Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The Expeditionary Learning English Language Arts Grade 7 instructional materials meet the expectations for alignment. Texts and text sets are high quality and at an appropriate level of rigor and complexity and organized to support students' growth in literacy over the course of the school year. The majority of tasks and questions are focused on these texts, and the instructional materials provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Students build knowledge as they engage integrated reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language study. Culminating tasks require students to read, discuss, analyze, and write about texts while students participate in a volume of reading to build knowledge. Modules are developed to support and build knowledge, to intentionally address academic vocabulary, and to scaffold supports so that students will independently demonstrate grade-level proficiency at the end of the school year.

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Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
17
32
36
35
32-36
Meets Expectations
18-31
Partially Meets Expectations
0-17
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
32
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
33
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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-
Gateway One Details

The Grade 7 instructional materials meet expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. The instructional materials also include texts that are worthy of student's time and attention. The Grade 7 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence, and the instructional materials provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. In general, high-quality texts are the central focus of lessons, are at the appropriate grade-level text complexity, and are accompanied by quality tasks aligned to the standards of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language in service to grow literacy skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
20/20
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials meet expectations for text quality and complexity. Central texts are of publishable quality and address topics of interests to Grade 7 students. The instructional materials include a variety of literary and informational texts. The level of complexity of most texts is appropriate for Grade 7. The materials support students increasing literacy skills over the year, and students are provided with many opportunities to engage in a range and volume of reading throughout each unit and module. The instructional materials also include a text complexity analysis and rationales for their purpose and placement in the materials. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of student's time and attention.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for central texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading and considering a range of student interests.


Central texts consider a range of student interests including but not limited to survival, working conditions, personal identity transformation, slavery, brain development, and water sustainability. Many of the central texts have won awards, are written by award-winning authors, or are considered classics, and all are worthy of careful reading.

Examples of central texts that are worthy of careful reading include the following:

  • Module 1 - A Long Walk to Water, Linda Sue Park
  • Module 2A - Lyddie, Katherine Patterson
  • Module 2A - "Commonwealth Club Address," Cesar Chavez
  • Module 2B - Pygmalion, George Bernard Shaw
  • Module 3 - Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass,an American Slave, Frederick Douglass
  • Module 4A -“Growing Up Digital” Scholastic New York Times Upfront Jan 31,2011, Matt Richtel
  • Module 4A - "Teens and Decision Making: What Brain Science Reveals," Scholastic Inc., the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • Module 4B - The Big Thirst, Charles Fishman
  • Module 4B - "Water Is Life," Barbara Kingsolver

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards.


Central texts include a mix of informational texts and literature. Supplemental texts within the modules are also a mixture of literature and informational texts. A wide distribution of genres and text types as required by standards are evident, including but not limited to speeches, plays, historical fiction, non-fiction, articles, poetry, and periodicals.

The following are examples of literature found within the instructional materials:

  • Module 1 - A Long Walk to Water, Linda Sue Park
  • Module 2A - Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez, Kathleen Krull
  • Module 2B - Nadia’s Hands, Karen English
  • Module 3 - Harriet Tubman,” Eloise Greenfield

The following are examples of informational text found within the instructional materials:

  • Module 1 - “Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee Camps, Stephen Buckley
  • Module 2A - Ethical Style: How Is My T-Shirt Made? Tabea Kay
  • Module 3 - Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave, Frederick Douglass
  • Module 4B - The Big Thirst, Charles Fishman

All anchor and supplementary texts in Module 4A and 4B are informational texts.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.


Most texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade. For example, in Module 3, students read Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave by Frederick Douglass, which has a Lexile measure of 1080 as stated by the publisher. The quantitative measure is within the range indicated by the standards for the grade band 6-8. In addition, this text qualitatively shows evidence that supports placement at this grade level. Some examples of this include but are not limited to Douglass’s rhetoric, varied structures, layers of meaning, and rich vocabulary. Students read excerpts of this lengthy text and study point of view, use of language to impact meaning, and text structure, and they build their proficiency in collecting textual evidence to support analysis of Douglass’s position. Students use this nonfiction text to engage in many tasks that encourage literacy development in reading, writing, speaking, and listening which include using their study of the text to assist in creating a picture book for younger children that captures an event in Douglass’s life.


Texts that are quantitatively above grade band have scaffolds in place to ensure student access. For example, in Module 2B, students read Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw which has a Lexile measure of 1340 as stated by the publisher. The quantitative measure is above the range indicated by the standards for the grade band 6-8. The text has layers of meaning and purpose, varied sentence length and structures, and rich language and vocabulary. With support and scaffolding from the teacher, students closely read and examine the theme of personal identity formation and transformation as they engage in activities, projects, and readings that require them to analyze text structure, conduct character studies, and review author’s craft. The study and reading of Pygmalion culminates with the development of an essay that presents a claim with supportive details and quotes from the play.

Texts that are quantitatively below grade band are accompanied by tasks that increase the level of rigor requiring students to use higher order thinking skills or complete a task more independently. For example, in Module 1, students read A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park which has a Lexile measure of 720 as stated by the publisher. The quantitative measure is well below the range indicated by the standards for the grade band 6-8. However, this text qualitatively shows evidence that supports grade-level appropriateness for Grade 7 students. Some examples of this include but are not limited to varied sentence length and structures, layers of meaning, rich language, and unfamiliar vocabulary. Students read closely and study the main characters to analyze contrasting points of view, draw inferences, determine the meaning of words and phrases in text, and build their proficiency in collecting textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says. Students use analysis of the two main characters of the novel to author a two-voice poem.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations that materials support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. Series of texts are at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.

There is a gradual release of responsibility as each unit and module moves forward throughout the year in order to grow literacy skills.

  • In Module 1, students study the experiences of people of Southern Sudan during and after the Second Sudanese Civil War. They use textual evidence to support ideas in their writing, both in shorter responses and in an extended essay. They read A Long Walk to Water, analyzing the points of view of the central characters. Students focus on one key theme: how individuals survive in challenging environments. The novel is paired with complex informational texts on Sudan. Students then combine research about Sudan with quotes from the novel and craft a research-based two-voice poem.
  • In Module 2B, students explore the issue of working conditions of the past and present. They analyze how people, settings, and events interact in literary and informational texts. Students first focus on Lyddie and write an argument essay about her choices around joining a protest over working conditions. Then they read a speech by César Chávez as they consider the role that workers, the government, and consumers play in improving working conditions. Finally, a short research project explores how businesses can affect working conditions. As a final performance task, students create a guide of working conditions in the garment industry.
  • In Module 3 students read the autobiography of Frederick Douglass to focus on how he uses language in powerful ways and how he tells his story in order to serve his purpose of working to abolish slavery. Students begin by building background knowledge about Douglass and his historical context. They then read closely key excerpts from his narrative to study his craft and messages. Finally, they select one episode from the book and rewrite it as a children’s story, using Frederick Douglass: The Last Day of Slavery as a mentor text.
  • In Module 4A, students explore adolescent brain development and the effects of entertainment screen time on the brain. Students read informational texts to build background knowledge about adolescent brain development. Then they begin to focus on the issue of screen time and how it may affect teenagers. Students evaluate the soundness of reasoning and the sufficiency and relevancy of evidence in argument texts and media. They review first the potential benefits and then the potential risks of screen time by conducting a lengthy research project. Students finish the module by writing a position paper and then creating a visual representation of their paper.

Students revisit and build on knowledge and skills introduced in earlier modules as they progress through the year. Students gradually move toward being able to complete tasks independently after extensive modeling and group activities.

