Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

Benchmark Grade 5 materials partially meet the expectations of alignment. The materials meet most expectations of text quality and complexity, and many tasks and questions are grounded in evidence. . Some speaking and listening activities may need to be supported with extensions to dive deeper into the text, but focus on teaching protocols and modeling academic language are in place. Materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning during reading. The materials partially meet expectations for building knowledge within the grade level. Academic vocabulary is addressed in each module. There is partial evidence of the materials providing coherently sequenced questions and tasks to support students in developing literacy skills. Culminating tasks partially meet the criteria for requiring students to read, discuss, analyze, and write about texts while students participate in a volume of reading to build knowledge.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
38
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
26
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
34
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

Grade 5 instructional materials meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. Most tasks and questions are text based and grounded in evidence. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous, evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Some speaking and listening activities may need to be supported with extensions to dive deeper into the text, but focus on teaching protocols and modeling academic language are in place. Materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning during reading.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
18/20
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials for Grade 5 meet the criteria for including anchor texts that are of publishable quality, are worthy of especially careful reading and/or listening, and consider a range of student interests. Texts meet the text complexity criteria for each grade. Students engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

The texts provided throughout Grade 5 include anchor texts that are rich in language and engaging. Texts across units cover various content areas with multicultural themes which supports a wide range of text types. The quality and depth of the texts support multiple reads for multiple purposes. Texts are used to expand big ideas, to build academic vocabulary, and to facilitate access to future texts.

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, “The Structure of a Corn Plant” provides content knowledge of plant structures. The text contains labeled diagrams, definitions, and inset images of parts of the plant. In Week 2, the text “A Short History of a Special Plant” discusses beginnings of Native Americans in Mexico and how early Americans used corn as a staple crop for survival and how corn rose to become an industry in farming. The text contains text about “Three Sisters” as well as an image of the planting method. “A Short History of a Special Plant” has photos, illustrations, maps, graphs, and charts pertaining to information about corn.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students read “I Hear America Singing” by Walt Whitman. This poem contains a repetitive pattern about different workers in America. Also in Week 1, students read “I, Too” by Langston Hughes, which is a poem sharing the experience of an African American man in America. In Week 2, students read “Gold Country” which is an excerpt from Laurence Yep’s The Journal of Wong Ming-Chung: A Chinese Minter, California, 1852. The excerpt has sepia-colored photos of Chinese workers during the Gold Rush. The verbs in the text are descriptive, such as surrounded, perched, and scattered.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, students read “Road to Revolution” by Susan Buckley. This text is an informational piece with a timeline spread across four pages about key American Revolution dates. In Week 2, an informational piece, “The Nation at War” by Susan Buckley contains quotes from American soldiers in the Civil War and World War II. The text contains an artist’s depiction of the Revolutionary War and photos of soldiers.
  • In Unit 8, Week 2, students read “The Pagoda on the Hill of the Imperial Springs,” which is an excerpt from Myths and Legends of China by E.T.C. Werner. This text contains illustrations, a portrait, and photos and detailed captions about each. The text also contains footnotes to define proper nouns such as Peking and Prince of Yen.In Week 3, students read “Questions and Answers About the Oceans.” This text is formatted as a question and answer piece asking questions such as “Why is the ocean important? How does the ocean affect the climate?” The text contains diagrams about the pH scale, photos of sea animals, and a map of ocean currents.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

The instructional materials provide texts which all students access that have a balanced mix of literature and informational text. Text genres represented include, but are not limited to, informational texts, biographies, folktales, historical fiction, poetry, realistic fiction, myths, and fables. Additional literary and informational texts are found within the leveled readers and Readers Theater. Anchor texts include 22 literary texts and 18 informational texts. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • “The Dred Scott Decision” by Monica Halpern (Unit 1, Week 2, Extended Read 2, Informational Text)
  • “Becky Returns” by Mark Twain (Unit 2, Week 1, Short Read 1, Realistic Fiction)
  • “The Science of Growing Food” by Carla Corriols (Unit 3, Week 3, Extended Read 2, Editorial)
  • “Gold Country” by Laurence Yep (Unit 4, Week 1, Short Read 2, Historical Fiction)
  • “The Making of the Industrial Age” by Kathy Furgang (Unit 5, Week 3, Extended Read 2, Informational Text)
  • “Brushfire” by David Boelke (Unit 6, Week 1, Short Read 2, Play)
  • “The Nation at War” by Susan Buckley (Unit 7, Week 2, Extended Read 1, Informational Text)
  • “The Water Famine” retold by Gare Thompson (Unit 8, Week 1, Short Read 1, Legend)
  • “Old Cities Revitalize” by Alexandra Hanson-Harding (Unit 9, Week 3, Extended Read 3, Informational Text)
  • “John Dalton: Father of Atomic Theory” by Kathy Furgang (Unit 10, Week 1, Short Read 1, Informational Text)

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

In each Unit, the anchor texts have the appropriate quantitative level of complexity for the grade band (Grade 4-5 Band of Lexiles 740-1010). The overall text measure is based on an analysis of four dimensions of qualitative text complexity. These four dimensions are: Purpose & Levels of Meaning, Structure, Language Conventionality & Clarity, and Knowledge Demands. The tasks of each anchor text is at the appropriate level for Grade 5 according to the ELA standards. Texts with the appropriate level of complexity for Grade 5 students include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, students read “Thurgood Marshall’s Liberty Medal Acceptance Speech.”
    • Quantitative: Lexile 1060.
    • Qualitative: This speech employs elements of persuasive text with the purpose of convincing the audience that every American should work toward justice and equality for all. Multiple text structures are used, including sequence of events, cause and effect, problem and solution, examples, and descriptions, and graphic features such as photographs, captions and footnotes. The speech contains mostly complex sentences with many higher-level vocabulary terms and selected unfamiliar terms are supported with context clues.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students read “Camp Life” by Mark Twain.
    • Quantitative: Lexile 910
    • Qualitative: The narrative excerpt relies on description, sequence of events, dialogue, and imagery throughout. There are many complex sentence structures, antiquated terms and phrases.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students read “The Science of Growing Food” by Carla Corriols.
    • Quantitative: Lexile 1110
    • Qualitative: The explicit purpose of this selection is to show both sides of an argument. Multiple text structures including sequence-of-events, examples, description, cause-and-effect, and problem-and-solution are used to support claims. Line graphs, as well as other graphic elements such as diagrams, maps, charts, and captioned images are used to support the text. The selection contains mostly complex sentences with many higher-level vocabulary terms. Few unfamiliar terms are supported with context clues.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, students read of “Yankee Doodle Boy” by Joseph Plumb Martin.
    • Quantitative: Lexile 1100.
    • Qualitative: The diary entry is structured in chronological order. Because it is excerpted from a longer piece, the reader must recognize that ellipses are used to represent missing text. Some terms and phrases may be archaic or unfamiliar to readers and require the consultation of reference materials. The text also uses figurative language and extensive academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
  • In Unit 9, Week 3, students read “Old Cities Revitalize” by Alexandra Hanson-Harding.
    • Quantitative: Lexile 950
    • Qualitative: The clear purpose of this text is to explain how different cities are evolving and working on economic revival in a post-industrial age. This informational text uses a problem and solution text structure. The information in the running text is supported by maps, photographs, captions, and primary source images. Language is clear, but some domain-specific and unfamiliar vocabulary terms and phrases are not directly supported in the running text.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)

The complexity of anchor texts that students read provides an opportunity for students’ literacy skills to increase across the year through a series of texts that include a variety of complexity levels. In the Teacher’s Resource System, lessons contain the gradual release of responsibility which helps guide teachers through teaching complex texts. The scaffolded components of the lessons include teacher modeling and teacher think-alouds. In Guided Practice, scaffolds include rereading to find text-dependent evidence, note-taking in a graphic organizer with text details, and collaborative conversations between students about the text. Although scaffolded activities are provided throughout the materials, all Short Read texts are shared and analyzed over Week 1, all Extended Read texts have one week each for analysis. More complex texts do not receive increased instructional and analysis time. There are specific weekly routines for close reading and rereading that do not allot additional time for more complex text.

  • Throughout Unit 1, Weeks 1, 2, and 3, the anchor texts of the Short and Extended Reads range in quantitative Lexile levels of 890-1090 (Grade band of 4-5 has a Lexile level of 740-1010) and an 8 -12 qualitative level which is of moderate to substantial complexity. In Week 1, students read and analyze the Short Read texts, “Creating the Constitution” and “President Lyndon Johnson’s Voting Rights Act Address.” For both Short Read texts, student determine main idea and explain how key details support it. In Week 2, students read and analyze the Extended Read 1 text, “The Dred Scott Decision,” and students identify key details. In Week 3, students read and analyze the Extended Read 2 text, “Thurgood Marshall’s Liberty Medal Acceptance Speech,” and students identify key details.
  • Throughout Unit 5, Weeks 1, 2, and 3, the anchor texts of the short and extended reads range in quantitative Lexile levels of 970 - 1010 with two poems that do not have Lexile levels and a 11-14 qualitative level which is of substantial to high complexity. In Week 1, students read and analyze the Short Read texts, “Technology and the Lowell Mill Girls” and “Eli Whitney’s Cotton Gin.” For “Technology and the Lowell Mill Girls” students read and respond, and for “Eli Whitney’s Cotton Gin,” students determine main idea and explain how key details support it. In Week 2, students read and analyze the Extended Read 1 text, “The Secret of the Machines,” and students determine main idea and explain how key details support it. In Week 3, students read and analyze the Extended Read 2, “The Making of the Industrial Age,” and students determine main idea and explain how key details support it.

The tasks students complete over the three week unit are similar, and there is a missed opportunity for the tasks to increase in rigor when the tasks are repetitious.

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Lesson 14, students compare and contrast two texts, “Voting Rights Act Address” (Extended Read 1) and “Liberty Medal Acceptance Speech” (Extended Read 2). The teacher reads the Close Reading Question: “Reread paragraphs 3-5 of the ‘Voting Rights Act Address’ and paragraphs 2-4 of the ‘Liberty Medal Acceptance Speech.’ Compare and contrast the reasons and evidence Lyndon Johnson and Thurgood Marshall gave to support the idea that we can and should look to our past in our fight to improve our present. Annotate! Jot ideas in a two-column chart to help you compare.” During Guided Practice, students reread and annotate the text. During Share, students share their answers to the close reading question. In Apply Understanding, during independent time, students write a one- or two- paragraph answers to the close reading question, citing the reasons and evidence used by each man.
  • In Unit 8, Week 3, Lesson 14, students compare and contrast two texts, “Questions and Answers About the Oceans” (Extended Read 2) and “Water-Wise Landscaper” (Short Read 2). The teacher reads the Close Reading Question: “Reread paragraphs 15-19 of ‘Questions and Answers About the Oceans’ and paragraph 6 of ‘Water-Wise Landscaper.’ How do Earth’s water supply and climate affect each other? Annotate! Underline any sentences that describe a cause-and-effect relationship between Earth’s climate and its water supply.” During Guided Practice, students participate in Collaborative Conversations: Partner to write cause and effect relationships in the text. During Share, students share their answers. In Apply Understanding, during independent time, students apply their understanding of the causes and effects in “Water-Wise Landscaper” and “Questions and Answers About the Oceans” to answer: “How do Earth’s water supply and climate affect each other?”

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The Program Reference Guide provides rationale for the texts in the materials.

  • Shared Readings connect to the unit topic and are intended to be used to model fluency.
  • Texts for Close Reading selections are designed to capture students’ interest and imagination. These texts state standards for achievement.

Each unit has a Guide to Text Complexity for the Short Reads and Extended Reads. A quantitative (Lexile score) and total qualitative measure based on analysis of the four dimensions of qualitative text complexity (purpose and levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity and knowledge demands) are provided. The four dimensions of qualitative text complexity form a rubric. Using this rubric, texts receive a score out of four for each dimension and those scores are added together to determine the overall score. Examples of analysis provided include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 6, Week 1, the first Short Read “Androcles and the Lion” has a Lexile level of 960. The total qualitative measure is moderate complexity. The second Short Read is “Brushfire!” with no Lexile level. The total qualitative measure is substantial complexity. In Week 2, the Extended Read “The Law of Club and Fang” has a Lexile level of 950. The total qualitative measure is moderate complexity. In Week 3, the Extended Read “Julie Fights for Survival” has a Lexile level of 790. The total qualitative measure is substantial complexity.
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, the first Short Read “Yankee Doodle Boy” has a Lexile level of 1100. The total qualitative measure is substantial complexity. The second Short Read is “Road to Revolution” with a Lexile level of 930. The total qualitative measure is substantial complexity. In Week 2, the Extended Read “The Nation at War” has a Lexile level of 960. The total qualitative measure is substantial complexity. In Week 3, the Extended Read “The Youth in Battle” has a Lexile level of 950. The total qualitative measure is substantial complexity.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

The instructional materials provide clear opportunities and explicit supports for students to engage in a volume of reading. Each Unit offers students a variety of text types, topics and disciplines in order for students to become independent readers at the grade level. Students have an opportunity to participate in interactive read-alouds, silent reading, choral reading, echo reading, partner reading, and independent reading. Trade books for independent reading are available.

