and Anchor charts. Students demonstrate knowledge of content through writing. The student materials for each module are clearly labeled and provide clear directions for each instructional activity. Examples include:

  • Anchor charts are used to describe procedures and protocols such as Sharing Our Work. In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, students complete a two-column chart describing a character’s feelings and words that describe those feelings.
  • Lessons contain several response sheets with guiding questions and students respond to the question.
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 8, students interview a classmate about toy preference. Students circle the preferred toy and answer the question, “How do you play with your preferred classroom toy?”
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 13, students complete a reflection of the information learned by answering the questions, “One thing I learned about toys” and “One thing I learned about playing with others.”
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 2, students complete a Meteorologist Notebook by completing facts about weather such as temperature, moisture, clouds and rainbows.
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 6, students record the weather each day for nine days. Students journal the type of clothing worn for specific types of weather and record the temperature.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 2, students use their Research Notebook to observe an item (plant, person, animal, toy), record their observations in a small box that is provided, and then construct a sentence about whether the item is living or non-living citing reasons within the context of a sentence frame.
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 1, students use a Note-catcher page to draw, label, and write one way the classroom community could enjoy a tree.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks and assessment items. Alignment to the Common Core State Standards is documented throughout the materials. The materials are comprehensive and include the teaching and assessing of all strands of the CCSS. The learning targets for each lesson are designed with the CCSS as a primary source of guidance. Module lessons were developed using a framework called the Four T’s (topics, tasks, targets, texts). In the context of the Four T’s framework, “targets” refers to the ELA Standards.

Alignment information can be found in the Curriculum Plan, Curriculum Map, and individual modules through the Expeditionary Learning website. For example, standards are noted for each lesson in the Purpose and Alignment to Standards. Also found in each lesson are Standards-Based Learning Targets which are written in student-friendly language.

The Assessment Overview for each module describes the Module Performance Task, each Unit Assessment, and the Assessment Checklists. These descriptions also document the standards addressed by these tasks and assessment items. The Assessment Checklists are designed to help track students’ progress toward a variety of standards over the course of this module. These formative assessment opportunities are noted throughout the module lessons.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The materials contain many visual aids to support student learning, including Anchor Charts, Graphic Organizers, Response Sheets, and Real Images that accompany text related to the content of the module. Additionally, illustrations and clipart utilized on student workbook pages are uncomplicated and appealing to the eye. The design of the materials is simple and consistent across grade levels. The font, margins, and spacing provided for student work are appropriate. Other examples include:

  • Information on each page of the student workbook is clear and consistent.
  • There is enough space for students to draw and write responses effectively.
  • Pages are labeled clearly so students can follow along with teacher directions.
  • The fonts and margins are reasonable.
  • Posters and anchor charts describing procedures and protocols are clear and easily understandable for students to refer back to throughout the year.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials meet the criteria that materials contain a Teacher Guide with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. A text analysis tool is provided for every central text in the curriculum. Materials contain a Teacher Guide that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. A rationale of the research that impacted the design of the curriculum, including explanations of the instructional approaches of the program, is provided. Materials reviewed meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials contain a Teacher Guide with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

Suggestions on how to present the content are contained in the Week at a Glance in each Overview, including Lessons, CCSS, Agenda, Daily Learning Targets, Ongoing Assessments, Anchor Charts, and Protocols. There are Teaching Notes for each unit that provide guidance on how to present the content.

The Language Arts materials include a Teacher Guide for each Module and state on page vii, “The curriculum is intended to act as a professional development resource for users.” The beginning of each lesson contains Teaching Notes that provide information about the purpose of the lesson and alignment to standards. These notes support lesson preparation along with making informed adjustments to best meet the needs of students. There is an Overview that lists the Big Idea, Guiding Questions Standards, Instructional Focus, Culminating Tasks, and Assessments that are addressed within each Module. The Overview contains an agenda listing each Lesson component which includes the following: opening (10 minutes), work time (35 minutes), and closing and assessment (10 minutes).

The Meeting Students’ Needs section in each Module provides additional considerations for students who may require further supports or extended learning opportunities. Strategies presented in the Universal Design for Learning section provide suggested tools and scaffolded support for all learners.