  • In Module 3, Unit 3, lesson 6, students evaluate work using feedback techniques learned in Module 1 and practiced in Module 2A. Students review the norms of peer evaluation and the importance of giving specific, constructive, and respectful feedback, and students are able to complete the evaluations more independently during this Module.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 2, lesson 2, students draw learning from either Module 2A or Module 2B about what makes evidence relevant. Modules 2A and 2B provide instruction on argument writing. The lesson in Module 4A reviews the skill and develops further understanding by adding in the concepts of sufficient evidence and sound reasoning to support the claim. Students trace an argument and identify and evaluate claims and evidence in different informational texts.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials being accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level. The Curriculum Map includes the quantitative Lexile measure of central texts for each module.

Rationales for the educational purpose and placement in grade level are provided at the beginning of each unit in the Unit Overview, and includes qualitative information. Some examples include the following:

  • Module 2A, Unit 1, Unit Overview - “This unit focuses on the historical era of industrializing America, and builds students’ background knowledge about what working conditions are and how they affect workers. The unit begins with a lesson that engages students in the guiding questions about working conditions that connect all three units in the module. Students then read the novel Lyddie, about a girl who goes to work in the Lowell mills, with an emphasis on CCSS-ELA RL.7.3, which is about how plot, character, and setting interact in literature.”
  • Module 3, Unit 3, Unit Overview- “In this unit, students write a picture book based on an event from the life of Frederick Douglass. First, students return to Frederick Douglass: The Last Day of Slavery, which they encountered in Unit 2. This children’s book serves as the model text, and the students read it and another children’s book closely to examine how the author used the tools of a narrative writer to craft a powerful story.”

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

TThe instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for texts providing opportunities for student to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.

Each unit includes lessons with supplementary texts of varying lengths and genres. These texts are read independently, in groups, aloud, and silently, offering multiple opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading.

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, lesson 6, students read the section, “Time Trip: Sudan’s Civil War” from the full article, “Life and Death in Darfur: Sudan’s Refugee Crisis Continues” to increase knowledge of the Sudanese people and practice gathering textual evidence.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 12, students read the poem, “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” and examine the structure and identify the meaning.

Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities for students to build fluency to become independent readers at the grade level.

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, lesson 1, the homework assignment requires independent reading and note taking.
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 6, students recite a two-voice poems aloud.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 2, lesson 2, students close read Chavez’s “Commonwealth Club Address” with a partner and discuss using guided questions.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 3, independent reading is addressed in the Preparation and Materials section at the beginning of the unit. This unit includes a section called “Independent Reading” which marks time for building independent reading and suggests that there be increased time to build independent reading routines.
  • In the preface for the curriculum, the following explanation of homework is provided, “Due to the rigors demanded by the CCSS in Expeditionary Learning’s Grades 3–8 ELA curriculum, students are required to practice the skills they learn in the classroom independently at home every day, for approximately 30–45 minutes. This usually involves a reading activity (e.g., reading or rereading a certain number of paragraphs or pages in a text) with a response task (e.g., highlighting or recording evidence to answer a question). Students also are expected to read independently every evening according to independent reading routines.”

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The Grade 7 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent and build towards a culminating tasks that integrates skills. The instructional materials provided frequent opportunities for evidence-based discussion that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and support student listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching. The materials include frequent opportunities for different types of writing addressing different types of text. Although the instructional materials provide some in context opportunities to address grammar and convention, the materials are not designed to included out of context opportunities. In general, the materials provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent and require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text.


Most questions, tasks, and assignments are structured and designed to encourage understanding of key ideas of texts and determine most important learning from the readings. Instructional materials include questions, tasks, and assignments that are text-dependent over the course of a school year. Teacher materials provide support for planning and implementation by providing exemplar answers.

  • In Module 1, students use a close reading anchor chart to capture textual evidence.
  • In Module 1, Unit 2, students record and analyze the significance of book quotes and decide if and how to use them in their own writing.
  • In Module 1, Unit 2, lesson 7 students compare and contrast the accounts of survival in “Time Trip: Sudan’s Civil War,” and A Long Walk to Water.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, students color code the Chavez speech text to identify elements of an effective conclusion.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, students cite evidence to explain plot, characters, setting, and the interactions between the three elements.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 3, lesson 4 students read quotes from text and choose the best way to paraphrase the information. Students provide rationales for paraphrasing choices. Students also learn and practice distinguishing between paraphrasing and plagiarizing.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, lesson 2, students read the article, “Team Players,” and answer text-dependent questions. Exemplar answers for questions are provided in the teacher materials.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 1, students note main idea and details from informational text about brain development.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 2, lesson 3, students read an argument text, “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” and complete a note-taking document to collect evidence and evaluate both sides of an argument.

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations that materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to a culminating task that integrates skills.

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Each module has a Final Performance Task. This is a culminating project that takes place during Unit 3 of every module. Performance tasks are designed to help students synthesize and apply their learning from the module in an engaging and authentic way. Performance tasks are developed using the writing process, are scaffolded, and almost always include peer critique and revision. Performance tasks are not “on-demand” assessments. Students who demonstrate success with sequences of questions can complete the culminating tasks. Culminating tasks are rich and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know and are able to do using speaking and writing.

  • In Module 3, students read and answer text-dependent questions about Frederick Douglass. They conclude the unit by writing a narrative based on an event from Frederick Douglass’s life.
  • In Module 2A, students engage in text-specific activities including identifying authors’ claims and examining current and historical working conditions in America. They conclude the unit by creating a worker’s guide around conditions in the garment industry.
  • In Module 4B, students engage in various readings and text-dependent activities around water sustainability and management and conclude the unit with a position paper about the topic.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for evidence-based discussion that encourages the modeling of academic vocabulary and syntax.


Vocabulary addressed in each lesson is noted in teacher planning documents.

There are many opportunities and protocols throughout modules and within lessons that support academic vocabulary and syntax. Teacher materials support implementation of these standards to grow students’ skills.

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, lesson 15, students are asked to focus on the learning targets. Since there are two words that students may not know, ensure and accurate, the teaching notes suggest that the teacher call attention to those words and define them if needed before asking students for a Fist to Five response of the learning target.
  • In Module 4B, Unit 3, lesson 4, students are arranged in groups of two to complete a peer feedback form. The teacher models how the peer feedback process will work. The teaching notes suggest that the teacher point out that in the model, the participants made heavy use of the vocabulary on the Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart and encourage students to do the same in their own conversations.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 2, lesson 1, the teaching notes state, “Direct students’ attention to the learning targets for the day, and tell them that first they will learn about agents of change. Ask a student to define agent (someone who works for someone else). Discuss examples of agents, such as Hollywood agents, FBI agents, and real estate agents. Introduce the phrase agent of change—someone or something that works to change a situation. One major agent of change in the textile industry has been technology, as students saw in the photos. But they are going to be thinking about the people or groups of people that are agents of change.”
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 9, students are asked to do two things: silently read the first paragraph, circling words they do not know (that are not already underlined); and see if they can determine the gist of the first paragraph. After giving students time to read, teachers are directed to call on students and congratulate them on noticing these words and remind them that strong readers don’t know every word; rather, they notice the words that are unfamiliar to them and try to make sense of them.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.


Speaking and listening work requires students to gather evidence from texts and sources. Opportunities to talk and ask questions of peers and teachers about research, strategies and ideas are present throughout the year. The curriculum includes a host of protocols and graphic organizers to promote and scaffold academic discussions.

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, lesson 1, students participate in Discussion Appointments to discuss texts with multiple classmates.
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 4, students participate in a peer critique based on the peer's two-voice poem. Students are provided an opportunity to review and discuss the Criteria for Success indicated on the student Expectations and Directions information.
  • In Module 3, Unit 3, lesson 4, students participate in Writers’ Roundtable providing peer observation and feedback of writing using a checklist to promote discussion.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 3, lesson 2, students identify an author’s claim and discuss with their partners supporting reasons using evidence from the text.
  • In Module 4B, Unit 3, students publish and share a visual representation of their position paper.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects. Students write both "on demand" and "over extended periods" throughout every module.

Materials include short and longer writing tasks and projects. Writing tasks and projects are aligned to the grade-level standards being reviewed.