Each Unit provides students with multiple opportunities to engage with text. These opportunities include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The focus of Unit 1 is The U.S. Constitution. Throughout Unit 1, students engage in two short reads and two extended reads. The genres and texts in Unit 1 are as follows: Week 1, an informational social studies text short read (“Creating the Constitution”); Week 1, a speech short read (“President Lyndon Johnson’s Voting Rights Act Address”); Week 2, informational social studies extended read (“The Dred Scott Decision”); and Week 3, a speech extended read (“Thurgood Marshall’s Liberty Medal Acceptance Speech”). During small group reading, independent reading, and conferring, students read from six texts, such as Shaping the Constitution and Math in a Democracy. Students can read and participate in Reader’s Theater with The Tasty Tort Trial or James Madison: The U.S. Constitution. Trade books are available in the Unit, such as Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March by Elspeth Leacock and Susan Buckley and Shh! We’re Writing the Constitution by Jean Fritz.
  • The focus of Unit 8 is Water: Fact and Fiction. Throughout Unit 8, students engage in two short reads and two extended reads. The genres and texts in Unit 8 are as follows: Week 1, a legend short read (“The Water Famine”); Week 1, an interview short read (“Water-Wise Landscaper”); Week 2, a legend extended read (“The Pagoda on the Hill of the Imperial Springs”); and Week 3, an informational science extended read (“Questions and Answers About the Oceans”). During small group reading, independent reading and conferring, students read from six texts, such as Catastrophic Storms and Antarctica: A Year of Science. Students can read and participate in Reader’s Theater with Wild Weather or Above the Clouds. Trade books are available in the Unit, such as Stella by Starlight by Sharon M. Draper and Crossing Bok Chitto: A Choctaw Tale of Friendship and Freedom by Tim Tingle.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The Grade 5 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent and build towards a culminating task that integrates skills. The instructional materials provide multiple opportunities for discussion that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and partially supports student listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching. The materials include frequent opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Materials meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for the grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

Teacher materials provide support for planning and implementation of text-dependent/specific questions, tasks and assignments for all learners through modeling, guided practice and applying understanding with scaffolding for light, moderate, or substantial support throughout the year. The Read Aloud Handbook, Build Reflect Write Handbook, and the E-book provide text-dependent questions, writing prompts, and speaking opportunities requiring students to engage in the text and make real world connections. Text-dependent/specific reading mini-lessons are included each day requiring all students to cite text evidence to support their answers explicitly or using valid inferences from the text. During whole-group, students are asked to answer a variety of literal, inferential, and evaluative questions by re-reading for evidence and/or annotating key details.

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 2, students read the text “Becky Returns” to identify key events and annotate and summarize the text by teacher modeling, guided practice, and applying understanding. Students use a chart to write key events and quotes before writing a 2-3 sentence summary. Scaffolding is provided for struggling readers.
  • In Unit 4, Recognizing Author’s Point of View asks inferential questions using Short Read 1, “I Hear America Singing” such as: “How does the party described at the end of Whitman’s poem differ from all the singers described before them?” and “How does this connect to the fact that all the previous singers sing during the day and the party sings at night?” In Extended Read 1, “Justice in Eatonville” text-dependent question examples include: “Giving don’t got a thing to do with going bankrupt. ...Holding back does. How does this connect to Carrie’s thoughts about Mr. Pendir and Gold?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 2, students read and summarize two poems. During the first read, students focus on summarizing each poem. The teacher models prior to student work time. Scaffolding strategies are available for struggling students. After the first read, students form small conversation groups to discuss the poem. Students consider the following questions; “What features of the poems are alike?”, “How does the poet’s point-of-view affect the tone of his poem?”, “What does the last line mean?” Students select one of the poems and write a summary in the margins of their texts. Groups summarize the highlights of their conversation whole group
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, Lesson 4 students write an informative report and revise it to improve sentence fluency by reducing sentences. Students describe the causes of wars and the sacrifices the nation faced as a result of these wars from the text “The Nation at War”. Students use facts, details, and quotations from the text. Teachers model a draft and revisions for students before students are asked to revise a model draft with a partner.

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria for having sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).

Culminating tasks of quality are evident across a year’s worth of material. Teachers and students are provided with a Unit Big Idea and a Unit Essential Question. The Essential Question is restated at the beginning of each week in the unit. Tasks are supported with coherent sequences of text-dependent questions related to the unit big idea which prepares students for success on the culminating tasks. Culminating tasks are varied throughout the year and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know and are able to do in speaking and writing and integrates standards in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.

  • In Unit 3, the Big Idea is Cultivating Natural Resources. A video introduces the Big Idea. The essential question is, “How do we decide which resources we should develop?” In this unit, students read and compare selections about cultivating food in the past and today to understand how we develop natural resources. The end-of-unit wrap-up is writing an informative report. During Weeks 1-3 progressive activities are used to build toward the culminating task of writing an informative report.
    • In Week 1, students analyze a mentor text, read a source text to find facts and details, listen & view a media source to find facts and details and analyze facts and details in a mentor informative report.
    • In Week 2, students read and analyze the prompt, find facts and details in a print source, take notes from a video source, and plan and organize ideas using descriptive text structure.
    • In Week 3, the writing prompt directly relates to the unit’s big idea and Essential Question. Students are asked,“Based on facts and details from the text and illustrations of “A Short History of a Special Plant” and information from the video “Corn from the CSA” write an informative report in which you explain how corn is produced in the United States.”
    • In Week 3, students draft a clear introduction, incorporate information from multiple sources, improve sentence fluency by combining sentences, edit to correct conjunction usage, and then evaluate and reflect on their writing.
  • In Unit 6, Up Against The Wild, daily tasks throughout the unit support students in successfully completing the culminating task of Narrative Journal Writing.
    • In Week 1, Lesson 3, students work with a partner using the mentor text to identify the remaining features of a Narrative Journal entry.
    • In Week 1, Lesson 6, students analyze characters and events and respond to the prompt, “What kinds of story information did the writer include in the mentor text?”
    • In Week 1, Lesson 11, students develop the character’s voice.
    • In Week 2, Lesson 4, students plan their own narrative journal entries based on the text, “The Law of Club and Fang.”
  • In Unit 9, daily tasks support students as they build toward the culminating task of creating a multimedia presentation focused around the essential question, “How do economic changes impact society?
    • In Week 1, Lesson 3, students focuses on purpose and audience as they view a sample presentation and respond to the following prompts; “What are some reasons that a person would create a multimedia presentation? Who is the audience for such a presentation? How might the audience affect the types of media the presenter chooses to use?”
    • In Week 2, Lesson 14, students gather images for their presentation.
    • In Week 3, students complete their presentation, practice with their peers, receive feedback, and present to the class.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Teacher materials provide support and direction needed for teachers to implement grade level standards in speaking and listening and help scaffold instruction for students who need extra support. Multiple modeling opportunities are well supported across the year. Materials provide multiple opportunities and support of protocols and implementation focused on using academic vocabulary and syntax for evidence-based discussions as well as teacher guidance across the year’s curricular materials to support students’ increasing skills. These materials are found in the Review and Routines section titled “Build Respectful Conversation Habits” and “Turn and Talk”.

During each unit, students have collaborative discussions with a partner multiple times a day. Weekly lessons offer multiple collaborative opportunities daily, with modeling and explicit directions provided to facilitate evidence-based discussions with a focus on academic vocabulary and syntax. Students utilize graphic organizers that require students to cite their evidence in whole group, small groups, and peer work to use academic vocabulary and syntax. Each week, students apply the understanding of their evidence-based conversations and share out their findings to the whole group. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Lesson 1, students participate in Turn and Talk to Share Knowledge using Build, Reflect, Write about their readings from the previous week. Students discuss with their partner two questions: “What did you learn about the Constitution last week? How does your knowledge of the Constitution affect your understanding of the Essential Question?” Students are informed that the teacher will call on several of them to summarize what their partner learned last week.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 1, students participate in Collaborative Conversation: Peer Group. Students work in peer groups to generate questions that will guide their inquiry about character traits. The teacher reviews Group Roles with students. The teacher provides sentence frames to support the participation of all students: “I learn about a character when I…. Some characters...each other. Other characters….” During Share, the group presenters share a guiding question formulated by the peer group.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Lesson 1, students turn and talk to share knowledge learned by reading about corn. Teachers provide the following questions to guide conversations: “What new information did you learn about uses of corn from last week’s readings?” and “How does this new information help you answer the Essential Question?” Students pose questions to a partner to clarify their partner’s responses to the two questions. Students briefly share out a summary of what their partners learned about corn and its uses. To support teachers, the unit outlines an example model of using informal English. In Week 3, Lesson 2, students discuss strategies for reading an informational text with a partner. Each partner chooses one strategy to explain by answering the questions given about each strategy. The teacher will call on students to briefly summarize the explanation of their partner.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Lesson 6, students determine the meanings of words or phrases used in a text while participating in Productive Engagement: Partner. Students follow a protocol for figuring out the meaning of unknown words with a partner. The teacher observes students and then plans reinforce or reaffirm the strategy.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

While the materials provide clear guidance and instructional supports for teachers, such as graphic organizers, extensive modeling opportunities, and sentence frames for students to use in peer responses, the engagement with texts in service of comprehension is inconsistently evident. Students are presented with activities to practice speaking and listening, but the focus of these activities is on the protocols rather than on demonstrating comprehension of the texts.

During some speaking and listening practice, students do engage in building their skills with demonstrating comprehension to support their speaking work and bolster comprehension of materials. For example, in Week 3, Lesson 11, students work in pairs of groups to complete a graphic organizer and discuss annotations created to analyze how images in "The Oregon Trail" support key details in the text. Students are guided to specific parts of the text to practice using evidence to complete the comprehension task.

However, other lessons focus on the protocols without assuring students are engaging with the specific texts at hand. In Unit 7, Week 3, Lesson 3, students identify and summarize key events using the text, “Concepts that Shaped a Nation.” Partners work collaboratively and share out key events they read in the assigned text. The teacher monitors students’ conversations to determine if they need additional support or challenge. Students contribute to the discussion and conversation by using relevant follow-up questions to information shared by peers. There is limited accountability to support the teacher should students need extra support or demonstrate misunderstanding during the process. Rather, the focus is on the actions of the protocols.

In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 1, students examine the "U.S. Constitution: Then and Now" and engage in collaborative conversations with peer groups. Examples of support provided for students include a Guiding Questions/Initial ideas chart, which helps students utilize and organize their ideas, and Model sentence frames, such as “I wonder what laws were changed or created as a result of _____. I wonder how _____ affects ______.” to support the participation of all students. While this frame supports the protocols and general development of speaking and listening, there is limited support for the teacher to assure students are comprehending and using the text evidence appropriately.

In Unit 3, Week 2, Lesson 1, students begin work on the culminating task of writing an informative report on corn using multiple text experiences throughout the unit to learn about the topic. Supports for students include asking and responding to questions during conversations and sentence frames, such as “Encourage students to pose questions to their partner to clarify their partner’s responses to the two questions.” Students who misunderstand the topic may not get consistent support to clarify.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Materials include multiple varied opportunities for both on-demand and process writing tasks that span the year’s worth of instruction. Writing projects, tasks and presentations are connected to texts of various genres, topics and themes. Each unit includes daily on-demand writing and the Performance Tasks have process writing over a three week span. Writing tasks are aligned to grade level standards, embedded into student work, provide occasions for short and extended writing, and allow students to learn, practice, develop, and apply writing skills throughout the year. Lessons culminate by having students respond to prompts in their Build, Reflect, Write manuals which lay the foundation for advanced writing tasks that students will engage in throughout the unit. Students are provided opportunities to work through various writing process stages throughout the year by writing to sources, answering text-dependent questions, taking notes (annotating), completing graphic organizers, research projects and presentations. Students write and revise informative, opinion, and narrative pieces focusing on topics such as ideas, voice, word choice, organization, and sentence fluency. Examples of the mix of on-demand and process writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, teachers guide students through the process of writing a personal letter based on the following prompt: “You are a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. Write a letter to someone close to you about your experiences during the convention. Make sure to include facts and details from 'Creating the Constitution' in your letter.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, teachers introduce the Realistic Fiction genre and guide students through the pre-writing steps in the writing process which include brainstorm, evaluate ideas, and plan. In Week 2, teachers guide students through the drafting steps in the writing process. In Week 3, teachers guide students through the revising, editing, and publishing steps in the writing process.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 14, students are asked to explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support the writer’s ideas. Students are provided a Compare/Contrast Chart as the teacher models through two selections and provides guided practice. Students are then asked to apply this understanding by writing two paragraphs comparing and contrasting “Clean-Burning Corn Is America’s Future” and “Keep Corn on the Cob Not in My Car!” Students are to do the following: “One paragraph should examine an aspect in which the two articles are similar, and the other should be about an aspect in which they are different.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 9, students complete a process writing task, writing an opinion essay and taking notes from online sources. Students are asked to summarize facts and details from online sources and to share ideas in collaborative conversations and in writing. Students cite research in order to support their opinion.
  • In Unit 8, Week 1, Lesson 10, students explain how reasons and evidence are used by an author in a text. Students are given a Reasons and Evidence chart as the teacher models using a text. Students write a paragraph about the reasons and evidence they found in a selection.
  • In Unit 9, Weeks 1, 2, and 3, students write a Multimedia Presentation. Modeling of a mentor presentation and discussion of features of a procedural multimedia presentation with an anchor chart helps students organize ideas and research to create this presentation. Short, discipline-specific tasks are incorporated throughout these three weeks to support the writing of this Multimedia Presentation.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Materials provide a progression of multiple opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply narrative, opinion, and informative writing. The materials provide tasks for students to use different genres/modes of writing, which are both connected to texts and stand-alone writing projects. The instructional guide provides supports for teachers to assist students as they progress in writing skills such as: graphic organizers, checklists, and rubrics. Each unit has mentor and anchor texts to support student writing which is embedded daily.

Each week focuses on a different writing genre, appropriately aligned to the text. Mini-lessons are scaffolded throughout the week in order to support student outcomes. Exemplar writing samples and other instruction support accompany each unit. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Units 1, 2, and 6, narrative writing is featured. In Unit 1, students write a personal letter using a mentor text and the Personal Letter Planning Chart. In Unit 2, students write a realistic fiction story. In Unit 6, students write narrative journal entries using events and details from a source text and develop a character using anchor charts, prompts, and a checklist. Students develop the character’s voice, use dialogue, and add description to develop events. In Unit 6, Week 1, Lesson 1, students write a narrative journal, making sure to include specific story events and and details from “Androcles and the Lion” into their writing. Unit 6, Week 3, Lesson 5 students reread paragraphs 17-20 and write a summary of the key events. Students explain how events in these paragraphs help them understand the author’s idea of what it takes to survive.
  • In Units 4 and 5, opinion writing is featured. In Unit 4, students write an Opinion Essay with a topic opinion and mentor and anchor text evidence for support. Students write an Opinion Essay using credible print sources and planning and domain-specific vocabulary. In Unit 4, Week 1, Lesson 3, teachers modeling how to brainstorm topics and opinions about those topics is provided. In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 3, the Opinion Essay Writing Checklist is used to support students. Writing exemplars for each writing type are provided under the drop down menu “Writing Exemplars.” In Unit 5 students use an opinion writing checklist to write evidence-based opinions. In Week 1, Lesson 9, students complete a process writing task, writing an opinion essay and take notes from online sources. Students summarize facts and details from online sources and to share ideas in collaborative conversations and in writing. Students cite research in order to support their opinion.
  • In Units 3, 7, 8, and 9, informative writing is featured. In Unit 3, students write an informative report from a print and video source. In Unit 7, students write an informative report with information from multiple sources. In Unit 8, students analyze cause/effect text structures for the informative report. In Unit 9, students prepare multimedia presentations which include text-specific research and other facets of multimedia.
  • In Unit 10, Week 1, Lesson 14 students write two or more paragraphs discussing ways in which “John Dalton” and “Matter Is Everywhere!” provide information that increases understanding of matter and atomic theory. Students use text evidence to support their ideas.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level.

