Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet the expectations of alignment. The materials include high quality, rigorous texts for students to engage with questions and tasks. The materials support development of foundational skills and provide support for teachers to attend to students' literacy growth. The materials also support building knowledge and growing academic vocabulary as student demonstrate their integrated skills.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
39
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
32
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
33
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

Materials meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading. Text complexity analyses and rationales are not provided for every required trade book and article. The materials meet the criteria for text complexity and for support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year. Materials include both text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that help prepare students for the each unit’s Extended Writing Task, which integrates writing, speaking, or both. The materials include frequent opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Materials meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Materials contain minimal evidence of explicit instruction of phonics and word recognition consistently over the course of the year. Materials provide limited opportunities to apply word analysis skills to connected texts. There are limited opportunities to practice speaking and receive feedback on fluency.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
19/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading. Students engage in a range and volume of reading in service of grade level reading proficiency, and consistent opportunities are provided for textual analysis. Text complexity analyses and rationales are not provided for every required trade book and article. The materials meet the criteria for text complexity and for support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

The texts provide content that is relevant and interesting to students. The literary texts portray fascinating stories through vivid illustrations and quality writing that would be of interest to students. The texts cover a variety a cultures and concepts, including science. However, two books, A Life Like Mine by DK Publishing and The Most Beautiful Roof in the World by Kathryn Lasky, are out-of-date and contain less relevant social studies information for students today. The photos are also out-of-date and not representative of current society and nature.

Anchor texts in the majority of chapters/units and across the yearlong curriculum are of publishable quality. Anchor texts consider a range of student interests and are well-crafted and content-rich, engaging students at their grade level. Examples include:

  • Module 1:
    • Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan is a historical fiction chapter book about a young girl who grows up wealthy but loses her loving father at a young age. The text contains descriptive wording and phrasing, such as “gentle slopes of the vineyard” and “with a plump face,” which help the reader to imagine the settings and characters.
  • Module 2:
    • The Great Kapok Tree is a folktale by Lynne Cherry. This text is written as a picture book. Cherry combines illustrations that reveal a naturalist's reverence for beauty with a myth-like story that explains the ecological importance of saving the rainforests. The text is a simply told story about a man who falls asleep while chopping down a kapok tree. The forest's inhabitants--snakes, butterflies, a jaguar, and, finally, a child--each whisper in his ear about the terrible consequences of living in “a world without trees'' or beauty, about the interconnectedness of all living things.
  • Module 3:
    • Promises to Keep: How Jackie Robinson Changed America by Sharon Robinson contains engaging text features, such as timelines and photos of aspects of Jackie Robinson’s life, such as newspaper clippings. The content is appealing to Grade 5 students since the text is about a sports figure and injustices.
  • Module 4:
    • Eight Days: A Story of Haiti by Edwidge Daniticat is of a little boy who is trapped under his house for eight days after an earthquake in Haiti. The story is told through the eyes of the little boy as he shares what he imagines doing on each of the eight days that he is trapped. The illustrations are vibrant and will give students an idea of the appearance of the landscape of Haiti.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

Students have the opportunity to read a mix of informational and literary texts. Genres include poetry, a chapter book, song lyrics, and informational texts. There are no opportunities for students to read myths or drama.

The following are examples of informational texts included within the materials:

  • Module 1: Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted and proclaimed by the General Assembly resolution 217 A (III) of 10 December 1948
  • Module 3: Promises to Keep: How Jackie Robinson Changed America by Sharon Robinson
  • Module 3: “Jim Abbott” by Rick Swain
  • Module 4: “How Well is Your Community Prepared?” from Scholastic Web

The following are examples of literary texts included within the materials:

  • Module 1: Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan
  • Module 2: The Great Kapok Tree by Lynne Cherry
  • Module 4: Eight Days: A Story of Haiti by Edwidge Danticat
  • Module 4: “O’ Beautiful Storm” by Gian Smith

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

Many texts reviewed have Lexile scores within the Grade 4-5 range. Some texts such as The Most Beautiful Roof in the World and Promises to Keep: How Jackie Robinson Changed America have high Lexiles, but the qualitative features, such as pictures or illustrations, help support student comprehension. Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task. Anchor texts are placed at the appropriate grade level. Examples include:

  • Module 1:
    • Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan has a Lexile of 750. The meaning and purpose of the text is very complex as the text contains subtle themes and multiple meanings that may be difficult for students to comprehend. The text structure is moderately complex since characters change over the course of the text and conflicting character perspectives about events in the story are presented. The language features are moderately complex. While sentences are easy for students to understand, the use of metaphors throughout the story makes it more complex. The knowledge demands of the text are moderately complex and includes many historical references that may be unfamiliar to students.
  • Module 2:
    • The Most Beautiful Roof in the World by Kathryn Lasky has a Lexile of 1100. The meaning and purpose is moderately complex with implied purpose that is easy to identify. The text structure is moderately complex with narrative structure with some subsections of expository structures. The language features are moderately complex with contemporary language. The knowledge demands are moderately complex with discipline-specific content knowledge.
  • Module 3:
    • Promises to Keep: How Jackie Robinson Changed America by Sharon Robinson has a Lexile of 1030. The text has an implied purpose, but the purpose can be determined through content and chapter headings. The text structure is slightly complex with information presented chronologically with supporting text features. The language features are moderately complex with many complex sentences and mainly contemporary vocabulary aside from academic words. Knowledge demands, abstract ideas and discipline-specific content are supported by the visual elements of the text.
  • Module 4:
    • “O’ Beautiful Storm” by Gian Smith is a poem thus does not have a Lexile. The meaning and purpose is very complex with multiple levels of meaning and a subtle theme. The text structure is slightly complex as the text is written in free verse. The language features are very complex because the meaning of the poetry relies on imagery, figurative language, and personification. The knowledge demands are moderately complex with experiences that are likely to be unfamiliar to most readers.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)

As the year progresses, questions and tasks build literacy skills and student independence. Lessons contain scaffolding and Universal Design for Learning to support students’ increasing literacy skills. Throughout the modules, the teacher reads aloud each of the complex texts. Students reread sections of the texts. There are few opportunities for students to read the grade level complex texts in the modules independently without a prior teacher read aloud.

  • In Module 1, students hear Esperanza Rising and articles from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights read aloud by teacher. Students are supported in analyzing the overall structure, main idea and details, and unfamiliar vocabulary through Guided Close Reading. Students reread sections of Esperanza Rising as homework and answer questions about the text.
  • In Module 2, students hear, read, and reread grade level complex texts including The Great Kapok Tree, Seeds of Change, and The Most Beautiful Roof in the World in order to build background knowledge about rainforests, compare text structures, and analyze how point of view influences how the events in the text are described. In addition, students research and read (using print and digital sources) ways to help the rainforests and challenges of being an ethical consumer.
  • In Module 3, students hear and read grade level complex texts in order to determine main idea and key details, summarize text, analyze accounts about which factor was most important in Jackie Robinson’s success. These include informational texts on Jackie Robinson’s success, informational texts on the qualities of effective leaders of change, and a text titled Promises to Keep by Sharon Robinson at varying Lexile levels and levels of text-complexity.
  • In Module 4, students work in expert groups to read informational texts of varying levels and complexities to gather research on the impact of natural disasters. In addition, students read in triads to analyze illustrations and visuals to determine how these texts contribute to meaning, tone, and beauty of text.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

Text complexity analyses and rationales are included in the program in the Curriculum Tools. The text complexity guides include a rationale for why they were placed in that grade at that particular place, alongside an explanation of how the book can be used to enhance student understanding. However, text complexity analyses and rationales are not provided for every required trade book and article.

Most anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale. Examples include:

  • In Bite at Night by EL Education, the analysis includes text description, placement, quantitative measures, qualitative measures, considerations for reader and task, and rationale. The analysis includes a summary of the text within the text description. Within the placement, the analysis includes the following information: “Both the quantitative and qualitative complexity of this narrative falls solidity within a fifth grade level.” The quantitative measures for this text are 900L and the associated band level 4-5. The qualitative measures include meaning/purpose, text structure, language features, and knowledge demands. The following guidance is provided for considerations for the reader and task: “Students analyze this story to build their understanding of key elements of narrative texts. Since the story is based on an event previously read in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World, the main character and setting will be familiar to students. This supports students in navigating the knowledge complexity of the text.” The rationale states that this text builds understanding of narrative writing elements such as figurative language and point of view.
  • In "O’ Beautiful Storm" by Gian Smith, the analysis includes text description, placement, quantitative measures, qualitative measures, considerations for reader and task, and rationale. The analysis includes a summary of the text within the text description. Within the placement, the analysis includes the following information: “Although this poem is quantitatively quite complex, the support given and the visuals in the multimedia presentation make the text appropriate for fifth graders.” The quantitative measures for this text are NP (poem) and the associated band level N/A. The qualitative measures include meaning/purpose, text structure, language features, and knowledge demands. The following guidance is provided for considerations for the reader and task: “The visuals in the multimedia presentation support comprehension. The images accompanying the first stanza poem are video footage of the damage taken after the event.” The rationale states that this text is used as students are studying natural disasters. To help students dig deeper into the human impact on natural disasters, students answer text-based questions.
  • In Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan, the analysis includes text description, placement, quantitative measures, qualitative measures, considerations for reader and task, and rationale. The analysis includes a summary of the text within the text description. Within the placement, the analysis includes the following information: “This text falls in the 4-5 band level. Despite its lower quantitative measure, the structure of the text, multiple themes, heavy use of metaphor and cultural and historical references make this text rich, complex and challenging for upper elementary students.” The quantitative measures for this text are 750L and the associated band level is 2-3. The qualitative measures include meaning/purpose, text structure, language features, and knowledge demands. The following guidance is provided for considerations for the reader and task: “Students may require some support in understanding the settings in this story, as well as many cultural aspects to the time and place in which the story takes place… The larger social issues raised by the book are still current and complex and should be handled sensitively.” The rationale states that this text builds understanding and empathy. The complex characters offer opportunities to explore how the author’s figurative language creates layers of meaning in the story.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

Students access a variety and volume of texts that supports students’ ability to read at their grade level. There is a Required Trade Book Procurement List and a Recommended Texts and Other Resources List. These lists contain a range and volume of informational and literary texts that students read to them during Module lessons. Opportunities include close reading strategies to support student learning During the Module lessons, students can participate in Accountable Independent Reading as part of homework, and during ALL Block, students participate in a rotation of Independent Reading for 20 minutes. There are Independent Reading Sample Plans found in Module 1 Appendix.

Instructional materials identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in reading a variety of texts to become independent readers and/or comprehenders and a volume of reading as they grow toward reading independence at the grade level. Examples include:

  • In Module lessons, students participate in Close Reading, which provides students with the opportunity to read complex texts. For example:
    • In Module 2, Lesson 3, students participate in a Close Read of pages 11-12 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. The teacher reads the text aloud, and students silently read the text. Later, students choral read the text and find the gist.
    • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 4, students are guided through a Close Read of “How Well is Your Community Prepared?” Students take notes in the Close Reading Note-catcher.
  • During the ALL Block, students read for 20 minutes. The purpose of their reading alternates each week with one week being focused on research reading and the following week being focused on reading for pleasure.
  • In Module 1, students learn about Accountable Independent Reading. Students are taught the structures of Accountable Independent Reading. Independent Reading is assigned for homework most nights. Teachers and students work together to set an independent reading goal, the teacher will check in once or twice a week to see how the student is progressing with their goal.
    • In Module 1, Appendix, Independent Reading Sample Plans, there are lesson plans with lessons to support students’ reading. For example, in a lesson called Research Reading Reviews: Something Interesting, students select an interesting fact, paragraph or image/illustration and share their interesting fact, paragraph, or image with a partner or triad.
    • At the end of Module lessons, the following homework is assigned: “Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.”

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Materials include both text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that help prepare students for the each unit’s Extended Writing Task, which integrates writing, speaking, or both. The instructional materials provide multiple opportunities for evidence-based discussion that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and support student listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching. The materials include frequent opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Materials meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials reviewed provide many tasks and opportunities for evidence-based discussions and writing using evidence from texts to build strong literacy skills.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

Each module includes a set of trade books that students use throughout the lessons. Materials for the lessons and ALL Block provide graphic organizers and instructional support tasks for students to engage with the text and to collect textual evidence, building toward a performance task. Students are directed to make connections not only across texts, but also across units and lessons. Texts are used significantly during lessons focused primarily on writing. While most questions, tasks, and assignments draw the reader back into the text and support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year, some questions, tasks, and assignments can be accomplished without use of the text.

The materials include graphic organizers that assist students in Close Reads of their text and citing evidence for specific questions or tasks they are asked to complete. Tasks for various lessons within each unit include teacher-led close reading of content-based text and text-dependent questions along with a focus question to drive a series of sessions on a complex text. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 5, materials include a graphic organizer titled “Quoting Accurately from the Text.” They use this organizer when reading Esperanza Rising to record how the human rights of characters were threatened in the book. Students are asked to use accurate quotes from the text. Students analyze the chapter to determine how the chapter fits into the overall structure of the text. Students use that chapter and an additional text to make comparisons.
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 2, students analyze the elements of plot in Miguel’s Monologue. Students label the parts of Miguel’s Monologue that establish the situation and introduce the characters.
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 2, students analyze text structure by rereading a portion of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. Students complete a graphic organizer to explain the structure of the text. Further in the lesson, students read a new section of the text for the purpose of reading for the gist. They use the information that they gathered through reading for the gist and complete a graphic organizer that also focuses on the vocabulary in the text.
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 5, the focus is on figurative language. First, students share two examples of figurative language within their independent reading books with peers. They use the two examples to compare and contrast the figurative language, including explanations and discussions of the context clues that help them to understand the figurative language.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 10, students finish the text, “Promises to Keep.” Throughout the reading, they focus on the gist of the text and look for a factor(s) that led to Jackie Robinson’s success. In Lesson 10, students create a timeline of important events in Jackie’s life. Students answer the following prompts: “Choose a person or event that led to Jackie’s success. Explain how he or she, or the event, led to his success in breaking the color barrier in baseball.” Students work in groups to determine the events and write the events on index cards. After work time is over, the teacher collects all the index cards and works with the students to create a timeline. After the timeline is completed, the teacher asks students to “Share an oral summary of ‘Play Ball!’ using the class Jackie Robinson timeline.” For Closing and Assessment, students use the timeline and their notes to write a paragraph about a factor that led to Jackie Robinson’s success.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 10, students analyze a model opinion essay and use the model to plan their own essay about the most important factor(s) for Jackie Robinson’s success in leading social change. As a support, students use an Opinion Writing Planning graphic organizer. Before using the graphic organizer, the teacher and students discuss how it works: “How is this graphic organizer similar to other writing graphic organizers we have used this year? How is this graphic organizer different from other writing graphic organizers we have used?” Students analyze the model opinion writing with the teacher, drawing their attention to the structure of the writing: “Which sentence in this paragraph most clearly states the author’s opinion? How do you know this statement is an opinion?”
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 4, students brainstorm specific questions to guide their research. Students watch videos in small groups about a natural disaster and take notes using their graphic organizers. Students begin their research by working in expert groups to research a natural disaster, learning about what it is and its impact: “What kind of information do we need to find in order to answer this question? What research questions can we use to guide us in finding relevant facts and details?” After students generate research questions through the use of text and videos, they use the text and videos to answer the questions they have about natural disasters: “Describe the natural disaster. What causes it? What happens during it?”
  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 4, students watch part of a video and read part of the first stanza of the poem, “O’ Beautiful Storm,” in order to identify the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases, understand the gist of the poem, and understand the human impact that occurred as a result of Hurricane Katrina. Students answer the following questions: “Having watched the video and listened to part of the first stanza of the poem, what do you think this poem is about? How do the visuals in the ‘Katrina: Don’t Let Her Go’ video contribute to the meaning, tone, and beauty of the ‘O’ Beautiful Storm’ text?”