  • In Module 1, students write a selected response and short constructed response using strong evidence.
  • In Module 2A, students write a research synthesis extended response.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, students write on demand to analyze photos connected to a text with an entrance ticket.
  • In Module 2B, students read texts and complete series of writing activities geared toward completing their Pygmalion Essay.
  • In Module 3A, students write a scaffolded narrative storyboard for the children’s book.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 2, lesson 4, students document internet resources using a Research Notebook.
  • In Module 4B, students read texts and complete tasks in order to prepare for writing a position paper.
  • In Module 4B, students draft a position paper and reflect on the writing process in writing.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Writing opportunities are focused around students’ analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills over the course of the school year.

  • In Module 1, students write a literary analysis: Writing about the theme of survival in the form of a research-based two-voice poem.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, lesson 1, students write on demand to analyze photos connected to a text with an entrance ticket.
  • In Module 2A, students write an argument paper: Should Lyddie sign the petition?
  • In Module 2B, students read texts and complete series of writing activities geared toward completing Pygmalion essay.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 2, lesson 4 students document internet resources using a Research Notebook.
  • In Module 3, students write a children's narrative retelling an episode from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: an American Slave.
  • In Module 4A, students write a position paper: Should the American Academy of Pediatrics raise its recommended daily entertainment screen time from two hours to four hours?

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations that materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.


Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Writing opportunities are focused around students’ analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills over the course of the school year.

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, students collect information about characters, adding to their notes as they learn new information during reading. Students use the evidence to compare and contrast characters’ viewpoints.
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 5 students examine and identify various sources regarding the effects of clean water on villages in Sudan and collect evidence to support their information.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 2, lesson 4, students record textual evidence to support claims.
  • In Module 4B, students read texts and complete tasks in order to prepare for writing a position paper.
  • In Module 4B, Unit 1, lesson 4, students view a video, identify the main idea, and write down the details that support the main idea.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level and with opportunities for application both in and out of context.


Materials include some explicit instruction of some grammar and convention standards, but some are omitted and/or are not provided at the appropriate grade level. Few opportunities are provided for students to demonstrate some application of skills out of context. The “Writing Instruction in Expeditionary Learning Grades 3-8 ELA Curriculum” guide states, “The modules do not include decontextualized teaching of writing skills (i.e., stand-alone lessons about parts of a sentence or proper use of commas). Teachers are encouraged to add these specific lessons based on the needs of their particular students. The modules do not include explicit instruction on all parts of speech, phonics, decoding, letter-sound correspondence, etc. Some Common Core language standards are addressed in context, rather than as a separate scope and sequence (e.g., additional literacy instruction that includes small groups and guided reading)”

Opportunities are provided for students to demonstrate skills in context.

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, lesson 19, students are instructed how to revise and correct a common error found in student essays.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, lesson 20, students are instructed how to revise and correct a common error found in student essays.
  • In Module 3, Unit 3, lesson 1, students practice combining sentences with a sentence practice worksheet.
  • In Module 3, students are quizzed on complex sentences during the Mid-Unit Assessment.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials meet expectations for building knowledge with texts, vocabulary, and tasks. The instructional materials support the building of knowledge through repeated practice with complex text organized around a topic or theme, the building of key vocabulary throughout and across texts, and providing coherently sequenced questions and tasks to support students in developing literacy skills. Culminating tasks require students to read, discuss, analyze, and write about texts while students participate in a volume of reading to build knowledge. By integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening and language development, students engage in texts to build literacy proficiency in lessons, units, and across the modules. Modules are developed to support and build knowledge, to intentionally address academic vocabulary, and to scaffold supports so that students will independently demonstrate grade-level proficiency at the end of the school year.

Criterion 2a - 2h

32/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for texts being organized around a topic/topics to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.


Each module has texts that connect by a central topic or theme.

  • In Module 1, students explore the experiences of people of Southern Sudan during and after the Second Sudanese Civil War.
  • In Module 2A, students explore the issue of working conditions, historical and modern-day.
  • In Module 2B, students explore the concept of personal identity formation and transformation in both historical and modern-day societies.
  • In Module 3, students read the autobiography of Frederick Douglass, with specific attention to understanding how he uses language and how he tells his story in order to serve his purpose of working to abolish slavery.
  • In Module 4A, students explore adolescent brain development and the effects of entertainment screen time on the brain.
  • In Module 4B, students explore water sustainability and fresh water management.

The sequence of texts and sufficient lesson scaffolds ensure students are able to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

  • Modules include text with quantitative measures at multiple levels within the grade band.
  • In all modules students are provided with graphic organizers and recording forms to engage students actively and provide scaffolding for students in need. Students read text independently, in small groups, and as whole group read-alouds to scaffold reading instruction. Students are asked to actively monitor their reading comprehension.
  • In Module 1, Unit 1, lesson 5, students are asked to reread chapters read in class that day for homework and add quotes to the graphic organizer, as well as read independently Chapters 14-15 to complete Reader's Notes to express understanding.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 1, lesson 1 teachers are directed to read aloud slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation while students look at the text and actively read to promote fluency and comprehension.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 1, students participate in an independent reading check in. Students talk about the text with a peer while the teacher confers with students about their reading. Students discuss reading goals and create new ones.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials containing sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Throughout the materials, students independently and as a whole group complete questions and tasks that require analysis of individual texts.

  • In Module 2A, Unit 3, lesson 3, students read text and paraphrase the section into a single sentence using key details from the text.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, lesson 3 students complete Reader's Notes that ask them to write a sentence to capture the central idea of the text, to make inferences based on the text, and to analyze key details of events in the text.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 2, lesson 4, students describe how setting, characters, and plot of the text Pygmalion interact.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 2, lesson 14 students complete a graphic organizer analyzing the structure of a model essay to prepare to write their own essay.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, lesson 2, students are asked text-dependent questions that asks students to analyze the language, details, craft and structure of the text. For example, "Lyddie describes her mother as ‘queer in the head’ What does queer mean? How do the context clues help you figure it out? What work might we use today to describe Lyddie's mother?"
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 12, students complete a three-step process of rereading a poem to find out how the sound, words, and shape of a poem work together to create meaning.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 13, students answer the question "What poetic tools does Douglass use to reinforce this idea?" after reading the text three times.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 2, students analyze an excerpt from the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. On the third read students are asked "After Douglass figures out what abolition means, he says, 'The light broke in upon me by degrees.' What does this mean and what type of figurative language is this? How does it show the importance of this moment in Douglass's life?"
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 7, students answer why Douglass uses the word cunning to describe Covey, rather than intelligence or effectiveness and tell how that connects to his purpose in telling the story.
  • In Module 4B, students examine water and its relationship to the world and read anchor text, The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water by Charles Fishman and a National Geographic article, "Why Care about Water?” Activities in this module prompt students to engage in multiple close readings and include encouraging a deeper understanding of informational text structures and organization. Video review is included as students collect evidence and analyze information using this form of media.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials containing a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. Each unit and module contains text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to integrate knowledge and ideas both in individual texts and across multiple texts.