Materials provide frequent opportunities that are varied and build writing skills over the course of the school year. Materials provide opportunities for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Writing opportunities are focused around students’ analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with texts and sources to provide supporting evidence. Students are required to respond to evidence-based writing prompts in the Build, Reflect, Write notebook. Prior to responding to the text, students are provided pre-work that adequately supports their responses. Students frequently generate ideas by closely reading text. Instructional support for teachers is provided throughout the units to guide students’ understanding of developing ideas and components of structured writing. Examples of opportunities include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 14, students compare and contrast informative and persuasive texts. Students complete a cross-text analysis by writing compare and contrast paragraphs using the Compare/Contrast Chart. Students evaluate purpose, point-of-view, language, use of facts, reasons, and evidence. One paragraph addresses ways texts are alike and the other paragraph addresses ways the texts are different. Students use evidence from selections to support their points.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 9, students complete a process writing task, writing an opinion essay and taking notes from online sources. Students summarize facts and details from online sources and share ideas in collaborative conversations and in writing. Students will cite research in order to support their opinion.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Lesson 13, students find examples of sequence of events in the text (drama). The students fill out a story structure chart which includes story parts, events, and function. Students write a short paragraph explaining which selection they preferred based on the story plot and evidence they have from the story structure chart. Students include references to at least two parts of the drama.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Lesson 3, students respond to the following prompt” “Write an informative report about the events leading up to the British surrender at the Battle of Yorktown.” Students include facts, details, and quotations from “Yankee Doodle Boy” in their informative reports.
  • In Unit 10, Week 1, Lesson 14, students use information from texts to complete the Integrate Information Chart. Students write two or more paragraphs in which they write about ways the two texts provide information that increases their understanding of matter and atomic theory. Students use text evidence to support their ideas.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

The Grade 5 program has multiple opportunities for whole class instruction aligned to the Grade 5 language standards. All grammar and conventions standards are taught over the course of the school year through reading, language, vocabulary, and writing mini-lessons. These lessons provide opportunities for teacher modeling and guided student practice. Grammar lessons are also applied to independent writing projects students work on. After the specific language standard has been taught, students the skill apply it to their own writing. Students receive direct instruction using the mentor text and dictionaries, and students have access to class charts.

Materials include instruction of all grammar and conventions standards for the grade level. Examples of each language standard include:

  • L.5.1a:
    • In Unit 2, Week 2, Lesson 15, Process Writing, students learn how adding interjections such as ah, help, hey and hmmm can make their dialogue more realistic. During independent writing time students practice using interjections in their writing.
    • In Unit 6, Week 1, Lesson 15, Writing to Sources, students learn about the function of prepositions.
  • L.5.1b:
    • In Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 15, Process Writing, students learn how to form and use perfect verb tenses.
    • In Unit 4, Week 1, Lesson 15, Writing to Sources, the teacher models how to use the past, present and future perfect verb tenses. Students work with a partner to add more perfect verb tenses to a chart the teacher has provided. During independent writing time students are instructed to, “Write a sentence in the present perfect tense for each of these verbs:believe, understand, and forget.”
  • L.5.1c:
    • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 15, Conventions of Language: Review Verb Tenses, the teacher models how to use the different verb tenses and provides students the opportunity to practice using the different tenses with a peer. During independent writing time students are instructed to, “Write four new sentences, one using a past tense verb, one using a present tense verb, one using a future tense verb,and one using a progressive tense verb.”
    • In Unit 4, Week 1, Lesson 15, Writing to Sources, students complete a Perfect Verb Tense Chart and also write what the verb is used to tell.
  • L.5.1d:
    • In Unit 4, Week 3, Lesson 13, Writing to Sources, students learn how to edit their writing papers through teacher model for inappropriate shifts in verb tenses.
  • L.5.1e:
    • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 15, Writing to Sources, students learn about the function of conjunctions including correlative conjunctions.
  • L.5.2a:
    • In Unit 1, Week 2, Lesson 15, Performance Task, the teacher then models and explains how to use commas to separate items in a series. During independent writing time, students are instructed to, “write several original sentences about foods they enjoy for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Students should include commas in their sentences.”
  • L.5.2b:
    • In Unit 3, Week 3, Lesson 13, Writing to Sources, when the teacher is modeling editing an informative report, correct comma usage is noted, “Sample think-aloud: My first sentence uses the conjunction I’ve used a comma after yield to separate that dependent clause from the independent clause that follows it. In the second sentence, I included the conjunction both. Did I include its partner, and? Yes, I did.”
  • L.5.2c:
    • In Unit 2, Week 2, Lesson 15, Process Writing, the teacher models how comma usage can enhance dialogue: “Sample think-aloud, item 2: Another way to make dialogue sound realistic is to use commas to indicate where pauses should be.”
  • L.5.2d:
    • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 12, Writing to Sources, students analyze a mentor text and learn how to use quotation marks and italics for titles.
  • L.5.2e:
    • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 8, in a lesson on short vowels, students practice sorting words from the text Creating the Constitution based on their short vowel sounds. Students are also given a list of spelling words at the end of the lesson that they must pick two words from that they then use in a sentence.
    • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 11, Word Study & Vocabulary, students apply their learning of multisyllabic short vowel words to their spelling practice.
  • L.5.3a:
    • In Unit 3, Week 2, Lesson 15, Writing to Sources, the teacher models for students how combining sentences can improve their writing. For example the sentences, “Dent corn is used as a food for people. It is also used as food for livestock.” becomes, “Dent corn is used as a food for both people and livestock.” Students then work with a partner to combine sentences.
    • In Unit 7, Week 3, Lesson 4, Writing to Sources, students students learn about editing to reduce their sentences for meaning, interest, and style.
  • L.5.3b:
    • In Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 10, Short Read 2 Mini-Lesson, the teacher demonstrates how an author’s use of dialect can enhance a story by using the text, “Games in the Woods.” The class works together to create a chart comparing and contrasting formal English and the different dialects used in the text.
    • In Unit 2, Week 2, Lesson 15, Process Writing, students learn about realistic dialogue and examine how interjections and commas make dialogue realistic.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
5/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks addressing grade-level CCSS for foundational skills to build comprehension by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression. Materials meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks guide students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading. The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for instructional opportunities being frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks addressing grade-level CCSS for foundational skills to build comprehension by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, syntax, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression.

Over the course of the year, lessons include the introduction of new foundational skill(s), teacher modeling, guided practice, partner work, graphic organizers/charts, and application to short read texts. Teacher instruction and student practice provide many opportunities over the course of the school year for students to work with prefixes, suffixes, irregularly spelled words and multisyllabic words. Each week, the teacher models how to decode a syllable using different vowel sounds, compound words or syllable rules. When teaching prefixes and suffixes, students identify how the prefix or suffix changes the meaning of the base word. Lessons are primarily taught during the Word Study and Vocabulary portion of the core reading materials. The Word Study and Vocabulary lessons provide students an opportunity to learn word analysis that is then applied in and out of context. The lessons frequently include how the word is understood through word analysis and proper pronunciation. The skill of decoding and understanding the meaning of words is introduced early in the week and applied later in the week during word study and vocabulary lessons. Foundational skill lessons build in complexity over the course of the year and there is a clear progression for students to work towards grade-level comprehension.

Materials (questions & tasks) support students’ use of combined knowledge of all letter sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology, according to grade level. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 8, Word Study & Vocabulary, students are introduced to short vowels a, e, ea i, o, u and complete a word sort chart. “Display the words establish, document, and running. Break each word into syllables, then help students identify the closed syllables and the short vowel sounds: e stab lish (short e, a, i); doc u ment (short o); run ning (short u, i). Point out that in multisyllabic words the unstressed syllable often has the schwa sound, not a short vowel sound. This is the case with document. Create and display a Word Sort chart and a list of words to sort (national, delegate, historical, popular,ugly). Read aloud the five headings, then read each word aloud and model thinking to identify the column in which it belongs. Discuss the meaning of the word in each column. I hear the /a/ sound in national. Listen: /na/tion/al/. I know the /a/ sound is the short a sound, so I will write the word national in the short a column.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 11, students are reminded that the letter r changes the sound of the vowels that comes before it can help them read and pronounce certain words. Students follow along as the teacher reads paragraph 6 of “City Kid, Country Kid.” Students are drawn to the word participate. The teacher explains that when a reader comes to a multisyllabic word such as participate, you can use your knowledge of r-controlled vowel sounds to help them read the word. Breaking the word into chunks may help you recognize word parts so they can read it. Participate can be broken into four chunks. Students then read “City Kid, Country Kid” on page 10 and underline words with the r-controlled vowel sounds of -ar,-or, and air. Students then write the words in a chart and write a possible definition for each word in the notation column.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 8, Word Study & Vocabulary, students are introduced to noun suffixes (-ology, -ant, -er, -or, -ery) and complete a five column word sort chart to develop meaning for the suffix in each word. “Display a five-column Word Sort chart and a list of words to sort (ecology, participant starter, inspector,bravery). Read each word aloud, and ask students to identify the column in which it belongs. Use sample sentences to model the meaning of the suffix in each word: Ecology is the study of Earth’s ecosystems. A participant is a person who participates in an activity. A starter is a person who tells runners when it’s time to start the race. An inspector is a person who inspects items in a factory to make sure they are made correctly. Bravery is a quality shown by people who face dangerous situations bravely.”
  • In Unit 8, Week 3, Lesson 9, the teacher models how adding -ful or -y to the end of a noun can turn the word into an adjective using the text “Questions and Answers About the Oceans.” “I see the root words sun and color in paragraph 7. I know something that can be described as colorful is full of colors. And a place that is sunny should get plenty of sun. I notice that sunny has a double n because some nouns require doubling the ending consonant before adding -y.” The teachers also explains the suffixes -ent, -ic and -ive to students and points out the word “acidic,” in the previously read text. Words with these suffixes also appear on students’ weekly spelling list - sandy, impressive, optimistic, dependent, cumulative, confident and historic.

Materials cohesively build to application of skills to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out-of-context. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 11, Word Study & Vocabulary, students apply previously learned knowledge of short vowels in context. Students read, “Susan B. Anthony” with a partner and circle multisyllabic short vowel words in the text. “Have students read the rest of “Susan B. Anthony” with a partner. Ask them to circle the multisyllabic words that have short vowel sounds and highlight the letter or letters in each word that stand for the short vowel sound, then use their understanding of multi syllabication to help them comprehend the text. Since there are many short-vowel words in the passage, you may ask students to find at least five examples of each vowel sound.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 12, Word Study & Vocabulary, students apply previously learned knowledge of noun suffixes to context. Students read “Lucy Larcom’s New England Girlhood” and underline words that have the suffix -ology, -ant, -er, -or, or -ery. Students complete a chart with suffixes and definitions.”
  • In Unit 9, Week 3, Lesson 9, using the text “Old Cities Revitalize,” the teacher models how knowing the meaning of different prefixes can help students understand the story, “These prefixes tell “where.” The prefix per- means “through.” For example, a performance is an act that takes place from beginning “through” to the end that is, throughout on a stage. The prefix en- means “in.” You might enlist a friend to be part of a performance to be “in” the performance.” The teacher also reviews the meanings of the prefixes pro-, em- and im-. Words with these prefixes also appear on students’ weekly spelling list - produced, program, embarked, energy, percent, permitted, permanently and imminent.
  • In Unit 10, Week 3, Lesson 12, the teacher reviews the previously taught prefixes re-, bio-, im-, ex- and micro- with students. “Now let’s try biography. A graph is a diagram or chart of something and the prefix means “life.” What does mean? Yes, it is a chart or list of events in someone’s life.” Students then circle and write definitions for words with re-, bio-, im-, ex- and micro- in the text, “Marie M. Daly: Biochemistry Pioneer.” Afterwards the teacher is instructed to, “Bring students together. Invite individuals or partners to share words they circled in the text and to provide a definition based on their word analysis. Use this opportunity to clarify the meaning of words students circled but were unable to define.” Words with some of these prefixes are also a part of students; weekly spelling list: biologist, biochemistry, reaction, postdoctoral, immigrant and microbiologist.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks guiding students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading.

Over the course of the year, materials provide students with multiple opportunities to demonstrate mastery of word analysis skills and apply word knowledge to grade level texts. Opportunities occur in core materials during Word Study and Vocabulary lessons through teacher modeling. Within the Word Study and Vocabulary Lessons, Process Writing and Writing to Sources Lessons, students have opportunities to identify word parts that allow them to decode the word properly and understand the word through word analysis which then allows them to understand the text better. The lessons provide opportunities for students to practice the word analysis with grade level text and encode through spelling. Students apply new skills to text through the use of partner work, independent work, and graphic organizers. Lessons increase in complexity to allow students access to applying word analysis skills to grade level text and support meaning of text. Lessons also included opportunities for students to demonstrate their understanding of a text through the use of an Apply Understanding portion at the end of reading lessons.

Multiple and varied opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate mastery of the application of word analysis skills to grade level text. For example:

  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Lesson 12, Word Study & Vocabulary, students use the text, “Nora Zeale Hurston” to find homographs in context and analyze the words to give cues to the meaning of the words in context. Students first participate in a teacher model of locating homographs in context and reviewing the meaning of homographs. Students then work with a partner to fill out a graphic organizer. “Model/Review-Review with students that homographs are words that have the same spelling but different meanings and may or may not have the same pronunciation. Remind students that they can use context clues to understand a homograph. For example, direct students’ attention to the first sentence in paragraph 1 in “Zora Neale Hurston.” The Zora in the novel Zora and Me is based on a real person-the author Zora Neale Hurston.” This sentence has a homograph: novel. The word novel can mean a new idea or concept. In this sentence, I read the book title Zora and Me. So I know the meaning of the word is “a story with characters and a plot.” “Invite students to read “Zora Neale Hurston” either independently or with a partner. As they read, tell them to underline five words that are homographs and use context clues to determine the meaning of each word. Tell them to write definitions for the words as they are used in the text in the notation column of the page.”
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, Lesson 9, the teacher explains and models decoding words with the prefixes re-, pre-, mis- and dis-. “This is the word rewrite. The base word is write. The prefix is re. It means “again.” The word rewrite means “to write again.” Now look at the word prearrange.The prefix pre- means “before.” The base word is arrange. So it means “arrange before.” The last word is mislaid. What is the base word and what is the prefix? The prefix means “wrongly.” What does the word mean? Yes, it means “laid in the wrong place.”

