Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

Bookworms Grade 5 instructional materials partially meet the expectations of alignment. The texts and text sets for 5th grade students are engaging, rigorous, and offer a breadth and depth of reading that will support literacy development and prepare students for 6th grade. Students engage with integrated reading, writing, speaking and listening daily, and often integrate study of language as well. Daily writing tasks are text-specific and offer practice to build component skills in writing and research, although there is little support for 5th grade students to practice longer research projects and fully processed writing pieces. Foundational support for students is complete with guidance and support for the teacher to build students' comprehension and fluency.There are some components of the program that are not fully outlined; these include materials to support students' independent reading, writing process practice, and culminating tasks. The program does include suggestions for outside resources, but teachers will have to identify, procure, and integrate them separate from these core materials.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
37
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
20
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations of Gateway 1. Included texts are rich and rigorous, offering students a balance of informational and literary reading over the course of the school year. Materials provide many opportunities for students to complete questions and tasks in reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are grounded in evidence, although there is limited engagement with culminating tasks and consistent work with the writing process. Support for students' developing literacy skills in foundational areas is explicit and comprehensive, providing teacher guidance and targeted instruction.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
19/20
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet the expectations of texts being high quality and rigorous, worthy of multiple close reads. Text selections are appropriately rigorous and support students’ building their reading skills over the course of the school year. The program has a balance of genres and text types included to provide students opportunities to read broadly and deeply as they build their literacy skills. The included text complexity analysis provides less supporting detail to guide teachers with their choices in class.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading, including a mix of informational texts and literature, and consider a range of student interests. The included texts have been previously published and are worthy of careful reading. These texts are divided into Shared and Interactive Reading. Those narrative texts contain multicultural themes as well as rich language, rich characterization, and well-crafted prose. The texts address a range of interests, including historical fiction, science, poems, and fantasy.

The following texts are examples of titles included in the instructional materials:

  • A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park, winner of the 2002 Newbery Medal, is included in the second Nine Weeks Interactive Read-Aloud Unit
  • The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin, winner of the 1978 Newberry Medal is included in the second Nine Weeks Shared Text Unit
  • Aunt Harriet’s Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold, winner of the Jane Addams Children's Book Award, is included in the third Nine Weeks Interactive Read-Aloud Unit
  • Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis, winner of multiple awards including the Newbery Medal, is included in the third Nine Weeks Shared Text Unit
  • The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis, honoree of multiple awards including the Newberry Medal and Coretta Scott King Award, is included in the fourth Nine Weeks Interactive Read-Aloud Unit
  • Informational texts such as Oceans by Seymour Simon, The Sun by Seymour Simon, and Volcano by Patricia Lauber are content-rich and accompanied by quality photographs and diagrams.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards.

Text selections do reflect an appropriate balance of literary and informational texts in both the Shared and Interactive readings. Twenty-four texts are included in the lessons. Poems and riddles by eight different authors are included.

Shared Reading lessons include 7 non-fiction texts and 5 fiction texts.

  • Examples of non-fiction texts students read are: Plant Cells and Life Processes by Barbara A. Somervill, Volcano by Patricia Lauber, and Ice to Steam by Penny Johnson
  • Examples of fiction texts students read are: Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech, The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrock, and The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin

Interactive Read-Aloud lessons include 6 non-fiction texts and 6 fiction texts.

  • Examples of non-fiction texts student listen to as read-aloud are: Flu of 1918 by Jessica Rudolph, Rats Around Us by Rachel Eagen, and I, Matthew Henson, Polar Explorer by Carole Boston Weatherford
  • Examples of fiction texts students listen to as read-aloud are: Porcupine Year by Louise Eldrich, The Boy who Loved Words by Roni Schotter, and The Watson go to Birmingham-1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis

The distribution of texts types and genres is very diverse, and a variety of genres is found throughout each unit for the entire school year. The number of texts of each included genre are well-distributed. Genres that are covered by this curriculum include the following:

  • folktales
  • informational texts
  • poetry
  • biographies
  • historical fiction
  • novels

Although a wide distribution of genres and text types as required by standards are evident, works of drama are not included in the instructional materials.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The texts reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for having appropriate levels of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and their relationship to the associated student task. All shared reading texts are appropriate to the grade level, and all interactive texts are either at or slightly above the suggested Lexile level and include sufficient scaffolds in the lesson plans for improved access. In the first quarter, Lexile levels of texts range from 770-920. In the second quarter, Lexile levels range from 750-990.In the third quarter, Lexile levels range from 680-950, and in the fourth quarter, Lexile levels range from 920-950. Texts used over the school year are all qualitatively appropriate.

For texts at a higher Lexile level, the daily lesson plans indicate that there are fewer “technical” or tier 3 terms (words commonly associated with science and technical subjects) included (making them appropriate to grade level tasks). Examples of these include:

  • I, Matthew Henson, Polar Explorer (Lexile 1070). Instructional support includes the guidance, "After Modeling Comprehension and Reading Aloud, the teacher explicitly teaches technical terms/multiple meaning words (such as tongue and calling) before students write."
  • Rats Around Us (Lexile 1030). Lesson plans include a section on Day 1 titled “Introduce Book and Preview Technical Vocabulary.” This is followed by a discussion of the text structure to preface reading (“So this book is organized using a topic-subtopic plan. What’s the topic? And each of these short sections is a subtopic.”)