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 5, students support their ideas using strong evidence from two texts, "Water for South Sudan" and A Long Walk to Remember. Students use this evidence to write a two-voice poem.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, lesson 10, students analyze Lyddie's decision by answering text-dependent questions and then synthesize the information to make a list of reasons Lyddie should and should not sign the petition.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 3, lesson 8, students prepare for the Unit 3 assessment by annotating three separate sources in their Researcher's Notebooks.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lessons 13-16, students analyze and integrate knowledge and ideas about the institution of slavery from various sources.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 1, lesson 4, students add to Model Brain Development Anchor Chart that is used across multiple lessons and texts. Students integrate new information from a multimedia video and record new information.
  • In Module 4B, Unit 1, lesson 9, on the End-of-Unit assessment, students analyze and integrate knowledge and ideas about water and agriculture and trace an argument across a video and an article.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g., combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, students engage in multiple activities throughout the module that prompt them to collect and site evidence to support claims, confirm perspectives, support analysis, and culminate with an assessment that requires them to gather textual evidence to identify perspectives.
  • In Module 2A, students are introduced to the research process. Students generate research questions, gather information from multiple sources, and paraphrase. As a culminating task, students write an informative brochure that is a teenage consumer's guide to buying clothes. Teachers monitor completion of the task by having students identify where on the Research Roadmap anchor chart they think they are at the moment.
  • In Module 2B, students read several articles about gender roles and advertising and collect notes. Students will synthesize the information gathered into paragraphs, write an advertisement analysis, and create a "counter ad" that will recreate the advertisement without including stereotypes.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 2, students examine arguments, claims, and evidence that support claims to be able successfully participate in discussions around making their own claims and formally presenting them.
  • In Module 4B, students research and extend the writing process to publish a research-based position paper. Students analyze a model position paper and plan their own. Students work with partners and teams to share ideas and get feedback. Teachers can monitor student progress during the Mid-Unit Assessment when the first draft of the paper is due. Students then revise their position papers and create a visual representation that they will present to their classmates.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials meet expectations for Grade 7 including a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Opportunities to build vocabulary are found throughout the instructional materials.


Vocabulary instruction calls for students to think about the meaning of words. Definitions are provided in student-friendly language, and word meanings are taught with examples related to the text as well as examples from other contexts students would be more familiar with.

  • Throughout the modules and units, students discuss and clarify language of learning targets to build academic vocabulary.
  • In Module 2, Unit 1, lesson 13, students are reminded that they have previously discussed the words relevant evidence, coherent, and appropriate in Module 1, Unit 2, as they wrote their essays on A Long Walk to Water. Students had included these words in their Writer's Glossaries in Module 1.
  • In Module 1, Unit 1, lesson 4, students are asked to look at the word "refuge" and look for a prefix. Students then review what "re-" means and are given examples of words that use "re-." Students are then directed to look at the root word, fug. They are told that fug means to run away and then asked to look at both the prefix and the root word. Students are asked "Given this prefix and this root, what do you think this word means? What is a refugee camp? Why might they be set up?" The students are asked to extend the learning of the word family by answering what other words have the same root (fugitive, refuge).
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 3, students define the word cite and think of other words with a partner that have the words cite in them. Students are shown that these words have the cit root in them and are given the definition of the root.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, lesson 13, students are invited to turn to a partner and share about a time that they were in an argument. Students discuss what causes an argument and students use this definition to build to what an argument means in writing.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, students keep a Reader's Dictionary to note word definitions that will be used throughout the unit. Students use the Reader's Dictionary while writing and when completing an argument essay.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, lesson 1, students define the term self-worth and write about it being different from being "stuck up" or "conceited." Students write about what it would look like for a person to have a sense of self-worth and how that can play a role in someone's identity.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 7, students determine the meaning of words in context, determine the meaning of words using roots, and answer questions about what sentences mean. The teacher models think aloud of finding context clues for words such as deprived in the text, giving specific evidence from the text that provided context clues to the words meaning.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 8, students complete an entry task that asks them to use sentences from a text to define roots, prefixes, and suffixes and also to define the word in the text.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 5, students are provided with a text excerpt and questions for "The Fight with Covey." The excerpt includes student-friendly definitions of words, as well as some words that students will need to define themselves based on context clues.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 1, lesson 19, a resource of definitions in the article “Growing Up Digital" is provided for teacher and student reference.

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectation for materials supporting students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Students are supported through the writing process with mentor text. Feedback is provided by peers, the teacher, and self-evaluations to ensure that students' writing skills are increasing throughout the year.

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 2 students use Two-Voice Poem: Graphic Organizers that have received feedback from the teacher. Teachers are directed to state, “Writers often play with several ideas before they generate their writing plans, and that they often talk over their ideas.” Students will then participate in a back-to-back and face-to-face discussion in preparation to write.
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 4, students participate in a peer critique protocol to review their two-voice poems.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 2, lesson 3, students focus on identifying the rhetoric words and terms in Chavez’s speech and add to an anchor chart of words that can be used when writing.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 3, lesson 13 students revisit past writings and reflect on their growth. The teaching notes state, “Congratulate students on their work and their accomplishments in reading and writing over the course of the module. Tell them to take a few minutes now to consider what they will take away from this module about writing. Distribute student essays and rubrics on Pygmalion (from Unit 2), as well as students’ Writing Improvement Trackers (from Unit 1). Ask students to use the Writing Improvement Tracker to reflect on their writing skills as they did before writing their essays on Pygmalion.”
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 12, students write a reflection on Frederick Douglass’s narrative after discussing with a partner reflection questions.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 15, students review a writing rubric to ensure that they understand the criteria and review a model essay “Telling the Truth about Slavery” in preparation to write their own essay.
  • In Module 4, Unit 3, lesson 8, students revise vocabulary and conventions of their argument writings based on feedback from peers. It is also noted that students should revisit the writing from A Long Walk to Remember from Unit 1 to help them in the self-reflection in the next lesson.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

  • In Module, Unit 1, students build background knowledge about physical environment and reading maps to prepare to read about Southern Sudan.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 3, lesson 4 students use their Researcher’s Roadmap to help identify credible sources in research. Students also clarify how to read a source while researching about human conditions in the workplace.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 3, lesson 8, students are asked to identify which sources they used from a “works cited” list that is provided in the Brochure Planning Guide. It is noted that students will develop the skills they need to create their own citations in Module 4.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 3, lesson 4, students are introduced to the research process and the process of creating quality questions while working on an Ad Analysis Task.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 2, students use a Historical Context Anchor Chart to gather evidence and hold their thinking about the historical context of the Narrative. Students will study slavery, the debate over slavery, and the life of Frederick Douglass.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 1 students build background information about Victorian England and the setting and time period of the play Pygmalion using a gallery walk of images and texts.
  • In Module 4, Unit 2, lesson 4, students review the skill of paraphrasing which is taught in Module 2. Students also use their Researcher’s Notebook to evaluate sources.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

The majority of lessons require some independent readings of text followed by text specific questions and tasks that reflect student accountability. Additionally, most homework assignments include independent readings and tasks that require students to produce evidence of reading.

  • In Module 2A, the overview outlines how independent reading is structured with accountability in place after students finish reading. The overview stresses the importance of increasing the volume of reading and launching an independent reading plan for students. Students have reading time in and outside of class with opportunities to share outside reading with the class. Units 2 and 3 include time to work on an independent reading routine that is in a calendar embedded into the daily lessons
  • In Module 2B, Unit 3, lesson 7, students participate in an Independent Reading check-in: they are supported with checking to see if they met previous independent reading goals as well as creating new goals.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 1, students participate in an independent reading check-in. Students talk about the text with a peer while teacher confers with students about their reading. Students discuss reading goals and create new ones.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 3, lesson 6, students analyze and evaluate Independent Reading texts to create cheat sheets for future students.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

TThe instructional materials meet expectations for instructional supports and usability. The use and design of the materials facilitate student learning. The materials take into account effective lesson structure and pacing, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding. Materials are designed to ease teacher planning and support teacher learning and understanding of the standards. Standards addressed and assessed in each lesson are clearly noted and easy to locate, and the teacher’s notes included with each lesson provide useful annotations and suggestions that anticipate both teacher and student needs. The materials reviewed provide teachers with multiple strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners. Content is accessible to all learners to be supported in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards. Students who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English are regularly provided with extensive opportunities to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards. Materials also provide students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level some extension and advanced opportunities. Materials also support the effective use of technology to enhance student learning.