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for having sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding. Culminating tasks require students to gather details or information using text-dependent questions, anchor charts, and graphic organizers to write a specific genre of writing at the end of each module. Each module has a final Performance Task. Performance tasks are designed to help students synthesize and apply their learning from the unit in an engaging and authentic way. Culminating tasks are rich and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know and are able to do using speaking and writing.

The Module 1 Performance Task requires students to work in small groups to compile monologues and create a program. In Unit 1, Lesson 4, students read article 3 of The Universal Declaration on Human Rights and answer text-dependent questions such as, “What is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights? Why was it written?” In the Unit 2 end-of-unit assessment, students participate in a text-based discussion about threats to human rights in Chapters 4–6 of Esperanza Rising. In Unit 2, Lesson 1, students read aloud and analyze the Model Character Reaction Paragraph, “Mama.” Students focus on the following questions: “What information does this paragraph contain? Why? How is it organized?” Students reread the model paragraph and annotate the text to answer the questions. In Unit 2, Lesson 11, students analyze the Model Two-Voice Poem. Students discuss the following questions with a partner: “What do you notice about the structure of the poem and how it was read? Why is there a column for each character? Why is there is a column in the middle for both characters?”

The Module 2 Performance Task requires students to compile their narrative writing into an ebook. In Unit 1, Lesson 3, students complete a close read of pages 11-12 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World and answer text-dependent questions, such as “What is the structure of this excerpt? How is the information organized?” In the Unit 2 end of unit assessment, students read a new excerpt of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World and write an on-demand essay to answer the question: “What does the use of concrete language and sensory detail help you understand about the rainforest?” In Unit 2, Lesson 7, students color-code a model essay. Then, they discuss the following questions: “Why do you think that is the introduction? Why do you think that is the focus statement?” In Unit 3, Lesson 6, students analyze a model, “Bite at Night.” They annotate the text and then discuss the following questions: “Looking across the parts you have underlined, what do you notice about what the author did to speed up time? Why did the author speed up time here?”

The Module 3 Performance Task requires students to reflect on the personal qualities that help leaders to affect social change and, in groups, create a poster for a display titled “Be an Effective Leader of Change.” In Unit 1, Lesson 8, students complete a close-read of Pages 38–41 of Promises to Keep, and answer text-dependent questions about Jackie Robinson and the reasons for his success as a force for social change. In Unit 1, Lesson 11, students reflect on Habits of Character using the following anchor charts: Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart, Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart, and Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart. These anchor charts have been built by students throughout the year. Students reflect on the people that they have read about in Promises to Keep and how they have demonstrated the habits of character. The Unit 2 end of unit assessment requires students to write an opinion essay regarding the factors that make athletes forces for social change, draft a second body paragraph and conclusion, and revise their essays to ensure that each reason is clearly linked to the stated opinion and is well supported by facts and details.

The Module 4 performance task requires students to write an on-demand opinion essay in which they choose two personal items to include in an emergency preparedness kit for their own families and explain the reasons for choosing each. Students use technology to produce, revise, edit, and publish their writing. In Unit 1, Lessons 1-9, students research natural disasters and read “How Well is Your Community Prepared?” in Lesson 4 and answer text-dependent questions. In Unit 1, Lesson 9, students analyze a Model Public Service Announcement (PSA). Then, students utilize Think-Pair-Share to discuss the following questions: “The introduction of the model describes what the natural disaster is and how it impacts people and places. Why do you think it is organized in this way? Think back to the informational essays you’ve written throughout this year. How will the introduction of our PSAs be similar to these introductions? How will it be different? Can you figure out why the introduction of the PSA will be different from informational essays you have written, even though they are both informational pieces?” In Unit 2, Lesson 2, students complete the Quick Write: Visuals in Eight Days: A Story of Haiti. After collecting notes about how the visuals in the text contribute to the meaning, tone, and beauty of the text, students write a paragraph answering the following prompt at the top of their QuickWrite sheet: “How do the visuals in Eight Days: A Story of Haiti contribute to the meaning, tone, and beauty of the text?”

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols throughout modules and within lesson components for evidence-based discussions such as Turn-and-Talk, Think-Pair-Share and text-based discussions such as Socratic Seminars and Collaborative Discussions that support academic vocabulary and syntax. In the supporting materials, graphic organizers such as Academic Vocabulary Form and Domain-Specific Vocabulary Form and an Affix List are provided for students to use in their writing and speaking activities. Units include practices that encourage the building and application of academic vocabulary and syntax including total participation routines and think pair share. Teacher materials support implementation of these standards in a clear and direct manner. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Module 1, Unit 1, Module Overview Overview states that this is “the first in a series of two that include built-out instruction for strategic use of the Think-Pair-Share protocol to promote productive and equitable conversation.” Students participate in two text-based discussions, during which students discuss how human rights are threatened in Esperanza Rising. Students complete a series of note-catchers in preparation for these discussions and they “orally negotiate with classmates the meaning of what they are trying to say, pushing them to change their language to be more comprehensible. Additionally, students can celebrate their successful attempts at communication and their ability to extend and enhance the discussions.”
  • The Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Teacher Guide explains that, during this lesson, students generate a Discussion Norms anchor chart to support students in having productive and equitable discussions that deepen their understanding, targeting Speaking and Listening CCSS 5.1. During this lesson, students contribute to the Academic Word Wall, providing new words that they will use throughout their lessons and discussions.
  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, “..students watch a model small group discussion to generate discussion norms. Choose three to five students who can serve as strong models of speaking and listening, invite students from an older grade to choose and bring their own research reading texts to share, or invite several teachers or adult volunteers to choose and bring their own books to share and discuss” (p. 47).
  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 9, students have been reading Esperanza Rising and The Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Teacher Guide explains that students will be introduced to the Goals 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 2, the Teacher Guide instructs the teacher to “tell students that now they will see a summary of pages 9-10 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World and think about what makes the summary effective. The students were asked to Think-Pair-Share: “What were the main ideas of pages 9–10 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World? What details did you hear to support the main idea? How might you paraphrase these pages?”
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 13, students participate in a Science Talk. Students use their notes and goals sheets, What Can I Do to Help the Rainforest? note-catcher from Lesson 11, the End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part I: Web Research from Lesson 12, and the Notices and Wonders note-catcher to participate. Students sit in a fishbowl arrangement to being the discussion. Later in the lesson, students repeat the Science Talk.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 3, students use a total participation technique in order to gather input from the group using the graphic organizer, “Determining Main Ideas and Key Details: A Black and White World” note-catcher. Students answer the following questions: “What is one main idea of this chapter? What is another main idea of this chapter? What is the big idea of this entire chapter? Why did Sharon Robinson write it?”
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 1, students use the interactive Word Wall protocol to better understand some of the words and meanings that they have encountered within the text. Students use their vocabulary logs and their copy of Promises to Keep. Students receive large index cards and work with their triad to choose a domain-specific word that they have encountered and write it on the front of the index card. Students decide on their word and write it on the front of their index card. After two minutes, each triad finds another triad, forming a group of six and shares the words that they have written on their index cards.
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 5, students work with their expert groups to read over their Natural Disaster note-catcher to determine “What research questions do you need more information for?” Later in the lesson, students participate in preparing for a Science Talk, still working with their expert groups, but working to answer and research “How do natural disasters affect the people and places that experience them?” Students use the Natural Disasters: Preparing for a Science Talk note-catcher. Students work with their groups to gather information that will be used later in the unit.
  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 3, students work in triads to answer questions about the text, “In the Water Where the City Ends.” The lesson is designed for students to dig deeper into the text to build a better understanding of the human impact of the Tohoku tsunami. Students answer text-dependent questions and read the question, reread the corresponding part of the text, and then discuss the answer to each question before recording a response on the graphic organizer.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

The individual lessons throughout the module units support students’ speaking and listening about what they are reading and researching. Each module overview outlines the Speaking and Listening standards that will be targeted throughout the unit, and each lesson contains routines to engage students in speaking and listening. Unit lessons require students to share out their reflections and engage in follow-up questioning. Collaborative routines are included in the daily lessons along with protocol explanations and discussion structures described in the lesson section titled Teacher’s Notes. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Module 1, Unit 1, Module Overview, the Teacher Guide indicates that students will participate in two text-based discussions, during which students will discuss how human rights are threatened in Esperanza Rising. Students complete a series of note-catchers in preparation for these discussions and they “orally negotiate with classmates the meaning of what they are trying to say, pushing them to change their language to be more comprehensible.”
  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 10, students participate in a text-based discussion. They use the Discussion Norms anchor chart for reference to the criteria for the discussion. Students move into groups of five and sit around a table or in a circle with their group and their Preparing for Text-Based Discussion note-catcher. The students should be focused on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and their collaborative discussion includes describing how they feel.
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 13, students participate in a Science Talk to answer the question: “What can I do to help the rainforest?” The structure of this talk follows the Fishbowl protocol. “Templates are provided in the supporting materials, but some advance research is required to gather materials and ensure that the information provided on the templates is up-to-date.” When they are in the outside circle, they listen to their peers and record ideas and questions in the first box on their End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part II: Text-Based Discussion note-catcher. At the end of the lesson, they write their conclusions, so they should leave that space blank for now.” Students are asked to bring their Science Talk Notes and Goals (Lesson 10), What Can I Do to Help the Rainforest? note-catcher (Lesson 11), End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part I: Web Research (Lesson 12), and Notices and Wonders note-catcher (Lesson 13) to the discussion.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 6, students are shown page 22 of Promises to Keep and read aloud the chapter title. Students focus on the photographs on pages 22–23. They “Turn and Talk” with a peer to answer the question, “What do you notice and wonder?” Teacher/students then read pages 22–23 aloud. Again they “Turn and Talk” and use a “total participation technique” to answer the question, “What is the text about?” After listening to portions of the text read aloud, students “Turn and Talk” to discuss “What are the main ideas of this chapter? What are the key details supporting the main ideas?” Students are then asked to write a summary of “1945: A Changing World.” After summaries are written, students share put their summaries to the class.
  • In Module 3, Unit 3, Lessons 2 and 3, students are researching an athlete in order to answer the question “What are the similarities and differences between the factors that contributed to the success of your athlete as a leader of social change and those of Jackie Robinson?” Students review a list of athletes and what sport each athlete was famous for. Students choose their athlete and get into groups with others wanting to research the same athlete. As students in the group research, they divide and conquer the resources by taking notes on the information they uncover and then share out with the group. Using the comparison to Jackie Robinson note-catcher, student groups discuss, “What similarities do you notice between factors that contributed to Jackie Robinson’s success as a leader of social change and your athlete’s success as a leader of social change?
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 7, students participate in a Science Talk, around the question,“How do natural disasters affect the people and places that experience them?” The purpose of a Science Talk is to allow students to build on each other’s ideas. These talks provide a glimpse into students’ thinking that helps teachers figure out what students really know and what their misconceptions may be. Science Talks follow the Fishbowl protocol, with two concentric circles, one observing the other as they participate in the Science Talk with students providing feedback to the whole group, instead of individual students.
  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 4, students participate in a Whole Group Critique: Proof Paragraphs 1 and 2. Students use the opinion writing checklist, with a main focus on two of the criteria: “W.5.1b: I provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details from sources” and “W.5.1c: I use linking words to connect my opinion and reasons.” An essay is read aloud to the group and the students discuss “What is the opinion here? What are the reasons given for the opinion?” Students write a “Star and a Step” on a sticky-note as feedback for the opinion writing focus criteria. Stars and steps are shared out as a group. After several feedback discussions, students go back to their own work and see how they can make improvements, using the star and step comments made during the whole group discussion.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

There are opportunities for on-demand writing, process writing, and short, focused projects through a variety of instructional tasks. Students develop drafts for each individual paragraph or portion of a writing product over the course of several lessons. Students also spend time on self-revisions, targeted peer-critiques, and publishing of their work using digital resources and technology. The teacher provides direct instruction to guide students through the writing process, requiring them to analyze good writing models from the text sets they read. The writing lessons included in each module are based on text(s).

On-demand writing occurs each day when students write to what they have read in various formats. Intentional instruction (focus statement, checklist, etc.) is included to support students in writing to meet the criteria. Materials include short and longer writing tasks and projects and are aligned to the grade-level standards being reviewed. Examples of writing include note-catchers, graphic organizers short answer, or paragraph construction.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1,Unit 2, Lesson 8, students will write their own paragraphs about Esperanza’s reaction to Miguel losing his job and quote accurately from the text.
  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 12, students analyze a model literary essay that compares the character reactions of Miguel and Esperanza to the fire, using the Painted Essay structure in order to create criteria for their own essays. The teacher models the essay to show what students are aiming for and what makes a high-quality essay. The model is referred to throughout the unit as students draft their own essays.
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 4, students reread “Rainforests and Why They Are Important” to determine the main idea and describe the structure. They work in pairs, using a graphic organizer to record their thinking about the structure of the text and plan a summary of it. Students then work as a class to write a shared summary of the text. Lesson 5 adds an additional text so students can compare the text structures from pages 11–12 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World and “Rainforests and Why They Are Important.” Students use a comparing text structures graphic organizer to capture their thinking and then use the information on the graphic organizer and additional research to answer the research question "Why do scientists study the rainforest?"
  • In the Unit 2, in Part II of the End of Unit 2 Assessment, students write an on-demand essay to answer the question, “What does the use of concrete language and sensory detail help you understand about the rainforest?”
  • In Module 3, for the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, students write an on-demand informative essay comparing and contrasting athletes who broke barriers. To start, students watch a video and read about Janet Guthrie. Students identify the similarities and differences between the factors that helped her succeed in being an effective leader of social change with those of Jackie Robinson. Students write an essay outlining the similarities and differences using evidence from both texts.
  • In Module 3, students work on a process writing piece about Jackie Robinson and his role as a societal changer during Unit 2, Lessons 11-13. In Lesson 11, students analyze the structure of the model essay using the “Painted Essay” template and write their introductory paragraph. In Lesson 12 and 13, students write the proof paragraphs of this opinion essay, and in Lesson 13, students write the conclusion to of their essay.
  • In Module 4, as part of a presentation, students explain the emergency preparedness kit they have created and share the rationale for the items they have chosen to include. They also share the emergency preparedness leaflet that they created. During Unit 3, Lessons 3-5, students work on a process writing opinion piece. In Lesson 3, during Work Time A, students plan an essay responding to the prompt: “Which two items do you think are most important to include in your emergency preparedness kit? Why?” Students choose their two items, write opinion statements, and plan opinion essays. In Lesson 4, students write the proof paragraphs for the opinion piece. Students are required to include logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and evidence from the sources they used to research emergency preparedness. In Lesson 5, during Work Time A, students draft the conclusion of their opinion essays and cite sources that were used for facts and evidence.
  • In Module 4, students complete an on-demand writing for the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment. This assessment has two parts. In Part I, students read a section of a new poem about the aftermath of a natural disaster and summarize the text. Then, in Part II, they watch a video of the same poem and answer short constructed response questions about the theme and the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases.
  • In Module 4, students complete an on-demand writing for the End of Unit 3 Assessment- Writing an Opinion Essay: Students write an on-demand opinion essay in which they choose two personal items to include in an emergency preparedness kit for their own families and explain the reasons for choosing each.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. According to the curriculum map, provided at the beginning of each module, opinion writing is not addressed until Module 4. Each unit includes a multiple writing lesson and students engage with multiple genres and modes of writing. Throughout the modules students learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Every unit throughout the modules contains a minimum of 4-6 lessons during the unit that focus on developing the skills for producing a particular text type of writing. Materials provide experiences in writing across different genres with narrative and informative writing, as well as opinion writing. Opportunities to address text types of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Module 1 performance task, students work in small groups to create a program using the individual monologues written by the students. Throughout Unit 3, students write and revise a monologue based on a character’s reaction to an event from Esperanza Rising.
  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 8, students independently write a paragraph about Esperanza’s reaction to Miguel losing his job.
  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 11, students work in pairs to write a “two-voice poem” analyzing a character’s reaction to an event. Students compare and contrast the two character reactions in preparation for writing an essay over the next few lessons.
  • In the Module 2, Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, students produce a narrative writing of a first-person story based on The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. By using the Narrative Planning graphic organizers, students write a first draft of a new first person narrative, building out a scenario from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.
  • In the Module 1, Unit 1, mid-module assessment, students read Article 13 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Students are asked to determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary, and determine the main idea, using supporting details from the text to write a summary of the article that includes quotes from the text.
  • The Module 2, Unit 1, Lessons 1-12 provide students opportunities to address writing on-demand, evidence-based short constructed responses in response to literature. In Unit 1, Lesson 3, students find the gist of the text: Finding the Gist and Unfamiliar Vocabulary: Rainforests and Why They Are Important.
  • The Module 2, Unit 1, Lessons 1-13 provide students opportunities to address writing informational texts. Module 2, Unit 1, Lessons 1-12 directs students to address writing on-demand, evidence-based, short constructed responses to literature. In Unit 1, Lesson 3, students find the gist of the text: Finding the Gist and Unfamiliar Vocabulary: Rainforests and Why They Are Important.
  • In the Module 2, Mid-Unit 1 Assessment, students read passages about the destruction of the rainforest, written in two different text structures and create a graphic organizer to record the main ideas and details of each text. Students then use the graphic organizer to write a summary of the texts.
  • The Module 3, Mid-Unit 3 Assessment is an informative essay comparing and contrasting athletes who broke barriers. Students begin the assessment by reading and watching a video about a new professional athlete, Janet Guthrie. Students then identify the similarities and differences between the factors that supported her success in being an effective leader of social change with those of Jackie Robinson. Finally, students write an on-demand essay outlining the similarities and differences using evidence from both texts.
  • The Module 3, End of Unit 2 Assessment is an opinion essay where students explain what factors and success in Jackie Robinson’s life contributed to the person he became. In Part 1 of the assessment, students continue to work on the opinion essay that was previously started in class by drafting a second body paragraph and conclusion. In Part 2, they revise their essays to ensure that each reason is clearly linked to the stated opinion and is well-supported by facts and details.
  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lessons 3-7, students write an opinion piece responding to the prompt: “Which two items do you think are most important to include in your emergency preparedness kit? Why?” In Lesson 3, students begin by stating their opinion with reasons and evidence and then receiving peer feedback on strength of the supporting evidence and the organization of their opinion introduction. In Lesson 4, students write the body paragraphs of their opinion, continually referring back to the Opinion Writing Checklist. In Lesson 5, students draft the conclusion for the opinion writing and cite sources for the evidence. In Lessons 6 and 7, the End of Unit Assessment, students are asked to write an on-demand opinion writing about two items they would choose to include in an emergency preparedness kit. During these lessons, “students are directed to look back at the Opinion Writing Planning graphic organizer and the Model Essay: Branch Rickey as a model for an organizer and an opinion essay and to transfer what they learned in Module 3 to this content.”