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that materials support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. Texts for Shared Reading increase in complexity within each unit, and the interactive reading texts meet the expectations of text complexity across the year and provide a variety of complexity levels within series of texts or text sets. Interactive texts that are read aloud and discussed whole group are generally above level texts, which is appropriate for this grade level. The shared reading texts that are read both aloud and with partners have complexity levels that are on grade level.

Although there are some texts at lower Lexile levels (for example, one text is 680 in the third quarter) these texts' content include more difficult subject matter and complex qualitative features associated with the informational text and related tasks, so students continue to engage with reading at a rigorous level. No texts are low enough to be considered "below" an appropriate level.

  • The texts in the first nine weeks have Lexile levels from 770-920. An example in the first nine weeks in Shared Reading is the novelWalk Two Moons, which has a Lexile level of 770. This text contains a chronological story with literal and conventional language. Some words are unfamiliar, which increases the text complexity. The theme is implicit. To help students understand this text, there are 23 days of lessons with frequent stopping points for the teacher to ask whole group discussion questions. In Day 3, one of the comprehension questions starts to unpack a complex part of the theme: "How can we tell that there is a story within a story going on here? Find specific quotes to justify your answer" (p. 4).
  • The texts in the second nine weeks unit have Lexile levels ranging from 750-990. An example is The Volcano which has a Lexile level of 830. This text is about one volcano, Mt. St. Helens, and the information is stated directly. The text features such as pictures assist students in understanding the text and information. This text does contain academic and domain-specific vocabulary. Six days of lessons are planned for this text. During Day 1, the teacher guides students through the diagram on page about volcano eruption. Each day the teacher is directed to ask comprehension questions based on the choral reading. Students have opportunities to show their understanding through Super Sentences and talking with a partner about the illustrations.
  • The texts in the third nine weeks unit have Lexile levels ranging from 680-1070. An example is Bud, Not Buddy which has a Lexile level of 950. This text is chronological with implicit themes. This text contains slang and Tier II vocabulary, which may be new to students. Twenty days are spent on this text. To help students access this text, Meaning Vocabulary is emphasized daily. For example, on Day 6, words and phrases about trains (riding the rails, hopping a train, cardboard jungle) are discussion. To help students understand implicit themes, students write about their understanding based on different points-of-view and by analyzing the character's actions.
  • The texts in the fourth nine weeks have Lexile levels ranging from 920-1000. An example is The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963 which has a Lexile level of 1000. This complex text is read-aloud to students. The story is chronological and most of the language is literal with the exception of the "Wool Pool." There are many levels of meaning and several themes, which can be understood better with background knowledge of the Civil Rights time period. This read-aloud has 20 days of lesson plans. To support students' understanding of this text, the teacher lesson plans suggest specific places to stop and ask questions. The plans suggest opportunities for students to process their understanding by writing a note to the main character, writing a list of suggestions for how to handle a bully, and writing a journal entry from the mother's point-of-view.

Texts and associated tasks do increase in complexity over the school year, with variation within the grade level band throughout the year (for both Interactive and Shared Reading). Overall, there is an overall increase in the rigor of texts for students to engage with as they build their reading skills.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for materials being accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

A rationale and text complexity explanation (not detailed analysis) is located in the Grade 4 Manual under the heading Bookworms Books (pgs. 6-7). Texts were proposed by a group of teachers and then reviewed by Bookworms creators. Fictional texts were selected based on content and the potential to build knowledge. Non-fiction texts were selected based on social studies and science content with the potential to build knowledge. The Lexile band for grades 4-5 (770-980) were considered for text complexity.

Some of the guiding principles used in the selection of texts include: shared reading texts are mostly in the grade level bands, texts (when feasible) are in Lexile ascending order, and interactive read-aloud texts are mainly above grade level.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for supporting materials providing opportunities for student to engage in a range and volume of reading. The instructional materials include opportunities for students to read daily across a wide range and volume of texts that are read aloud by the teacher, read aloud chorally, and read during shared reading as well as a daily independent reading time for self-selected texts. Texts are divided into Interactive, Shared Reading, and Self-Selected texts. Interactive Reading texts are often above grade level and are read aloud by the teacher who also leads students in discussion of the text.

  • In the First Nine Weeks students are read the texts Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt, The Porcupine Year by Louise Erdrich, the poem “The Eagle” by Alfred Tenyson, and the poem “A narrow Fellow in the Grass” by Emily Dickenson.
  • In the Third Nine Weeks students are read the texts The Boy Who Loved Words by Roni Schotter, I, Matthew Henson, Polar Explorer by Carole Boston Weatherford, Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringold, Scholastic Kids Discover Magazine titled “Underground Railroad”, Scholastic Kids Discover Magazine titled “Martin Luther King Jr.”, Scholastic Kids Discover Magazine titled Wright Bros., and the poems: “The Grackle by Ogden Nash, “Pigeons” by Lilian Moore, and “Something Told the Wild Geese” by Rachel Field.

Shared Reading Texts are at grade level and are read chorally as a class for a specific purpose and then reread with a partner for different purpose.

  • In the Second Nine Weeks students read the texts Volcano: The Eruption and Healing of Mount St. Helens by Patricia Lauber, Oceans by Seymour Simon, The Sun by Seymour Simon, and The Wresting Game by Ellen Raskin chorally and with a partner.
  • In the Fourth Nine Weeks students read the texts The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrick and The Thief by Megan Turner chorally and with a partner.