Criterion 3a - 3e

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8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The use and design of the instructional materials facilitate student learning. The design of the materials is consistent, simple, and not distracting. The curriculum map and module and unit overviews make lesson structure and pacing clear. The 32 weeks of instruction is reasonable for a school year. All resources include clear directions, explanations, and standards alignments.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

  • The Grade 7 curriculum is comprised of four eight-week modules.
  • Four modules make up one year of instruction. Each grade level has six modules. Teachers can choose between an A and a B option for two of the modules.
  • Within each module there are three units. Each module has the same sequence of units. Unit 1 is Building Background Knowledge, Unit 2 is Extended Reading and Research, and Unit 3 is Extended Writing. Modules are anchored by one or more books as a central text.
    • For example, in Module 2, Unit 1 focuses on Building Background Knowledge and "What is Identify and How is it Formed?" Unit 2 focuses on Identity Transformation in Pygmalion, and Unit 3 focuses on a Culminating Project and "Analyzing Gender Roles in Advertising."
  • Materials include a curriculum plan located online at eleducation.org that lists the topic, focus, central texts, and major writing tasks in each module.
  • Materials include a curriculum map located online at eleducation.org that includes a module description, assessments, and standards assessed for each module.
  • A module overview is found at the beginning of each module. The module overview explains the story of the module, lists standards assessed, and provides a week-at-a-glance planning chart. For example, the Module 2A overview is found on pages 2-19.
  • There are unit overviews and a Unit-at-a-Glance located online at eleducation.org for each of the three units in each module.
Materials also include detailed daily lessons plans and supporting materials. Lessons are 45 minutes long for Grade 7. Teachers can download the MS Word version of the lesson plan files to modify them. Each module contains 35-40 lessons.
  • All lessons have three sections: Opening, Work Time, and Closing and Assessment. For example, Module 1, Unit 1, lesson 1, has the following parts: Opening (20 minutes), which is broken down into Engaging the Reader (10 minutes) and Introduction Learning Target (10 minutes); Work Time (10 minutes), which comprises Engaging the Reader Part II (10 minutes); and, Closing and Assessment (5 minutes), which comprises the Debrief: Revisiting Learning Targets and Creating Partner Discussion Criteria.
  • Each lesson includes a title that names the literacy skills students will work on as well as the content, long-term learning targets that name the standards addressed in the lesson, supporting learning targets that specifically name what learning will take place in the lesson, ongoing assessment to be used as formative assessments, an agenda to map out the day’s outline, and teaching notes that guide teachers on how to prepare for the lesson. Also included are lesson vocabulary that list both academic and content words being addressed in the lesson, lesson materials, a Meeting Student’s Needs column to suggest differentiation and scaffolding, and all supporting materials that include student-facing materials to be distributed to students.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet expectations that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

  • Each Module provides approximately eight weeks of instruction. Four modules make up a year of instruction which provides approximately 32 weeks of instruction.
  • The total number of lessons of available for Grade 7 is 238. However, teachers are given a choice which two modules they want to exclude. For example, the teacher can select Module 2A or Module 2B and Module 3A or 3B. Therefore, the total number of lessons taught range between 159 and 161 which is a reasonable number of lessons to complete during a school year.
  • This pacing allows for maximum student understanding. Time is built in for teachers to modify lessons to tailor to their student’s needs. The program allows flexibility for teachers to rely on professional judgment to modify pacing.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet expectations that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).

Materials include but are not limited to graphic organizers, note catchers, text dependent questions, word-catchers, reference charts, anchor charts, unit assessments, supporting excerpts or texts, close read guides, jigsaw question strips, essay rubrics, reference aids, model writings, entrance and exit tickets, teacher reference sheets, vocabulary words lists and definitions, feedback forms, and writing prompts.

  • Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 1, includes a Powerful Stories anchor chart and a note-catcher. Lesson 7 includes clear directions for second read of the text and a close read guide with note-taker. Also included is a Roots, Prefixes, and Suffixes reference sheet.
  • Module 4A, Unit 1, lesson 1, includes a notices and wonders note catcher, a gallery walk teacher reference, a supporting text, a vocabulary anchor chart, an informational text structure map graphic organizer with teacher reference model, a gist note taker, a vocabulary note taker, and a text and questions chart. Lesson 6 includes a digital revolution text structure graphic organizer, an excerpt note taker, a teacher reference close read guide, and a model brain development anchor chart. Lesson 10 includes a text excerpt, End-of-Unit Assessment directions with chart and questions, End-of-Unit Assessment teacher reference.

Student resources include clear directions. Activities that are completed with teacher guidance have directions included in the teacher lesson plan notes. Resources that are completed independently or in small groups without direct teacher guidance include clear directions and explanations so that the task can be completed.

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 4, the lesson includes a peer critique expectations and directions form written clearly: directions include, "Partner: Gives feedback based on rubric criteria: "I like how you ____. You might consider____."
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, lesson 5, the lesson includes an entry task with the following directions: "Use your Reader's Notes from Chapters 6 and 7 of Lyddie to answer the questions below."
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 2, the lesson includes a T-chart with the following directions clearly written: "Write each word in the column that it belongs in. Complete this task with a partner."

Reference aids including glossaries, photographs, anchor charts, and handouts are clearly labeled as such at the top and in the teacher’s materials. Reference aids are labeled correctly.

  • In Module 4A, Unit 3, lesson 7, an example of student material reference aids can be found on page 154.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

Alignment to the CCSS is documented in multiple places in the curriculum. CCSS standards are documented on the Grade 6-8 Curriculum Map, at the module level, at the unit level, and in the Teacher's notes for each lesson in the form of Long-Term Learning Targets. Alignment for all assessments are also provided in the Curriculum Overview.

The grade-level curriculum map lists all assessments and which standards are being assessed. This map also includes a chart that illustrates which standards are being assessed in each module. These maps can be found for each grade level at eleducation.org.

At the beginning of each module there is a Week-at-a-Glance chart as well as a Unit-at-a-Glance chart that provides teachers with an overview of standards taught and assessed in each lesson. At the beginning of each module there is a module overview—a description of assessments which includes the performance task, Mid-Unit Assessments, and End-of-Unit Assessments. This overview includes standards being assessed in each assessment. The performance task, Mid-Unit Assessment, and End-of-Unit Assessment for each module includes alignment documentation of the standards addressed.

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 6, the performance task provides long-term learning targets in the lesson (page 84) and on the student-facing material (page 88).
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, the Assessments Overview is found on pages 21-22.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, the Week-at-a-Glance chart is found on page 13. Unit-at-a-Glance is found on page 35.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, lesson 5, the long-term learning targets assessed are provided in the lesson (page 135) and on the student-facing material for the mid-unit assessment (page 145).

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 contain visual design (whether in print or digital) that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The material design is simple and consistent. All modules are comprised of materials that display a simple design and include adequate space to capture thoughts as needed. The font, size, margins, and spacing are consistent and readable. All modules include graphic organizers that are easy to read and understand. There are no distracting images, and the layout of the student consumables is clear and concise.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials meet expectations for teacher learning and understanding of the standards. The materials include a teacher's edition with annotations and suggestions on how to present the content. The materials include adult-level explanations and examples and explanations of the role of specific standards in the context of the overall materials. The instructional approaches of the program are explained in the context of the overall curriculum. Although few strategies for informing stakeholders about the program and about how they can support student progress and achievement are provided, overall, the materials do support teacher learning and understanding of the standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectation for materials containing a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

Materials include a teacher’s edition that provides teaching notes for each lesson. These notes provide an overview of the lesson, directives for the teacher, and explanations of what learning will occur. The notes also give suggestions of specific actions teachers can take to promote learning or plan for future learning. Materials also include student “listen for” statements in lessons. These "listen for" statements provide teachers with model student answers to ensure students are on target.