Teacher guidance for the use of technology is provided for each lesson in the Technology and Multimedia section, which gives recommendations on how to extend student learning into digital experiences. Other examples include:

  • The 4 T’s table in the Module and Unit Overview unpack how each Module engages students in compelling topics, texts, and tasks, working towards mastering the specific standard or target.
  • The At a Glance summaries, marked by a calendar icon, give the gist of a Module, a Unit, or the Assessment structure before beginning teaching on a new topic.
  • The Teaching Notes at the beginning of the lessons provide scaffolds for teaching and professional development. Teaching Notes are intentionally highly scaffolded to support lesson preparation and empower teachers in making informed decisions and adapt the curriculum to students within a classroom.
  • Meeting Students’ Needs provides additional adaptations for students who may require extensions or supports to reach the rigor of the grade level lesson. There are specific supports for English Language Learners and for different learning modalities from the Universal Design for Learning framework.
  • The Universal Design for Learning framework emphasizes differentiation. Tools and scaffolding support all learners, and teachers have flexibility in the manner in which they present information, ask students to respond, and engage with students.
  • A complete set of classroom protocols, including all of the protocols used in lessons, are available in the Classroom Protocols pack on Curriculum.ELeducation.org. The book, Management in the Active Classroom, is a rich resource for protocols and classroom management strategies, available on ELeducation.org.
  • Instructional videos showing the curriculum at work in real classrooms can be accessed at Curriculum.ELeducation.org.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials contain a Teacher Guide that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

Each Module includes a Teacher Guide with detailed explanations for each instructional task, its purpose, and alignment to the standards. In addition, the Your Curriculum Companion is designed to provide guidance on the delivery of the Language Arts Curriculum and serve as a resource to build professional knowledge in the areas of standards and research-based best practices. The guidance document, Implementing the K-2 Labs, is intended to help teachers understand the why, what, and how of the K-2 Labs. Other examples include:

  • In the Your Curriculum Companion, on pages 141-145, teachers are provided Module lesson planning task cards. Each task card has guiding questions and provides specific information to teachers to help build their knowledge in order to plan for each part of the Module.
  • Chapter 5, section 5A of the Your Curriculum Companion provides teachers with guidance on text complexity. Teachers are given information on what makes a text complex, how to determine text complexity, and the rationale behind the importance of text complexity (pages 260-262).
  • Chapter 6 of the Your Curriculum Companion provides teachers with information on writing. Specifically, evidence-based writing, the writing cycle, and strengthening student writing. It provides charts that correlate the reading and writing CCSS standards, student examples, and evidence-based instructional strategies.
  • Each chapter in the Your Curriculum Companion provides a frequently asked questions section, which builds teacher knowledge by providing information on the standards, how the program addresses the standards, and best practices for implementation.It includes notes that give adult-level explanations and examples.
  • The Engaging Students with Protocols section of Chapter 3 in Your Curriculum Companion states that “[p]rotocols are an important feature of our curriculum because they are one of the best ways we know to engage students in discussion, inquiry, critical thinking, and sophisticated communication. A protocol consists of agreed-upon, detailed guidelines for reading, recording, discussing, or reporting that ensure equal participation and accountability in learning.”

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials contain a Teacher Guide that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

The Your Curriculum Companion serves as a guide in combining content area standards and CCSS language to create a target with the goal of meeting and contextualizing the standard. Each lesson contains a learning topic that addresses priority content standards and targets that combine the content with ELA/literacy standards.

The Module Overview clearly connects the learning for the day to the intended CCSS. Standards are explicitly taught and, as students move through the program, standards cycle back through allowing for review and solidification of concepts. The curriculum provides direct standards correlation at the beginning of each Module in the Skills Block Teacher Guide for quick reference as teaching begins.

  • The Teacher Guide for each Module lesson contains a Teaching Notes section that provides the purpose of the lesson and standards alignment and explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. For example, in the Grade K, Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 7, “Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards: In this lesson, students continue to cultivate their curiosity and build their knowledge of the components that make weather. This lesson invites students to ask and answer questions about details and unknown words in the text regarding wind as they seek to clarify their understanding, connect with prior knowledge, and wonder about the components that make weather (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4).”
  • On page 9 of the Your Curriculum Companion, it states “We believe the standards invite us to build in our students critical skills for life--for career success and civic contribution. What is important is not just what the standards say, but how they are used.” On pages 25-27, it explains how the curriculum addresses each CCSS shift in the aspect of reading, writing, language, and speaking/listening. The Your Curriculum Companion provides more specific details in pages 29-35 by explaining how the backwards design approach to the curriculum connects to each CCSS shift.
  • In the Module Overview in the Teacher Guide for each Unit, all standards covered in the entire Module are listed, separated into Reading-Literature, Reading-Informational Text, Foundational Skills, Speaking and Listening, Language, and Writing. It further provides information regarding which standards are assessed per unit, the instructional focus for each unit, and the assessments and performance tasks for each unit. An explanation is provided for the emphasis on reading, writing, language, speaking, and listening standards.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials contain a explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies.