Self-Selected Texts are read during Differentiated Instruction time while the teacher is working with groups. Students self-select texts from multiple reading levels and record texts using a reading log.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
12/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations that students will have opportunities for rich, rigorous discussions and writing tasks that are evidence based. Speaking and listening and writing tasks are mostly text-dependent, and challenge students to grow their skills in close reading as they build their comprehension. Students write frequently, connecting writing skills back to the texts being read. Grammar and conventions instruction is embedded to facilitate students’ application of language skills in and out of context.The materials do not include culminating tasks over the course of the year, nor comprehensive writing process support; rather, the materials provide guidance for teachers to identify their own process and culminating tasks.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent and require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text. During daily discussions and written assignments, students respond to text-dependent prompts and provide evidence for their thinking. Students must engage with the text to answer questions and complete tasks and assignments.

In the first nine weeks, students read the text Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech and answer the text-dependent questions and tasks such as:

  • Is Gramps’ “helping” the woman surprising, given what we have learned about him?
  • Does Phoebe seem like her parents? Why? What specific words and phrases from the story support your opinion?
  • How do you think Mrs. Winterbottom feels during the dinner? What clues does the author give?
  • What do we learn about the relationship between Sal’s mother and father?

In the second nine weeks, students read the text Volcano: The Eruption and Healing of Mount St. Helens by Patricia Lauber and answer the text-dependent questions and tasks such as:

  • How did the volcano turn into a mountain?
  • Why did animals and tourists visit the mountain before the eruption?
  • How were the perspectives of geologists different from the perspectives of tourists?

In the third nine weeks, students read the text Bud Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis and answer the text-dependent questions and tasks such as:

  • Why does Mrs. Amos keep the suitcase as an assurance? Based on context, what does assurance mean?
  • Use depression and commence in a super sentence that captures important details from these chapters.
  • Reread and describe the reasons Bud gives that being six is hard. Provide a quote to support your argument.

In the fourth nine weeks, student read the Scholastic Kids Discover Magazine titled “Underground Railroad” and answer the text-dependent questions and tasks such as:

  • Why was it called the Underground Railroad?
  • Why didn’t slavery end before 1860?
  • Think about how he learned to read. What does that tell you about the members of a slave-owning family?

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 do not meet expectations that the materials support students' completion of culminating tasks that after engaging with sequences of text dependent questions and tasks.

Culminating tasks are not included in this curriculum. There are sequences of text dependent questions that address some research standards within writing; however, these do not lead or build to a culminating activity. While there are daily writing and discussion prompts of very high quality, there are no multi-faceted projects in either Interactive or Shared Reading.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet expectations that materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. Daily text-dependent discussion questions are included for both Interactive and Shared Readings. Students are often directed to use new vocabulary terms both during discussion and when writing responses to text.

Protocols are included throughout lessons for students to “talk to your partner” or “ask your partner” prompting student discussion. “Every-Pupil-Response” Protocols include talking to a partner, pair sharing, polling the class, thumbs up and thumbs down, and written responses.

  • In the second nine weeks, during the shared reading of the text Walk Two Moons, in Week 2 on Day 8 students are led in a comprehension discussion. Questions included in this discussion are:
    • What do you think is the relationship between Mrs. Cadaver and Mr. Birkway? Give evidence for your opinion.
    • Why doesn’t Sal like to spend time at Mrs. Cadaver’s?
    • Why do you think Sal notices that Phoebe’s mother is sad, but Phoebe doesn’t? Why is Sal's point of view different?
    • What do you think Sal’s father wants to tell her about Margaret?
    • What do you think the boy wanted to do when he saw pants on the bank of the river?
    • What does Gramps do to protect Sal and Gram?
    • How does the snakebite change everything?
  • In the third nine weeks, during the interactive reading of the text Poems for the Birds, on Day 2 students are prompted to work in small groups to present to the class which of the three poems read they liked best and why. Students collaborate to create a presentation. After the presentations students take a straw poll. Students are then asked to discuss if anyone has changed his or her mind about which poem they liked best based on the arguments presented by other groups.

Teachers often pause and model their thinking using academic vocabulary during Interactive Read aloud texts.

  • In the first nine weeks, during the shared reading of the text Walk Two Moons, in Week 1 on Day 3 the teacher states, “This story is going back and forth in time, so I am going to stop here to summarize. I am going to pick out only details that are about Sal’s parents.”
  • In the second nine weeks, during the interactive reading of the text The Flue of 1918, on Day 2 when addressing the word pandemic, the teacher states, “I’ll underline the first three letters, pan, because they give us a clue. The prefix pan-means “all”. A pandemic is one type of epidemic, except that it takes place over a large area.”

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet expectations that materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

During both Interactive and Shared Reading, students are provided a focus before they read to “help them access relevant prior knowledge and lead them toward an appropriate mental representation of text meaning.” (Bookworms Grade 5 Manual, page 45)

  • In the fourth nine weeks, during the shared reading of the text Thief, in Week 6 on Day 29 the teacher provides students with the lesson’s focus, “Think about how the author provides us with information about the setting-really the three kingdoms of Sounis, Eddis, and Attolia.”

During choral reading and interactive read-alouds, teachers model seven comprehension strategies that students can use to better comprehend and discuss a text. These strategies are making connections, asking questions to aid understanding, creating sensory images, inferring, determining importance, synthesizing, and self-monitoring. Procedures for these strategies can be found in lesson plans and on pages 45 and 46 of the Grade 5 Manual.