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level.

Writing opportunities are focused around students’ analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills over the course of the school year.

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, students answer text-based questions using short-constructed responses on the novel, Esperanza Rising, citing evidence from text.
  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 6, students complete “Character Reaction Note-catcher: “Los Espárragos.” This note-catcher asks students, “What do the character think/feel? How do you know?”
  • In the Module 1, End of Unit 1 Assessment, students participate in a text-based discussion about threats to human rights from chapters 4-6 of Esperanza Rising with a focus on a character’s reaction to those challenges. Students must quote accurately from the text and additional resources (UDHR) to answer questions about the text.
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 2, students read The Most Beautiful Roof in the World for gist, and in Lesson 3, students do a close reading of an excerpt from this section answering text-dependent questions in writing and citing textual evidence in their short responses.
  • In the Module 2, Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1, students read a passage about the rainforest and use evidence to answer text-based questions. Then, in Part 2, students read and analyze two excerpts about the same event comparing points of view and supporting the comparisons with evidence from the text.
  • In the Lesson Ticket for Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 2, students are asked to determine the main idea and identify key details from Promises to Keep, citing relevant details in short-constructed responses.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 4, students have to determine the main idea and supporting details using “Determining Main Ideas and Key Details: 'Signs of Hope' Note-catcher”.
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 4, students complete “Close Reading Note-catcher: How Well Is Your Community Prepared?” This note-catcher require students to supply the reason and evidence from the text.
  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 7, students are analyzing the author’s point of view for the text “Eight Days: A Story of Haiti.” Through student analysis of the text, they are able to answer the question, “How does the narrator’s point of view influence how the events are described in 'Eight Days: A Story of Haiti'?” Students must look for evidence and examples from the text to support their rationale about the author’s point of view.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Opportunities to learn language standards are in the Module Lessons including Language Dives and lessons in the ALL Block. Materials include instruction of all grammar and conventions standards for the grade level. Examples of each language standard include:

  • L.5.1a
    • In Module 2, Unit 3, Lesson 3, students learn to use conjunctions in their writing. Students are told that conjunctions can give writing natural flow or rhythm.The teacher shows examples of conjunctions from the Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions handout. Students reread the first three paragraphs of “Bite at Night” and find examples of conjunctions. Students answer questions about the kinds of conjunctions and the purpose of the conjunctions.
  • L.5.1b
    • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 2, the teacher reminds students that verbs are words that describe an action or state of being. The teacher displays and distributes Perfect Verb Tenses handout, which explains verb tenses. Using a total participation technique, students answer questions about verb tenses. Students rewrite a sentence to show present perfect tense.
  • L.5.1c
    • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 2, during a Language Dive, students use a Note-catcher to analyze the verbs in the following sentence: “Before we get into the story of Jackie Robinson, however, we need to understand how segregation became a way of life in the United States.”
  • L.5.1d
    • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 3, during a Language Dive, students use a Note-catcher to learn about verb tense to determine the inappropriate shifts in verb tense.
  • L.5.1e
    • In Module 3, Unit 3, Lesson 4, during a Language Dive, students focus on the following sentence to analyze correlative conjunctions: “Both Jackie Robinson and Jim Abbott faced adversity with courage and persistence, and neither person gave up on his dreams despite the negative words and actions of others.” Students use a Note-catcher to practice using correlative conjunctions.
  • L.5.2a
    • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 10, the teacher displays and distributes Using Punctuation in a Series handout. The teacher clarifies that items in a series must all be the same grammatically and shows in a model sentence. Students whisper read with a partner the second practice sentence and edit the sentence for commas in a series.
  • L.5.2b
    • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 5, the teacher distributes the Introductory Elements handout. The teacher tells students they should use a comma to separate the introductory element from the rest of the sentence.
  • L.5.2c
    • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 11, the teacher distributes Using Commas to Set Off Words and Phrases handout. The teacher informs students that yes and no can be found at the beginning of a sentence. The teacher shows a practice sentence with no at the beginning of a sentence, and the teacher shows putting a comma after no. The teacher also shows how to set off a tag question with a comma. Students practice adding commas to set off yes, no, tag questions, and direct address.
  • L.5.2d
    • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 3, students learn how to mark titles and quotations. The teacher asks, “How should we indicate the titles of the texts in our paragraphs? How should we mark the quotations from the texts in our paragraphs?” Students write a paragraph using the Comparison Paragraph frame and are to correctly indicate the titles of texts and quotations from the texts.
  • L.5.2e
    • In Module 4, students are reminded to use correct spelling as they pen an on-demand opinion essay using the Opinion Writing Checklist.
  • L.5.3a
    • In Module 2, Unit 3, Lesson 6, the teacher leads students through analyzing a model text for how the author sped up time. The teacher asks: “Looking across the parts you have underlined, what do you notice about what the author did to speed up time?” The teacher and students add new information about combining sentences and reducing sentences to the Narrative Texts anchor chart.
  • L.5.3b
    • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 8, during a Language Dive, students focus on analyzing “I got the Rain in my veins” to compare varieties of English. The teacher asks: “What variety of English does Smith use in this chunk? Can you figure out why Smith chose to switch between a local variety of English and classroom English prose?"

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
4/6
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials contain minimal evidence of explicit instruction of phonics and word recognition consistently over the course of the year. Materials provide limited opportunities to apply word analysis skills to connected texts. There are limited opportunities to practice speaking and receive feedback on fluency.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.

According to information in the Appendix, foundational skills are integrated through Modules 1-4, yet explicit instruction in how to decode multisyllabic words is not explicitly and systematically taught. Teachers are informed during the Reading Foundational Skills assessment (found in the Appendix) that, “If, during this assessment, it is evident that students are unable to meet the grade-level expectations and require additional support with learning to read, consider using and/or adapting EL Education’s K–2 Reading Foundational Skills Block.” If a student receives EL Education as their primary core instruction prior to Grade 5 and is lacking in foundational skills in Grade 5, they will have already received the K-2 Foundational Skills Block instruction. There is no explicit instruction in phonics, since the ALL Block focuses on additional time to work with texts, ideas, and skills that are initially introduced in the Module Lessons (EL Education Your Curriculum Companion, p. 83). Some prefixes and suffixes are explicitly taught in Module lessons and during the ALL Block, but a systematic sequence of teaching decoding of Latin suffixes, multisyllable words, and irregularly spelled words is not present in the materials.

Materials contain some explicit instruction of irregularly spelled words, syllabication patterns, and word recognition consistently over the course of the year. Examples include:

  • The Your Curriculum Companion states that their method of teaching phonics is structured phonics -- teaching spelling-sound patterns in a clear sequence based on the Alphabetic Principle (p. 201). However, the Your Curriculum Companion also states that in Grades 3-5, their materials focus more on a contextualized approach to teaching phonics and word recognition (p. 85).
  • Opportunities are provided to practice phonics, syllabication, and morphology throughout the year through vocabulary games, vocabulary squares, and Frayer models (p. 85.) However, these opportunities are not consistent over the course of the year.
  • The ALL Block suggests that students who need remediation in Reading Foundations get resources from the K-2 Reading Foundations Skills materials which contains below grade level phonics and word recognition lessons.

Some tasks and questions are sequenced to application of grade-level work (e.g., application of prefixes at the end of the unit/year; decoding multi-syllable words). Examples include:

  • In the modules, there is word study with an emphasis on morphology, syllabication, and spelling, and vocabulary protocols, routines, and tools to figure out meaning of new words (p. 87). In the ALL Block, there is practice with word analysis, two new words per week, domain-specific words, and word study games and activities (p. 87).
  • In Module 1, vocabulary study is described as Intentional vocabulary building from content-based text; attention to figuring out words from context; decoding; emphasis on academic (Tier 2) vocabulary.
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 4, students are working with using affixes and roots in sentences and identifying when reading.
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, ALL Block, students break the word “exploration” into syllables.
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Week 2, Day 2, ALL Block, students break the word “technology” into syllables.
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Week 2, Day 2, ALL Block, students break the word “destruction” into syllables.

Minimal assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year to inform instructional adjustments of phonics and word recognition to help students make progress toward mastery. Examples include:

  • The assessment that assesses the foundational skills is the Reading Foundational Skills: Phonics and Word Recognition Checklist. Upon giving the assessment teachers are informed, “If, during this assessment, it is evident that students are unable to meet the grade-level expectations and require additional support with learning to read, consider using and/or adapting EL Education’s K–2 Reading Foundations Skills Block.”
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, the End-of-Unit Assessment centers on CCSS ELA W.5.4, W.5.5, L.5.1b, RF.5.3, and RF.5.4 and has three parts. In Part 1, students answer selected and short response questions about the perfect verb tense. In Part 2, students apply what they have learned about revising to the Directors’ Note they have written, with a focus on task, purpose, audience, and verb tense. In Part 3, students read a section of Esperanza Rising aloud and are assessed on accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression.

Materials contain some explicit instruction of word solving strategies (graphophonic and syntactic) to decode unfamiliar words. Examples include:

  • Instruction in finding the meaning of unfamiliar words is done through the use of a Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart. This chart is referenced and used throughout the course of the school year. Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 3, “Underline the word theme in the first target. Explain that underlining or circling the meaning of unfamiliar words can help you find them quickly when you are ready to try and work out what they mean. Point out this strategy on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart.”
  • In the ALL Block, students work on Word Study and Vocabulary, in which they practice sorting words into academic and domain-specific vocabulary to be able to record words in the appropriate place in their vocabulary log. The ALL Block contains no formal assessments of students’ learning of the identifying and knowing the meaning of words with prefixes and suffixes.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

The materials include instruction and practice in Word Study and Vocabulary that occurs as a component of the five components in the ALL Block. During each two-cycle, students have two teacher guided sessions and two independent heterogeneous grouping sessions, which provides students the opportunity to participate in 20 minutes of Word Study and Vocabulary four times a week every other week. The emphasis of Word Study and Vocabulary is context-driven word study. The Your Curriculum Companion states that “readers in intermediate grades benefit from a more contextualized approach to teaching phonics and word recognition (p. 85). There is an increased focus on morphology of words related to word meaning. The Your Curriculum Companion describes Word Study and Vocabulary as working with words from complex texts and use of vocabulary protocols, routines and tools to figure out meaning of new words (p. 87). In the Modules, there are some opportunities for students to analyze words when words are being added to the Academic Word Wall. Ongoing word analysis assessments are not used over the course of the Grade 5 sequence.

Some varied opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to learn, practice, and apply word analysis skills in connected texts and tasks. Examples include:

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Week 2, Day 3, ALL Block, students complete the following task:
    • "Say this word three times: monologue.
    • Pair up with someone. Talk with your partner about what the word means.
    • Practice using the word in sentences. Say two sentences aloud to your partner using the word.
    • Write two or three sentences using the word below. You can write more sentences on the back if you have time."
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 5, students had an opportunity to answer questions about what they thought "meaningless" means when close reading: “Meg’s voice spins out into the night. The words dissolve into the thick, humid air of the rainforest. They become meaningless sounds in the darkness.” The teacher asks: “What other words can you think of with the suffix -less? What does the suffix -less at the end of the word mean? So what does meaningless mean?”
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Week 2, Days 2 and 4, ALL Block, students use a vocabulary tree to analyze the words “unacceptable” and “resentment” from the text, Promises to Keep.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Week 2, Days 2 and 4, ALL Block, students use a vocabulary tree to analyze the words “greatness” and “integrity” from the text, This I Believe: Free Hearts and Minds at Work.
  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Week 2, Days 2 and 4, ALL Block, students use a vocabulary tree to analyze the words “population” and “equivalent” from the text Eight Days: A Story of Haiti.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

The materials provide students’ opportunities to practice fluent reading of prose and poetry over the course of the school year during Module lessons and the ALL Block (starting in Module 1, Unit 2). During some weeks in the ALL Block, Reading and Speaking Fluency/GUM, students are provided a grade-level fluency poem or complex text excerpt for the week, and students self-assess their work to determine their fluency or students have a peer assess their fluency. Students read with a partner and utilize sentence stems in order to discuss how they have improved their sentence fluency since the beginning of the week as well as discussing their rate and whether they adhered to the punctuation while reading.

There are limited opportunities for the teacher to listen to each student read orally and provide fluency feedback and instruction since fluency is not a consistent focus every week. Opportunities are missed to provide teachers with oral reading fluency assessment materials such as running records or miscue analysis to drive individualized fluency instruction. Basic checklists are used as assessments such as the Module 2, End of Unit 2 Assessment. Further guidance as to what needs to happen next for teaching fluency with each student is not provided. According to EL Education, “Reading fluency is best practiced on text that is at or below the independent reading level. For students whose independent reading levels are below this excerpt, allow them to use an excerpt from their independent reading book to practice fluency.” For differentiation, a teacher must find texts outside of EL Education materials to help students reading below grade level improve in fluency. If a student is below grade level in fluency, EL Education states: “Consider using the Reading: Foundational Skills Informal Assessment: Reading Fluency Checklist to gather baseline reading fluency data from students’ independent reading books in Closing and Assessment A (see Module 1 Appendix).” In Module 4, the EL Education Teacher Guide states “For students who may need additional support with reading fluency: Pair these students with a highly fluent reader such as a peer model and have them chorally read together.”

Opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy and fluency in oral and silent reading. Examples include:

  • In Modules 1 and 2, to practice silent reading fluency, students are to follow along silently as the teacher reads the complex text.
  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, ALL Block, students work on fluently reading a passage from Esperanza Rising. The teacher models reading the passage aloud, the students chorally read the passage aloud and then students work with a partner to practice reading the passage in a whisper voice, a robot voice, and a voice full of emotion.
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, ALL Block, students select part of the expert group texts to practice reading for fluency. Students look for an interesting part to read aloud, highlight the section, and whisper read it.

Materials support reading or prose and poetry with attention to rate, accuracy, and expression, as well as direction for students to apply reading skills when productive struggle is necessary. Examples include:

  • In Module 2, Unit 1, ALL Block, students read excerpts from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World aloud for fluency and accuracy. They are divided into groups. On the first day, with teacher guidance, students are introduced to fluency texts and continue to use the fluency checklist for self-assessment. Students identify strengths and set goals. On the second day, students follow a task card to practice reading their fluency passage to themselves and to partners. Students provide feedback to partners based on the goals set on Day 1.
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lessons 7-11, the learning target says, “I can read aloud an excerpt of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World with accuracy and fluency.” Students use Fluent Readers chart to be sure of criteria. Students continue this through Lesson 11 before the assessment.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Week 1, Day 3, ALL Block, students focus on punctuation when reading the passage from Promises to Keep to build fluency. Students start by finding as many different types of punctuation in the passage that they can. After a discussion on punctuation, the teacher models fluently reading the passage and then students have the opportunity to practice fluently reading the passage with a partner.

Materials support students’ fluency development of reading skills (e.g., self-correction of word recognition and/or for understanding, focus on rereading) over the course of the year (to get to the end of the grade-level band). Examples include:

  • The Your Curriculum Companion describes how the EL materials support the development of fluency, by decoding with automaticity, following along in the text while a fluent reader is reading, and reading the same text text multiple times. Students learn specific criteria for fluent reading and receive peer or teacher critique on their reading.
  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Week 1, Day 3, ALL Block, the teacher models self-correcting using a passage students are working on from Esperanza Rising. The teacher models misreading and leaving out words as s/he reads, then models going back and correcting his/her mistakes. Students then work in groups of three to practice self-correcting.
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, ALL Block, the teacher models reading a passage from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World, three times, “First read: quickly, not attending to punctuation. Second read: slowly, word by word, sounding out every fifth word or so, again not attending to punctuation. Third read: at an “appropriate rate.” Make a mistake or two, but show how fluent readers would self-correct. Match your facial expression and body language to the piece. Change your rate, volume, pitch, and tone to reflect an understanding of the author’s intended message.” After each reading students discuss whether or not it was fluent.

Some assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current fluency skills and provide teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery of fluency. While self-assessment is a regular part of fluency lessons over the course of the school year, opportunities for teachers to use a comprehensive, explicit rubric for assessing students’ fluency and how to help individual students make growth in fluency are missing. Examples include:

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, ALL Block, students self-assess their own fluency, with a focus on the following skills, “I can correct myself and reread when what I read was wrong or didn’t make sense. I can read my text at a speed that is appropriate for the piece. I can read smoothly without many breaks. I can notice and read punctuation.”
  • In Module 2, Unit 2 has an end of unit assessment related to fluency and accuracy. In Part I, students read an excerpt of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World aloud for fluency.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, ALL Block, students are assigned a fluency passage, and they utilize a self-assessment guide in order to determine where they are at with their passage. Students discuss their fluency with a partner and what they still need to work on.
  • Module 4, Unit 2 has a mid-unit assessment in which students read an excerpt of a new poem about the aftermath of a natural disaster aloud for fluency and summarize the text.
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, ALL Block, students meet with the teacher on Day 3 to read a part of the text. The teacher is to provide general feedback as well as specific feedback.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials meet the expectations of Gateway 2. Materials partially meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently. Most anchor texts, supporting texts, daily tasks, and Performance Based Assessments are centered on the topic(s) or theme(s) for each Module and Unit. The guiding questions and big ideas in the module overview and the individual unit lessons contain coherently sequenced sets of text-dependent questions that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across and within texts. Students are asked to produce work that shows mastery of several different standards (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) at the appropriate grade level throughout their thematic units of study; however, not all culminating tasks demonstrate the same quality. Vocabulary is taught both implicitly and explicitly, using words in the core and supplementary texts. Students are supported through the writing process and various activities are placed throughout units to ensure students' writing skills are increasing throughout the year. Students are provided with daily independent reading, research, and discussion during every lesson in the module. Most homework assignments include independent reading and tasks that require students to produce evidence of reading.

Criterion 2a - 2h

32/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.

Module 1 contains text sets that may need extra support to link them together into one coherent topic. Anchor texts, supporting texts, daily tasks, and Performance Based Assessments are centered on the topic(s) for each Module and Unit. The units in each module are built around a central topic. In each unit, the anchor text and supporting texts center around the topic. Within each unit of the module, texts are organized around the topic to help students understand vocabulary and read and understand complex text.

In Module 2, students engage in a study on the topic of “Biodiversity in the Rainforest.” In Units 1-3, students explore this topic while reading texts about rainforest, and they analyze several authors’ craft, so that they can write their own narratives about rainforests. The texts that students read within this Module include the following: The Great Kapok Tree by Lynne Cherry, Seeds of Change by Jen Cullerton Johnson, and The Most Beautiful Roof in the World by Kathryn Lasky. The Module 2 performance task gives students a chance to work in groups to compile all of their narrative writing from Unit 3 into an ebook with a front cover, a contents page, an introduction, and the three narratives, with eye-catching images/pictures selected or created that enhance the narratives.

In Module 3, students engage in a study on the topic of “Athlete Leaders of Social Change.” In Unit 1, students closely read informational texts about Jackie Robinson to determine the main idea and key details, and summarize the text. In Unit 2, students closely read informational texts, watch videos, and listen to a speaker to analyze and compare multiple accounts about which factor was most important in Jackie Robinson’s success while taking notes and summarizing. In Unit 3, students research an athlete leader of social change in expert groups and write a four-paragraph essay to compare and contrast the factors that contributed to the success of the researched athlete along with those of Jackie Robinson.

In Module 4, students engage in a study on the topic of “The Impact of Natural Disasters.” In Units 1-3, students read about natural disasters and delve deeply into the primary text, Eight Days: A Story of Haiti by Edwidge Danticat. Students research natural disasters using a variety of sources -- videos, informational texts, and websites.

As noted, in Module 1, students engage in a study on the topic of “Stories of Human Rights.” The teacher may need to supplement the discussion to link these stories to specific topics versus the overall theme of "human rights." In Unit 1, students analyze Esperanza Rising and closely read articles of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and make connections between threats to human rights in both texts. In Unit 2, students finish reading Esperanza Rising and analyze character reactions to events in story. Students write a literary analysis essay comparing and contrasting the reactions of two characters to the same event in story. In Unit 3, students read Miguel’s Monologue and Mama’s Monologue. Students compare two monologues with the excerpt from Esperanza Rising to understand characteristics of the monologue format. This analysis supports students in writing their own monologues throughout the unit.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.

The instructional materials require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics. Throughout the units, students independently and in collaborative pairs or groups, complete questions and tasks that require analysis of individual texts. The module lessons include close reading portions with questions that are sequenced and scaffolded and the module lessons include tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of complex texts such as tasks requiring students to determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary in a text and writing tasks requiring students to write informative paragraphs analyzing the message or lesson in a story. Examples of learning targets with sets of questions found in the instructional materials include the following:

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 9, students analyze the language and key details from Esperanza Rising by using a note-catcher to record metaphors within excerpts from the text and explaining what the metaphor means. For instance, students read “Las Papayas” and identify the metaphor, “In Mexico we stand on different sides of the river.” Then, they must analyze the metaphor to understand that “Esperanza and Miguel are not equal because he is the son of a peasant and she is the daughter of a wealthy landowner.”
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 2, students analyze a text for the structure of a monologue. Students are using this analysis to write their own monologue. To help students understand the structure they are asked questions: “How can examining the format of this monologue help us when writing our own monologues? What is the gist of this text? What is it mostly about? How did the narrator establish the situation in this monologue? What is happening, and what is the setting? How did the narrator introduce the characters? Who is the narrator, and what does the audience need to know about him/her?”
  • The Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 6 task on the chronological structure of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World requires students to analyze how the way a text is structured supports our understanding of complex ideas. Students must refer to pages 17-20 of the text to list three to five events that explain what Meg does in the canopy in the order in which they occurred to understanding how the structure supports understanding of key ideas.
  • Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 3, focuses on figurative language through student analysis of text. Questions to help students analyze include: “What two things are being compared in this simile or metaphor? How does this simile or metaphor help you understand the meaning of the text? What is a simile? What is a metaphor? What is an idiom? Which type of figurative language was used in your independent reading book? What does it help you to understand about the text?”
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 1, students are exploring text in order to understand the focus of the module. Students analyze the cover of the text, “Promises to Keep”: “Now that you have heard the blurb, what do you know about Jackie Robinson?” Students then analyze the images used in the text to deepen their thinking about the purpose of the text and module. “Thinking about what you learned from the blurb, and the title of the book, what do you think this picture represents? Why do you think Jackie Robinson is in the Baseball Hall of Fame? What is one interesting photograph or idea you read in the text? What did what you read or saw in the book make you think about? Why?”
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 3, students are working to determine Jackie Robinson’s point of view on the most important factor that contributed to his success in leading social change. They are doing this through the text, “This I Believe: Free Minds and Hearts at Work”: “What do we mean by point of view? How did we determine Sharon Robinson’s point of view on which factors were important in Jackie’s success? Who is the author of this essay? Whose point of view are we describing?”
  • In Module 3, Unit 3, Lesson 8, students are creating a presentation that answers the question “What are the key factors that can contribute to success in being an effective leader of social change?” The teacher guides them through understanding the purpose of a presentation and how to structure an effective presentation: “What is this presentation about? What was that section of the presentation about? What information is included on the slide? How am I presenting the information to make this an effective presentation? What am I doing?”
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 8, students are analyzing and generating criteria for an effective PSA. “What type of writing is this PSA? How do you know? How is the overall structure of this PSA similar to the informative essays we have written this year? How is it different? What is the target audience for this PSA? What in the PSA makes you think so? What key points did the writer make in this PSA?”
  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 10, students are working on preparing a presentation using prompt cards. This lesson helps students understand how to create their presentation and make it effective. Students are directed to create the first prompt card by answering the questions "How and why did you make your PSA? How would you introduce your PSA? What is your PSA about? What do you know about effective presentations? What does an effective presentation look like? When delivering a presentation, what do you need to do?”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

The guiding questions and big ideas in the module overview and the individual unit lessons contain coherently sequenced sets of text-dependent questions that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across and within texts. Questions are asked of both single and multiple texts to integrate and build knowledge in order for students to reach the module’s learning goals. Lessons include sequenced sets of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge.

The Module 1 guiding questions are coherently sequenced to require analyses of the integration of knowledge and ideas, including: "What are human rights, and how can they be threatened? How can we use writing to raise awareness of human rights?"

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 4, students look at two videos, “The Right to Life” and “The Story of Human Rights.” Then they discuss the following text-dependent questions with a partner based on these videos: “What is the message of this video? What does 'liberty' mean? What does security of a person mean? What is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights? Why was it written? Why do these rights matter? Why are we reading about them?” In Lesson 11, students continue to listen as A Life like Mine is read aloud. Then they make connections with Esperanza in Esperanza Rising.

The Module 2 guiding questions are coherently sequenced to require analyses of the integration of knowledge and ideas, including: "Why do scientists study the rainforest? How do authors engage readers in narratives?"

  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 3, students closely read, The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. They describe the text structure: What is the structure of this excerpt? How is the information organized?” Then they read “Rainforests and Why They Are Important” to get the gist and answer questions: “What is the gist of this part of the text? What is it mostly about?”
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 6, students analyze text for concrete words and phrases and sensory details. Using the Mystery Quotes protocol to analyze quotes from the rainforest, students discuss concrete words and phrases based on a quote.

The Module 3 guiding questions are coherently sequenced to require analyses of the integration of knowledge and ideas, including: "How have athletes broken barriers during the historical era in which they lived? What factors can contribute to an individual’s success in changing society?"

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 4, students identify factors for success based on Promises To Keep and to determine the following: “How have athletes broken barriers during the historical era in which they lived? What factors can contribute to an individual’s success in a changing society? What goal was Jackie working toward? What was the bigger goal that others were working toward during this time?”
  • In Unit 3, Lessons 2 and 3, students compare and contrast the model essays of Jackie Robinson and Jim Abbott. They address the question: “What are the similarities and differences between the factors that contributed to the success of Jim Abbott as a leader of social change and those of Jackie Robinson?" Then students do internet research and answer the following question: “What are the similarities and differences between the factors that contributed to the success of your athlete as a leader of social change and those of Jackie Robinson?”

The Module 4 guiding questions are coherently sequenced to require analyses of the integration of knowledge and ideas, including: "How do natural disasters affect the people and places that experience them? How can we prepare for a natural disaster?"

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 4, students closely read How Well is Your Community Prepared?. The purpose of the close read is for students to research ways to stay safe during natural disasters. They use a note-catcher to document their evidence from the reading.
  • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, students watch the video and read aloud the song lyrics to “In the Water Where the City Ends” in reading triads: “Having watched the video and listened to the song, what do you think this song is about? Where is Japan on the map? Which continent do we live on?”

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

The curriculum addresses all literacy standards, including reading, writing, speaking, and listening throughout each individual lesson, and each unit has a mid-unit and end-of-unit assessment that build upon one another culminating in a final performance task. The final unit ultimately assesses all of the standards addressed throughout the module. Students are asked to produce work that shows mastery of several different standards (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) at the appropriate grade level throughout their thematic units of study.

At the culmination of Module 1, students develop their ability to read and understand complex text while exploring the question of what human rights are, and how real people and fictional characters respond when those rights are threatened. While not all tasks accomplish this, the tasks that support and demonstrate knowledge through integrated skills include the following:

  • In Unit 1, students closely read the novel, Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan, learning about human rights and applying this learning to interpret the characters and themes in the novel. Through close reading, interpretation, and analysis of fiction and nonfiction texts, students begin to build their understanding of human rights. Throughout the unit, students closely read selected articles from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) related to events in Esperanza Rising where human rights are threatened.
  • In Unit 2, students finish reading Esperanza Rising, focusing on characters’ reactions and responses to events when their human rights are threatened. They write a two-voice poem with a partner, as well as a four-paragraph literary essay comparing the response of two characters to a selected event from the novel, describing how each character responds to the event.
  • In Unit 3, students plan, write, and perform monologues based on events from Esperanza Rising where human rights are threatened. In groups, students write a Director's’ Note to describe their selected scene from Esperanza Rising, explain which specific articles of the UDHR relate to the event, and explain how people today are impacted by this issue. Students revise, rehearse, and perform their group’s monologues for the class, addressing CCSS ELA RF.5.4, W.5.4, W.5.5, and W.5.8.