  • Module 2A, Unit 1, lesson 5 includes a note to the teacher to listen for students to identify the character’s problem-solving skills, determination, and courage to ensure that students are comprehending.
  • Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 3 includes suggestions for maximizing student understanding: "If students produce strong sandwiches, consider asking permission to display and explain their work as a model, for example, under a document camera. You could also have selected students repeat to the entire class strong work in the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol."
  • Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 7 explains the lessons purpose in the teaching notes on page 183. The notes clearly explain the purpose of the lesson, what will happen in the lesson, and for the teacher to consider referring to previous discussions to better understand the text. The teacher is also prompted to prepare for the lesson by taping four quote cards under students’ desks in advance and review the excerpt for the lesson.
  • Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 9 includes the document, "A Close Reading Guide, Second Read," that includes guidance on how to support students during reading.
  • Module 4B, Unit 2, lesson 12 includes guidance to support students that need practice with oral response or extend processing time. The teacher’s notes state, “Consider selecting students ahead of time for cold calls. Those who need practice in oral response or extended processing time can be told the prompt before class begins to prepare for their participation."

Technology is listed and/or suggested when appropriate in the section Resources and Links and Multimedia.

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, lesson 2, the Meeting Students’ Needs column suggest that for students who struggle with complex vocabulary, consider adding visual images to the definition to the Reader’s Dictionary. To further support ELLs, consider providing definitions of challenging vocabulary in the student’s home language. Resources such as Google Translate and bilingual translation dictionaries can help.
  • In Module 4B, Unit 1 under Resources and Links on page 24 there is a link provided to a site to search for images with licenses to reuse. http://search.creativecommons.org/.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectation of materials containing a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

Materials include teachers notes and other documents that explain and give rationales for teacher actions, accommodations, pacing, instructional materials, and resources.

  • The "Preparing to Teach a Module: Guidance for Coaches and Teacher Leaders" document found at eleducation.org explains how to prepare to teach a module and give a guidance timeline with detailed direction.
  • The "Assessment Design in Expeditionary Learning Grades 3-8 Curriculum" document outlines the step-by-step process for designing effective assessments aligned to the CCSS.
  • The "Help Students Read Closely" document explains the close reading process and explicitly demonstrates how a teacher plans for a close read lesson.
  • The "Writing Instruction in Expeditionary Learning Grades 3-8 ELA Curriculum" document explains the how and why of Expeditionary Learning’s approach to writing instruction.

Explanations and examples can also be found in the lesson narratives, the Meeting Student's Needs section, and in Preparation and Materials for each lesson.

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 1, the lesson provides a rationale for using graphic organizers and recording forms: "Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning."
  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, lesson 2, the lesson contains an explanation regarding the importance of a teacher reading a complex text aloud: "Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency and comprehension for students. They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. "
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 2, the lesson includes a rationale for the use of guiding questions: " Guiding Questions provide motivation for student engagement in the topic and give a purpose to reading a text closely."

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet expectations for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

Materials include a document, “Preface to the Modules" found on eleducation.org. The preface includes an introduction to how the materials address the Common Core shifts as well as a detailed account of how the CCSS standards have a role in the curriculum.

  • The introduction to the preface states, “Expeditionary Learning’s Grades 3–8 ELA Curriculum has been designed by teachers for teachers to meet the needs and demands of the Common Core State Standards: to address and bring to life the shifts in teaching and learning required by the CCSS. To prepare students for college and the workplace, where they will be expected to read a high volume of complex informational text and write informational text, the shifts highlight the need for students to learn and practice these skills early on. This curriculum has been designed to make this learning process engaging with compelling topics, texts, and tasks.”

Each module contains a Module Overview which provides a summary to show how different ELA standards are applied to develop knowledge and expertise in content areas.

  • In Module 1, the overview states, “In this eight-week module, students explore the experiences of people of Southern Sudan during and after the Second Sudanese Civil War. They build proficiency in using textual evidence to support ideas in their writing, both in shorter responses and in an extended essay. In Unit 1, students begin the novel A Long Walk to Water (720L) by Linda Sue Park. Students will read closely to practice citing evidence and drawing inferences from this compelling text as they begin to analyze and contrast the points of view of the two central characters, Salva and Nya. They also will read informational text to gather evidence on the perspectives of the Dinka and Nuer tribes of Southern Sudan. In Unit 2, students will read the remainder of the novel, focusing on the commonalities between Salva and Nya in relation to the novel’s theme: how individuals survive in challenging environments. (The main characters’ journeys are fraught with challenges imposed by the environment, including the lack of safe drinking water, threats posed by animals, and the constant scarcity of food. They are also challenged by political and social environments.) As in Unit 1, students will read this literature closely alongside complex informational texts (focusing on background on Sudan and factual accounts of the experiences of refugees from the Second Sudanese Civil War). Unit 2 culminates with a literary analysis essay about the theme of survival. Unit 3 brings students back to a deep exploration of character and point of view: students will combine their research about Sudan with specific quotes from A Long Walk to Water as they craft a research-based two-voice poem, comparing and contrasting the points of view of the two main characters, Salva and Nya. The two-voice poem gives students an opportunity to use both their analysis of the characters and theme in the novel and their research about the experiences of the people of Southern Sudan during the Second Sudanese Civil War. This task addresses NYSP12 ELA Standards RL.7.6, RL.7.11, W.7.3a, d, W.7.4, W.7.5, W.7.8, W.7.9, L.7.1, and L.7.2.”

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies.

Materials include online resources found on eleducation.org that provide explanations of the instructional approaches and identify research-based strategies. The preface to the modules includes how materials address the Common Core shifts, provides research, explains the story and structure of the modules, and explains how the materials integrate reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language strands through lessons, assessments, engagement strategies, and differentiation.

  • The “Introduction to Preface to the Modules: Introduction to Grades 3–8 ELA Curriculum” document states, “Some structures, approaches, and strategies may be new to teachers. The materials have been designed to guide teachers carefully through the process of building students’ skills and knowledge in alignment with the standards. The modules also have been designed to build teacher capacity, so that as teachers become more familiar with the structures and strategies, they can adapt the materials to the needs of their specific students.”
  • The “Preface to the Modules: Introduction to Grades 3–8 ELA Curriculum” document states, "Expeditionary Learning’s instructional practices emphasize student inquiry, critical thinking, and craftsmanship. In these ELA modules, students engage in original research and deep interdisciplinary investigations of rich academic topics, using their learning to create authentic, high-quality, academic products to share with outside audiences."
  • Materials provide links to other resources websites that include a research document, “The Importance of Increasing the Volume of Reading.” This document explains research that supports increasing the volume of reading as well as rigor and relevance.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials containing strategies for informing stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers, about the ELA/literacy program but provide few suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, the Performance Task on page 26 in the section Options for Teacher suggests that "Students may present their stories to members of the school community."
  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, lesson 9, the Meeting Students' Needs section suggests that teachers communicated with the cooperating service providers about students who will receive accommodations for assessments.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 4, lesson 2, the Meeting Students’ Needs section suggests that teachers invite coordinating service providers to your class to check in with students who need more reading support. This is an opportunity to ensure that students comprehend their independent reading and monitor their practice.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials meet expectations for providing teacher resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the standards. Formative and summative assessment opportunities are provided throughout the materials. All assessments clearly indicate which standards are being emphasized, and teachers are provided guidance on how to interpret student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Routines and opportunities to monitor student progress are included throughout the materials.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Each module incorporates seven formal assessments, in addition to daily opportunities to check for understanding via homework, entry and exit tickets, and in class assignments.

The formal assessments are broken into three categories which include Mid-Unit Assessments, End-of-Unit Assessments, and a Culminating Performance Task.

  • Mid-Unit Assessments are on-demand, tied to standards addressed in the first half of the unit, are a checkpoint before teacher’s progress to the second half of the unit, and usually emphasize reading.
  • End-of-Unit Assessments are on-demand, tied to standards addressed throughout the unit, assess understanding of both content and skills, and usually emphasize writing.
  • Culminating Performance Tasks take place over the course of Unit 3, are tied to standards addressed across Units 1 and 2, are aligned to a mode of writing, always involve writing from sources and citing evidence, and always require research to build and present knowledge.
    • Module 4B Mid-Unit Assessments include: Unit 1, “The Water Crisis Isn’t Global. It’s Local”: Listening for Main Ideas and Supporting Details; Unit 2, Simulated Research Task: Water Management Strategies; and Unit 3, Final Draft of Position Paper. The End-of-Unit Assessments include: Unit 1, We Need to Pay More Attention to Water: Tracing and Evaluating Arguments in Text and Video; Unit 2, Making a Claim about Water Management, and Unit 3, Final Draft of Position Paper and Reflection on the Writing Process. The Culminating Performance Task that takes place in Unit 3 is a Visual Representation of the Position Paper.