  • In the third nine weeks, during the interactive reading of the text Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky, on day3 the teacher models self-monitoring and asking questions to aid understanding. The lesson directs teachers to model their thinking by saying, “I’m a little confused here. When that happens I like to stop and think it through. Cassie has just found a note from her brother, but we know that he is on the ghost train. Now I realize he is ahead of her, but I thought the ghost train was moving across the sky, not on the ground. How can I make this make sense?”

Discussion starters are provided for shared and interactive readings that require students to combine information from the text with their prior knowledge in order to make inferences. Teachers are directed to follow up with student answers by asking how the student knows the answer or further question them to help them find the information to make the logical inference. Most discussions have students working with a partner to ensure that all students are involved.

  • In the fourth nine weeks, during the interactive reading of the text The Watsons Go to Birmingham on Day 1 students are asked, “We are learning more about the characters from what they say and do. Think about Bryon. Do you think Byron and his friend were being mean or just playfully teasing? Talk it over with your partner.”

Graphic organizers are modeled to help students organize information from text and student must be active listeners during shared and interactive readings in order to participate in discussion and written responses.

  • In the second nine weeks, during the shared reading of the text Oceans, in Week 2 on Day 7 the teacher models a semantic map to show the organization of the text,” He didn’t use subheadings, though, so I had to figure out the organization by reading carefully. There are five subtopics. I’ll start a map and we can add to it as we read. [Begin the semantic map and briefly introduce the five subtopics. Add the key terms when you come to each section].”

Pair-Share Written Responses are shared before beginning new reading each day. Students read and respond to another’s written responses.

  • In the first nine weeks, during the interactive reading of the text Tuck Everlasting, on Day 3 students read the written response from Day 2 before they begin the new lesson. Students are asked to share with a partner their notes written from Winnie’s point of view, “Pretend that Winnie really did run away. Write a short note that she might leave to her mother explaining why. Remember, you’ll need to write from Winnie’s point of view.”

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 partially meet expectations that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

While an abundance of on-demand daily writing tasks are provided, there are is minimal support for students to develop the writing process to address the process itself. There are frequent opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills; however, these materials do not include opportunities for students to complete multiple drafts and revisions, including focused projects over time.The materials do include some considerations for teachers to address this, however.

Examples of on-demand writing prompts include:

  • In the Shared Reading Unit, First Nine Weeks, Week 1, Day 1 of Walk Two Moons, students write to the following prompt: "What do you think the relationship between Phoebe and Sal might be? How could be important?" (p. 3).
  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Unit, Third Nine Weeks, Day 3 of Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky, students write to the following prompt: "Put yourself and Cassie's place years later, as she is telling her story to her own children. Write and tell me what Cassie might say about the time she spent hiding in the coffin. How do think she felt? Give plenty of details" (p. 23).
  • In the Shared Reading Unit, Second Nine Weeks, Week 1, Day 2 of Volcano, students write to the following prompt: "Write a short front-page news story about the events of the eruption. Reread and think about the illustrations to help you" (p. 5).
  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Unit, Second Nine Weeks, Day 8 of The Porcupine Year, students write to the following prompt: “Today I want you to compare two characters. Write a paragraph that tells how Omakayas and Zahn are sharing the same feelings" (p. 42).

From the Grade 5 Teacher's manual (page 11):

You will see that there are not as many interactive read-aloud lesson plans as there are shared reading lesson plans. This difference is deliberate. Nearly half of the 45-minute time segments for interactives must be reserved for process writing so that students learn to compose, revise, and edit their own writing pieces. We have not designed this portion of the curriculum. Teachers should work together to use consistent process writing procedures and language and to sequence the three writing genres (narrative, informative, and persuasive/argumentative) across the school year.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 partially meet expectations that materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

A variety of prompts include a distribution of opinion, informative/explanatory, and narrative writings as required by the Grade 5 standards, however the short written responses do not provide adequate opportunities for students to meet all aspects of the Grade 5 Standards that address text types. Teachers will need to supplement this curriculum with other writing resources to meet all requirements of the Grade 5 standards that address text type distribution. In Grade 5, students need to learn how to write opinion, informative/explanatory, and narrative pieces with topic introductions, details or facts, linking words or temporal words and a concluding statement/section or sense of closure. (Writing Standards 5.1.a-5.1.d, 5.2.a-5.2.e, 5.3.a-5.3.e). There are missed opportunities to address all those required standards.

Written responses from interactive reading and shared reading are completed as seat work during small-group time. Students have the opportunity to complete one text-based response each day, and two responses on the days when an interactive read aloud is done. Teachers are instructed to model for students at the beginning of the year to establish norms for length and quality of these written responses. The prompts vary in structure and address different text types.