At the culmination of Module 2, students work in pairs to create an ebook on Rainforest Adventures, assessing their competencies in standards W.5.3, W.5.4, and W.5.6. While not all tasks accomplish this, the tasks that support and demonstrate knowledge through integrated skills include the following:

  • In Unit 1, they build background knowledge on biodiversity in the rainforest and rainforest deforestation to understand why scientists study the rainforest. Students closely read excerpts of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World by Kathryn Lasky to identify text structure and practice summarizing the text. Students research several sources to identify ways they can help the rainforest and participate in a collaborative discussion at the end of the unit.
  • In Unit 2, students explore how authors of narrative texts about the rainforest help the reader to understand what it is like in the rainforest by analyzing author’s use of figurative, concrete, and sensory language. In Lesson 3, students compare what the figurative language is in two texts using any two of the three texts: The Dreaming Tree, The Great Kapok Tree, or The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.
  • In Unit 3, students write first person narratives, building out a scenario from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World to describe the rainforest.

At the culmination of Module 3, students work in groups to create a poster highlighting a personal quality that effective leaders of change need to have for a display titled “Be an Effective Leader of Change,” demonstrating mastery of standards RI.5.1, RI.5.9, W.5.4, W.5.8, and W.5.9b. While not all tasks accomplish this, the tasks that support and demonstrate knowledge through integrated skills include the following:

  • In Unit 1, students explore the factors that contribute to the success of professional athletes as leaders of social change. They read about athletes who have been leaders of social change, building background knowledge about Jackie Robinson through reading Promises to Keep, written by Jackie’s daughter, Sharon. Students then think about the relationship between people and events in the text as they gather factors that led to Jackie Robinson’s success in leading social change and building on their understanding of factors that led to his success by developing an opinion on which factor(s) were most important in his success.
  • In Unit 2, students participate in a text-based discussion and draw from the discussion to write an opinion essay on which factor they think was most important in Jackie Robinson’s success in leading social change.
  • In Unit 3, students read about other athletes who were also leaders of social change, research, and write essays to compare and contrast the factors that contributed to the success of the athletes they study with those of Jackie Robinson. Students then read about other athletes and consider the common factors that contribute to being an effective leader of social change and then work in pairs to create a multimedia presentation highlighting three of those factors.

At the culmination of Module 4, students present to a live audience about preparing for a natural disaster and give the rationale for the items included, demonstrating mastery of standards for ELA SL.5.4, SL.5.5, and SL.5.6. While not all tasks accomplish this, the tasks that support and demonstrate knowledge through integrated skills include the following:

  • In Unit 1, students work in groups to research a natural disaster, focusing on answering the following question: “How do natural disasters affect people and places that experience them?” As they research, they consider how authors use reasons and evidence to support particular points. Students use their research to write and record a public service announcement (PSA) explaining how to stay safe during a natural disaster.
  • In Unit 2, students read and analyze literary texts about the aftermath of natural disasters.
  • In Unit 3, students take action to help others prepare for a natural disaster by researching supplies to include in an emergency preparedness kit. Then, they write opinion essays on the most important items to include.
  • In the Unit 3 assessment, students demonstrate mastery in the reading, writing, speaking, and listening standards that they have learned throughout each unit in the Module.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

Opportunities to build vocabulary are found throughout the instructional materials. Vocabulary is taught both implicitly and explicitly, using words in the core and supplementary texts. As texts are read multiple times, students gain new vocabulary. Materials focus on elements of vocabulary, such as abstract or multiple meanings, connotation, relationships among words, and morphology. Definitions are provided in student-friendly language, and word meanings are taught with examples related to the text as well as examples from other contexts students would be more familiar with. Throughout the modules and units, students discuss and clarify language of learning targets to build academic vocabulary.

Throughout the Modules, there is intentional vocabulary building from content-based text; attention to figuring out words from context; decoding; and an emphasis on academic (Tier 2) vocabulary. The Academic Word Wall (words you might find in informational texts on many different topics) is a permanent Word Wall that will be added to throughout the year. The Domain-Specific Word Wall will change from module to module, as the topic changes. Teachers will record words and definitions clearly in student-friendly language. Teachers may also record translations in home languages in a different color next to the target word or invite students to write the translations.

In the Curriculum Tools, there is a section called Focus on Building Academic Vocabulary Protocols. These protocols include the following:

  • Contextual Redefinition- students find unambiguous information in a text selection and synthesize it with the author’s intent. Students pay attention to other “keys” to word meaning such as grammar.
  • Frayer Model- a four-part graphic approach to analyzing and understanding vocabulary.
  • Word Sort- this builds upon students’ background knowledge and experiences and works to organize and synthesize that knowledge.
  • Vocabulary Square- this helps students to deepen their understanding of key words.
  • List/Group/Label- this includes critical thinking for identifying relationships between words.
  • Semantic Webbing
  • SVES (Stephens Vocabulary Elaboration Strategy)- this is a vocabulary notebook that allows students to write down any new vocabulary word that they note.

The ALL Block gives students opportunities to practice with morphology of words as it relates to word meaning and syllabication patterns and more complex spelling patterns in a variety of activities, including vocabulary games, vocabulary squares, and Frayer Models.

"Vocabulary: Explicit vocabulary instruction is a key feature of our Grades 3–5 Language Arts Curriculum. Besides this explicit vocabulary instruction, students get a great deal of implicit instruction in general academic and domain specific vocabulary through exposure to many complex (and less complex) informational texts, and some literary texts as well. In the ALL Block students have additional time to practice module-related word analysis through word study games and activities."

Language Dives are included in the EL curriculum throughout the modules and units. The purpose of the Language Dive is to provide students with strategies to analyze, understand, and use the language. During a Language Dive, teachers and students slow down the reading of a text to deeply analyze the meaning, purpose, and structure of a specific part of the text. The Language Dive supports ELL students to acquire language and deconstruct complex text. Language Dives follow the routine of Deconstruct-Reconstruct-Practice. In the Deconstruct phase, teachers guide students to deconstruct a sentence for meaning and purpose. Students are guided into chunking the sentence to analyze the importance and purpose of the words used in the sentence. In the Reconstruct phase, students put the sentence back together and discuss possible variations of the sentence that could be formed and then analyze how the meaning and purpose changes with the varied sentences. In the Practice phase, students practice using different language structures (Curriculum Resources-Language Dives)

In the teacher notes for each lesson within a unit/module, there is a section titled “Vocabulary” and a Key: (L): Lesson-Specific Vocabulary, (T): Text-Specific Vocabulary, (W): Vocabulary Used in Writing is used to breakdown the vocabulary students come in contact with in order to help the teacher instruct the vocabulary and to help students keep track of the type of vocabulary in their vocabulary logs.

Specific examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, students begin a vocabulary log to collect new academic and domain-specific (topical) vocabulary. The vocabulary log requires that students record: Word and Pronunciation, Definition, Translation, Sketch/ Diagram. Use of this log continues throughout the entire module.
  • In Module 2, students can use the same vocabulary log for this module that they began in Module 1 if they have pages left; however, they can also start a new section for the domain-specific vocabulary from this module at the back of their vocabulary log. The Module 2 Teacher Guide explains that this can be done using flags or sticky tabs for each module and teachers are advised to consider organizing both academic and domain-specific vocabulary as follows: Word and Pronunciation, Definition,Translation, and Cognate, Synonym or Antonym, Sketch/ Diagram/ Icon, and Notes. In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 2, teachers will distribute and display Finding the Gist and Unfamiliar Vocabulary: The Most Beautiful Roof in the World: “Out of the Shadow and into the Light.”
  • In Module 3, Unit 2 , Lesson 10, students build their vocabulary through their vocabulary log, in this lesson focusing on the following Lesson-Specific Vocabulary: states, support, specific, reason, evidence, and the phrase, “use my strengths.”
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 2, students build their vocabulary through their vocabulary log, in this lesson focusing on the following Lesson-Specific Vocabulary: credible, affect, experience, and relevant.

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.

Students are supported through the writing process and various activities are placed throughout units to ensure students' writing skills are increasing throughout the year. Students are encouraged to develop writing stamina by writing frequently and for various purposes. Students engage in activities that include reading and discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write, examine, and identify a range of text structures, and they are guided to assess the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing. Students are supported through the writing process with mentor text.

Each unit lesson contains a section, titled “Down the Road,” that outlines the writing structure of the module units. Feedback is provided through peers, the teacher, and self-evaluations to ensure that students’ writing skills are increasing throughout the year. Within each module, students produce, present, and publish writing pieces as part of a final project. Module units are scaffolded to provide increasing support and build students’ writing abilities culminating with the most advanced writing happening in the final module unit. At the end of each module, students complete a performance task, which is a writing piece.

Examples from each Module include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 12, students analyze a model literary essay that compares the character reactions of Miguel and Esperanza to the fire, using the Painted Essay structure in order to create criteria for their own essays. The teacher models the essay to show what students are aiming for and what makes a high-quality essay.
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 6, students analyze the concrete words and phrases and sensory details in the excerpt of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. Students begin to write a focus statement for the essay that they will begin to write in Lesson 7 to answer the question: “What does the author’s use of concrete language and sensory detail help you understand about the rainforest?”
  • The Module 3, Module Overview in the Teacher Guide explains that students will build their writing skills over the course of the units.
    • In Module 3, Unit 1, students closely read informational texts and watch videos to analyze and compare multiple accounts about which factor was most important in Jackie Robinson’s success and listen to a speaker and watch videos, taking running notes and using these notes to summarize the points made. As the unit moves forward, they are asked to look more closely for factors that occurred in Jackie’s life that led to successes.
    • In Module 3, Unit 2, students write a four-paragraph essay stating an opinion about which factor was most important in Jackie Robinson’s success in leading social change. Students analyze the craft and structure of the writing, looking at the author’s point of view and comparing author’s perspective. After analyzing how others felt about the impact of Jackie Robinson, students begin to develop their own opinions on what was the most important factor in Jackie Robinson’s success in breaking the color barrier in baseball.
    • In Module 3, Unit 3, students put together everything they have learned and researched to write an informational essay comparing and contrasting athletes that broke barriers.
  • In Module 4, Unit 3, students combine what they have learned through informational text about natural disasters and what they learned about the impact on humans through literature, and write an opinion piece about “Which two items do you think are most important to include in your emergency preparedness kit? Why?”

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

Modules are divided into three units that build knowledge of a topic using multiple texts. Each module is designed for students to act as researchers and to gather details or ideas from texts throughout the unit to build a body of evidence for the culminating task. Students began each module with more whole class research and then an individual research project. By the end of each module, students write a piece demonstrating their increased knowledge about their selected topic. Students are provided with daily independent reading, research, and discussion during every lesson in the module. Examples include, but are not limited to:

In Module 2, students read to build knowledge about the rainforest.

  • In Unit 1, students develop background knowledge on biodiversity in the rainforest and rainforest deforestation. Students close read multiple texts, and they research using several print and digital sources to identify ways they can help the rainforest and the challenges associated with being an ethical consumer.
  • In Unit 2, students analyze texts about the rainforest by considering the author’s use of figurative, concrete, and sensory language.
  • In Unit 3, students write first person narratives by building out a scenario from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World using concrete and sensory language to describe the rainforest.

In Module 3, students research a professional athlete who became a leader for social change.

  • In Unit 1, students began by doing a research project on Jackie Robinson by considering some of the factors that contribute to his success as a professional athlete who became a leader for social change.
  • In Unit 2, students continue to develop this research by determining which factor was most important. During this unit, they also engage in discussions about the most important factor.
  • In Unit 3, students build upon their knowledge by researching other athletes.

In Module 4, students read multiple literary and informational texts on the impact of natural disasters and places and people.

  • In Unit 1, the work in expert groups to answer the question: How do natural disasters affect the people and places that experience them?” As they are researching, they consider how the authors use reasons and evidence for supporting claims.
  • In Unit 2, students read and analyze literary texts including poems and songs to determine how illustrations and visuals contribute to meaning.
  • In Unit 3, students research supplies to be included in an emergency preparedness kit.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

In the Modules, students engage in an independent reading protocol with independent research reading books that relate to the topic they are studying. Additionally, most homework assignments include independent reading and tasks that require students to produce evidence of reading. One of the five components of the weekly ALL Block includes Accountable Independent Reading/Volume of Reading. This is designed for students to have free choice in reading and to read content-related texts at their independent reading level. During this time, they have student tasks card that they are required to complete and also share their books to the group. Students are also accountable to independent reading through nightly homework. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Throughout all the modules, there are 5 components of the ALL Block, and Independent Reading is one of the components. Accountable Independent Reading includes research reading books related to the topics of the units and free choice reading. Through research reading, students build background knowledge and vocabulary, both domain-specific and academic. Free choice reading builds knowledge and vocabulary, but primarily builds students’ motivation and love of reading. The ALL Block gives students additional time for both research and free choice reading.
  • Each day in the ALL Block, students spend 20 minutes engaged in Accountable Independent Reading. The goal of this time is to provide additional time for independent reading at a range of levels, build more content- and domain-specific knowledge, give some free choice reading (every other week), and build on students’ motivation and interests in hopes of creating a love of reading.
  • During independent reading time, students read both research texts (related to the topic of learning challenges) and free choice texts (on any topic of their interest), and they practice completing Student Task Card. They work with partners and in small groups to share new vocabulary and learning from their texts.
  • During the Module lessons, students practice Accountable Independent Reading and read through 20 minutes of nightly homework where they not only read, but also respond to a prompt in their reading journal. In addition to responding in their reading journals, students are held accountable through peer and teacher discussions of their reading journals.
  • Module homework includes both research reading and choice reading. Research reading is where the student is expected to independently research a topic by reading topic-related books of his or her choice for approximately 20 minutes each day and responding to a prompt of choice in the front of the independent reading journal. Choice reading is for students that would also like to independently read and respond to a book of free choice, using the back of the independent reading journal.
  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, an independent reading program is launched. Students choose independent research reading books and discuss why they chose those particular books in small groups. They continue to read different books throughout the lessons. The daily independent reading homework requires students to read and write in a journal answering different prompts.
  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Independent Research Reading is launched. Students receive independent reading journals to record information about the time they spend reading, as well as to respond to prompts about their reading. They are given vocabulary logs for recording new vocabulary. For Modules 1, Module 3 and Module 4, students respond to the following reading research prompts: “What is the main idea of the text you read? What are some of the key details, and how do they support the main idea?”
  • Throughout the Units in Module 2, students follow the independent reading routines set in Module 1. They select new texts based on the new topic for the Module, read them independently for homework, and engage in frequent research reading shares during the Module lessons for accountability. After every lesson, students’ homework is to select a prompt to respond to in the front of their independent reading journal.
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 2, ALL Block, students follow a task card to independently read research texts (Module-related) for 10 minutes and log their reading in their independent reading journals.
  • In Module 2, Lessons 1–7, homework focuses on research reading and determining the meaning of unfamiliar words using context and reference materials. In Lessons 8–12, homework focuses on finding connections between sentences and paragraphs of text in independent research reading texts. For example, research reading prompts in Module 2, Unit 2 include the following instructions: “From the pages you read in your research reading book, choose two paragraphs next to each other. Respond to this question: What questions do you have about frogs or frog adaptations after reading?” Examples of independent reading prompts throughout all 4 modules include: “What challenges are faced? How are they overcome? What is the main idea of the text? What are some of the key details and how do they support the main idea? What do the illustrations (photographs, maps) tell you? How do they help you to understand the words? What questions do you now have after reading? What would you like to learn more about? Why?”

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway Three Details

Grade 5 EL Language Arts Curriculum materials meet the criteria for being well designed. Materials take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Materials can reasonably be completed within an academic year. There are ample resources as well as publisher produced standards alignment documentation.

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
8/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials meet the criteria for being well-designed and utilize effective lesson structure and pacing. Daily lessons include structures and resources for both whole group and small group literacy instruction. The program allows flexibility for teachers to rely on professional judgment to modify pacing. Materials include trade books, text collections, scaffolded strategy activities, performance tasks, a Life Science Module, homework that includes additional strategies for family support and practice, and the ALL Block that contains Modules for study and practice in independent reading, fluency, grammar/usage/mechanics, writing practice, word study/vocabulary, and additional practice with complex text. Daily lessons, tasks, and assessments specifically denote the standards to which the lessons and tasks are aligned. The student materials have clear instructions and have simple designs that do not distract the student.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for being well-designed and utilize effective lesson structure and pacing. Daily lessons include structures and resources for both whole group and small group literacy instruction.