Materials include supports for students to demonstrate they have made meaning of the grade-level text.

  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Lesson 6, Extended Read 1 Mini-Lesson, students determine the meaning of domain-specific vocabulary through using cues in nearby texts. Students participate in a teacher model and then guided practice with a partner to complete a graphic organizer with the word, context clues, and working partner definition. “The word describes something about the soil. This paragraph tells about the advantages of planting several crops together. Advantages are good, so maybe integrity is connected to the idea of being good. I see soil is mentioned twice in this paragraph. Sentence 3 says beans “restore the soil” with nitrogen. Sentence 4 says squash kept “moisture in the soil.” The last sentence says a “healthy crop . . . maintained the integrity of the soil.” The words “restore,” “moisture,” and “healthy” suggest examples of integrity to me. The word integrity means “a good or healthy state.” Model how you confirm, revise, and/or expand on your definition by consulting a print or online dictionary or scientific reference. In the case of integrity, the paragraph alone is not enough to define the word. Consulting a dictionary shows there are two different meanings for integrity. Help students see that it is not the first meaning (“honesty”), but the second (“wholeness, completeness”) that is being used here. Guided Practice-Create and display a Context Clues Chart. Then read aloud paragraph 9. Circle the word rotation. Ask partners to underline one or more context clues in the paragraph to help them know the meaning of the word. Do the same for hybrid (11) and staple (12).”
  • In Unit 10, Week 2, Lesson 12, the teacher explains the following science roots to students - port, chem, phys, frig and form.“When we know the meaning of a root, it helps us better understand vocabulary we find in science and other texts. Look at the root word port. The root word port in portable means “carry.” Something that is portable can be carried or moved around. Let’s look at each of the other root words on the chart. Remember what the root words mean: (chemical in nature), (physical in nature), (cool), and (form (shape).” Students then look for words with the science roots they have learned about in the text, “My Dad the Street Chef.” Afterwards the teacher leads a class discussion on the words students found and what students may think the definitions are. The teacher is also provided with the following question to help guide the discussion, “How did understanding the root ____ and the word ____ help you understand the text?”

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for instructional opportunities being frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Over the course of the school year, students practice fluency through the use of Small Group Reader’s Theater scripts. When students perform Reader’s Theater, they practice reading fluently with expression, accuracy, and rate. Fluency lessons are explicitly modeled during Reader’s Theater. Reader’s Theater is during the 15-20 minute block of Small-Group Independent Reading Conferring. Some Reading-Mini Lessons include fluency lessons and as students are learning how to read with accuracy. However, opportunities are missed in whole group instruction to provide consistent fluency practice. When students practice building fluency, it is through a variety of strategies such as partner reading, choral reading, and echo reading. There are missed opportunities over the course of the year to build reading fluency of grade level prose and poetry. Explicit instruction in the reading strategies students should use when they come to unfamiliar words for decoding is not supported in the materials.

Opportunities are provided over the course of the year in the small group Reader’s Theater materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy and fluency in oral and silent reading. For example:

  • Materials provide multi-level Reader’s Theater scripts for small group instruction that allow students to practice fluency and comprehension skills. “Multi-leveled Reader’s Theater scripts build fluency and comprehension. The five-day lesson plans provided in the Reader's Theater Teacher's Handbook supports students in building fluency, developing oral expression, and increasing vocabulary.”
    • In Unit 3, Week 3, the Reader’s Theater script, Little Green Riding Hood, is provided. Fluency objectives for the script include, “Students will: Build fluency through echo-reading, choral reading, and repeated reading. Read with prosody (pitch of voice, stress, inflection, expressiveness) Read dashes.”
    • In Unit 8, Week 3, the Reader’s Theater script, Above the Clouds, is provided. One of the literacy objectives listed for this script is, “Students will develop fluency and expression.” During the lesson, the teacher models fluent reading of the script and provides suggestions for improving expression.
  • Reader’s Theater materials provide independent reading time of the script for students to practice silent reading fluency. “Have students reread the script as a small group, with a partner, or independently by following along with the interactive e-book.”

Some core materials support reading or prose and poetry with attention to rate, accuracy, and expression, as well as direction for students to apply reading skills when productive struggle is necessary. For example:

  • During the rereading portion of Reader’s Theatre texts, teachers are provided with options for students to practice reading fluency through choral reading, echo reading, partner reading, and reading aloud to practice rate, accuracy, and/or expression skills taught during the teacher model.
  • In Unit 3, Book 2, Lesson 2, Reader’s Theatre, students practice reading with characterization and feeling first through a teacher model, then a choral read, and a reread.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Lesson 6, Extended Read 2 Mini-Lesson, students practice reading the text, “Asparagus,” with characterization and expression. The teacher models reading with no expression and then reading with expression. The teacher then models what to look for in a text in determining expression,
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Lesson 6, Extended Read 2 Mini-Lesson, when reading the selection, “Poems of the Industrial Age”, students work on their expression while reading. The teacher models how to use context clues to change your expression, “Lines 5 and 6 tell what the machines want and use the phrase “all we ask.” When I read them, I’ll soften my voice and sound like I’m asking for something.”
  • In the Informal Assessments K-6, Section 3, a rubric for assessing students’ phrasing/fluency, intonation, pace, and accuracy.
  • In the Intervention materials, there are Fluency Quick Checks with a Reader’s Theater Assessment Rubric and fluency quick checks for Grade 5. Also in the Intervention materials, there is Intervention Fluency with passages at different levels.

Some materials support students’ fluency development of reading skills (e.g., self-correction of word recognition and/or for understanding, focus on rereading) over the course of the year (to get to the end of the grade-level band). The main strategy emphasized is the use of context clues. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Lesson 6, Extended Read 1 Mini-Lesson, students practice using context clues in the text, “The Dred Scott Decision,” “Remind students that domain-specific words are vocabulary terms used in a field, such as Social Studies or Science. Explain that context clues are the words around a word that can help them read a word and understand its meaning. Context clues include synonyms, direct definition, description, and examples. Model how to analyze the context clues around the word secession in paragraph 3.”
  • In Unit 9, Week 2, Lesson 6, Extended Read 1 Mini-Lesson, when reading, “The Great Migration and the Growth of Cities,” the teacher models how to use context clues to determine the meaning of unknown words. Students are then provided with a context clues chart with the headers, Word, Context Clues, Our Definition, Revised Definition Using Dictionary. Students fill in the chart with words from the text such as - incentive, droves, emigrant, seaboard and vibrancy.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

Grade 5 instructional materials partially meet expectations for building knowledge with texts, vocabulary, and tasks. The instructional materials partially support the building of knowledge through repeated practice with appropriate grade-level complex text organized a topic. Academic vocabulary is addressed in each module. There is partial evidence of the materials providing coherently sequenced questions and tasks to support students in developing literacy skills. Culminating tasks partially meet the criteria for requiring students to read, discuss, analyze, and write about texts while students participate in a volume of reading to build knowledge. Materials meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

26/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students' knowledge and vocabulary which, over time, will support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Each three week unit contains shared reading, mentor reading, and extended reading texts covering a variety of genres related to an essential question which sometimes focuses on a topic and other times focuses on a genre or issue.

Examples of text sets that are not centrally focused on units to build knowledge through topics include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Developing Characters’ Relationships, the Essential Question is “Why do we value certain qualities in people?” Texts that support this topic are: “Becky Returns,” “Camp-Life,” and “Tom’s Secret.” During this unit, students compare and contrast characters within the texts.
  • In Unit 4, Recognizing Author’s Point of View, the Essential Question is “How can other perspectives help us evaluate the world?” Students have multiple opportunities to read a series of texts recognizing author’s point of view.

While these units explore literary themes, they do not focus on the topical knowledge-building called for in the standards.

Some text sets do provide opportunities to build knowledge on topics. Some examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Cultivating Natural Resources, the Essential Question is “How do we decide which resources we should develop?” Students read and compare cultivating food now and then to understand how we develop our natural resources. Week 1, the teacher explains that students will learn about a familiar resource, corn, and read informational texts about the science, history, and industry of corn. In Weeks 1-3 students use the following texts to dig deeper into the content and grow their vocabulary include: “Gathering Leaves,” “Amber Waves of Grain,” “The Structure of a Corn Plant,” and “The Science of Growing Food.” In this unit, students gain knowledge of the scientific and social studies components of the topics.
  • In Unit 8, Water: Fact and Fiction, the Essential Question is “What does water mean to people and the societies they live in?” Students have multiple opportunities to read texts about water. “The Water Famine,” “Water-Wise Landscaper,” and “Questions and Answers about the Ocean” help students build vocabulary. Connect Across Disciplines Inquiry Projects deepen students’ understanding the Essential Question through inquiry-based learning. Projects utilize connected texts to answer the Essential Question. Projects utilize connected texts to answer the Essential Question. Projects include interview a body of water and create statistical portraits.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.

Short reads, extended reads, and independent readings assist students in developing a deeper understanding of key ideas. Language lessons provide opportunities for students to explore word choices and text structure. Sequences of questions and tasks support students’ skill development in analyzing components of texts, so students may navigate the content, draw conclusions and articulate their evidence-based opinions.

Opportunities are provided for students to analyze language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of texts in order to determine main idea, describe text structures, and explain author’s reasoning. To support students in developing a deep conceptual understanding of texts in each unit, questions and tasks are scaffolded, becoming progressively more complex. Questions accompanying the texts require students to use inferential knowledge to deepen their understanding of the texts. Questions and tasks push students’ thinking around the text structure, language and author’s craft.

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 5 students identify and analyze an author’s objective point of view. After rereading paragraph 3 in “The Structure of a Corn Plant,” students pause to model thinking about the details in the paragraph and how they illustrate an objective point of view. Examples of objective adjectives and verbs are recorded on a class chart. Students reread paragraphs 1 and 2 and circle examples of verbs and adjectives that support objective point of view. Students reflect on objective language and its uses in the texts they read across content areas in school. Partners address these questions: “What texts in your classroom have an objective point of view? Why do these texts use objective language?” Students are reminded that an objective point of view presents facts without stating opinions.
  • In Unit 8, Week 3, Lesson 11, students explain the relationship between events in a scientific text. Students reread a text to find text evidence and draw an inference from the evidence, incorporating key vocabulary as they demonstrate understanding of the topic at hand.
  • In Unit 9, Week 3, Lesson 3, students read paragraphs 1-11 in Old Cities Revitalize and underline key details and main ideas and practice discerning relevant information from less relevant. Partners pose questions to each other that will clarify the reasons for underlining a detail in service of understanding and core of the text.
  • In Unit 10, students answer close reading questions requiring them to analyze the structure of the text, author’s intent and language, and use vocabulary from the text itself to explain their analyses. These questions are located in the Text Evidence Questions resource. From “John Dalton: Father of the Atomic Theory," students answer: “What evidence from the text supports this statement?” From “Matter Is Everywhere!” students answer: “How does this illustration help you understand particle movement for each type of matter?” From “Investigate: Changes in Matter” students view the diagram on page 13 and answer: “How is chewing a piece of food an example of a physical change? How is saliva breaking down the food an example of a chemical change?” From, “Marie M. Daly: Biochemistry Pioneer” and “John Dalton: Father of the Atomic Theory” students answer: “How did Dalton’s and Daly’s work advance people’s understanding of matter?”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

The materials for Grade 5 contain many coherent questions and tasks that support students’ development in the analysis of knowledge and ideas as well as providing opportunities for students to analyze across multiple texts as well as within single texts, however, questions are often focused on basic understanding of the texts and not on building knowledge.

Examples of text-based questions and tasks that do not necessarily build knowledge include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, students read texts to build their knowledge of the U.S. Constitution. In Week 2, Lesson 14, students read to annotate texts, “The Dred Scott Decision” and “Creating the Constitution,” and are directed to find textual evidence in order to support their understanding of text structure to answer close reading questions such as “How are the text structures of the two sections alike? How are they different?” Students refer to specific evidence from each text to support their answers, but these questions guide students to the structures rather than the content/knowledge within.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Lesson 14, after reading two texts with similar themes, students compare and contrast by responding to: “Compare and contrast the characters and story events of “The Law of Club and Fang” and “Androcles and the Lion.” How are the lessons about survival in the stories different? Students record their findings on a Compare and Contrast Theme Chart and use this chart to apply their understanding of the theme of both stories by writing several sentences comparing and contrasting how the theme of survival is presented in the two selections. This work supports students in understanding text components, but does not build their knowledge of topics.

Other sequences of questions and tasks do provide some practice with building knowledge. Some examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Lesson 14, students analyze information from two different texts on the same topic. They answer the Close Reading Prompt, read paragraphs 3-5 of the “Voting Rights Act Address” and paragraphs 2-4 of the “Liberty Medal Acceptance Speech.” Students compare and contrast the reasons and evidence Lyndon Johnson and Thurgood Marshall gave to support the idea that we can and should look to our past in our fight to improve our present.
  • In Unit 3, the topic is cultivating natural resources. In this unit, students read and compare selections about cultivating food in the past and today to understand how we develop our natural resources. The end of unit culminating task is writing an informative report that focuses students' reading and writing work on understanding the new information learned.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Each Unit concludes with culminating tasks requiring students to draw from multiple texts across the Unit. These tasks reflect students’ understanding of the unit strategies or skills. Daily tasks prepare students for the culminating tasks and provide teachers with feedback. Students demonstrate an integration of skills to demonstrate mastery of the unit skill or strategy. However, completion of culminating tasks does not always demonstrate knowledge of a topic.

There arel tasks provided during Small-Group and Independent Reading. Materials contain a Build, Reflect, and Write reflection sheets that take place during Reader’s Workshop: Texts for Close Reading. Students reflect upon the unit’s topic and essential question.

Materials contain Connect Across Discipline Inquiry Projects which require students to read, write, think, speak, and listen to apply the content knowledge they have gained. These projects can be found in the Additional Resources section of the Teacher’s Resource System volume. However, these projects are optional, and time is not allotted in planning to complete the tasks.