  • In the Fourth Nine Weeks of the Interactive Read-Aloud of The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963, on Day 8, students respond to the following written opinion response prompt: "Pick a side. Do you think the Watsons made a good decision about sending Byron to Alabama? Or do you think it was the wrong choice? Write a paragraph explaining your opinion" (p. 16).
  • In the Second Nine Weeks of the Shared Reading Unit of Bud, Not Buddy, in Week 1 on Day 1, students respond the written opinion response prompt, "Think about the new information that we have about Herman Calloway. Now do you think that he is Bud’s father? Give reasons for your opinion” (p. 21).
  • In the Third Nine Weeks of the Interactive Read-Aloud of The Boy Who Loved Words, on Day 3, students respond to the following written informative response prompt: "Compare The Boy Who Loved Words to the story of Johnny Appleseed. Write two paragraphs. In the first, tell how the two stories are similar. In the second, write about how they are different. So, in the first paragraph you will compare the two stories. In the second paragraph you’ll contrast them” (p. 7).
  • In the First Nine Weeks of the Shared Reading Unit of Animal Cells, in Week 6, Day 27, students respond to the following written informative response prompt: "Take notes for this chapter. Write each organelle name, then a simple description. At the end, try to draw a cell and label its parts" (p. 37).
  • In the Fourth Nine Weeks of the Shared Reading Unit of The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg, in Week 1 Day 1, students respond to the following written narrative response prompt: "Pretend you are Homer and send an email to the sheriff telling him what has happened to Harold. Write from his point of view" (p. 3).
  • In the First Nine Weeks of the Interactive Read-Aloud of Tuck Everlasting, on Day 3, students respond to the following written narrative response prompt: "Winnie talks to the toad quite often, but the toad never gets to say anything. Write down a few comments for the toad to say if it could speak. Create a dialogue if you wish. You’ll need to consider the toad’s point of view" (p. 7).

Students write without explicit instruction and no direct instruction for writing is provided.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 fully meet expectations that materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. Most writing included is informational (responses to literature and nonfiction texts), and tasks are appropriate to grade level. Writing includes expository, with some narrative, opinion, or poetry prompts in response to shared and interactive readings. Writing is at least 20 minutes daily. There are standards-based rubrics supporting teachers as they work with students’ writing from evidence on page 74 of the Fifth Grade manual.

  • In the novel Walk Two Moons, which is read in the first quarter, an opinion prompt is given: “Reread these two chapters. What do we learn about Sal’s relationship with her mother? Find quotations to support your opinion.” (Week 1, Day 5)
  • For the nonfiction book Volcano, read in quarter two, students are asked to make a brief timeline of the events leading up to the eruption of Mt. St Helen beginning in March, 1980. (Week 1, Day 1). Then they “Write a short front-page news story about the events of the eruption. Reread and think about the illustrations to help you.” (Week 1, Day 2)
  • In quarter three, in response to the historical fiction text, The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg, “Pretend you are Homer and send an email to the sheriff telling him what has happened to Harold. Write from his point of view.” (Week 1, Day 1)

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of the context.

The language standards are addressed both in small group lessons and during Interactive Read-Alouds (whole group) where students have opportunities to apply the skills in and out of context. Because the interactive read-aloud is teacher-directed and a whole-class activity, the teacher can target specific knowledge students need to attain . This can be done by pointing out features of sentences with which the class is working.

Application opportunities are found in the sentence composing component of the lesson. Bookworms teaches grammar and conventions through sentence combining.

“Grammar instruction in Bookworms is based on the daily study of sentences that come from the read-aloud. This approach is called sentence composing, and it is a well-established alternative to descriptive grammar instruction (Gartland & Smolkin, 2016; Killgallon & Killgallon, 2000). Drawing sentences from the text of the day’s read-aloud has two advantages: They are crafted by professional authors and they are fresh in mind." These sentences (sometimes in slightly modified form) are used in two brief activities each day, selected from a set of four basic possibilities. They include:

  • Combining. The teacher presents two or three short sentences and leads the students in combining them into a single sentence with a more complex syntax (Lawlor, 1983; Saddler, 2005).
  • Unscrambling. In advance of the lesson, the teacher breaks a relatively long sentence from the text into words and short phrases.
  • Imitating. The teacher presents a single, well-crafted sentence from the text, and then replaces one or more content words (nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs) with blanks.
  • Expanding. The teacher presents a simple sentence from the text and guides the students in adding to it by attaching words, phrases, and clauses, making the syntax more complex. (Grade 5 Manual, page 58-60)

Examples of Sentence Combining include:

1st Quarter

Sentence Combining - Tuck Everlasting - Day 3

  • Unscramble: as she came – abreast of ­– it however – it blinked – and the movement – gave it – away
  • Imitate: There were little flowers she did not recognize, white and palest blue. There were little ______ she did not recognize, ______ and ______ ______.

2nd Quarter

Sentence Combining - A Single Shard - Day 12

  • Combine: Tree-ear did not stop walking. Every step took him closer to the palace. [Prompt use of the causal words and phrases, such as because or which is why.]
  • Unscramble: he drew / a silent / breath to / quell the / small nudge of / anxiety that / was rising / within him / so far he had / not been / forced to lie

3rd Quarter

Sentence Combining - Aunt Harriet's Underground Railroad in the Sky - Day 1

  • Expand: The Underground Railroad was a network of people and hiding places.
  • Unscramble: during - the Civil War - Tubman served - as a nurse - a spy - and a commander - of intelligence - operations in - the Union Army

4th Quarter

Sentence Combining - The Watsons Go To Birmingham - Day 5

  • Imitate: Four more times Momma lit a match and four more times Joey patoohed them out. Four more times Momma ______ and four more times Joey ______. Four more times ______ ______ and four more times ______ ______.
  • Unscramble: Byron squirmed – around for – a second and – then did – something I’d – only seen him – do a couple ­– of times before

The following is a chart that includes the grammar/conventions skilled outlined in the standards and included in the 5th grade materials. (Bookworms, Grade 5 Manual, page 52)

Grade 5 Grammar/Sentence Construction

Skill

Sample Cue

Explain conjunctions, prepositions, interjections

Imitating

Let’s start by removing a preposition.