The year is divided into 3 Modules of Study, with Module lasting 8-9 weeks. Each Module is divided into three units and lasts two hours (one hour for Module lesson and one hour for Additional Language and Literacy block [ALL Block]). For additional flexibility, a flex day is built into every two weeks of instruction. In Module 2, there is an optional Life Science Module which lasts approximately 8 weeks.

  • The ALL Block is comprised of five separate components: independent reading, additional work with complex text, reading and speaking fluency/GUM (grammar, usage, and mechanics), writing practice, and word study/vocabulary. Rotation pacing for ALL Block is as follows: 20 minutes - accountable independent reading (heterogeneous groups), 20 minutes - independent work in an ALL Block component (heterogeneous groups), and 20 minutes - teacher-guided work in an ALL Block (homogeneous groups). During each two-week cycle, students have two sessions of teacher-led instruction and two independent sessions in each of the ALL Block components (except for Accountable Independent Reading, which happens every day).
  • Each 60 minute Module lesson follows the structure of Opening, Work time, Closing and Assessment, with time allotments provided for each. During each of the four Modules, lessons are listed with CCSS, Daily Learning Targets, Anchor Charts & Protocols, and an agenda for the lesson.
  • Each Teacher Guide contains two 20-minute blocks of teacher-guided instruction for a component, which are differentiated for students working at different levels, including English Language Learners (ELLs).

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

The program allows flexibility for teachers to rely on professional judgment to modify pacing. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • There are four Modules spanning approximately nine weeks of instruction, which are each broken into three units. Each unit contains 10 to 12 lessons. There are approximately 120 to 130 lessons in the Grade 5 materials. Lessons are set up for 60 minutes each and contain opportunities for direct instruction, work time, and closing/assessment. These sections have time frames attached to support pacing.
  • In addition to the Module Units, there is an additional 60 minutes of instruction in the ALL Block that has three units parallel to the three units of the Module lessons. There is one flex day built in every week that the teacher has the flexibility to meet the specific needs of students. For example, this time may be utilized to provide additional time for work started in Module lessons, practicing literacy skills, informally assessing reading skills, or offering additional time for ELLs. The ALL Block contains three units to be taught alongside the Module units; however, the Units in the ALL Block last for only two weeks, so there is flexibility in the pacing of the ALL Block based on teacher and student need. There is an optional one hour Life Science Unit that would make a third hour of instruction to accompany Module 2. Each Life Science Module is designed to last eight weeks with about three hours of science instruction per week, giving flexibility to pacing.
  • As noted on page 65 of the Your Curriculum Companion, each Module is structured for students to complete specific activities throughout the Units. In Unit 1, students read, discuss, dramatize, draw, and write. Then in Unit 2, students do more research and are involved in discussions. In Unit 3, students complete a performance task. The ALL Block and the Module Lessons are complementary, working together to accelerate the achievement of students: “[W]e have responded to feedback from teachers and leaders and added additional components that give you the opportunity to teach a curriculum that is comprehensive. In addition to explicitly teaching and formally assessing all of the standards, the curriculum also offers time to reinforce and give students additional practice with important skills, time for creativity and play, and time to help them be leaders of their own learning by developing strong habits of characters.”

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.)

Teacher materials include the explanation of the “why” behind the student resources and work. Materials provided include trade books, text collections, scaffolded strategy activities, performance tasks, a Life Science Module, homework that includes additional strategies for family support and practice, and the ALL Block that contains Modules for study and practice in independent reading, fluency/grammar/usage/mechanics, writing practice, word study/vocabulary, and additional practice with complex texts. Each of these resources include ample opportunity to review and practice, clear directions and correct labeling. ALL Block Modules include teacher-guided activities that are differentiated based on student need, and teaching notes explaining the purpose of the lesson. Examples of useful annotations and suggestions include, but are not limited to:

  • In the ALL Block, Module 1, Unit 1, Week 2, Day 1, directions are provided for “Differentiation: Students will need varying degrees of support with this task. Some may need to work with fewer words and complete the activity with teacher guidance throughout, while others may be able to complete this task independently. Students who need lighter support could extend their learning by finding or writing ‘showing sentences’ with the vocabulary words. See the Unit 1, Week 2, Day 1: Word Study and Vocabulary: Teacher-Guided Student Activity Card for instruction that has been differentiated for ELLs.”
  • In the Teacher Guide, teachers are directed to “Tell students that today they are going to focus on the event of the immigration sweep,because different characters in the story reacted differently to this situation, which reveals things to us about their characters.” Students complete the graphic organizer on page 69 of the student edition, Character Reaction Note-Catcher.
  • In the Teacher Guide, Levels of Support, for “Lighter Support” teachers are given the following scaffolding suggestions: “Invite a student to paraphrase the key points of pages 199–213 of Esperanza Rising” (p. 278). Students would then use this scaffold to respond to questions from the text and complete the Character Reaction Note-Catcher.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 5, in the teacher’s notes for The Opening of the lesson it states, “Remind students that they have seen these learning targets in the previous lessons, and review Vocabulary: main ideas (the main points the author wants you to understand and take away from reading), key details (evidence that supports the main ideas), and summarize (to give a short explanation of something that has been read, viewed, or heard), as needed.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 8, Work Time teacher’s notes, it states, “Distribute the Discussion Notes Form: Jackie Robinson and tell students that the top box on this form is for them to capture any questions they might want to ask so that they don’t forget while they are waiting for a chance to speak. Emphasize that, during the discussion, they need only complete the top box, as they will fill in the other boxes after the discussion. Distribute sticky notes to students in the outside circle to record observations of norms on the Discussion Norms anchor chart. Tell students that as they observe, listen, and take notes on what takes place in the first round of the discussion, they should record evidence of discussion norms on their sticky notes. Consider using the following prompts: 'What are two stars, or two things this group did really well? What is one step, or one thing this group could work on next time?'”
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 8, teacher notes for a Conversation Cue state, “Play several example PSAs. After playing each, Think-Pair-Share: “What is this PSA about? (Responses will vary.) What is the purpose of this PSA? (Responses will vary.) What do you like about this PSA? What makes you want to listen to it? (Responses will vary.) Conversation Cue: Can you say more about that? (Responses will vary.)”
  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, the teacher is directed to guide students through creating their own note catcher: “Distribute paper and tell students that they are going to be responsible for drawing their own note-catcher to organize their notes to answer the question. Remind students that in their QuickWrite they will need to respond to the 'what' and 'why' of the question and cite their sources, so they should ensure that their note-catcher provides them with the opportunity to catch all of that information. Emphasize the note on the QuickWrite sheet that sometimes they may have to infer 'why'.”

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for including publisher-produced aligned documentation of the standards addressed in questions, tasks, and assessment items. Daily lessons, tasks, and assessments specifically denote the standards to which the lessons and tasks are aligned. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Alignment to the CCSS is documented in the Module At-A-Glance, Unit, and Assessment Rubric. For example, publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards is provided in the writing rubric for opinion writing. The Module At-A-Glance provides alignment of standards for each Unit and how those standards are assessed. Each Unit details how the standards and assessment for each lesson are addressed. In Module 1, Unit 1, and Lesson 1, the standards are written as “I can” statements, setting the expectation for students as: “I can infer the topic of this Module from the resources (RL.5.1, W.5.8).”
  • The final performance task for Module 1 has students draw on their learning from Unit 3 and centers around CCSS RF.5.4, W.5.4, W.5.5, and W.5.8. Students work collaboratively to create a program using monologues previously written. The monologues are all based on a character’s reaction to an event from the text, Esperanza Rising. Students focus on the human right that is challenged in the event they are describing in the monologue and how people are impacted by that issue in today’s world.
  • In the Grade 5, Module 1 Unit 3 Mid-Assessment, students draft a monologue using the point of view of one of the characters from Esperanza Rising. Students describe how a character responds to the challenge in the text, but they also look at how that challenge could be a human rights issue impacting people today. This assessment focuses on CCSS W.5.3, W.5.3a, W.5.3b, W.5.3c, W.5.4, and W.5.10.
  • In the Curriculum Plan, Module 1, students are asked to complete writing tasks of Revising an Analytical Essay: Comparing Character Responses to An Event in Esperanza Rising (W.5.4, W.5.5, W.5.6, W.5.10, L.5.2d, L.5.6) and a Monologue Performance and Program (RF.5.4, W.5.4, W.5.5, W.5.8, W.5.10).
  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 11, students complete the End of Unit 1 Assessment: Answering Questions about a Literary Text covering standards RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.10.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 11, the Opinion Writing Checklist include the following characteristics on the checklist:
    • “W.5.1a: I state my opinion clearly, and my writing stays focused.”
    • “W.5.1a: I have an introduction that gives the reader the information needed to understand the topic or issue.”
    • “L.5.1: My words and sentences follow the rules of writing.”
    • “L.5.3, L.5.6, W.5.4: The words and sentences I use are appropriate for this task, purpose, and audience.”
  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 9, Work Time A, students use their understanding of the characteristics of PSAs to plan the key points of their own PSA about how to stay safe during a natural disaster (W.5.2a, W.5.2b, W.5.4, W.5.5). Students then analyze the introduction of the Model PSA and compare it to the introductions of other informative pieces written throughout the school year. They then use their plan to draft their own introductions (W.5.2 a, W.5.4, W.5.5).
  • In Module, Unit 2, Lesson 7, Work Time A, students complete a QuickWrite to explain how the narrator’s point of view influences how events are described in "Eight Days: A Story of Haiti" (RL.5.1, RL.5.6).

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject. The materials contain many visual aids to support student learning, including Anchor Charts, Graphic Organizers, Response Sheets, and Real Images that accompany text related to the content of the Module. Additionally, illustrations and clipart utilized on student workbook pages is uncomplicated and appealing to the eye. The design of the materials is simple and consistent across grade levels. The font, margins, and spacing provided for student work are appropriate. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 10, the student workbook provides a graphic organizer that is Preparing for a Text-Based Discussion Note-Catcher that has very clear instructions using the student text, Esperanza Rising.
  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 4, the student workbook provides a Metaphors Note-catcher: Abuelita’s Blanket that gives the excerpt from the text, the metaphor, then the student needs to tell what the metaphor means. Materials are very clear and concise.
  • The Table of Contents contains a breakdown of each unit, first with a unit overview that gives the page numbers for Week-at-a-Glance and assessment information and then a lesson by lesson breakdown that includes not just the labeling Lesson 1 but more details, such as “Lesson 1: Analyzing Character Reactions: Esperanza Rising: Las Cebollas.”
  • Icons are used throughout the the Teacher Guide to draw the teacher’s attention to key elements of the curriculum design and aid teacher’s in locating specific information in the curriculum.
  • In the Student Editions, all pages are clearly labeled with the Module/unit/lesson and the CCSS that are being addressed with the assignment/activity. The pages in the Student Edition provide direct instruction without including unnecessary wording that could distract or confuse the student.
  • In the Teacher Guide, the curriculum uses red text to identify the parts that are meant to be said aloud by the teacher to the students.
  • The material design is simple and consistent. Modules are set up the same displaying a simple design and include adequate space. The font, size, margins, and spacing are consistent and readable.
  • Units include graphic organizers, charts, worksheets, tables and other forms that are easy to read and understand. There are no distracting images, and the layout of the student workbook is clear and concise.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials meet the criteria that materials contain a Teacher Guide with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. A text analysis tool is provided for every central text in the curriculum. Materials contain a Teacher Guide that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. A rationale of the research that impacted the design of the curriculum, including explanations of the instructional approaches of the program, is provided. Materials reviewed meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a Teacher Guide with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

Suggestions on how to present the content are contained in the Week-at-a-Glance in each Overview including Lessons, CCSS, Agenda, Daily Learning Targets, Ongoing Assessments, and Anchor Charts and Protocols. There are also Teaching Notes for each unit that provide teacher guidance and suggestions on how to present the content. Each module lesson also contains a Technology and Multimedia section that offers guidance on using technology that is directly accessible through a link to support student learning in anticipated areas requiring additional student support or to offer extensions for additional enhancements to the content. Examples of useful annotations and suggestions include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Module Overview, there is a Technology & Multimedia section that provides teachers with a technology and multimedia chart for the unit. The chart lists digital tools, the purpose of the tool in the module, how the tool should be used within the module and a website URL to access the tool.
  • Within each lesson, there are more specific technology and multimedia suggestions that connect a section of the lesson with a piece of technology. For example, in Unit 2, Lesson 1, teachers are given the suggestion that during work time if there are students that would benefit from “hearing the text read aloud to consider using a text-to-speech tool such as Natural Reader.” In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 4, Technology and Multimedia section, teachers are advised that during Work Time B, students may “complete their note-catchers in a word-processing document—for example, a Google Doc—using Speech to Text facilities activated on devices, or using an app or software such as Dragon Dictation,” providing guidance on using technology to support student learning.
  • In the unit overview Week-at-a-Glance for each Lesson, teachers are provided with the CCSS standards that are the focus of the lesson, daily learning targets, assessments, anchor chart suggestions, and protocols for instruction.
  • The unit overview includes a section for supporting English Language Learners. In this section, teachers are provided information on how to prioritize lessons in the unit for ELL students. Teachers are also given teaching strategies, such as Language Dives, and ways to add diversity and inclusion to the lessons.
  • A section entitled Preparation Overview is included with each unit. This section gives a list of prep work teachers will need to complete in order to teach the lessons.
  • Every lesson within a Unit follows a similar routine: Opening, Work Time, Closing & Assessment, and Homework. Within each section, teachers are given time frames and teaching notes all directly labeled with CCSS. Within each section, teachers are provided guiding questions to ask (written in red) and actions to take within the lesson. For example, in Unit 2, Lesson 1, the following guidance is provided: “Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group to the question 'Whose reactions are we going to be analyzing? Why?'”
  • Teachers are given suggestions on how to meet students’ needs throughout the lesson. This gives teachers scaffolded instruction of how to reteach the lesson or parts of the lesson for students’ in need. For example, the Teacher Edition provides guidance for levels of support. In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Lighter support, there is guidance provided to have students paraphrase key points from the text, compared to Heavier Support that recommends teachers dictate key sentences to students.
  • In the Grade 5, Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 4, teachers are advised that “Students may need additional support reading the text to interpret the metaphors. Consider grouping students who will need additional support with this in one group to receive teacher support.”
  • In the Grade 5, Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 7 “Teaching Notes,” teachers are informed that this lesson builds on previous work: “In Work Time B, students follow the same peer critique directions used in Lesson 4 when giving and receiving feedback on their monologue plans.”

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a Teacher Guide that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The materials also include the Your Curriculum Companion that provides specific research, rationales, and explanations that will help teachers build knowledge of the content. The materials provide a K-5 Text Analysis tool that includes “an analysis of every central text used in the EL Education K-5 Language Arts Curriculum, focusing on four specific qualitative aspects of complexity: meaning, structure, language features, and knowledge demands” that provides teachers examples of advanced literary concepts. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Text Analysis for the central text, Esperanza Rising, provides an adult-level explanation of moderately complex language features, explaining that “the sentence structure consists primarily of simple and compound sentences, with some complex constructions.”
  • In the Your Curriculum Companion, on pages 141-145, teachers are provided Module lesson planning task cards. Each task card has guiding questions and provides specific information to teachers to help build their knowledge in order to plan for each part of the Module.
  • In Chapter 5, section 5A of the Your Curriculum Companion, teachers receive guidance on text complexity. Teachers are given information on what makes a text complex, how to determine text complexity, and the rationale behind the importance of text complexity (pages 260-262).
  • In Chapter 6 of the Your Curriculum Companion, teachers are provided information on writing. Specifically evidence-based writing, the writing cycle, and strengthening student writing. It provides charts that correlate the reading and writing CCSS standards, student examples, and evidence-based instructional strategies.
  • Each chapter in the Your Curriculum Companion provides a frequently asked questions section, which builds teacher knowledge by providing information on the standards, how the program addresses the standards, and best practices for implementation. The Your Curriculum Companion includes notes that give adult-level explanations and examples. Examples include, but are not limited to the following: The “Engaging Students with Protocols” section of Chapter 3 states that “[p]rotocols are an important feature of our curriculum because they are one of the best ways we know to engage students in discussion, inquiry, critical thinking, and sophisticated communication. A protocol consists of agreed-upon, detailed guidelines for reading, recording, discussing, or reporting that ensure equal participation and accountability in learning.”