Examples of culminating tasks that reflect students' understanding of unit skills and strategies through integrated skills include the following:

  • In Unit 1, Weeks 1, 2, and 3, teachers scaffold the skill “integrating information from multiple texts on the same topic.” The culminating task in Week 3, Lesson 14, asks students to reread paragraphs 3-5 of the “Voting Rights Act Address” and paragraphs 2-4 of the “Liberty Medal Acceptance Speech.” Students compare and contrast the reasons and evidence that Lyndon Johnson and Thurgood Marshall gave to support the idea that we can, and should, look to our past in our fight to improve our present. In the applied understanding, students write a one or two-paragraph answer to the close reading question, citing the reasons and evidence used by each man.
  • In Unit 5, Weeks 1, 2, and 3, teachers scaffold the skill “integrating information from multiple sources to speak knowledgeably about a topic explaining how an author uses reasons and evidence to support points in a text”. In Week 3, Lesson 14, students reread paragraphs 10-20 of “The Making of the Industrial Age” and the first two stanzas of “The Secret of the Machines.” and think about the new developments of the Industrial Revolution reflected in Kipling’s poem. Students link the images in the poem to specific technologies mentioned in the informational text. They integrate the information from the two texts to explain the author’s and poet’s points of view about these developments.
  • In Unit 9, Weeks 1, 2, and 3, teachers scaffold the skill “integrating information from several texts on the same topic.” In the culminating task in Week 3, Lesson 14, students integrate information from ”Chicago: An American Hub,” “The Great Migration and the Growth of Cities,” and “Old Cities Revitalize” to address the Essential Question: “How do economic changes impact societies?” Students choose one economic change, such as the Great Depression, World War I or II, or a city’s growth and decline in population, and write a paragraph explaining how that factor was a cause of positive or negative effects in these citiess.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

The instructional materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. A scope and sequence is provided allowing for identification of the academic and domain-specific vocabulary for each week within the unit of study. Vocabulary instruction is highlighted throughout each unit and is addressed both explicitly and embedded in context. Teachers are provided guidance and suggestions outlining differentiated support in order to meet the needs of various learners that is cohesive and spans across the year.

Opportunities are provided for students to use and respond to the words they learn through playful informal talk, discussion, reading or being read to, and responding to what is read. Word study and vocabulary mini-lessons are a part of the instruction each week with a text to accompany the lessons. Vocabulary builds throughout the week and across texts within a one-week period. Specific texts are used which focus strictly on domain specific vocabulary. Academic vocabulary is also a part of the unit assessment as well as the weekly assessment.

Vocabulary lessons highlight the most relevant vocabulary words aimed at building knowledge of the unit topic and support comprehension. To support students’ understanding of complex texts, the following vocabulary words and mini-lessons are targeted. Opportunities to interact and build vocabulary include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, vocabulary words come from shared, mentor, and extended texts. Giddy, rollicking, mar, throng, laden are in “Becky Returns.” The Build Vocabulary instructional focus is using context clues to define uncommon or archaic words. For Making Meaning with Words, students learn mischievous and rollicking from “Becky Returns,” and students learn cautiously from “Games in the Woods.”
  • Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 1, to support instruction, teachers are provided differentiated support options to assist students in determining the meanings of domain-specific words In the section, Integrate ELD, there is a detailed plan for light, moderate or substantial support. The teacher shows the video and asks students to draw or write questions or ideas they have about the video. Students discuss new ideas related to the Essential Question and add those to the class list. The teacher writes the domain-specific vocabulary words cultivate, develop, landscape, and resource on the board and then replays the video and ask students to use audio and video clues to determine the meaning of these words. In Week 2, Lesson 6, the teacher rereads paragraph 5, circling the word symbiosis and modeling how to determine the meaning of symbiosis, using clues in nearby text.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, vocabulary words come from shared, mentor, and extended texts. Public spectacle, ravenous, bounding, fawned and pardoned from “Androcles and the Lion.” The Building Vocabulary instructional focus is Determine the Meaning of Words and Phrases as They Are Used in a Text. For Making Meaning with Words, vocabulary words from the shared mentor and extended texts are chaos, evacuate and priorities in “Brushfire!” The instructional focus is building word knowledge by using vocabulary routines to introduce the words and having students complete the “Making Meaning with Words” glossary on the inside back cover of their Texts for Close Reading.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Lesson 5, objectives for students include acquire and use domain-specific words related to the Revolutionary War and use reference materials such as print and digital dictionaries, to discover the meaning of domain-specific words. Students use context clues to determine the meaning of enlisted, siege, and detachment.
  • In Unit 10, Week 2, vocabulary words are from shared, mentor, and extended texts. Properties and particles are from “John Dalton: Father of the Atomic Theory”, states, properties, particles, property, texture and state are from “Matter Is Everywhere”, property, particles, properties, texture, solution, reactants and state are from “Investigate: Changes in Matter”, and solution is from “ My Dad the Street Chief.” The instructional focus is Determine the Meaning of Domain Specific Words. In Making Meaning with Words, vocabulary words are from the shared mentor and extended texts. Condensed and dissolves are in “Investigate: Changes in Matter.” The instructional focus is building word knowledge by using vocabulary routines to introduce the words, and having students complete the “Making Meaning with Words” glossary on the inside back cover of their Texts for Close Reading.

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.

The instructional materials include embedded writing across the year using a variety of well-designed guidance, protocols, models, and support for teachers to implement and monitor students writing development. The writing instruction supports students’ growth in writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the year. Students write to address multiple topics over both short and extended time frames and are provided with mentor texts, writing prompts, and rubrics to help them self-evaluate writing, as well as give teachers a clear picture to evaluate and give feedback. The required time the weekly lesson would take, along with the amount of writing students are responsible for, is balanced and takes place during each three week unit. Students are provided time to adequately refine and reflect on their writing before moving on to a new topic. Discussion regarding writing also takes place with peers and with the teacher.

Students participate in both on-demand and process writings throughout the year. Students are required to respond to evidence-based writing prompts in the Build, Reflect, Write notebook. Prior to responding to the text, students have pre-work to support their response. Students read and reread texts, use annotation, cite text evidence to support their ideas and opinions, and write short analytical responses. Students are provided objectives directly related to the writing process during the lessons.Writing requires students to synthesize information gathered while engaging with text sets and use the writing to demonstrate comprehension of complex texts. Writing is used as a vehicle for research and building knowledge, and range of writing activities and increase in rigor from the beginning to the end of the school year. To provide comprehensive support, teacher resources support students’ writing development by providing well-designed lesson plans, models and/or exemplars, and protocols to support student writing. Materials attend to not just end results of writing work, but also provide guidance for practicing, revising, and creating.

  • The Benchmark Program Reference Guide includes a component that outlines writing alignment: Writing Aligned to Common Core Expectations. This resource shows the writing progression and distribution of writing types and skills for grades K-6.
  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lessons 3, 6, 9, and 12, students write a personal letter with the teacher scaffolding the following strategies: read a mentor text, analyze features of the mentor text, find facts and details from “Creating the Constitution” that is included in the mentor personal letter, plan the letter using a planning guide to gather and organize information, and draft the personal letter using the Personal Letter Writing Rubric.
  • In Unit 5, students use an Opinion Essay Writing checklist at each step in their writing to help them construct a well-organized opinion essay. In Lesson 6, students find facts and details that support their opinion. In this process writing mini-lesson, the teacher shows students how to evaluate online sources of information to distinguish between those that are knowledgeable and credible and those that are not. In Lesson 9, students take notes from online sources. In Lesson 11, students plan and organize the information to draft a strong opinion essay.
    • In Week 2, students write a draft starting with introduction, incorporating research to support opinion, using words and phrases to link opinion and reasons, and drafting a concluding statement.
    • In Week 3, students revise by varying sentence beginnings to improve fluency, revise to strengthen opinion using modal auxiliaries, edit for correct comma usage and correct spelling using reference materials, creating a title, and using technology to publish the writing.
  • In Unit 6, students write to sources using narrative journal entries. Throughout Week 1, students analyze the genre and complete the following mini-lessons: read a mentor text, analyze character and events, read a text source to find character traits, develop the character’s voice, and conventions of language: understand the function of prepositions.
    • In Week 2, students work to organize their ideas for writing and are provided practice through the following mini-lessons: read and analyze the prompt, reread a source text to find character information, read to find story events, plan your journal entries, and to use future perfect tense.
    • In Week 3, students work to draft, revise and edit and are provided practice through the following mini-lessons. Use description in your draft, draft an ending to provide a sense of closure, revise to add details using prepositional phrases, and to edit for correct form and use of verb tense. In Lesson 10, students are provided with a model text to illustrate the draft and revisions made using the mini-lesson on adding details through the use of prepositional phrases. In Lesson 15, students are provided with a narrative journal writing rubric in order to evaluate their draft text for self-reflection and determination if the student feels it is ready to turn in for evaluation.
  • In Unit 8, Week 1, teachers introduce the Informative Report and guide students through the prewriting steps in the writing process: brainstorm, evaluate ideas, and plan. In Week 2, teachers guide students through the drafting steps in the writing process and provide instruction in Conventions of Language and sentences with multiple tenses. In Week 3, teachers guide students through the revising, editing, and publishing steps in the writing process.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

The instructional materials provide a Program Reference Guide component that outlines writing alignment. This resource shows the writing progression and distribution of writing types and skills for grades K-6. In Units 8, 9 and 10, students conduct research independently or with a peer. In each unit, students conduct research to write in a different mode. Daily research and writing process mini-lessons support students’ independent work. In addition to a progression of writing tasks that increase in complexity across the grade levels, tasks also increase over time vertically through the grade levels. In Grade 5, students participate in independent/peer research projects. Research opportunities are sequenced throughout the year to include a progression of research skills that build to student independence. Opportunities are provided for students to integrate their language skills across units and topics. Students are provided with robust instruction, practice, and application of research skills throughout their grade level reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language skills. These skills are supported and put into practice as they build knowledge about a topic or topics. Support for students to develop and apply research skills are explicitly provided throughout each unit. The mini-lessons and topic-driven text sets support teachers in employing projects that develop students’ knowledge of different aspects of a topic.

  • In Unit 2, Connect Across Disciplines Inquiry Projects, there are three choices of inquiry/research projects connected to the Essential Question of Why do we value certain qualities in people?
    • Write Help Wanted Ads for Explorers: Students analyze characteristics of explorers, research specific skills and traits of explorers to the Americas, create Help Wanted ads designed to attract explorers, and identify successful ads.
    • Give Opinion Speeches: Students research people from the colonial era, choose a colonial person to meet and identify personal opinions, write and present a speech including description and opinion, and analyze evidence presented in speeches.
    • Profile the Mississippi River: Students research information and visuals to profile the Mississippi River, select relevant statistics, data, and visuals for a profile of the Mississippi River, and create a presentation using information and visuals.
  • In Unit 3, Weeks 1-3, Writing to Sources, students write an informative report based on facts and details found in a media source and in a Mentor Informative Report.
    • In Week 1, students listen and view a media source, “Harvesting Corn” and take notes about information in the video.
    • In Week 2, students read and analyze the prompt: “For this prompt, I need to explain how corn is produced in our country.
    • In Week 3, students incorporate information from the sources during the drafting of the informative report.
  • In Unit 5, Connect Across Disciplines Inquiry Projects, students can show their knowledge of the Essential Question of: What value does technology bring to people’s lives? There are three choices of inquiry/research projects:
    • Design a Technological Solution: Students make connections between technology and change, research technological innovations from the Age of Exploration, choose one innovation to show the power of change, evaluate presentations for strength of evidence and conclusions, and share thinking with peers.
    • Nominate Technologies from the Age of Exploration: Students define and identify examples of technology, research colonial technology write a letter describing one colonial technology and its importance in the colonial economy, evaluate presentations by my peers, and share thinking with peers.
    • Describe Colonial Technology: Students identify and describe problems, work with peers to design multiple solutions to a problem, present design solutions to the class, and share thinking with peers.
  • In Unit 8, Weeks 1-3, students complete the process writing task of creating an Informative Report.
    • In Week 1, students organize their ideas, develop a focus, select knowledgeable and credible print resources, take notes from print sources, and use cause/effect text structure to organize the report.
    • In Week 2, mini-lessons focus on the introduction and development of the topic, how to use linking words and phrases to connect ideas, to provide a concluding statement, and to use writing conventions.
    • In Week 3, students work to revise, edit,and publish their writing, focusing on expanding sentences, revising with domain-specific vocabulary, using correct verb tense, using reference materials to check spelling, and publishing the writing using technology.
    • In Week 3, Lesson 14, students integrate information from the two texts to answer the close reading question. Students write sentences from the two texts that show cause-and-effect relationships.
  • In Unit 9, Connect Across the Disciplines, there are three choices of inquiry/research projects pertaining to the Essential Question of: “How do Economic Changes Impact Societies?”
    • Analyze Environmental Change in Butterflies: Students research the status of Monarch butterflies and identify cause-and-effect relationships, analyze and present data showing environmental changes affecting Monarch butterflies, share thinking with peers.
    • Profile an American City Over Time: Students research and report on changes that have occurred over time in specific American cities, create presentations to show these changes, and share thinking with peers.
    • Track Sky Changes: Students form hypotheses and draw conclusions about the movement of Earth relative to the sun, create a sundial, make predictions and observations, share thinking with peers.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

The Benchmark materials provide the opportunity for students to read independently throughout the school year. The materials include a resource in Program Support titled, “Managing Your Independent Reading Program,” which details the expectations for teachers and students to be reading both in class and independently at home. The “Managing Your Independent Reading Program” includes: resources for organizing independent reading, the classroom library, room arrangement, anchor charts, mini-lessons for promoting independent reading, reading response journals and logs, discussion groups and book recommendations, guidance for conferring with students, and information on growing your classroom library. According to the materials, “Students should also be encouraged to develop a routine of reading daily at home for a minimum of 20 minutes, either independently or with a parent.” In the independent reading stage, students are required to self-select and to read materials at their own ‘just-right’ levels.” For Fluent Readers, the Five-Finger Method is recommended for book selection:

  1. Choose a book that you would like to read.
  2. Turn to any page and begin reading.
  3. If there are five words you can’t pronounce or that you don’t understand, the book is too difficult for you.
  4. Repeat the process until you find a “just-right” book.

A tracking system is recommended in the “Managing Your Independent Reading Program” to track students’ independent reading in the form of a reading log and reading response journal. Reading response journals are kept by students and used to record personal responses to texts they have read or will read. Teachers demonstrate proper techniques, provide mini-lessons on how to respond to literature and model several prompts by listing them on chart paper, and hang the paper on the wall. The reading log is also suggested as an independent reading tracking tool. In reading logs, students keep a record of what they have read by writing the book title, author, illustrator, genre, and date read.