Perfect tense

(had walked, have walked, will have walked)

Imitating

Let’s remove the verb [but not the auxiliary]

Tense to convey time

Combining

Both the verbs are in the past tense, right?

Inappropriate shifts in verb tense

Combining, after secretly altering one verb

What’s wrong with these two sentences?

Correlative conjunctions

(either/or, neither/nor)

Imitating, deleting the noun following each and every example will reinforce the pairing

Use and identify 8 parts of speech, esp.

conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections

Combining

What conjunction can we use to link these?

Punctuation of a series

Unscrambling, after order is established

These 3 go together. What do we need?

Comma after introductory element

Expanding, supply or elicit one

Do we need a comma here?

Comma to set off yes or no, tag question, or person addressed

(Yes, I know. It’s true, isn’t it? Hi, Steve.)

Unscrambling, after order is established

Where do we need a comma?


Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
6/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 fully meet the expectations for support of students’ foundational skills development. The materials support building students’ comprehension through targeted lessons with the component parts of reading instruction (including phonics, word recognition, reading fluency, etc.) in a clear progression. Students are guided to read with purpose in shared reading, interactive read-alouds, and as they reflect in their writing. The mateirlas have build in practice for students to achieve reading fluency (oral and silent) and the teacher is provided with clear guidance to support students in this development.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, vocabulary, morphology, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression.

Foundational skills are presented to address phonics, word recognition, morphology, and vocabulary (strong opportunities for vocabulary development in each shared/read aloud lesson in every unit). There are word study lessons described in the Word Study document as well as in the Shared Lessons to guide teachers to instruct word study (which addresses decoding, spelling, and meaning vocabulary). According to the Grade 5 Teacher’s Manual, students learn multisyllabic decoding based on syllable types and correlate the connection to spelling and meaning (p. 12).

  • For example, week 1 of the Shared Reading Lessons, students study the following words, which are from the read-aloud text: return, restore, comfort, defend, respect, and impress. Students learn how to break each word into syllables and study word morphology.
  • For example, in the First 9 weeks, Week 5, Day 21, students learn independent, “an adjective that means not needing any help. In- is a prefix that means not; dependent is a root word that means needing someone or something” (p. 27). Each week, students study particular words as part of the word study and then test their learning on the fifth day.

Tier 2 Words are addressed in the Interactive Read-Aloud lessons. The Tier 2 vocabulary words are related to the read-aloud selection. For example, in the Second Nine Weeks, Day 6 of the A Single Shard lesson, the teacher directions emphasize protrude and oblivious. “Another word from our book today was oblivious. What word? Oblivious means unaware” (p. 23). Tier 2 Words are also addressed in the Interactive Read-Aloud Poetry lessons. For example, in “The Bat” of Bat Poems, students learn amiss. “If something is amiss, it’s not right. It’s incorrect. What word?” (p. 2).

Fluency is addressed in Shared Reading Lessons and in differentiated lessons for small groups. In Shared Reading Lessons, students participate in choral reading and rereading. In small group lessons, students’ reading fluency will be addressed based on results of the informal Decoding Inventory.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks guide students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between the acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning from reading.

In the Grade 5 Manual, word study is described as a way “to move systematically across grade levels from sound to pattern to meaning” (p. 12). The fifth grade word study emphasizes “multisyllabic decoding, based on syllable types and the link between spelling and meaning” (p. 12). Words for study and analysis are selected from the meaning vocabulary in the shared reading selections. The manual contains explanations to the teacher about syllable types and word morphology such as common prefixes and suffixes. During the Writing Sort time, students write in their word study notebooks. Students copy the headers (categories) and sort the words. During Identify and Explain Syllable Types, students learn how to use chunking to decode, spell, and make meaning of words.

During the Grade 5 Word Study Scope and Sequence, 10 minutes are suggested for Decoding-Spelling-Meaning Vocabulary. For example, in Grade 5, First 9 Weeks, Week 1, students learn: Re turn (open, rcontrol) can be used as a noun or a verb, but the meanings are very similar. Return means to go back or come back, or the act of going or coming back. That makes sense because the prefix re means again” (p. 2). In Grade 5, Second 9 weeks, Week 6, students learn: “E co sys tem (open, open, closed, closed) is a noun that means a connected set of living things. This chapter is about the emergence and links in an ecosystem. Eco refers to a branch of science and system is a linked, connected network. They are connected to one another and to their physical surroundings” (p. 8). On some days, students are asked to go back to the text and find the words in context and talk about their meanings. Otherwise students participate in word study practice with student notebooks during differentiated group time.

The materials provide differentiated small group lessons for teachers to provide support of foundational word analysis skills. After students are assessed using the Informal Decoding Inventory, the teacher places students in one of four small groups. Depending on placement, students receive more targeted support in specific foundational skills such as word recognition skills and multisyllabic decoding.

It should be noted that these word study lessons do not include student materials (such as the student notebook) which would need to be generated by the teacher.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials meet expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

According to Walpole and McKenna of the Grade 5 Manual, “Fluency is built through repeated reading” (p. 44). Students have the opportunity to read and reread one segment of text each day, which includes informational and narrative. Students have the opportunity to become fluent readers of those styles of texts using choral reading, echo reading, and rereading. Students participate in silent reading during differentiated lessons. Once students complete their text-based reading, they may do self-selected silent reading.