Materials identify the five elements of literacy instruction most critical for addressing literacy: vocabulary, knowledge building, syntax, fluency, and decoding. Research surrounding these five elements influenced the design of the curriculum. The Skills Block Teacher Guide, provides an in-depth year-at-a-glance or scope and sequence document teachers utilize to ensure students have multiple exposures to content to gain a deeper understanding. This guide clearly explains the connections between learning and the CCSS Reading Foundation Standards and provides the research that informed the creation of the curriculum.

The Skills Block Teacher Guide includes an assessment overview and a specific Module overview. The Cycle at a Glance component found in the Skills Block Teacher Guide, provides research-based resources for the teacher to access while planning throughout the year. It also encourages teachers to utilize specific videos created by EL Curriculum of modeled teaching strategies and instruction.

The Your Curriculum Companion provides an in-depth rationale for the delivery method of the entire program, in addition to the research-based strategies that have been chosen to deliver the content. Such as:

  • Chapter 1B of Your Curriculum Companion explains how research impacted the design of the curriculum. On page 19, Your Curriculum Companion provides an analysis of the research on the literacy achievement gap and, on page 20, uses charts to explain what is already known about the literacy achievement gap and how the EL curriculum addresses it. The Your Curriculum Companion continues to provide this for the research behind knowledge building, syntax, fluency, and decoding making the connection to the EL curriculum. It provides information regarding the five elements of literacy instruction most critical for addressing the literacy achievement gap: vocabulary, knowledge-building, syntax, fluency, and decoding. This is based on the presentation by David Liben, Student Achievement Partners, July 2015.
  • Page 27 of Your Curriculum Companion states that the design of the curriculum uses the guiding principles of backward design, which required curriculum designers to consider three questions: “1. At end of a sequence of instruction, what will students know and be able to do? 2. What will proficiency look and sound like? 3. How will we know when students are proficient?”
  • Pages 83-85 of Your Curriculum Companion explain how the parts of the ALL Block promote proficiency and growth in students. In these explanations, research is cited to support the curriculum, such as the following explanation: “Research tells us that readers in intermediate grades benefit from a more contextualized approach to teaching phonics and word recognition” (pg. 85).
  • The “Research Behind EL Education Language Arts Curriculum and Professional Services Guide” provides a “high level summary of the research that informed the Language Arts curriculum design (e.g., content-based literacy, phonics, supports for ELLs) and our professional development (e.g., focus on leadership, coaching, common implementation challenges).”
  • The “Language Dives in the K-5 Language Arts Curriculum” Overview contains an explanation of the language dive and the research behind this instructional technique. The guide “describes what a language dive is, criteria for a good language dive sentence, when students do language dives, what the benefits of language dives are, and the principles and research base that underlie language dives.”

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Each Module contains an Overview for Families, explaining what students will be learning, including Daily Learning Targets, Common Core State Standards Alignment, an Agenda, Ongoing Assessment, and Anchor Charts/Protocols.

  • In each Teacher Guide, there is a section titled “Optional: Experts, Fieldwork, Service, and Extensions.” This section provides teachers with suggestions of ways to connect the learning to the community.
  • The curriculum includes sample letters that teachers can send home to describe what students will learn during a given Module and Unit, and how guardians can support student learning and specific homework assignments. Students are encouraged to share what they are learning with the family. For example, in Module 4, Unit 3, parents are informed, "What will your student be learning?" Students will begin to study the topic of how to inspire others to appreciate trees with a focus on how trees contribute to our communities. The learning will be focused on these ideas:
    • Trees contribute many beautiful and useful things to our communities.
    • We can inspire others to appreciate trees through high-quality work Students will also practice these reading foundation skills:
      • Identify and write the sound for most consonants and vowel
      • Segment (break apart) the individual sounds of spoken, one-syllable words, and blend them back together.
      • Decode (read) and encode (write) regularly spelled, one-syllable words How will your student be learning?
    • Throughout the unit, "your student will read, think, listen, talk, write, and ask questions about the topic of where and why people plant trees." Students will participate in these activities, among others, to build their literacy skills:
      • Listening to a read-aloud about how planting trees made the world a better place for different communities using the text, We Planted a Tree.
      • Singing songs and reciting poems about trees in preparation for our Celebration of Learning
      • Engaging in conversations with classmates
      • Closely observing pictures of trees and/or trees in the community
      • Creating, revising, and publishing writing and pencil sketches with watercolor that inspires others to appreciate trees

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Assessment materials clearly denote which standards are being emphasized. The Assessment Overview in the Teacher Supporting Materials and the Assessment Overview in the Teacher Guide contain the standards addressed within each unit. Materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments, ways to scaffold assessments, areas of focus, connections to learning building towards the assessment, and suggestions for lessons in the future. Each assessment is broken down into sections to help support teacher understanding. Materials include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress and indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

The materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. The curriculum offers numerous opportunities for assessment of student learning and emphasizes formative assessment, daily learning targets and checking for understanding techniques, and opportunities for formal assessments and performance tasks.