There is sufficient teacher guidance to foster independence for all readers and procedures are organized for independent reading included in the lessons, for example, as stated in the text, “Within Benchmark Advance, students may participate in daily independent reading during the Independent and Collaborative Activity block, while the teacher meets with small groups of students to conduct differentiated small-group reading instruction, model fluency skills through reader’s theater, or reteach skills and strategies.” Students complete a variety of reading activities in the reading block. Students have shared reading and mentor read-alouds each week. There are also a set of small group texts that will be used in small group time. Each set of texts is leveled according to Guided Reading levels. Student independent reading materials span a wide volume of texts at grade levels. These texts titles are included as a teacher resource, Recommended Trade Books.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

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Gateway Three Details

The materials reviewed meet the expectations for usability. Materials are well-designed and include support for implementation over the course of a school year. Materials include clearly labeled navigation and support to aid teachers to support students’ literacy growth. The design of the materials supports effective lesson structure and pacing. Student resources include review and practice, clear directions, and explanations, and correct labeling of reference aids. Visual design is not distracting to students and support students’ learning.

The materials support teachers in helping students to learn and understand the concepts in the standards. Teacher’s editions explain the role of specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. Materials include strategies for communicating with stakeholders about the program and how they can support students in their learning.

There are a variety of assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. There is sufficient guidance for interpreting student performance on assessments and suggestions for follow-up. Materials also provide routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Students are accountable for independent reading.

Materials meet expectation for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. There are clear supports for students who struggle as well as those who work above grade level.

Instructional materials include useful technology to enhance student learning. They include materials to support students’ personalized learning via navigable online platforms. The digital platform offers opportunities to enhance student learning as well as opportunities for both student and teacher collaboration.

Criterion 3a - 3e

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8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for being well-designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The Read Aloud Handbook, Build Reflect Write Handbook, and the E-book provide text-dependent questions, writing prompts, and speaking opportunities requiring students to engage in the text and make real world connections. Daily specific text-dependent reading mini lessons are included requiring all students to cite text evidence to support their answers explicitly or use valid inferences from the text. The materials meet the expectations for the teacher and student reasonably being able to complete the content within a regular school year with the pacing allowing for maximum student understanding. The materials meet the requirements for resources including ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanations, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g. visuals, maps, etc). The materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. The visual design is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Examples of effective lesson structure and pacing include but are not limited to the following:

  • The Read Aloud Handbook, Build Reflect Write Handbook, and the E-book provide text-dependent questions, writing prompts, and speaking opportunities requiring students to engage in the text and make real world connections. Daily specific text-dependent reading mini lessons are included requiring all students to cite text evidence to support their answers explicitly or use valid inferences from the text.
  • There are ten units of study. Many units focus on a Science or Social Studies themed topic. Within these topic-driven units, there are three lessons. These lessons include two short reads and two extended reads designed to build knowledge and vocabulary around the identified topic. Supplemental and leveled texts also support this topic with a balance of literary and nonfiction texts.
  • Materials provide explicit details for executing whole group instruction. Culminating tasks for each unit builds student engagement with the text and depth of understanding of the topic. To promote inquiry-based learning and reinforce topics across disciplines, each unit includes a section entitled, Connect Across Disciplines: Inquiry Projects Introduction. These interdisciplinary projects can be found under the Additional Resources tab. These projects are designed to deepen students’ understanding of the unit concepts and essential questions through inquiry-based learning.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1 outlines a suggested time frame for addressing the read aloud (10 minutes), mini-lessons (15 minutes), small group/ independent reading (15-20 minutes), writing (15 minutes) and word study (10 minutes).

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

The instructional materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build academic skills across texts. A scope and sequence is provided allowing for identification of the units and lessons within the year. Supplemental and leveled texts also support this topic with a balance of literary and nonfiction texts. The balance of genres with extensive topics across units serve to build student knowledge and vocabulary at various levels of depth and meaning. Students read across text sets organized around a topic. Texts gradually increase in difficulty over the course of the year and resources provided scaffold support for all students in order to move students toward grade level proficiency. Teachers are given guidance and suggestions outlining support to meet the needs of various learners across the year. For example:

  • There are 10 units that are each broken into three weeks. Each week contains 15 lessons. There are a total of 450 lessons and students cover 2-3 lessons each day.
  • Lessons are set up for 365 minutes per week and/or 73 minutes per day which includes interactive read alouds, reading mini-lessons, small group and/or independent reading, writing mini-lessons, and word study mini lessons.
  • Lessons include two Short Reads and two Extended Reads designed to build knowledge and vocabulary around the identified topic. Each lesson also includes three vocabulary mini lesson texts and leveled readers for independent and small group reading.
  • In Unit 3, Cultivating Natural Resources the knowledge strand is life science. The essential question is “How do we decide which resources we should develop?” Students read and compare cultivating food now and then to understand how we develop our natural resources. In Week 1, the teacher explains that students will learn about a familiar resource, corn and read informational texts about the science, history, and industry of corn. In Weeks 1-3 students use the following texts to dig deeper into the content and grow their vocabulary. Read alouds include: Gathering Leaves, Agriculture, Part 1 and Part 2, Different Ways, Gonzalo, The Peanut Man, Amber Waves of Grain and Legend of the Corn. Short reads include: “The Structure of a Corn Plant” and “The Past and Future of a Crop.” Extended reads include: “A Short History of a Special Plant” and “The Science of Growing Food.” Vocabulary study mini lessons include the following texts: “Paul Bunyan and The Great Popcorn Blizzard,” “The Union of Corn and Bean,” and “The World’s Only Corn Palace.”

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (eg. visuals, maps, etc.)

Materials provided include trade books, shared readings, mentor read alouds, scaffolded activity strategies, close-reading texts, performance tasks, a leveled text library, Reader’s Theater, and interventions. All of these are digitally interactive, i.e. where annotation is required it is done digitally. Each of these resources include ample opportunity to review and practice, clear directions (in some interactive tools directions are also given orally), and correct labeling. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Lesson 5, directions are given to review the main ideas of “The Dred Scott Decision” written in the margins during Lesson 3. Teachers call on specific students to paraphrase important information they read in the first part of “The Dred Scott Decision.” Teachers explain that students will read the second half of the selection today and will work on summarizing informational text.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Lesson 5, students read paragraphs 13-22 of “The Making of the Industrial Age” to identify additional key details about inventions that show how the Industrial Revolution changed the way Americans live. “Students underline key details about inventions. Observe students’ annotations to assess their ability to identify relevant information. If students need support to read the assigned selection, refer to “Ways to Scaffold the First Reading,” at left in margin.”
  • In Unit 10, Week 3, Lesson 11, students participate in close reading. “Review that readers often have to draw inferences by using clues in the text. In this lesson, students will accurately quote text evidence to support their inferences about Dr. Daly and gender and racial barriers at that time.” Teachers will display a blank Draw Inferences Chart and distribute copies to the class and divide students into peer groups and have them accurately quote evidence from the text as they complete the chart. Each group should come to an agreement about their examples and inference and be prepared to share their final answer with the class.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

Daily lessons and Performance Based Assessments specifically denote the standards to which the lessons and tasks are aligned. This publisher-produced alignment to standards is provided in Benchmark Program Reference Guide under the heading of ELA Correlations to the Common Core Standards. It is also provided within each lesson within each Unit. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Lesson 11, students draw inferences, and put together pieces of evidence in order to better understand the text, especially ideas that are not stated directly. Teachers model how to draw an inference using facts and details, and then students draw their own inferences about the text. Students will communicate their inference and text evidence in writing. This is aligns to RI.5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • Unit 5, Week 3, Lesson 14, students get information about a topic from different sources and integrate the information so they understand and can speak about the topic. Students are reminded that the author’s point of view is the author’s opinion of a topic. Sometimes the authors of two texts may have similar points of view on a topic. Students integrate information from two texts to speak knowledgeably about the author’s and poet’s points of view, take an active role in a class discussion, asking questions and elaborating on my classmates’ ideas and write an imagined dialogue integrating information from both texts and showing my understanding of the author’s and poet’s points of view. This aligns to RI.5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topics, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The instructional materials included utilize a digital visual design that is not distracting or chaotic, and supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject. The digital materials are easily navigated through a clear design and interface. For example:

  • The digital materials in the Benchmark program are easily navigated through clicking the grade level and specific unit from the My Library. The teacher’s online resource includes easily clickable tabs for navigation throughout the program. A Unit timeline is also provided across the top in order to easily navigate from unit to unit.
  • The digital student text allows space for annotations and close reading notes to be added during reading. The paragraphs are numbered for students to easily locate text passages as needed during time spent with the text.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Lesson 9, students identify and sort hyphenated and open compound words. A clearly labeled Word Sort Chart is provided and does not include any distracting or chaotic features.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation for materials containing a Teacher's Guide with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.The materials contain a Teacher's Guide that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literary concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject as necessary. The materials reviewed meet expectations for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. Materials reviewed contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies. The materials reviewed contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.Specific materials are provided, including a Family Welcome Letter (available in English and Spanish) for the program, School-To-Home letters for each unit, and daily take-home activity calendars.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning..

Materials include a Teacher’s Resource System (TRS) that includes a clear outline of each unit as well as notes and suggestions about presenting content. The TRS also includes the objectives of the lesson, explanations of where to find descriptions of routine, and suggested ways to present content as well as possible questions to ask. Each question asked is followed by a sample student answer. The TRS includes scaffolded instruction boxes to address learners needs with suggestions and ideas on how to differentiate instruction for those students in need.

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Lesson 6, teachers remind students that domain-specific words are vocabulary terms used in a field, such as social studies or science. “Explain that context clues are the words around a word that can help them read a word and understand its meaning. Context clues include synonyms, direct definition, description, and examples. Model how to analyze the context clues around the word secession in paragraph 3. The directions for the teachers give an sample modeling, for example, In sentence 3, I see the word session and circle it, because I’m not really sure how to read it or what it means. I will look at the words around this word to see if I can find clues.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Lesson 15, teachers explain to students that there are two last choices to make in order to publish their writing: creating a title and using technology to identify a font size and style that will present the opinion essay in the clearest possible way. “Use think-alouds like the ones that follow to model how you create an effective title and choose an appropriate font size and style.”
  • Unit 9, Week 2, Lesson 13, teachers remind students that multimedia presentations often include images that support and enhance the writer’s ideas. “Point out that often, writers must gather a variety of images for a presentation.” There is a sample think-aloud for the teachers to use while modeling. They will display Multimedia Presentation Slide 2 and point out the caption to students. They will explain that the caption helps show how the visual supports the presenter’s reason.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

To develop teachers’ ability to improve their own knowledge of the subjects, ongoing teacher support is provided throughout each unit, including: sample modeling, if/then strategies, strategies for differentiated support and ways to scaffold the first reading. To provide comprehensive support, teacher materials to support students’ writing development by providing well-designed lesson plans, models and/or exemplars, and protocols to support student writing. Teacher materials provide support for planning and implementation of text-dependent/specific questions, tasks and assignments for all learners through modeling, guided practice and applying understanding with scaffolding for light, moderate, or substantial support throughout the year. The instructional materials include embedded writing across the year using a variety of well-designed guidance, protocols, models, and support for teachers to implement and monitor students writing development. Materials provide guidance to teachers in supporting students’ literacy skills. For example:

  • To support instruction and provide teacher guidance in Unit 10, Week 1, Lesson 5, teachers are provided an if/then strategy, addressing potential student barriers as students draw on information from multiple sources to locate answers.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 14, teachers are provided a sample model of how to synthesize information from two or more texts. The teacher discusses with students how synthesizing information from two or more texts creates a bigger picture of a topic or issue. Teachers use information from “Becky Returns” and “Games in the Woods” to draw a larger character portrait of Tom Sawyer.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Lesson 14, teachers are provided suggestions for differentiated support to support students in comparing/contrasting the two texts using transition clauses. This teacher support is found under “Integrated ELD” and gives suggestions for light, moderate and substantial support.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

Each unit is designed to address key shifts in curriculum and instruction that reflect research on how best to prepare students for success in the globally competitive society of the 21st century. A Skills and Strategies grid that lists the standards used in each unit which correlates to texts and activities for reading, writing, speaking, and listening can be found in the Program Reference Guide. Each week contains a Comprehensive Literacy Planning Guide which lists the lessons covered and corresponds the standards and skills. For example:

  • When each unit is opened there, are two tabs that introduce the teacher to the unit: Unit Strategies and Skills overview and Components at a Glance which gives the teacher a 3-week glance of the texts used for each unit.
  • Skill and Strategies grid for Grade 5 can be found on pages 109-130 of the Program Reference Guide which is an online tool of the program.
  • The Comprehensive Literacy Planning Guide for each weekly lesson reflects the order of the week's mini-lessons in the Teacher Resource System.
  • Each weekly lesson also includes a Reading and Writing workshop planner and writing and vocabulary grids that outline lessons for writing and vocabulary.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meets the criteria that materials contain a explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies.