Daily formative assessment opportunities are included in lessons as well as the unit overviews.

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, the overview on pages 33-28 includes an Ongoing Assessments chart that lists assessment opportunities in lessons. For example, lesson 9 on page 36 lists a written self-reflection, world café charts, and prewriting ideas.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 1, lesson 4 students show a Fist to Five Self-Assessment to address the learning target, “By engaging in discussion with my partner, I can analyze one section of Lyddie to deepen my understanding of the plot, characters, and setting.”
  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, lesson 1 students respond to tasks in journals to show their understanding of how to make inferences about the central ideas of "Nadia's Hands" and begin building a definition about identity.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 12 students complete an exit ticket which is a self-assessment for student reflection and to measure progress.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 3, lesson 3 students complete and exit ticket to show where they are in the Steps to Writing a Paper. Teachers collect the exit tickets to monitor student progress.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the requirement for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized.


Each formal assessment emphasizes the same standards as the accompanying lessons. Standards are also provided in the unit overview and other planning materials. Formative assessment occurs throughout unit lessons and are connected to the standards addressed in the lesson.

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 6 the Final Performance Task gives students a chance to demonstrate their understanding of the characters and issues of survival by crafting and presenting a two-voice poem assessing CCSS -ELA RL.7.6, Rl.7.11, W.7.3a, W.7.3d, W.7.4, W.7.5, W.7.8, W.7.9. L.7.1, and L.7.2. Standards are denoted on the Assessment Overview page and in lesson 9 as long-term targets.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 3, lesson 9 the End-of-Unit Assessment has students complete their research on the use of stereotypical gender roles in advertisements and synthesize their findings into several paragraphs in which they acknowledge their sources assessing CCSS-ELA W.7.7 and W.7.8. Standards are denoted on the Assessment Overview page and in lesson 9 as long-term targets.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 5, the Mid-Unit Assessment has students read a text about Frederick Douglass, then answer questions in which they analyze the text and support their conclusions with evidence from the text assessing CCSS-ELA RI.7.1. Standards are denoted on the Assessment Overview page and in lesson 5 as long-term targets.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations of assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.


Materials provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance.

  • In Module 2A, Unit 3, lesson 5, teachers are provided with guidance and direction around assessing the performance of struggling students; the Meeting Student’s Needs column states, "For students who struggle, consider checking on their answer to Question 1 before they continue. Mark their answer correct or incorrect, then let them know which supporting research question they should use to guide the rest of their assessment."
  • In Module 2B,Unit 1, lesson 5 the lesson includes guidance around next steps for the Mid- Unit Assessment and explains that students will correct their own assessments.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 7 teachers are given guidance around the scoring of the Mid- Unit Assessment. The lesson notes state, “In determining grades, Part 1 of the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment should count much less heavily than Part 2.”

Materials provide suggestions for follow-up.

  • In Module 3, Unit 3, lesson 11, the teacher’s notes state, “If a group is having trouble, you may suggest they look for metaphors or a phrase that pulls them. This is a good way to identify powerful elements. Or they may want to look for turning point in a character’s development.”
  • In Module 4B, Unit 3, lesson 6, the Meeting Students’ Needs column states, “Students who indicated that they did not meet the learning targets proficiently may benefit from an opportunity to revise their work before sharing it with a wider audience.”

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectation for including routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Materials include an "Appendix: Protocols and Strategies" that includes multiple procedures to monitor student progress. Protocols and Strategies that focus on Checking for Understanding and Ongoing Assessment include Admit and Exit Tickets, Catch and Release, Cold Call, Equity Sticks, Fist-to-Five, Four Corners, Go-Around, Guided Practice, Human Bar Graph, No Opt Out, Presentation Quizzes, Red Light, Green Light, Tracking Progress, Turn and Talk, and White Boards. These protocols and strategies are used in the majority of lessons to monitor student progress.

Materials include routine checks embedded in lessons to help teachers monitor student understanding.

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, lesson 5, a note in the Homework section suggests that teachers give individualized feedback to each student about his or her progress on the learning target, such as “I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis.”
  • In Module 3, Unit 3, lesson 3, the teaching notes state, “At the end of class today, students hand in their My Children’s Book Plan. Use this, along with the exit ticket, to identify students who may need additional time or support in this important first step.”
  • In Module 4B, Unit 2, lesson 2, the lesson debrief includes a “Fist to Five” checking for understanding for students to self-assess themselves on the learning target.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Independent reading is built into units and lessons with independent reading check-ins built in. Time is allotted for students to choose independent reading books and check-ins with graphic organizers are clearly evident.

  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, lesson 7, students are provided independent reading as part of their homework assignment.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 5, the teacher's guide suggests that the teacher use the Independent Reading Status Check located on page 150 during the lesson for each individual student.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, lesson 10, students participate in an independent reading celebration to highlight the texts that they have read.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 7, students have an Independent Reading Check-in with the teacher to review their independent reading progress.
  • In Module 4B, Unit 3, lesson 5 students can use the Independent Reading Cheat Sheet Planner to capture their thinking. Students are held accountable for their reading by using the cheat sheet during the next day's lesson when students share out their thinking recorded the day prior during the current lesson.

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
9/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards. The materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. Materials regularly provide support for students who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English, but additional extensions and advanced opportunities are needed for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meets the expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so that the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

Materials provide supports noted within the lesson and also in the Meeting Students’ Needs column to provide teachers with multiple strategies for supporting all learners. Resources are provided on eleducation.org to meet the needs of students.

  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, lesson 2 the Meeting the Students’ Needs column states, “Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.”
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 5, the Meeting the Students’ Needs column states, “Many students will benefit from seeing questions posted on the board via a document camera, but reveal questions one at a time to keep students focused on the question at hand.” This same lesson also includes the note, “For students who continue to struggle with third read questions, consider omitting some of the questions required for homework. Students can then focus on given quality answers to a few questions rather than struggling to answer all of them.”
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 2, the Meeting Students’ Needs column states, “During this work time, you may want to pull a small group of students to support them in answering the questions and determining the meaning of vocabulary words. Some students will need more guided practice before they are ready for independent work.”
  • In Module 4A, Unit 2, lesson 9, the Meeting Students’ Needs column states, “If students struggle to write or select strong supporting research questions, consider providing question stems or model questions for them to modify for their research.”
  • At eleduation.org the document "Common Core Interventions for Adolescent Readers" suggests interventions for students who are struggling.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet expectations for materials regularly providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards. All students engage in the same complex text. Scaffolds are provided so that all students can access the complex texts and meet or exceed grade level standards.

Resources are provided on eleducation.org to meet the needs of students who are below grade level or an English Language Learner with opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade level standards.

  • The "Common Core Interventions for Adolescent Readers" document located on eleducation.org suggests interventions for students who are struggling.
  • The "A Guide to Support English Language Learners" document located on eleducation.org provides strategies for scaffolding learning for students who read, write, speak, or listen in a language other than English.

Materials provide supports noted within the lesson and also in the Meeting Students’ Needs column to provide teachers with multiple strategies for supporting all learners.