The Reading Foundational skills block contains benchmark assessments, cycle assessments, and daily assessments. Benchmark Assessments include letter name and sound identification, phonological awareness, spelling, decoding, and fluency. These are given at the beginning of the year to form differentiated small groups and are reused during the middle and end of year to provide targeted instruction. Cycle assessments are given once per cycle beginning in Module 4 and are tied to module targets. Snapshot Assessments are given daily and provide a quick check on mastery of daily learning targets.

The Content-Based Literacy Instruction contains Formative Assessments: assessment checklists, text-dependent questions, and writing routines. Checklists are provided for reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language skills. In Kindergarten, text-dependent questions are answered orally. Throughout the module, students write in research notebooks, journals, note-catchers, and graphic organizers which can be used for teachers to gather evidence.

The Content-Based Literacy Instruction also contains Summative Assessments: end of unit assessments and on-demand writing. End of Unit Assessments may include written responses, completed graphic organizers, or selected responses. On-Demand Writing tasks are at the end of each unit found in the module and address the module’s anchor writing standard. In Kindergarten, students write with support.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

Assessment materials clearly denote which standards are being emphasized. The Assessment Overview in the Teacher Supporting Materials and the Assessment Overview in the Teacher Guide contain the standards addressed within each unit. These documents allow the educator to see how assessments and standards build on one another throughout the curriculum. In the Supporting Materials document, educators are provided with checklists and specific unit assessments that have clearly matched standards.

Kindergarten assessment materials clearly denote which standards are being emphasized. The standards are clearly labeled in the Assessment Overview of each Module. Standards are clearly labeled in the daily lessons and are also found on the performance-based assessments for each unit. For each Module, the standards formally assessed are indicated with a check mark on a chart containing all ELA standards. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Teacher Guide, Grade K, Module 2, pg 16, it is clearly noted which standards are being emphasized for each assessment. For example, for the final performance task, it states, “In this performance task, students write an imaginary narrative about a character’s experience with the weather, using The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats as a mentor text. Students’ narratives reflect how the weather affects the choices the character makes about what to wear and what to do. Students use group notes, puppets, and oral planning as scaffolding to illustrate and write their stories. They also revise, edit, and practice reading their original narratives in preparation for sharing them with families and friends during the end of module celebration: a Weather Expo. This task addresses CCSS ELA W.K.3, W.K.5, L.K.1a, L.K.2a, L.K.2c, L.K.2d, and L.K.6.”
  • The end of unit assessments specifically note the standards that are addressed. For example, students complete the Module 3, Unit 2 end-unit assessment, which “centers on CCSS ELA W.K.2, W.K.7, and W.K.” In this assessment, they “write an informational booklet stating researched facts about different animals that get food from trees. Students use the individual notes created during the research process to inform their writing with researched facts. Over the course of three lessons, students complete their booklet with a focus statement and three detail statements about different animals that get food from trees.”
  • In Module 1, End of Unit 3 Assessment: Speaking and Listening: Interviewing a Classmate about a Favorite Classroom Toy, p. 283 in the Teacher Guide, assesses the following standards: W.K.8 and SL.K.3.
  • In Module 2, the Kindergarten Create Lab Checklist for Create Lab: I can create detailed weather landscapes and cityscapes, assesses the following standards: SL.K.1a, SL.K.4, L.K.1d, L.K.1f.
  • In Module 4, Unit 2, the End of Unit 2 Assessment: Reading about an Author’s Point and Writing Opinions, assesses the following standards: RI.K.8, W.K.1, L.K.1e, L.K.2a, and L.K.2b.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

Materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments, ways to scaffold assessments, areas of focus, connections to learning building towards the assessment, and suggestions for lessons in the future. Each assessment is broken down into sections to help support teacher understanding. The first section is titled “Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards.” The curriculum refers to assessments as an additional lesson, so in this section it explains which standards the assessment aligns to, the purpose behind the assessment, and information about tracking progress. The second section is titled “How it builds on previous work.” In this section, the curriculum explains how the unit and lessons have build upon each other in order to bring students to this place of learning. The third section is titled “Areas where students might need additional support.” This section anticipates barriers that students may face and offers suggestions to teachers on how to move students past the barriers. The fourth section is titled “Assessment guidance.” In this section, the assessment is broken down for teachers, typically by standard and explains how the assessment addresses each standard. There is also additional information regarding feedback for students. The last section is titled “Down the Road.” In this section the curriculum explains how the knowledge students have now will be used as they move forward in the curriculum.