Materials include an Implementation Guide that provides a walkthrough of the curriculum citing and explaining the rationale and research-based strategies including, but not limited to, the principles of backwards design and the design principle of backward mapping. For example:

  • The Program Reference Guide states, “This program was built to address key shifts in curriculum and instruction that reflect research on how best to prepare students for success in the globally competitive society of the 21st century. Benchmark Advance enables all students to master rigorous learning goals with the support of strong differentiated instruction, focused English language development, and responsive teaching based on ongoing assessment. As a flexible comprehensive solution, Benchmark Advance meets the needs of districts implementing a reading collaborative, balanced approach, or workshop model. A careful backward-mapping process was applied in the creation of lessons that promote meaning-making strategies in Week 1 and close reading opportunities in Weeks 2 and 3. Each Essential Question, is crafted to support the tenets of Understanding by Design, promotes thinking about a topic or concept from many perspectives simultaneously. Benchmark Advance is a forward-thinking program that reflects a 21st-century vision. A state-of-the art digital portal provides access to online planning tools, interactive, customizable e-books built for annotation and accessible on any device, weekly teacher presentations, online assessments that prepare students for tech-enabled and tech-enhanced tests, and reporting features that enable teachers to identify and respond to the learning needs of every student.”
  • In the additional resources tab there are clear explanations of the instructional approaches of the program. These explanations include information about: connecting content across disciplines, pre-teach and reteaching routines, small group strategies, and the collaborative conversation approach. Research based approaches are mentioned throughout the additional resources. The program contains supportive information on expanding the reading skills of learners, under the tab titled, Literacy and Language to Advance All Learners. The Access and Equity document discusses how to support students with disabilities and references “Strategies for Teaching Students with Learning and Behavior Problems [Vaughn, S. & Bos, C. (2012). Boston, MA: Pearson]”, which has provided many of the strategies used within the materials.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

The Benchmark Advance Program contains strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program. Specific suggestions are provided for how they can help support student progress and achievement outside of the school day. Specific materials are provided, including a Family Welcome Letter for the program, School-To-Home letters for each unit, and daily take-home activity calendars. For example:

  • In the Home-School materials, a Family Welcome Letter is provided that helps to inform all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/Literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement. For example, the opening letter explains “Each book is meant to be used for just three weeks. After three weeks of reading and working with the texts in class, students will bring the annotated book home. Your student’s annotations will allow you to see exactly how they are interpreting and engaging with the readings. As your student is working through each unit, you’ll notice that all of the readings are centered on one topic. These topics include social studies and science content as well as literary subjects such as point of view, theme, and character. Every three weeks, you’ll receive a school-to-home letter that will provide additional activities you can do at home with your student. These activities connect to the unit topic as well as the vocabulary, comprehension, and phonics/word study skills being taught during the unit.”
  • In Unit 6 School-to-Home letter provides specific information about the unit and additional suggestions to integrate the home-school connection. “We are kicking off our sixth unit of study in the Benchmark program. As with the previous units, I am providing suggested activities you and your child can do together at home to build on the work we’re doing in class. In this unit, we will read and compare selections about characters who are up against the wild and analyze how different genres approach similar themes. We will be reading a variety of genres, including a fable, drama, folklore, realistic fiction, historical fiction, and informational text. This unit will allow you and your child to consider what drives a character to survive, despite being up against terrible odds.”
  • A Daily Take-Home Activity Calendar is included for each unit. This resource provides daily activities for each day, Monday-Friday, for weeks 1, 2 and 3. For example, in Unit 1, Week 1, the following information is provided for Monday: “Creating the Constitution, pp. 4-5 invite your child to read aloud the selection. Discuss how the United States Constitution has impacted the world.”

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Materials have phonics screeners, weekly and unit assessments, informal assessments and interim assessments. Assessments are in paper format as well as online format. Materials reviewed meet the expectations for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized. Materials meet the expectations for assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments and interpreting results through rubrics and scoring guidance documents.The materials contain information to guide teachers in analyzing assessment as well as foundational checklists to help guide the assessment material. The materials include a developmental writing checklist for teachers to use to analyze students’ skills to determine students’ level of writing and how to implement lessons and mini lessons. Instructional materials meet the expectations for including routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

Benchmark for Grade 5 provides several opportunities for student assessment, formative and summative, during each unit: informal assessments, 4 interim assessments per unit, and also end of week 1 assessment, end of week 2 assessment and then a unit assessment after the end of week 3. Each assessment is located in a separate ancillary document located under the “Assessment” tab. Included in the guide for each of these assessments are overviews, types of questions, and instructions on how to administer the tests. For example:

  • Page 4 of the informal assessment guide provides information to teachers about a wide variety of informal literacy assessments that enable teachers to:
    • obtain multiple perspectives on the literacy growth occurring in their classrooms;
    • monitor and reflect on their teaching and students’ learning;
    • make informed decisions about students’ progress and needs;
    • select appropriate materials and instructional techniques that match
    • students’ current level of development;
    • document progress over time through a cumulative portfolio;
    • report progress to students, parents, and administrators
  • Page 5 Rhodes and Shanklin (1993) outlined the eleven principles of literacy assessment. Each of these principles is supported in Benchmark's informal assessments. A chart is included on page 5.
  • Overview of the interim assessment program is found in the Interim Assessment and Performance Task guide. On page 5 the overview states “This book provides a set of Interim Assessments and Performance Tasks designed to assess students’ progress in reading and writing, based on the standards and skills taught across the units. Both types of assessment are aligned to the Common Core State Standards for each grade level”.
  • Overview of the weekly and unit assessment can be found in the Weekly and Unit Assessment guide. On page 5 the overview states, “This book provides a set of Interim Assessments and Performance Tasks designed to assess students’ progress in reading and writing, based on the standards and skills taught across the units. Both types of assessment are aligned to the Common Core State Standards for each grade level.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

Benchmark identifies standards in the formative and summative assessments. Standards are explicitly a component of the test and questions are directly correlated to the standards and evidence of this can be found in the answer key of the informal assessment, performance tasks, interim assessments, end of week and end of unit assessments. For example:

  • Standards for each of the questions on the interim and performance tasks can be found in the Interim Assessment and Performance Task Guide for each unit in the answer key. The answer key is found at the end of the list of units for Grade 5 and contains the question number, answer, standard tested, and DOK level.
  • Standards for each of the questions on the weekly and unit assessments can be found in the Weekly and Unit Assessment Guide in the Answer Key. The answer key is found at the end of the list of units and each unit contains question number, answer, standard tested and DOK level.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up

Materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments and interpreting results through rubrics and scoring guidance documents. For example:

  • Interim and Performance Based Assessments provide teachers with notes and guidance regarding administration of assessments. The information provided guides teachers to allow students to complete the assessment over multiple lessons, to review the Essential Questions, and revisit the main selection texts. Sample responses are provided for what a 2/2 response would resemble. As a part of the Interim Assessment and Performance Guide, teachers are provided information on how to administer, score, and use assessment data.
    • Directions for administering interim assessments is on page 9 of the guide.
    • How to score interim assessments is on page 10 of the information guide.
    • On page 11 of the guide it states, “Reviewing a student’s assessment with the student may also be helpful. It can provide an opportunity for students to see which questions they answered incorrectly and why their answers were incorrect. This kind of review will help them be more successful next time”.
  • Guidance is provided for teachers in administering and scoring assessments, along with interpreting student assessment scores on Weekly and End-of- Unit Assessments. For example, in the Weekly and Unit Assessment Information Guide, an assessment overview is provided and in that overview on page viii assessment administration information is provided. On page x, how to score assessments is provided. On page xii, how to use assessment results is provided. A rubric for scoring the extended response items of the End-Of-Unit Assessment can be found in the answer key.
  • Instruction and guidance are provided for administering Oral Reading Assessment found in the informal Assessment Guide and an overview is found beginning on page 4 of the guide. Information on oral reading assessment begins on page 19 of the guide. Small group reading assessment can be found on page 40 of the same guide.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade Benchmark 5 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Students’ volume of reading is reinforced through encounters with short reads, extended text, leveled texts and suggested texts from the classroom library. Materials include mechanisms for teachers to monitor student progress toward grade level independence. Students are assessed using informal assessments, weekly formal assessments and performance tasks. Each assessment is located in a separate ancillary document located under the Assessment tab. Additionally, students are required to respond to evidence-based writing prompts in the Build, Reflect, Write notebook. Prior to responding to the prompt, students are given pre-work to support their response. For example:

  • To support students and teachers in monitoring progress in writing skills, Unit 5, Week 1, Lesson 3 introduces an Opinion Essay Writing Checklist. Writing exemplars for each writing type are given under the drop down menu Writing Exemplars.
  • In Unit 1, during Small Group Reading, Independent Reading and Conferencing, students choose from eight supplemental texts at varying reading levels and genres including an opinion essay, Opinions About Freedom of Speech. During this unit, students are also assessed using informal assessments, weekly formal assessments and performance tasks found in the Assessment tab.
  • Students work in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, including Write in Response to Reading prompts that require students to cite text evidence as they write about what they’ve read. For example, in Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 13 students write in response to reading identifying key ideas in “Below Deck: A Titanic Story.”

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

The instructional materials reviewed detail how students are held accountable for independent reading. This outline is based on student choice and interest. It supports students in building stamina, confidence, and motivation. The materials provide a resource called Managing Your Independent Reading Program that provides guidance on setting up an independent reading area and tracking student progress. Guidance is available to teachers throughout each unit for incorporating the independent reading program. Materials are provided for teachers, students, and parents/guardians to track the reading activities students do both inside and outside of school. With each lesson, students engage in 20 minutes of daily independent reading while small group reading is taking place.

Teachers are able to assign independent reading to students if necessary to help them gain deeper knowledge in the objectives. An independent reading log is kept for each student so that students and teachers are able to track self-selected texts used for independent reading. The Managing Your Independent Reading Program includes: resources for organizing independent reading, the classroom library, room arrangement, anchor charts, mini-lessons for promoting independent reading, reading response journals and logs, discussion groups and book recommendations, guidance for conferring with students, and information on growing your classroom library. To support independent reading outside the classroom, students are given a Daily Take Home Activity Calendar. For example:

  • The Comprehensive Literacy Planner outlines 20 minutes per day of independent reading and usually occurs between mini-lessons 2 and 3. This time is specified for independent reading and conferring and small group reading.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Lesson 4, students partner reread “Becky Returns” to determine important actions by characters.
  • A list of recommended, award-winning trade books is provided for every unit in Benchmark, with titles that expand on the unit topics. Students are encouraged to read these trade books during independent reading. Some trade books that support the Unit topic, Up Against the Wild, for Unit 6 are: Bomb: The Race to Build-and Steal-the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon, Ice!: The Amazing History of the Ice Business, and The Mighty Mars Rovers: The Incredible Adventures of Spirit and Opportunity.

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. Materials meet the expectations for providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English, extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.The materials contain a differentiated instructor planner, as well as, an integrated ELD component. A recommendation of light, moderate to substantial support for students is available. Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

The Differentiated Instruction Planner and Advancing Foundational Skills for English Language Development provide multiple resources and strategies to meet the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and support them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standard. For example:

  • The Differentiated Instruction planner helps to guide teachers through meeting the needs of all learners. It provides Small-Group Reading Instruction Options: Unit-Specific Leveled Texts for Differentiated Instruction, Close Reading of Complex Text, Reader’s Theater, Literature Circles, Reading Strategy Instruction, English Language Development and Intervention. Independent and Collaborative Activity Options: Read Independently, Read Collaboratively, Write Independently, Conduct Research, Apply Understanding, Answer Questions Using Text Evidence, Practice and Build, Reflect, Write.
  • The Advancing Foundational Skills for English Language Development provides guidance and support for students. It is recommended that foundational skills instruction for English Learners be adapted based on: the student’s age and level of schooling, the student’s previous literacy experiences in his or her native language, the student’s level of oral proficiency in the native language and in English, the native language writing system used, and how closely the student’s native language is related to English. Therefore, students’ language and literacy characteristics need to be taken into consideration and individualized instruction may be needed in order to provide the appropriate foundational skills instruction.
  • Each lesson includes Integrated English Language Development with specific guidance for multiple levels of support: Light Support, Moderate Support, and Substantial Support. As noted in the Program Guide, strategies to support ELLs are embedded into every core lesson at three levels of scaffolding intensity. The goal of these strategies is to target the most cognitively or linguistically challenging task in each lesson with substantial, moderate, and light support so that all learners benefit from the core instruction. Therefore, teachers are able to consider and provide the level of support students need in relation to specific lessons, and to use the strategies flexibly.
  • Additional resources are provided in the Grade Resources regarding Access and Equity: Meeting the Needs of Students with Disabilities and Meeting the Needs of of Students Who Are Advanced Learners.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

The materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade level standards. For example:

  • The Teacher’s Resource System provides daily scaffolding for immediate opportunities to support students during lessons, and the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides more extensive follow up to support students whose primary language is something other than English.
    • In Unit 1, Week 3, Lesson 11, Integrated ELD supports include:
      • Light Support, Invite students to state what they believe Marshall’s main point is. Ask them to reread the text for evidence that supports what they believe. Instruct them how to use the evidence and their opinion to complete the sample Reasons and Evidence chart.
      • Moderate Support, Ask students: What is the main point that Marshall is trying to make? He believes that _____. He wishes that _____. Ask students: How do you know this? Write what he says that makes you think this. Have them return to the text to find examples of what Marshall says that makes them have these opinions. Encourage them to explain how these support their opinion. He believes racism and prejudice still exist because he says _____. He feels we need more progress with social justice because he says _____.
      • Substantial Support, Ask students to describe what they believe Marshall feels when he gives his speech. I believe that he thinks we need more progress. It appears that he is disappointed with what we have not achieved. Prompt them to return to the text to find examples of what he says that makes them have these opinions. Have them explain how these examples support their opinion. I wish I could say racism and prejudice were recent memories’ shows that he believes they still exist. I wish I could say this nation has traveled far on the road to social justice’ means he does not believe it has progressed enough.
  • Each lesson includes Integrated English Language Development with specific guidance for multiple levels of support: Light Support, Moderate Support, or Substantial Support. As noted in the Program Guide, “Strategies to support ELLs are embedded into every core lesson at three levels of scaffolding intensity. The goal of these strategies is to target the most cognitively or linguistically challenging task in each lesson with substantial, moderate, and light support so that all learners benefit from the core instruction. Therefore, teachers are able to consider and provide the level of support students need in relation to specific lessons, and to use the strategies flexibly.
  • According to the Program Guide, the English Language Development Teacher's Resource System is designed to develop students’ awareness of how English works in both spoken and written language, and allows teachers to provide English Learners with the skills necessary for learning, thinking, and expressing in the English language. The texts for English Language Development are excerpted and supported, not adapted. Benchmark ELD takes a critical chunk of grade-level ELA content and amplifies it for the Learner. Amplification is done through visuals/pictures/graphic elements, leveling, and explanations to scaffold meaning. The English Language Development Assessment provides teachers the tools to evaluate and document English Learners' growth in language proficiency over time using formative assessment tools that are directly related to learning activities and tasks from the TRS lessons and are based on the program’s informational and literary texts.
  • The Advancing Foundational Skills for English Language Learners provides additional support to accelerate foundational skills, print concepts, phonological awareness, phonics and word recognition, and fluency for English Learners at Grades 3−6. The Think-Speak-Listen Flip Books work to engage students in academic conversations with the conversation sentence starters provided in the Think-Speak-Listen Bookmarks and Flip Books.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

The Access and Equity section contains an article titled, “Meeting the Needs of Students Who Are Advanced Learners”, which details how to meet the needs of students who are advanced learners. The article discusses how to recognize students who are advanced learners and provides guidance to the teacher for differentiating instruction for students in this group. Some of the suggestions for differentiating instruction are: “flexible grouping and small-group instruction for most reading and writing activities allows teachers to group student with similar levels of advancement or similar talents/interests. Flexible pacing and If/Then "Reinforce or Reaffirm the Strategy" instruction within the mini-lessons allow teachers to compact the content and accelerate the instruction in each lesson, within each standard, as needed.