In each of the Interactive Read-Aloud Units, there are poems such as Mystery Poems, Narrative Poems, Poems for the Birds, and Bat Poems for students to hear read-aloud. Directions to the teacher do not include explicit instructions to have students read the poems aloud with the teacher. For example, in Poems for the Birds, Day 1, the teacher is to say: “As we read each of the poems, be thinking about one you like best and why” (p. 1). It is not clear if the students should be reading the poems aloud also. If students only listen to poems read-aloud, this is a missed opportunity for students to practice reading fluency with poetry.

In the Shared Reading Lessons, students have the opportunity to practice oral reading through choral reading and rereading with a partner. In the Lesson Plan, teachers are provided with page numbers for having students choral read. For example, in Grade 5 First 9 Weeks, Week 1, Day 3, the class will Choral Read Chapters 5-6 of Walk Two Moons, which is narrative text. In the Second 9 Weeks, Week 1, Day 3, students choral read Chapter 3 of Volcano. After choral or echo reading, teachers are to pair students up by reading achievement ranking. The teacher is directed to teach students how to participate as a reader and a coach. The expectation is that students will read with expression. When the reader makes an error, the coach should prompt the reader to reread. There is a missed opportunity to emphasize rate in the partner reading activity.

In order to assess students’ fluency, learning modules about screening and diagnosis are provided on the website. Teachers are directed to use DIBELS Next (which is free to access and to use) to assess each student’s fluency. It is suggested to do reading fluency 1-minute oral readings at least three times over the year. The materials suggest providing small group instruction around fluency and comprehension based on the results of the DIBELS assessment. Small group instruction around fluency can be found in the books by Walpole and McKenna, which the teacher will need to purchase.

In Walkthrough Observation Tool Designed to Enhance Implementation, teachers can utilize narrative text during small group time to help students build fluency. Students echo or choral read for 5-6 minutes and then reread with a partner or whisper read.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The Bookworms Grade 5 instructional materials partially meet the expectations of Gateway 2. The materials support students’ growing literacy skills through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language through coherently and clear work around building academic vocabulary and studying texts to understand craft and style. Some text sets are organized around topics to grow students’ knowledge, while other texts sets are less-strongly connected. Students have ample practice learning the component parts of research as they read and work within texts. The materials do not include a plan for independent reading nor a wholly comprehensive writing plan to cover the whole school year, although there are suggestions to support teachers as they identify these pieces outside the materials.

Criterion 2a - 2h

20/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for texts organized around topics to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. The instructional materials for grade 5 fully meet the expectations of indicator 2a. Materials are organized to build students’ knowledge through topic-focused texts. There are many topics explored over the school year, spanning topics such as Native American culture, to the United States in the 1930’s and the Depression, to study of animals.

For example, in grade 5 during the second nine weeks, the topic centers around planet Earth and earth science. Samples of texts include the following titles:

  • The Sun (nonfiction)
  • Volcano (nonfiction)
  • Oceans (nonfiction)

In grade 5, the first nine weeks, the topic focuses on informational texts, two of the informational texts are:

  • Plant Cells (nonfiction)
  • Animal Cells.(nonfiction) While reading Animal Cells, students work independently to synthesize information, listing and describing the events that happen as you eat food and it becomes cells. Students write a brief description in their own words.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 5 instructional materials meet expectations that the materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Through the Comprehension Discussion Questions, Model Comprehension Strategies and Ask Questions During Reading, and Written Responses (in some places called Written Follow-Up) students address facets of this indicator with nearly every text. As students read and engage in large class, small group, and individual work, they engage in study of words and components of texts.

The following examples demonstrate how students analyze author’s craft and language:

  • Students analyze author’s craft and language in the First Nine Weeks of Shared Reading in Week 1, Day 1 of Walk Two Moons: Why do you think the author compares the story to a plaster wall? How does that use of language serve the author's purpose? (p. 3)
  • Students analyze author’s craft in the Second Nine Weeks of Interactive Read-Aloud in Day 2 of The Flu of 1918: So is this a mistake, or did the author mean something else? What do you think she might have meant? (p. 6)
  • Students analyze author’s craft and language in the Third Nine Weeks of Reading Reading in Week 1, Day 4 of Bud, Not Buddy: What does the author mean to say Bud’s mother was like a tornado? Use context to understand the figurative language here (p. 7)

These demonstrate a few of the frequent opportunities for students to analyze key ideas, details, and structure are also part of daily analysis. For example:

  • In the Second Nine Weeks of Shared Reading, Week 1, Day 2 students read Volcano and students respond to the following discussion questions: “Why would an earthquake trigger an avalanche? Why would a steam explosion be so dangerous? What actually caused all of the trees to be flattened? What was the difference between the stone wind and the avalanche? Why were the pumice and ash dangerous?” (p. 4)
  • In the Third Nine Weeks of Interactive Reading, Day 3, students read The Boy Who Loved Words and students respond to the following discussion questions: How have people's opinion of Selig changed, now that he has found his purpose? How does Selig feel now? And please use a word other than lonely or solo! (p. 6)
  • In the Fourth Nine Weeks of Shared Reading, Week 1, Day 1, students read The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg and respond to the following discussion questions: Why does Squint lie about Harold's age? Does Squinton Leach actually sell Harold to the army? Use evidence from the text (p. 2).