In Your Curriculum Companion, pgs. 396-397, there are examples of student work and how they should be graded using the rubric found in the Teacher Guide. Further guidance is provided on the following:

  • Choosing evidence for analysis, pg. 401
  • Organizing the evidence, pg. 403
  • Identifying the patterns and trends that can inform instruction, pg. 403
  • Creating an action plan based on the data (next steps), pg. 404

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Materials include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. There are informal checklists to help collect evidence of progress as teachers observe students working. Progress monitoring formative assessments are integrated within every module by using mid and end unit assessments, performance tasks, ongoing assessment suggestions within each lesson, scaffolded instruction. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Your Curriculum Companion, on pgs. 393-395, there is an overview of how the curriculum supports ongoing progress monitoring. For example, on pg. 393 a description of how each lesson within the module includes formative assessments that align with the learning targets.
  • In the Your Curriculum Companion on pg. 394, it describes the use of informal checklists. The informal checklist is a tool that provides teachers with a way of tracking student progress while making observations. In Kindergarten, informal checklists include reading fluency, writing process, collaborative discussions, presentation of knowledge and ideas, and speaking and listening comprehension.
  • The curriculum uses text-dependent questions as an ongoing progress monitoring tool. This takes place by having students answer the questions independently while reading additional text.
  • Writing routines are built with ongoing formative assessments. The curriculum uses exit tickets, note-catchers, and graphic organizers to assess student learning.
  • On pg. 394 in Your Curriculum Companion, it states that writing routines are repeated and appear frequently throughout the modules. Exit tickets, note-catchers, and graphic organizers are repeated multiple times in a unit.
  • In Your Curriculum Companion, p. 395, there is an explanation on Tracking Progress Forms. It states, “students review their assessments for evidence of mastery of standards and add sticky notes to their work to point to this evidence. After students track their progress, the teacher then reviews and adds to the form.”

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

The materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation. Independent Reading is built into the K-2 Reading Foundation Skills Block. The Curriculum Companion, page 231, explains that each day students who are not working directly with the teacher will engage in purposeful independent rotations.

During the Accountable Independent Reading station, students choose from a variety of texts based on interest and reading goals. During this time, a teacher can observe or confer with students on reading proficiency goals and to monitor fluency and comprehension. Response Sheets for Independent Reading can be found in the Independent and Small Group Work document.

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
9/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards. The Teacher Guide for each module provides a section supporting English Language Learners that includes various scaffolds and levels of support recommendations, which often include allowing students to grapple with complex texts and tasks before providing necessary adjustments based on targeted observation. The materials partially meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level and meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

In the Module Blocks in each lesson, there is a section called Universal Design for Learning. It is divided into three different parts: Multiple Means of Representation (MMR), Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE), and Multiple Means of Engagement (MME). The Teacher Guide for each module anticipates areas where students might need additional support and provides a section geared toward supporting English Language Learners that includes various scaffolds and levels of support recommendations. Each lesson includes a section on Universal Design for Learning, an educational framework based on research in the learning sciences that promotes the use of flexible learning environments in order to accommodate individual learning differences.

The Skills Block is a one hour block consisting of 15-20 minutes of whole group instruction and 40-45 minutes of differentiated small group instruction.This systematic instruction for all students followed by differentiated small group instruction, eliminates the need for additional interventions for struggling readers. The Skills Block is structured, so that students that are the furthest behind will meet with the teacher daily to receive additional explicit instruction. Guidance for more advanced students can be found in the Teacher’s Notes, Meeting Students’ Needs sections of the Skills Block.