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a Teacher Guide that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Teacher Guide for each module lesson contains a “Teaching Notes” section that provides the purpose of the lesson and standards alignment and explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. For example, in the Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 4 “Teaching Notes” section, teachers are provided the following explanation of the standard alignment in the lesson: “Students read the next chapter of Esperanza Rising, 'Las Papas,' and they analyze how the chapter fits into the overall structure of the text (RL.5.1, RL.5.5). They then make connections between this chapter and the UDHR, looking for evidence of threats to human rights (RI.5.1). Students then interpret metaphors about Abuelita’s blanket across the novel in expert triads (RL.5.1, L.5.5a). They use their interpretation of the metaphors to identify themes (RL.5.2).”
  • The Your Curriculum Companion states, “We believe the standards invite us to build in our students critical skills for life--for career success and civic contribution. What is important is not just what the standards say, but how they are used” (p. 9). On pages 25-27, it explains how the curriculum addresses each CCSS shift in the aspect of reading, writing, language, and speaking/listening. On pages 29-35, it explains how the backwards design approach to the curriculum connects to each CCSS shift.
  • In the Module Overview in the Teacher Guide for each Unit, all standards covered in the entire module are listed, separated into Reading-Literature, Reading-Informational Text, Foundational Skills, Speaking and Listening, Language, and Writing. It further provides information regarding which standards are assessed per unit, the instructional focus for each unit, and the assessments and performance tasks for each unit. An explanation is provided for the emphasis on reading, writing, language, and speaking and listening standards.
  • In the Module 1 Teacher Guide, page 18, a CCSS correlation chart is provided. The chart shows all 4 CCSS areas (Reading, Writing, Language, Speaking and Listening) and correlates the shift with EL’s curriculum.
  • In the Module 1 Teacher Guide, page 24, there is a curriculum plan for grades 3-5, which explains the focus standards of each module for each grade within the categories of writing tasks and required trade books.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies. A rationale of the research that impacted the design of the curriculum, including explanations of the instructional approaches of the program, is provided. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Chapter 1B of the Your Curriculum Companion explains how research impacted the design of the curriculum. On page 19, Your Curriculum Companion provides an analysis of the research on the literacy achievement gap and, on page 20, it uses charts to explain what is already known about the literacy achievement gap and how the EL curriculum addresses it. The Your Curriculum Companion continues to provide this for the research behind knowledge building, syntax, fluency, and decoding making the connection to the EL curriculum. It provides information regarding the five elements of literacy instruction most critical for addressing the literacy achievement gap: vocabulary, knowledge-building, syntax, fluency, and decoding. This is based on the presentation by David Liben, Student Achievement Partners, July 2015.
  • In the Your Curriculum Companion, page 27, the design of the curriculum uses the guiding principles of backward design, which required curriculum designers to consider three questions: “1. At end of a sequence of instruction, what will students know and be able to do? 2. What will proficiency look and sound like? 3. How will we know when students are proficient?”
  • In the Your Curriculum Companion, page 83-85, it explain how the parts of the ALL Block, promote proficiency and growth in students. These explanations cite research to support the curriculum, such as the following explanation: “Research tells us that readers in intermediate grades benefit from a more contextualized approach to teaching phonics and word recognition” (pg. 85).
  • The “Research Behind EL Education Language Arts Curriculum and Professional Services Guide” provides a “high level summary of the research that informed the Language Arts curriculum design (e.g., content-based literacy, phonics, supports for ELLs) and our professional development (e.g., focus on leadership, coaching, common implementation challenges).”
  • The “Language Dives in the K-5 Language Arts Curriculum” Overview contains an explanation of the language dive and the research behind this instructional technique. The guide “describes what a language dive is, criteria for a good language dive sentence, when students do language dives, what the benefits of language dives are, and the principles and research base that underlie language dives.”

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Each Module Unit provides a “Homework Resources (For Families)” section that includes a description of what students learn at school and ways to support their learning at home. For example, in the Module 1 Teacher Guide, in the lesson supports area, there is a section titled “Homework Resources for Families.” In this section, there is a unit overview that provides families with guiding questions, big ideas, a summary of what students will be doing at school, specific tips of how parents can support at home, an overview of the homework assignments that correlate with each lesson in the unit, a guide for supporting independent reading, and additional practice pages.
  • In the Module 1 Teacher Guide, there is a section titled “Optional: Experts, Fieldwork, Service, and Extensions.” This section provides teachers with suggestions of ways to connect the learning to the community. For example, to bring in the community, the curriculum states to invite family members into the classroom to read their favorite poems or to bring experts, like poets, to share their poetry with students.
  • The Module 1, Unit 1 “Homework Resources (For Families) section recommends that families “read articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and discuss what they mean” as a way to support student learning for this unit at home.
  • The curriculum includes sample letters teachers can send home to describe what students will learn during a given module and unit and how guardians can support that learning and specific homework assignments. Students are encouraged to share what they are learning with the family. For example, in Module 1, Unit 1, parents are informed of the following:

“What will your student be doing at school?

  • This unit is designed to help students build knowledge about human rights while simultaneously building their ability to read challenging text closely through a case study of the threats to human rights faced by fictional characters in the novel Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan (740L). Students read this novel in conjunction with selected articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and consider how the human rights of the characters were threatened in the novel.

How can you support your student at home?

  • Talk to your student about human rights and threats to human rights, including any personal experiences you may have had.
  • Read informational texts to determine the main ideas from supporting details and to summarize.
  • Read articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and discuss what they mean and how you feel about them. (Students closely read Articles 2, 3, 13, 17, and 23 in class.)
  • Watch documentaries and research on the internet with your student to find out more about the Mexican Revolution and its effects on immigration.”

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Assessment materials clearly denote which standards are being emphasized. The Assessment Overview in the Teacher Supporting Materials and the Assessment Overview in the Teacher Guide contain the standards addressed within each unit. Materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments, ways to scaffold assessments, areas of focus, connections to learning building towards the assessment, and suggestions for lessons in the future. Each assessment is broken down into sections to help support teacher understanding. Materials include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress and indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

Materials include multiple formative assessments, pre-assessments, performance-based assessments, a mid-unit assessment, and end-of-unit assessments. Opportunities are provided during daily lessons for monitoring student progress in reading and writing, as well as opportunities are provided to assess oral reading fluency. Teachers are provided with tracking process forms, checklists, rubrics, note-catchers, protocols, and exit slips for formatively measuring student progress. The teacher guide provides an assessment overview, which outlines the following for each unit: final performance task, mid-unit assessment, and end-of-unit assessment. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, students are provided with a fluency passage for the week. They self-assess their fluency and practice reading it with a focus on volume, pace, tone, and expression. All students follow a task card to read/perform their fluency passages aloud to the whole group, one by one. Students will self-assess and revisit their fluency goals from Day 2 to determine progress.
  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lessons 12 and 13, students have an End of Unit 2 Assessment: Reading Fluency and Writing a Literary Analysis Essay. “II. In Part I, students read aloud a new excerpt from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World (RF.5.4). In Part II, they write a literary analysis essay to answer the question: “What does the use of concrete language and sensory detail help you understand about the rainforest?” (RL.5.1, W.5.2, W.5.9a).”
  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 16: students have an End of Unit 2 Assessment: Revising a Literary Essay. “In Opening A, students’ Mid-Unit 2 Assessments are returned with feedback. The purpose of this is for students to have the opportunity to see how they performed in order to improve in their next assessment, and to ask questions if they don’t understand the feedback.”
  • Performance-Based Assessment tasks are included with each module. Students complete a task that requires analysis and demonstrating knowledge in writing. For example in Module 1, the performance-based assessment requires students to “analyze model programs and a model Director’s Note to understand the format of these texts.” They read the model Director’s Note for gist and use it to plan a monologue as part of the performance task (RI.5.4, W.5.2, W.5.4, W.5.8, SL.5.1, L.5.4).
  • Teacher Guides include mid-assessments, for example, in Module 4, Unit 2, Lessons 5 and 6, students complete the mid-assessment, in which they read and watch a video of a new poem called “Job” about the aftermath of the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti (RL.5.1, RL.5.2, RL.5.4, RL.5.7, L.5.4a, L.5.5c).

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

The assessment materials clearly denote which standards are being emphasized. The standards are clearly labeled in the Assessment Overview of each module. Standards are clearly labeled in the daily lessons and are also found on the performance-based assessments for each unit. For each module, the standards formally assessed are indicated with a check mark on a chart containing all ELA standards. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Teacher Guide, Module 1, pgs. 13-15, it is clearly noted which standards are being emphasized for each assessment. For example, for Mid-Unit 1 Assessment, it states, “This assessment centers on CCSS ELA RI.5.1, RI.5.2, RI.5.4, RI.5.10, L.5.4b, and L.5.4c. Students read Article 13 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary, and determine the main idea, using supporting details from the text to write a summary of the article that includes quotes from the text.“
  • The mid- and end-of-unit assessments specifically note the standards that are addressed. For example, in Module 4, the Teacher Guide states that the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment “centers on CCSS ELA RL.5.1, RL.5.2, RL.5.4, RL.5.7, RF.5.4, L.5.4a, and L.5.5c and has two parts. In Part I, students read an excerpt of a new poem about the aftermath of a natural disaster aloud for fluency and summarize the text. In Part II, they watch a multimedia video of the same poem and read it to answer selected response and short constructed response questions about the theme and the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases. They also analyze how the multimedia on the video contributes to the meaning, tone, and beauty of the poem.”
  • In the End of Unit 2 Assessment: Analyzing Point of View in a Literary Text, the two-part assessment centers on CCSS ELA RL.5.1, RL.5.6, and L.5.3b.
  • In the Mid Unit 3 Assessment: Research: Supplies to Include in an Emergency Preparedness Kit, the assessment centers on CCSS ELA RI.5.1, RI.5.7, W.5.7, and W.5.8.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

The instructional materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments, ways to scaffold assessments, areas of focus, connections to learning building towards the assessment, and suggestions for lessons in the future. Each assessment is broken down into sections to help support teacher understanding. The first section is titled “Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards.” The EL curriculum refers to assessments as an additional lesson, so in this section it explains which standards the assessment aligns to, the purpose behind the assessment, and information about tracking progress. The second section is titled “How it builds on previous work.” In this section, the curriculum explains how the unit and lessons build upon each other in order to bring students to this place of learning. The third section is titled “Areas where students might need additional support.” This section anticipates barriers that students may face and offers suggestions to teachers on how to move students past the barriers. The fourth section is titled “Assessment guidance.” In this section, the assessment is broken down for teachers, typically by standard and explains how the assessment addresses each standard. There is also additional information regarding feedback for students. The last section is titled “Down the Road.” In this section the curriculum explains how the knowledge students have now will be used as they move forward in the curriculum.

In Your Curriculum Companion, pgs. 396-397, there are examples of student work and how they should be graded using the rubric found in the Teacher Guide. Further guidance is provided on the following:

  • Choosing evidence for analysis, pg. 401
  • Organizing the evidence, pg.403
  • Identifying the patterns and trends that can inform instruction, pg. 403
  • Creating an action plan based on the data (next steps), pg. 404

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

The instructional materials provide routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. There are informal checklists to help collect evidence of progress as you observe students working. Progress monitoring formative assessments are integrated within every module by using mid- and end-of-unit assessments, performance tasks, ongoing assessment suggestions within each lesson, scaffolded instruction. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Your Curriculum Companion, pgs. 393-395, there is an overview of how the curriculum supports ongoing progress monitoring. For example, on pg. 393 a description of how each lesson within the module includes formative assessments that align with the learning targets.
  • In the Your Curriculum Companion, pg. 394, it describes the use of informal checklists. The informal checklist is a tool that provides teachers with a way of tracking student progress while making observations. Some of the informal checklists are as follows: reading fluency, writing process, collaborative discussion, presentation of knowledge and ideas, and speaking and listening comprehension.
  • The EL Curriculum also uses text-dependent questions as an ongoing progress monitoring tool. This takes place by having students answer the questions independently while reading additional text.
  • Writing routines are also built with ongoing formative assessments using exit tickets, note-catchers, and graphic organizers to assess student learning. These activities are used in conjunction with text pieces and provide a formative assessment more frequently when students are reading a lengthy text.
  • In Your Curriculum Companion, on pg. 394, it states that writing routines are repeated and appear frequently throughout the modules. Exit tickets, note-catchers, and graphic organizers are repeated multiple times in a unit.
  • In Your Curriculum Companion, p. 395, there is an explanation on Tracking Progress Forms. It states, “students review their assessments for evidence of mastery of standards and add sticky notes to their work to point to this evidence. After students track their progress, the teacher then reviews and adds to the form.”
  • In the Teacher Guide, pg. 19, a Key Criteria for Success is provided, which outlines the criteria needed to complete the task.
  • In the Student Workbook, Module 1, pg. 19, a step-by-step guide is provided to students to utilize when quoting from a text. Students and teachers can use this to determine if students followed the steps and completed the task or to see where students were confused or struggled.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

In the Module Block there is 20 minutes daily accountable independent reading for homework at a range of levels; students respond to a prompt in their independent reading journal and are held accountable for their reading through discussion with their peers. In the ALL Block, additional time for independent reading at range of levels, building more content and domain-specific knowledge and some free choice reading (every other week), to build on students’ motivation and interests.

In the Module 1, Student Workbook, pg. 38, students are provided with an independent reading tracking form. Students have an independent reading journal to record time reading and prompts. On pg. 45, it indicates that students are to independently read a choice, topic-related book for homework and they may read a free choice book for extra independent reading. In Unit 1, Lesson 2, students begin working on independent reading routines as part of explicit instruction. This begins by teaching students about book selection with the lesson goals of students being able to select a research reading book they have interest in and also being able to explain to peers why they selected the book.

In addition to explicit lessons, the ALL Block also has the component of accountable independent reading/volume of reading. In the Your Curriculum Companion on pg. 83, it describes this routine as “content-related reading at each student’s independent reading level; including free-choice in reading.”

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
9/10
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards. The Teacher Guide for each module provides a section supporting English Language Learners that includes various scaffolds and levels of support recommendations, which often include allowing students to grapple with complex texts and tasks before providing necessary adjustments based on targeted observation. The materials partially meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level and meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

In the Module Blocks in each lesson, there is a section called Universal Design for Learning. It is divided into three different parts: Multiple Means of Representation (MMR), Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE), and Multiple Means of Engagement (MME). The Teacher Guide for each module anticipates areas where students might need additional support and provides a section geared toward supporting English Language Learners that includes various scaffolds and levels of support recommendations. Each lesson includes a section on Universal Design for Learning, an educational framework based on research in the learning sciences that promotes the use of flexible learning environments in order to accommodate individual learning differences. For example, in Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 3, the Teacher Guide advises teachers to use multiple means of engagement to increase engagement during the close read by offering choice in how students display their depiction of the rainforest. In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 6, the Universal Design for Learning, Multiple Means of Representation (MMR) instructs teachers to “Consider ways to facilitate increased comprehension by repeatedly offering opportunities for students to access prior knowledge and review previous material. Additionally, use a color-coding system to help students make connections between the model paragraphs and the Character Reaction Paragraph anchor chart. This way, students can see how to apply these writing strategies to their own work.”