Each unit offers support for accelerated learners in the Independent Writing Time and/or Apply Understanding and the Connect Across Disciplines Inquiry Project. The small group options provided in the Differentiated Instruction Planner provides opportunities that include: Unit Specific Leveled-Text for Differentiated Instruction, Reader’s Theater, and Independent Reading. Managing an Independent Reading is outlined in the Grade Resources and has guidance for setting up and managing a classroom reading program, strategies to help students self-select books and texts, ideas to support book-sharing, partner-reading, and discussion circles, activities to promote reflection and writing in response to reading, prompts, questions, and strategies to support engaging one-on-one conferencing between teacher and student and home-school letters.

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Lesson 14, in the Apply Understanding of the Teacher’s Resource System, there is a Challenge Activity provided which is different from the required activity for students. “Challenge Activity, Ask students to use text evidence from two of the unit’s selections to compare and contrast two amendments to the Constitution, telling how they helped our laws evolve.” In Unit 1, in the Connect Across Disciplines Inquiry Project, there is a challenge project that students are asked to Make A Science Safety Rule Poster. Students are asked to research information about James Madison, plan, write, and record scripts for a radio interview program, and develop questions on federalism.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Lesson 8, in the Apply Understanding of the Teacher’s Resource System, there is a Challenge Activity provided which is different from the required activity for students. “Challenge Activity, Ask students to write two rhyming couplets, in a machine-like voice, from the point of view of the machines in Kipling’s poem.” In Unit 5, in the Connect Across Disciplines Inquiry Project, there is a challenge project that students are asked to Describe Colonial Technology. Students are asked to Identify and describe problems they would like to solve, work with my peers to design multiple solutions to a problem, and present design solutions to the class.
  • In Unit 9, Week 3, Lesson 14, in the Apply Understanding of the Teacher’s Resource Guide, there is a Challenge Activity provided which is different from the required activity for students. In Unit 9, in the Connect Across Disciplines Inquiry Project, there is a challenge project that students are asked to Profile an American City Over Time. Students are asked to research and report on changes that have occurred over time in specific American cities and create presentations to show these changes.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for providing opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. Students participate in partner and small group Think/Pair/Share, Whole Class Discussion, Small Group Discussion, Read Alouds, Shared Reading, Literature Circles, Independent Reading for both Informational and Literary texts and Leveled Texts. The Teacher’s Resource Guide provides small group options for teachers to meet the needs of their students. Teachers are encouraged to use information gained from whole group instruction to help determine where students need additional supports or extensions during small groups. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Lesson 2, students read with partners paragraphs 3-5 to determine the main idea for each section and to underline the key details that support the main idea. Refer to the Ways to Scaffold the First Reading sidebar for students who need extra support to read the assigned paragraphs.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Lesson 2, students explain to a partner the strategy of analyzing problems and solutions and consider these questions: “What types of texts most commonly have a problem/solution structure? How do you identify problems and solutions within a text? Why would you decide to analyze problems and solutions in a text? The teacher encourages students to ask their partners clarifying questions and add their own ideas to elaborate on their partner's answers. Teachers tell students that they will call on some of them to summarize their partners’ explanations.”
  • In Unit 9, Week 3, Lesson 10, partners take turns rehearsing their multimedia presentations. The teacher reminds students that rehearsing will help make their presentations stronger and more effective. “As students rehearse, have listeners take notes about effective elements and suggestions for improvement. After each student rehearses, have their partners share feedback. Have them use the Multimedia Presentation Rehearsal Chart to evaluate what they did well and what they need to work on.”

Indicator 3s

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Materials are available to access with a sign-in and password. Once signed in, an educator can access a Quick Start Guide that provides information on using all components of the system. Teachers can also access a table of contents for the resources. Pieces for teachers include accessing information in Spanish, messages, student management, assessments, reports, e-planner, and a blog. When students sign in, they have access to the program components, assignments, reading log for students, and a my library tab for independent reading and trade books. All materials are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers and platform neutral. Components can be accessed on PC’s, tablets, and a mobile device. On the website, teachers can create classes to assign work, check on the status of assignments, create groups, and post class calendars. Videos are used to introduce the units and also throughout units to help with student comprehension.

In the Quick Start Guide, it reads, “This guide will help you get started with your new digital materials for Benchmark Advance and Adelante. You’ll discover how to use interactive e-books and access your teacher resources”. The introduction goes on to say, “Benchmark Universe includes all your content, planning, and management tools. You have everything you need to integrate technology into your reading/language arts curriculum, with tools to differentiate and personalize learning for your students.”

Indicator 3s3v

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers , “platform neutral”, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Materials reviewed meet expectations for supporting effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. They include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovation. Materials can be easily customized for local use.The instructional materials reviewed meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)

Indicator 3t

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meets the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Materials in Benchmark support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. At the beginning of each unit, a short video is used to introduce the unit and discuss the Essential Question for each unit. Technology is used to enhance learning through research as students organize projects or just as enhancement to reading and writing assignments. Technology is also used to publish writing and aid in student presentations to enhance speaking and listening skills. The home school connection component is used to bring parents/guardians into the learning by providing activities for the students and parents to use together at home. Daily activities, anchor texts, support materials, assessments, home-school activities, word study tools, and other components are all in digital form and user friendly to enhance student learning. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • A video is used as a unit opener for each unit. In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 1 the teacher displays the Unit 3 video and while students are watching, they are asked to draw responses or write questions and ideas they might have about the video. The teacher introduces vocabulary words and or words related to the narrative text such as central message, theme, and moral. After viewing, discuss then takes place about the essential question and the teachers asks if there were any other words that students were not familiar with.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 9 students are working on the following writing prompt that asks student to view a video incorporating technology into the unit. The writing prompts states, “Based on facts and details from “The Structure of a Corn Plant” and information from the video “Harvesting Corn,” write an informative report in which you describe the appearance and structure of a corn plant.” While watching the video, students are to take notes using the note taking guide that was distributed.
  • Unit 9, all weeks, students are creating a multimedia project they will present at the end of the unit to their peers. This unit involves anchor texts as well as gathering sources using technology. Students use a mentor multimedia slides to help them organize their own materials.
  • Unit 10 in the home school connection gives parents an overview of the unit (Transforming Matter) and the Essential Question and then breaks down information into the following topics with explanations and suggestion for an activity at home within each: Topic connection, vocabulary connection, comprehension connection, and word study connection. Under the vocabulary connection asks parents to play a game of charades with their students using unit 10 vocabulary words to help students gain an understanding of content vocabulary.

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. An online Screener Assessment is used to pinpoint students' struggles. Digital materials provide Informal, Weekly, and Unit assessments. Teachers can view data individually by student from the class assignment list. Teachers can customize their leveled texts and personalize this learning for each student. There is a Quick Start Reference that helps both teachers and students how to navigate in the digital program. There is also interactive close reading texts so that each student will be able to annotate the text digitally.

Students are able to access E-Books at their instructional or independent level. The teacher can assign particular books for students to read. The teacher is able to model highlighting and annotating on the smartboard or screen.

Indicator 3u.ii

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

Materials can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, Benchmark Universe, allows teachers to use the customization tools in each e-book to differentiate instruction. When the e-book launches, the student can fill in a name for the customized e-book and click Yes. The teacher can also utilize the ePlanner for lesson planning. In the Manage Students component, the can keep track of student learning in classes and groups. The teacher can customize the Reading Log for each student. The Reports component is customizable for each teacher. Assignments can be selected and assigned by the teacher.

Using the Edit Tools, the teacher can zoom in on any area, add window shades, highlight text, add diagrams and links.The teacher can add new pages, YouTube videos, and more.

Indicator 3v

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)

The materials contain E-Books and videos to access the learning. Students can interact with the teachers using the online components such as assignments or reading logs. The materials do not reference other technology opportunities for students to work on projects collaboratively utilizing websites, discussion groups, or webinars.

Professional development is available online through tutorials, onsite orientations, and online trainings. Access to professional development can be found on the Benchmark website.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers , “platform neutral”, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Materials reviewed meet expectations for supporting effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. They include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovation. Materials can be easily customized for local use.The instructional materials reviewed meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Materials are available to access with a sign-in and password. Once signed in, an educator can access a Quick Start Guide that provides information on using all components of the system. Teachers can also access a table of contents for the resources. Pieces for teachers include accessing information in Spanish, messages, student management, assessments, reports, e-planner, and a blog. When students sign in, they have access to the program components, assignments, reading log for students, and a my library tab for independent reading and trade books. All materials are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers and platform neutral. Components can be accessed on PC’s, tablets, and a mobile device. On the website, teachers can create classes to assign work, check on the status of assignments, create groups, and post class calendars. Videos are used to introduce the units and also throughout units to help with student comprehension.

In the Quick Start Guide, it reads, “This guide will help you get started with your new digital materials for Benchmark Advance and Adelante. You’ll discover how to use interactive e-books and access your teacher resources”. The introduction goes on to say, “Benchmark Universe includes all your content, planning, and management tools. You have everything you need to integrate technology into your reading/language arts curriculum, with tools to differentiate and personalize learning for your students.”

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meets the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Materials in Benchmark support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. At the beginning of each unit, a short video is used to introduce the unit and discuss the Essential Question for each unit. Technology is used to enhance learning through research as students organize projects or just as enhancement to reading and writing assignments. Technology is also used to publish writing and aid in student presentations to enhance speaking and listening skills. The home school connection component is used to bring parents/guardians into the learning by providing activities for the students and parents to use together at home. Daily activities, anchor texts, support materials, assessments, home-school activities, word study tools, and other components are all in digital form and user friendly to enhance student learning. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • A video is used as a unit opener for each unit. In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 1 the teacher displays the Unit 3 video and while students are watching, they are asked to draw responses or write questions and ideas they might have about the video. The teacher introduces vocabulary words and or words related to the narrative text such as central message, theme, and moral. After viewing, discuss then takes place about the essential question and the teachers asks if there were any other words that students were not familiar with.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Lesson 9 students are working on the following writing prompt that asks student to view a video incorporating technology into the unit. The writing prompts states, “Based on facts and details from “The Structure of a Corn Plant” and information from the video “Harvesting Corn,” write an informative report in which you describe the appearance and structure of a corn plant.” While watching the video, students are to take notes using the note taking guide that was distributed.
  • Unit 9, all weeks, students are creating a multimedia project they will present at the end of the unit to their peers. This unit involves anchor texts as well as gathering sources using technology. Students use a mentor multimedia slides to help them organize their own materials.
  • Unit 10 in the home school connection gives parents an overview of the unit (Transforming Matter) and the Essential Question and then breaks down information into the following topics with explanations and suggestion for an activity at home within each: Topic connection, vocabulary connection, comprehension connection, and word study connection. Under the vocabulary connection asks parents to play a game of charades with their students using unit 10 vocabulary words to help students gain an understanding of content vocabulary.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. An online Screener Assessment is used to pinpoint students' struggles. Digital materials provide Informal, Weekly, and Unit assessments. Teachers can view data individually by student from the class assignment list. Teachers can customize their leveled texts and personalize this learning for each student. There is a Quick Start Reference that helps both teachers and students how to navigate in the digital program. There is also interactive close reading texts so that each student will be able to annotate the text digitally.

Students are able to access E-Books at their instructional or independent level. The teacher can assign particular books for students to read. The teacher is able to model highlighting and annotating on the smartboard or screen.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

Materials can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, Benchmark Universe, allows teachers to use the customization tools in each e-book to differentiate instruction. When the e-book launches, the student can fill in a name for the customized e-book and click Yes. The teacher can also utilize the ePlanner for lesson planning. In the Manage Students component, the can keep track of student learning in classes and groups. The teacher can customize the Reading Log for each student. The Reports component is customizable for each teacher. Assignments can be selected and assigned by the teacher.

Using the Edit Tools, the teacher can zoom in on any area, add window shades, highlight text, add diagrams and links.The teacher can add new pages, YouTube videos, and more.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Benchmark Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)

The materials contain E-Books and videos to access the learning. Students can interact with the teachers using the online components such as assignments or reading logs. The materials do not reference other technology opportunities for students to work on projects collaboratively utilizing websites, discussion groups, or webinars.

Professional development is available online through tutorials, onsite orientations, and online trainings. Access to professional development can be found on the Benchmark website.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Fri Mar 16 00:00:00 UTC 2018

Report Edition: 2018

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Texts for Close Reading Unit 3 978-1-4900-3971-8 Benchmark Education Company 2015
Texts for Close Reading Unit 2 978-1-4900-3976-3 Benchmark Education Company 2015
Texts for Close Reading Unit 10 978-1-4900-9206-5 Benchmark Education Company 2015
Texts for Close Reading Unit 6 978-1-4900-9210-2 Benchmark Education Company 2015
Texts for Close Reading Unit 4 978-1-4900-9216-4 Benchmark Education Company 2015
Texts for Close Reading Unit 5 978-1-4900-9217-1 Benchmark Education Company 2015
Texts for Close Reading Unit 7 978-1-4900-9219-5 Benchmark Education Company 2015
Texts for Close Reading Unit 9 978-1-4900-9221-8 Benchmark Education Company 2015
Benchmark Advance Teacher Resource System Gr 5Unit 1 and 2 978-1-5125-2309-6 Benchmark Education Company 2018
Benchmark Advance Teacher Resource System Gr 5 Unit 3 and 4 978-1-5125-2310-2 Benchmark Education Company 2018
Benchmark Advance Teacher Resource System Gr 5 Unit 5 and 6 978-1-5125-2311-9 Benchmark Education Company 2018
Benchmark Advance Teacher Resource System Gr 5 Unit 7 and 8 978-1-5125-2312-6 Benchmark Education Company 2018
Benchmark Advance Teacher Resource System Gr 5 Unit 9 and10 978-1-5125-2313-3 Benchmark Education Company 2018
Texts for Close Reading Unit 7 978-1-5125-56339 Benchmark Education Company 2015
Texts for Close Reading Unit 1 978-1-5125-7853-9 Benchmark Education Company 2015

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Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

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All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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