Embedded within the lessons as teachers move from the Reconstruct to the Practice section of the lesson, teachers are given instruction on the type of support to provide. For example, in Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 6, teachers are given the following information: “Tell students to pretend they are making a doll themselves and to think about how they would use their imagination, just like Gertie, to make different parts of the doll. Display and read aloud the sentence frame.” Different sentence frames are available depending on the level of support needed by students. For heavier support, teachers are instructed to complete the practice as a shared group activity, provide an illustrated word bank, and consider sketching the doll to make the practice more concrete.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

The Teacher Guide for each module provides a section supporting English Language Learners that includes various scaffolds and levels of support recommendations, which often include allowing students to grapple with complex texts and tasks before providing necessary adjustments based on targeted observation. There are Eight High-Leverage Approaches to Supporting English Language Learners in the Supporting English Language Learners section of Modules. The Supporting English Language Learners section in the Unit Overview tells where support practices like Language Dives and Conversation Cues are placed in each unit. Protocols for Conversation Clues and Language Dives are scaffolded for English Language Learners and students who may need additional support in that specific skill to meet or exceed the grade-level standard. In lessons, the Supporting English Language Learners sections are found at the start of the lesson and are embedded throughout in the Meeting Students’ Needs section of the daily lesson plan and provide differentiated levels of support for students with different levels of language proficiency needed for that day’s work.

The Meeting Students Needs section provides additional adaptations for students who may require extensions or support to reach the rigor of the grade level lessons. There are specific supports provided for ELL students.

The Supporting English Language Learners section can be found at the start of the lesson and includes differentiated levels of support for students with different levels of language proficiency needed for that day’s work.

Language Dives provide students with strategies to analyze, understand, and use the language. During a Language Dive, teachers and students slow down the reading of a text to deeply analyze the meaning, purpose, and structure of a specific part of the text. The Language Dive supports ELL students to acquire language and deconstruct complex text (Your Curriculum Companion pages 99-100).

Conversation Cues engage ELL students and their peers in thoughtful and academically focused discussions based on questions asked by the teacher. The Goal for ELL students during these conversations is to be understood, listen carefully and seek understanding, deepen their thinking, and think of ways to extend the conversation (Your Curriculum Companion pages 100-101).

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Within the material itself, there are multiple modalities of learning addressed as well as multiple exposures to content. Teachers notes throughout the curriculum rarely offer extensions or opportunities for advanced learners. Each unit includes ways to extend the learning beyond the classroom linking home, community, and experts in their fields to share their experiences. However, there are no specific extensions or opportunities to compact the curriculum.

Grade K, Module 2, extensions include:

  • As a class, create a rain gauge to measure the rain over the course of a few weeks.
    Place a thermometer in an easily accessed outside location (e.g., near the recess area) and check the temperature daily.
  • Begin a class weather mural. As students learn, encourage them to add weather elements, characters, and other weather-related images to the mural.
  • Create a visual representation of a scene from the My Weather Story booklet. Examples include a shoebox diorama, a painting, or a paper collage.
  • Contact a local printing agency and inquire about publishing students’ weather stories into a bound class book.
  • Videotape students reading aloud their narrative weather stories to share with family and friends.

Grade K, Module 4, extensions include:

  • Invite school community members or families in to read a story or tell their own story about trees.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

The curriculum provides collaborative structures that are used consistently throughout the module lessons. The curriculum also encourages educators to teach total participation techniques to increase student engagement and opportunities to respond during whole group discussions. Additionally the materials provide opportunities for teachers to use both homogeneous and heterogeneous grouping strategies. Students participate in partner and small group Think/Pair/Share, Whole Class Discussion, Small Group Discussion, Read Alouds, Shared Reading, Independent Reading, and Language Dives for both informational and literary texts. Teachers are encouraged to use information gained from the ongoing assessments in the lessons to help determine where students need additional supports or extensions during small groups. In the Modules, a variety of grouping strategies are encouraged where students work in pairs or triads and are strategically paired in advance to create productive and supportive work time. In the Labs, student groupings are dependent on activities that are differentiated based on student need. Examples of groupings include, but are not limited to:

  • Think-Pair-Share: promotes productive and equitable conversations, giving all students the opportunity to share and consider the views of others. For example, in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 6, there is a Think-Pair-Share activity facilitated by the teacher and then followed up with questions to prompt further discussion or sentence frames for those who need them. Teachers ask, “What do you see happening in your picture? Which commitment is shown?”
  • Back to Back and Face to Face: designed to give students the opportunity to hear several different perspectives on a topic and/or to engage in critical thinking about a topic.
  • Pinky Partners: designed as a fun way for students to find a partner to engage in conversation.