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, lesson 3 the student materials include two versions of a two-voice poem planner graphic organizer, one having more scaffolding to support students who need additional support.
  • In Module 2A, Unit 3, lesson 2, the Meeting the Students’ Needs column states, “To support English language learners, consider posting the definitions of vocabulary relevant to research for the duration of this unit.”
  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, lesson 3, the Meeting Student’s Needs column states, “Consider pairing students with emergent literacy, such as ELLS, heterogeneously with a more proficient student; pulling a small group to explicitly model these strategies in a more intensive or supportive setting; or having the ELL teacher push into this lesson specifically. You might also consider modifying any homework text with inserted activities, worksheets, or annotated text that would assist them in putting these strategies into place for themselves.”
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 2, the Meeting Student’s Needs column states, “During this work time, you may want to pull a small group of students to support them in answering the questions and determining the meaning of vocabulary words. Some students will need more guided practice before they are ready for independent work."

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 partially meet the requirements for regularly including extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Materials regularly include optional extensions in the unit overviews that provide advanced opportunities for students in a variety of modalities. In unit overviews each unit includes optional experts, fieldwork, service suggestions, and extensions to provide more advanced opportunities.

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, the following optional opportunities for students are provided: Experts: Invite experts to come speak to the class about the connection between the Lost Boys of Sudan and your state. Locate refugees from Sudan to come and answer the questions students generate. Service: Coordinate a local refugee center to inquire about service opportunities. Extensions: Social Studies teachers may complement this unit with a focus on similar guiding questions, which were developed form the Social Studies Core Curriculum; see guiding questions above. Science teachers may directly connect with this unit with a focus on science Display Core Idea LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems, as written in the Next Generation Science Standards. Science teachers could use the Sudanese environment as a case study for analysis of interdependence in a particular biome.
  • In Module 1, Unit 3, the following optional opportunities for students are provided: Arrange for a local writer to visit the class and discuss the process of writing a poem or give students advice on their own work. Fieldwork: Arrange for students to attend a poetry reading. Service: Arrange for students to present their poems to an outside group such as a writer’s club, a library’s writer showcase meeting, other classes within the school, the district’s school board, a school PTO meeting, etc. Extensions: With social studies’ teachers, look for connections to studies of Africa, refugee issues, and immigration acclimation to a new country; With art, drama or music teachers, look for ways to connect African cultural arts to the understanding of these two characters’ voices in the poems as well as possible uses of music and art in presentation of the two-voice poems (page 8).

In daily lessons, limited teacher notes or Meeting Students’ Needs notes refer to extensions or more advanced opportunities for above-level students than to those on level or below level.

  • In Module 2B, Unit 1, the Meeting Students’ Needs column states, “If students produce strong sandwiches, consider asking permission to display and explain their work as a model.”
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 7, the Meeting Students’ Needs column states, “Consider offering selected, shorter or longer passages to specific groups based on the readiness and needs of the group. This provides an opportunity for students to read a complex text within the seventh grade-level span, but it differentiates the length of the text, not the complexity. Longer passages provide an opportunity for students reading above grade level to be challenged with a larger quantity of complex text."

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed meet the expectations of providing ample opportunities for teachers to use grouping strategies during lessons.

Grouping strategies are explained in detail in the document "Appendix: Protocols and Strategies."

  • The Appendix includes grouping protocols and strategies such as Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face, Carousel Brainstorm, Chalk Talk, Concentric Circles (Inner Circle/Outer Circle), Discussion Appointments, Final Word, Fishbowl, Gallery Walk/Hosted Gallery Walk, Give One, Get One, Move On (GoGoMo), Infer the Topic, Interactive Word Wall, Jigsaw, Mystery Quotes, Peer Critique, Praise, Question, Suggestion, Quiz-Quiz-Trade, Rank-Talk-Write, Say Something, Science Talks, Socratic Seminar, Take a Stand, Tea Party, Think-Pair-Share, and World Café.

Lessons include grouping strategies regularly during instruction.

  • In Module 2A, Unit 3, lesson 2, students work in triads to complete research question strips.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 3, lesson 3, students jigsaw learning and also participate in a “One-Example Go-Round” to discuss media techniques they are familiar with.
  • In Module 3, Unit 2, lesson 2, students participate in a peer critique to give feedback while writing an argument essay.
  • In Module 4A, Unit 2, lesson 13, students host a discussion with a partner to discuss research about daily entertainment screen time.

Indicator 3s

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructions materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet expectations that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The curriculum modules are all available for free download at the Expeditionary Learning website. Each module can be downloaded as one folder. Each folder contains Word and PDF files and folders for each individual unit in the module. Lessons can also be viewed online instead of being downloaded.

The Resources tab of the Expeditionary Learning website provides links to Curriculum Overview Documents, Supplementary Curriculum Documents, Teaching Guides, and videos.

Accessibility was tested on Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, an Android phone, an iPhone, and an iPad. All access was successful.

Indicator 3s3v

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Materials reviewed are compatible with multiple Internet browsers and operating systems, follow universal programming style, and are accessible on tables and mobile devices. Materials support the effective use of technology throughout modules and lessons and can be easily customized for individual learners when downloaded and modified as a word document. Materials do not support the use of adaptive or other technological innovations and do not include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other.

Indicator 3t

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Technology is used throughout modules and lessons to enhance student learning and draw attention to evidence and texts.

  • In Module 2A, Unit 2, lesson 1, students are introduced to the guiding question of the unit and use technology to examine and discuss images of working conditions and to build background knowledge on Cesar Chavez.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 3, lesson 12, students study how an author uses technology purposefully to communicate his message and they also use it as a guide to aid in the planning of their counter ads.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 15, students use a notetaker to gather evidence from the webisode, “Frederick Douglass Text from Freedom: A History of US.” The webisode text is also included for student reference.
  • In Module 4B, Unit 2, lesson 16, students examine a visual display using a document camera to identify its use in a presentation.

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials do not meet expectations that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. Adaptive or other technological innovations are not included in the instructional materials. The only digital instructional materials provided are documents which teachers can edit themselves.

Indicator 3u.ii

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students. The materials can be downloaded from eleducation.org as Microsoft Word documents. These documents can then be edited as necessary to support student learning.

Indicator 3v

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials do not include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate. Professional development is offered at eleducation.org, but does not include observable means of collaboration.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Materials reviewed are compatible with multiple Internet browsers and operating systems, follow universal programming style, and are accessible on tables and mobile devices. Materials support the effective use of technology throughout modules and lessons and can be easily customized for individual learners when downloaded and modified as a word document. Materials do not support the use of adaptive or other technological innovations and do not include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructions materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet expectations that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The curriculum modules are all available for free download at the Expeditionary Learning website. Each module can be downloaded as one folder. Each folder contains Word and PDF files and folders for each individual unit in the module. Lessons can also be viewed online instead of being downloaded.

The Resources tab of the Expeditionary Learning website provides links to Curriculum Overview Documents, Supplementary Curriculum Documents, Teaching Guides, and videos.

Accessibility was tested on Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, an Android phone, an iPhone, and an iPad. All access was successful.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Technology is used throughout modules and lessons to enhance student learning and draw attention to evidence and texts.

  • In Module 2A, Unit 2, lesson 1, students are introduced to the guiding question of the unit and use technology to examine and discuss images of working conditions and to build background knowledge on Cesar Chavez.
  • In Module 2B, Unit 3, lesson 12, students study how an author uses technology purposefully to communicate his message and they also use it as a guide to aid in the planning of their counter ads.
  • In Module 3, Unit 1, lesson 15, students use a notetaker to gather evidence from the webisode, “Frederick Douglass Text from Freedom: A History of US.” The webisode text is also included for student reference.
  • In Module 4B, Unit 2, lesson 16, students examine a visual display using a document camera to identify its use in a presentation.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials do not meet expectations that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. Adaptive or other technological innovations are not included in the instructional materials. The only digital instructional materials provided are documents which teachers can edit themselves.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students. The materials can be downloaded from eleducation.org as Microsoft Word documents. These documents can then be edited as necessary to support student learning.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
+
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials do not include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate. Professional development is offered at eleducation.org, but does not include observable means of collaboration.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Wed Jan 18 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2016

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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