Within every lesson, the EL curriculum provides information under the title “Meeting Student’s Needs.” In this section, the curriculum provides specific scaffolding strategies to support learners at different levels. For example, in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 12, the curriculum recommends that for students needing additional support with the assessment, the teacher can read the directions and questions aloud and clarify or paraphrase as needed to make sure students understand and are on the right track

In the Teacher’s Notes section of the lesson, there is a section titled “Areas in which students may need additional support.” In this section, teachers are given suggestions of how to support the needs of learners who may struggle.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

The Teacher Guide for each module provides a section geared toward supporting English Language Learners that includes various scaffolds and levels of support recommendations which often include allowing students to grapple with complex texts and tasks before providing necessary adjustments based on targeted observation. The materials also contain a section on Meeting Students’ Needs in each unit lesson with suggestions for adjusting the delivery of content or task to meet learners’ needs without changing the content itself. In the Module Blocks, levels of support are provided at the beginning of each lesson in the Supporting English Language Learners section. Lesson-specific ELL supports also are added to the Meeting Students’ Needs section. There are protocols for Conversation Clues and Language Dives that scaffold ELL students and students who may need additional support in that specific skill to meet or exceed the grade-level standard.

In the Teacher Guide, symbols are embedded based on the four levels - below level (square), on level (circle), above level (diamond), and ELL (triangle). These symbols prompt teachers to differentiate instruction based on the needs of each level. ELL students’ Additional Work with Complex Text involves the Language Dive (work on the words used in sentences and how sentences are constructed). During certain activities, students working below level are combined with ELL students because they need the same support.

Language Dives are included in the EL curriculum. The purpose of the Language Dive is to provide students with strategies to analyze, understand, and use the language. During a Language Dive, teachers and students slow down the reading of a text to deeply analyze the meaning, purpose, and structure of a specific part of the text. The Language Dive supports ELL students to acquire language and help them to deconstruct complex text (Your Curriculum Companion pgs. 99-100). Language Dives follow the routine of Deconstruct-Reconstruct-Practice. In the Deconstruct phase, teachers guide students to deconstruct a sentence for meaning and purpose. Students are guided into chunking the sentence to analyze the importance and purpose of the words used in the sentence. In the Reconstruct phase, students put the sentence back together and discuss possible variations of the sentence that could be formed and then analyze how the meaning and purpose changes with the varied sentences. In the Practice phase, students practice using different language structures.

Within each lesson, there is a section titled Meeting Students’ Needs. This section provides specific ELL strategies that are directly tied to that particular lesson. For example, in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 13, teachers are advised to consider that “For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing: Allow students to orally paraphrase.”

Within each lesson, there is a Teacher’s Notes section. This section provides specific ELL information for the teacher. It begins with a lesson breakdown, identifying all the important points in the lesson. This draws the teacher’s attention to an objective within the lesson to set as a priority for English Language Learners. Then, the section differentiates into levels of support- Lighter and Heavier. Depending on the needs of the ELL students, this differentiated support enables teachers to scaffold even further.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Within the material itself, there are multiple modalities of learning addressed as well as multiple exposures to content. Teacher notes throughout the curriculum rarely offer extensions or opportunities for advanced learners. Each unit includes ways to extend the learning beyond the classroom, linking home, community, and experts in their fields to share their experiences. However, there are no specific extensions or opportunities to compact the curriculum.

The Teacher Guide for each module provides homework tasks that include an independent reading journal through which students have the opportunity to select reading material that is above grade-level. In the Modules, materials do not supply, on a regular basis, extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, or listen above grade level.

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 3, the Homework assignment is an Accountable Research Reading task in which students must select a prompt to respond to in the front of their independent reading journal, allowing students to select reading material that is above grade level.
  • In the Language ALL Block, teachers are directed to use the module lesson ongoing assessments to determine students that would be working above grade level. As the lessons are broken down for the teacher, the curriculum provides a symbol key for each type of grouping with above level students being represented by a diamond. Throughout the lessons, teachers can easily locate information about how to enrich for students working above grade level by looking for the diamond shape. For example, in the Module 1,Unit 3,Day 1 explanation for small group instruction, students are analyzing a piece of text and each group has a different start and end point. For the group working above grade level it states, “From the beginning of the excerpt to the very end of the excerpt.” It also provides teacher guided activity cards that are differentiated to target students working above grade level. On the activity card there is a section titled “More Challenge” and this provides an extension beyond what a teacher would do with students working on grade level. For example, the extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who are above grade level include increased responsibility as they practice peer support and coaching of ELL students during ALL Block. In addition, extensions are provided on the task cards for students that can work independently.
  • In the Language ALL Block, the materials provide MORE CHALLENGE activities in the Student Activity cards that provide some extension activities for students who are more advanced.
    • In the Language ALL Block, Module 1, Unit 1, Week 1, Day 2, the materials states: “MORE CHALLENGE: If you finish early, make up a sentence using as many of the words in bold as you can. Write the sentence on the back of this task card.”
    • In the Language ALL Block, Module 1, Unit 2, Week 1, Day 2, the materials states: “MORE CHALLENGE: Write a new sentence for each of the words on the back of this card.”
  • The Module 4 extension activities include, “Students research local history about natural disasters and students create posters for the local community about how to prepare for a natural disaster.”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

The Teacher Guide for each module provides lesson structures and tasks that allow teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies depending on the task at hand. Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use both homogeneous and heterogeneous grouping strategies. Students participate in partner and small group Think-Pair-Share, Whole Class Discussion, Small Group Discussion, Read Alouds, Shared Reading, Independent Reading, and Language Dives for both informational and literary texts. Teachers are encouraged to use information gained from the ongoing assessments in the lessons to help determine where students need additional supports or extensions during small groups. In the Modules, a variety of grouping strategies are encouraged where students work in pairs or triads and are strategically paired in advance to create productive and supportive work time. In the ALL Block, student groupings are dependent on activities that are differentiated based on student need.

The curriculum provides teachers with different groupings to help students engage with and discuss text. The suggested strategies include; Think-Pair-Share, Back to Back and Face to Face, and Pinky Partners. Think-Pair-Share promotes productive and equitable conversations, giving all students the opportunity to share and consider the views of others. Back to Back and Face to Face is designed to give students the opportunity to hear several different perspectives on a topic and/or to engage in critical thinking about a topic.

In the Your Curriculum Companion, pg. 113, a chart is provided that explains all the grouping strategies for each component of the curriculum. In the module lessons, teachers are given suggestions to group students based on similar needs. Ongoing assessments throughout the module lessons are used to make grouping decisions about who should be grouped together. In the Language Block, students are grouped in either below grade level, on grade level, above grade level, or English Language Learner groups. These groups are formed for a two week period using the data from the module lessons. Students rotate through the activities and are provided the necessary scaffolds or enrichment depending on the group.

In the ALL Block, students rotate through three components: Accountable Independent Reading, Independent Activity in heterogeneous groups with a task card to guide their work, and teacher-guided activities in homogeneous groups (differentiated based on student need). In addition, these groups are flexible because a student may be below grade level in one area, but on grade level in another area.

Indicator 3s

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The instructional materials include suggestions to enhance lessons with the use of technology and multimedia. Located in each Module Overview, the Technology and Multimedia section gives general recommendations for how to utilize resources on the internet for classroom projects, such as the production of student work or to research a topic further. In a review of the suggested activities, it appears that different internet browsers and operating systems would not prove to be a challenge for accessibility. The Module 1 Overview provides a list of technological platforms to be used during the module that includes using speech-to-text technology to complete student note-catchers and create written work by speaking rather than writing or typing, using a free application, Dragon Dictation, on tablets and mobile devices.

The curriculum materials are available to access online. An educator may access and download teacher materials and student materials for each unit along with the assessments, protocols, and videos modeling the protocols.The optional Life Science module and components of this module are also available on the site and contain similar parts as the ELA module. These teacher and student materials include: the big ideas, the Four T’s, texts, assessments, performance task, materials, and Module-at-a-glance.

Accessibility was tested successfully on Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari, Windows, Mac Air, iPhone, and iPad.

Indicator 3s3v

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials meet the criteria that digital materials are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers , “platform neutral”, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning. Materials partially meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. Curriculum components contain student materials that can be downloaded in Microsoft Word and customized for individual learners or classroom use. The Teacher Guide for module lessons provide a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning which include technology platforms that facilitate collaboration among students and teacher as well as students with each other.

Indicator 3t

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning. Within this section, teachers are given suggestions on methods to incorporate technology, along with websites to utilize and an explanation of the manner in which technology can be used to scaffold instruction. For example, in the Module 1, Teacher Guide, Module Overview, the Technology and Multimedia section suggests that students use Google Docs to complete Note-Catchers and produce writing. It also suggests Google Forms for online Exit Tickets. It gives speech-to-text suggestions, such as Dragon Dictation and the National Geographic map site to explore places that students read in the texts. In Unit 3, Lesson 5, during Work Time B, students complete the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment online with questions set up on a Google Form. During Work Time B, students may utilize a digital narrative draft using Google Docs. Speech-to-text facilities could be activated such as Dragon Dictation to help enhance student learning. The Module 1 Overview also provides a list of technological platforms to be used during the module, including online reading and research. Examples include access to online articles on the Mexican Revolution, immigration, and human rights.

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Digital materials include a digital planning guide, step-by-step lesson plans and online materials with additional support for differentiated instruction. However, while digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for students through the use of Microsoft Word, it is limited in accessibility to innovative technology. The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to engage students in their learning which include adaptive technology; however, opportunities for creativity and innovation with technology were not widely present.

  • The Module 1 Overview provides a list of technological platforms to be used during the module that includes using speech-to-text technology to complete student note-catchers and create written work by speaking rather than writing or typing using the free application, Dragon Dictation, that can be used on tablets and mobile devices.
  • The curriculum materials are available to access online. Teachers may download the materials in .pdf or .doc form. When using .doc form, teachers can edit, change, add to documents to customize the materials as needed for students. However, utilizing these customized materials in conjunction with additional technology is not included as part of this program.

Indicator 3u.ii

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

The Module and ALL Block curriculum components contain student materials that can be downloaded in Microsoft Word and customized for individual learners or classroom use. In the Your Curriculum Companion, Chapter 3, strategies are provided to customize the lessons for local use. For example, on page 127, under the Refining Lessons heading, teachers are informed that “you can spend time preparing the materials in such a way that your students, who have been struggling with transitions, will have them at their desks when they come in from recess.” When accessing resources online, teachers can download the materials in .pdf or .doc form. When using the .doc form, teachers can edit, change, or add to documents to customize the materials as needed for students.

Indicator 3v

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

The Teacher Guide for module lessons provide a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning which include technology platforms that facilitate collaboration among students and teacher as well as students with each other. Teachers are often prompted to use collaborative documents such as Google Docs to collaborate during class.

Professional development videos are available on the Expeditionary Learning website; however, the videos are not linked to the resources. Teachers need to search through video topics for specific videos.

On the EL Education website under Resources, teachers are provided with digital tools to connect with other educators via online Professional Development (PD Packs).

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials meet the criteria that digital materials are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers , “platform neutral”, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning. Materials partially meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. Curriculum components contain student materials that can be downloaded in Microsoft Word and customized for individual learners or classroom use. The Teacher Guide for module lessons provide a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning which include technology platforms that facilitate collaboration among students and teacher as well as students with each other.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The instructional materials include suggestions to enhance lessons with the use of technology and multimedia. Located in each Module Overview, the Technology and Multimedia section gives general recommendations for how to utilize resources on the internet for classroom projects, such as the production of student work or to research a topic further. In a review of the suggested activities, it appears that different internet browsers and operating systems would not prove to be a challenge for accessibility. The Module 1 Overview provides a list of technological platforms to be used during the module that includes using speech-to-text technology to complete student note-catchers and create written work by speaking rather than writing or typing, using a free application, Dragon Dictation, on tablets and mobile devices.

The curriculum materials are available to access online. An educator may access and download teacher materials and student materials for each unit along with the assessments, protocols, and videos modeling the protocols.The optional Life Science module and components of this module are also available on the site and contain similar parts as the ELA module. These teacher and student materials include: the big ideas, the Four T’s, texts, assessments, performance task, materials, and Module-at-a-glance.

Accessibility was tested successfully on Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari, Windows, Mac Air, iPhone, and iPad.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning. Within this section, teachers are given suggestions on methods to incorporate technology, along with websites to utilize and an explanation of the manner in which technology can be used to scaffold instruction. For example, in the Module 1, Teacher Guide, Module Overview, the Technology and Multimedia section suggests that students use Google Docs to complete Note-Catchers and produce writing. It also suggests Google Forms for online Exit Tickets. It gives speech-to-text suggestions, such as Dragon Dictation and the National Geographic map site to explore places that students read in the texts. In Unit 3, Lesson 5, during Work Time B, students complete the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment online with questions set up on a Google Form. During Work Time B, students may utilize a digital narrative draft using Google Docs. Speech-to-text facilities could be activated such as Dragon Dictation to help enhance student learning. The Module 1 Overview also provides a list of technological platforms to be used during the module, including online reading and research. Examples include access to online articles on the Mexican Revolution, immigration, and human rights.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Digital materials include a digital planning guide, step-by-step lesson plans and online materials with additional support for differentiated instruction. However, while digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for students through the use of Microsoft Word, it is limited in accessibility to innovative technology. The Teacher Guide for module lessons provides a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to engage students in their learning which include adaptive technology; however, opportunities for creativity and innovation with technology were not widely present.

  • The Module 1 Overview provides a list of technological platforms to be used during the module that includes using speech-to-text technology to complete student note-catchers and create written work by speaking rather than writing or typing using the free application, Dragon Dictation, that can be used on tablets and mobile devices.
  • The curriculum materials are available to access online. Teachers may download the materials in .pdf or .doc form. When using .doc form, teachers can edit, change, add to documents to customize the materials as needed for students. However, utilizing these customized materials in conjunction with additional technology is not included as part of this program.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

The Module and ALL Block curriculum components contain student materials that can be downloaded in Microsoft Word and customized for individual learners or classroom use. In the Your Curriculum Companion, Chapter 3, strategies are provided to customize the lessons for local use. For example, on page 127, under the Refining Lessons heading, teachers are informed that “you can spend time preparing the materials in such a way that your students, who have been struggling with transitions, will have them at their desks when they come in from recess.” When accessing resources online, teachers can download the materials in .pdf or .doc form. When using the .doc form, teachers can edit, change, or add to documents to customize the materials as needed for students.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

The Teacher Guide for module lessons provide a Technology and Multimedia section that supports teachers in extending lessons into digital experiences to deeply engage students in their learning which include technology platforms that facilitate collaboration among students and teacher as well as students with each other. Teachers are often prompted to use collaborative documents such as Google Docs to collaborate during class.

Professional development videos are available on the Expeditionary Learning website; however, the videos are not linked to the resources. Teachers need to search through video topics for specific videos.

On the EL Education website under Resources, teachers are provided with digital tools to connect with other educators via online Professional Development (PD Packs).

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Tue Mar 06 00:00:00 UTC 2018

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Grade 5 Bundle: Language Arts + Additional Language and Literacy Block, Teacher Materials: Additional Language and Literacy Block: Module 4: The Impact of Natural Disasters, Teacher Guide and Supporting Materials 978-1-6836-2375-5 Copyright: 2017 Open Up Resources 2017
Grade 5 Bundle: Language Arts, Student Workbooks: Language Arts: Module 4: The Impact of Natural Disasters, Student Workbook (Second Edition) 978-1-6836-2378-6 Copyright: 2017 Open Up Resources 2017
Grade 5: Life Science: The Cycle of Matter and Energy in Healthy Ecosystems, Student Science Notebook n/a Copyright: 2017 Open Up Resources 2017

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

X