An Approaches to Flexible Grouping in the K-5 Curriculum chart is included. This chart explains all the grouping strategies for each component of the curriculum. For the module lessons, teachers are given suggestions to group students based on similar needs. Ongoing assessments throughout the module lessons are used to make grouping decisions about who should be grouped together. In the ALL Block, students are grouped in either below grade level, on grade level, above grade level, or English Language Learner groups. These groups are formed for a two week period using the data from the module lessons. Students then rotate through the activities and are provided the necessary scaffolds or enrichment depending on the group (Your Curriculum Companion page 113).

Indicator 3s

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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The instructional materials include suggestions to enhance lessons with the use of technology and multimedia. Located in each Module Overview, the Technology and Multimedia section gives general recommendations for how to utilize resources on the internet for classroom projects, such as the production of student work or to research a topic further. In a review of the suggested activities, it appears that different internet browsers and operating systems would not prove to be a challenge for accessibility. For example, in Module 1, Teacher Guide, Module Overview, the Technology and Multimedia section suggests using Google Drawings, Seesaw, and provides website recommendations to research the topic of “Toys and Play” in further detail.

The curriculum materials are available online. An educator may access and download teacher materials and student materials for each unit along with the assessments, protocols, and videos modeling the protocols.The optional Life Science module and components of this module are also available on the site and contain similar parts as the ELA module. These teacher and student materials include: the big ideas, the Four T’s, texts, assessments, performance task, materials and Module-at-a-glance.

Accessibility was tested successfully on Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari, Windows, Mac Air, iPhone, and iPad.

Indicator 3s3v

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials meet the criteria that digital materials are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers , “platform neutral”, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning. Materials partially meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. Curriculum components contain student materials that can be downloaded in Microsoft Word and customized for individual learners or classroom use. The Teacher Guide for module lessons provide a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning which include technology platforms that facilitate collaboration among students and teacher as well as students with each other.

Indicator 3t

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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning. Within this section, teachers are given suggestions on methods to incorporate technology, along with websites to utilize and an explanation of the manner in which technology can be used to scaffold instruction. For example, in Module 1, Teacher Guide, Module Overview, the Technology and Multimedia section suggests using Google Drawings and Seesaw. It provides website recommendations to research the topic of “Toys and Play” further and suggests using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials. The Teacher Guide also makes suggestions such as creating the word wall in an online format so that vocabulary words can be shared with families.

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Digital materials include a digital planning guide, step-by-step lesson plans, and online materials with additional support for differentiated instruction. However, while digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for students through the use of Microsoft Word, it is limited in accessibility to innovative technology. The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to engage students in their learning which include adaptive technology; however, opportunities for creativity and innovation with technology were not widely present. Many of the resources can only be viewed or printed and, therefore, do not allow for differentiation of content to meet the needs of learners. While in-class experiences are highly personalized as evidenced through the lab experiences, independent work, and opportunities to adjust curriculum based on assessment results, the digital resources do not aid in providing differentiated experiences to meet the needs of all students.

  • In Module 2, the Technology and Multimedia section provides support to extend lessons into digital experiences to engage students more fully in their learning. As stated in the Multiple Means of Representation (MMR), “During this lesson, students review the Think-Pair-Share protocol. Some students may need additional visual cues for each step of this protocol. Consider printing and displaying photographs of students demonstrating each step of the protocol.”
  • The curriculum materials are available online. Teachers may download the materials in .pdf or .doc form. When using .doc form, teachers can edit, change, add to documents to customize the materials as needed for students. However, utilizing these customized materials in conjunction with additional technology is not included as part of this program.

Indicator 3u.ii

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

The Module and Lab curriculum components contain student materials that can be downloaded in Microsoft Word and customized for individual learners or classroom use. In Your Curriculum Companion, Chapter 3, strategies are provided to customize the lessons for local use. For example, on page 127, under the Refining Lessons heading, teachers are informed that “you can spend time preparing the materials in such a way that your students, who have been struggling with transitions, will have them at their desks when they come in from recess.” When accessing resources on curriculum.eleducation.org, teachers can download the materials in .pdf or .doc form. When using the .doc form, teachers can edit, change, or add to documents to customize the materials as needed for students.

Indicator 3v

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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

The Teacher Guide for module lessons provide a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning which include technology platforms that facilitate collaboration among students and teacher as well as students with each other. Teachers are often prompted to use collaborative documents such as Google Docs to collaborate during class.

Professional development videos are available on curriculum.eleducation.org; however, the videos are not linked to the resources. Teachers need to search through video topics for specific videos.

On the EL Education website under Resources, teachers are provided with digital tools to connect with other educators via online Professional Development (PD Packs).

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials meet the criteria that digital materials are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers , “platform neutral”, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning. Materials partially meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. Curriculum components contain student materials that can be downloaded in Microsoft Word and customized for individual learners or classroom use. The Teacher Guide for module lessons provide a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning which include technology platforms that facilitate collaboration among students and teacher as well as students with each other.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The instructional materials include suggestions to enhance lessons with the use of technology and multimedia. Located in each Module Overview, the Technology and Multimedia section gives general recommendations for how to utilize resources on the internet for classroom projects, such as the production of student work or to research a topic further. In a review of the suggested activities, it appears that different internet browsers and operating systems would not prove to be a challenge for accessibility. For example, in Module 1, Teacher Guide, Module Overview, the Technology and Multimedia section suggests using Google Drawings, Seesaw, and provides website recommendations to research the topic of “Toys and Play” in further detail.

The curriculum materials are available online. An educator may access and download teacher materials and student materials for each unit along with the assessments, protocols, and videos modeling the protocols.The optional Life Science module and components of this module are also available on the site and contain similar parts as the ELA module. These teacher and student materials include: the big ideas, the Four T’s, texts, assessments, performance task, materials and Module-at-a-glance.

Accessibility was tested successfully on Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari, Windows, Mac Air, iPhone, and iPad.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning. Within this section, teachers are given suggestions on methods to incorporate technology, along with websites to utilize and an explanation of the manner in which technology can be used to scaffold instruction. For example, in Module 1, Teacher Guide, Module Overview, the Technology and Multimedia section suggests using Google Drawings and Seesaw. It provides website recommendations to research the topic of “Toys and Play” further and suggests using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials. The Teacher Guide also makes suggestions such as creating the word wall in an online format so that vocabulary words can be shared with families.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Digital materials include a digital planning guide, step-by-step lesson plans, and online materials with additional support for differentiated instruction. However, while digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for students through the use of Microsoft Word, it is limited in accessibility to innovative technology. The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to engage students in their learning which include adaptive technology; however, opportunities for creativity and innovation with technology were not widely present. Many of the resources can only be viewed or printed and, therefore, do not allow for differentiation of content to meet the needs of learners. While in-class experiences are highly personalized as evidenced through the lab experiences, independent work, and opportunities to adjust curriculum based on assessment results, the digital resources do not aid in providing differentiated experiences to meet the needs of all students.

  • In Module 2, the Technology and Multimedia section provides support to extend lessons into digital experiences to engage students more fully in their learning. As stated in the Multiple Means of Representation (MMR), “During this lesson, students review the Think-Pair-Share protocol. Some students may need additional visual cues for each step of this protocol. Consider printing and displaying photographs of students demonstrating each step of the protocol.”
  • The curriculum materials are available online. Teachers may download the materials in .pdf or .doc form. When using .doc form, teachers can edit, change, add to documents to customize the materials as needed for students. However, utilizing these customized materials in conjunction with additional technology is not included as part of this program.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

The Module and Lab curriculum components contain student materials that can be downloaded in Microsoft Word and customized for individual learners or classroom use. In Your Curriculum Companion, Chapter 3, strategies are provided to customize the lessons for local use. For example, on page 127, under the Refining Lessons heading, teachers are informed that “you can spend time preparing the materials in such a way that your students, who have been struggling with transitions, will have them at their desks when they come in from recess.” When accessing resources on curriculum.eleducation.org, teachers can download the materials in .pdf or .doc form. When using the .doc form, teachers can edit, change, or add to documents to customize the materials as needed for students.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

The Teacher Guide for module lessons provide a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning which include technology platforms that facilitate collaboration among students and teacher as well as students with each other. Teachers are often prompted to use collaborative documents such as Google Docs to collaborate during class.

Professional development videos are available on curriculum.eleducation.org; however, the videos are not linked to the resources. Teachers need to search through video topics for specific videos.

On the EL Education website under Resources, teachers are provided with digital tools to connect with other educators via online Professional Development (PD Packs).

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Tue Mar 06 00:00:00 UTC 2018

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Kindergarten Bundle: Language Arts + Labs, Teacher Materials: Labs: Modules 3 & 4: Teacher Guide and Supporting Materials 978-1-6836-2364-9 Copyright: 2017 Open Up Resources 2017
Kindergarten Bundle: Language Arts + Labs, Student Workbooks: Language Arts: Modules 3 & 4, Student Workbook 978-1-6836-2367-0 Copyright: 2017 Open Up Resources 2017
K-2 Reading Foundations Skills Block: Learning Letters 978-1-6836-2370-0 Copyright: 2017 Open Up Resources 2017

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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