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet expectations that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

The majority of the questions and tasks are coherently sequenced to support students’ analysis and integration of knowledge and ideas. On page 17 of the teacher’s manual, it is stated: “Nearly all questions provided for in shared reading are inferential, meaning that students have to combine information from within the text, or between the text and prior knowledge to answer.” And on page 18: “Students will have the opportunity to complete one text-based written response per day.” This relates to standards RI.5.1 and RL.5.1.

Students are often asked to examine and analyze details and key ideas to integrate their knowledge and ideas. Students will have to take earlier learning and synthesize it into the new task to complete the questions and analyses below.

  • In the first few days of the text Walk Two Moons (First Nine Weeks Shared Reading), students are asked 5-6 comprehension questions in most lessons, which help students examine and analyze details in the story.
  • In The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg (Fourth Nine Weeks Shared Reading), students are instructed to pay attention to details of setting to focus in on key ideas to help them make sense in regard to time and place in the story: “This book is a narrative. The events are in time order. So we’ll often stop to review what’s occurred. What are the main events that have happened so far in the story?” (p. 3)
  • In the first lesson, students respond to: “The author hints that Phoebe is going to be an important character. What do you think the relationship between Phoebe and Sal might be? How could she be important?” (p. 3).
  • In the second lesson, students respond to: “What do we learn about Phoebe in these chapters? What sort of character do you think she is going to turn out to be?” (p. 4).
  • In the ninth lesson, students are asked to ponder: “Think about what we are learning about Phoebe’s family” (p. 13).

Students are asked integrate knowledge and ideas from multiple texts:

  • In both The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg (Day 1, Day 2, Day 9, Day 11, Day 15) and The Thief (Day 29, Day 38), many of the writing activities instruct students to write from a certain character’s point-of-view. A student would certainly need to analyze details to be able to successfully do this.
  • In the Third Nine Weeks Interactive Read-Aloud, students compare The Boy Who Loved Words to the story of Johnny Appleseed. “Write two paragraphs. In the first, tell how the two stories are similar. In the second, write about how they are different. So, in the first paragraph students compare the two stories. In the second paragraph you’ll contrast them (p. 7).

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 do not meet expectations that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Culminating tasks are not included in this curriculum. While there are daily writing and discussion prompts of very high quality, there are no multi-faceted culminating tasks in either interactive or shared reading that extend beyond the day to day smaller tasks.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 fully meet the expectations of this indicator, with a year-long plan to build academic vocabulary. For these materials, academic vocabulary is defined as words that are traditionally used in academic dialogue and text. Specifically, it refers to words that are not necessarily common or frequently encountered in informal conversation.

Academic vocabulary practice is embedded throughout the fifth grade materials, mostly supported in the Interactive Reading lessons, under the headings “Model a Comprehension Strategy and Ask Questions During Reading.” For example, in the third nine week unit, when reading The Boy Who Loved Words, the following is included:

  • “As we finish our book today, think about how it is similar to the story of Johnny Appleseed, and also how it is different. Later I will ask you to write two paragraphs, one comparing the two books and the other contrasting them. So be thinking about similarities and differences as I read today.”
  • “So what exactly is Selig’s [the author’s] purpose? Talk it over with your partner.”
  • “If you look closely at these two pictures you will see that they are the same people. It looks to me like the first page is all about negative words, and the second page is all about positive words. Let’s look closely so that we can compare and contrast. [If you can project the illustrations, point out a few of the differences, window by window.]”

Academic vocabulary can also be found (and is explicitly defined) in the Word Study Scope and Sequence amongst Tier 2 vocabulary words. For example, in the fourth week of the second unit under “Meaning and Spelling Vocabulary,” the following is included in the lesson plan:

  • “Mo tive (open, closed) is a noun that means a reason to do something. For someone to kill someone else, there has to be a strong motive. The verb form is motivate. A motive motivates someone to do something.”

Similarly, in the fourth nine week unit of Word Study, the following is included in the lesson plan:

  • “In quir ies (closed, vce, vowel team) is a noun that means questions one might ask to find out particular information. Professor Fleabottom has been making inquiries about the movement of the troops. The verb form is inquire.”

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 partially meet expectations that materials support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. There is consistent, daily time for writing practice over the course of the year. During the differentiation block, students have as many as 30 minutes each day to complete text-based writing tasks.

While prompts are tied to texts of gradually increasing rigor (all within the grade level), there is minimal explicit support for students to practice revision, editing, and for moving from single parts to comprehensive written pieces. Writing tasks at the end of the year are very similar to the beginning of the year. Rubrics are available to support teachers as they determine students’ writing level and assess growth. Additionally, there are 90 45-minute blocks built into the year plan for which no interactive read-alouds are planned, providing opportunities for teachers to support more writing instruction and practice.

In the Grade 5 Teacher’s manual (p. 11), it states, “You will see that there are not as many interactive read-aloud lesson plans as there are shared reading lesson plans. This difference is deliberate. Nearly half of the 45-minute time segments for interactives must be reserved for process writing so that students learn to compose, revise, and edit their own writing pieces. We have not designed this portion of the curriculum. Teachers should work together to use consistent process writing procedures and language and to sequence the three writing genres (narrative, informative, and persuasive/argumentative) across the school year. In the materials, writing tasks are all on-demand and are text-dependent, which is a strength.

However, there is no plan for modeling or support materials for a writing process present in materials. For example, on page 47 the Teacher’s Manual states, “Model for students at the beginning of the year to establish norms for length and quality," but no models are provided in the instructional materials.

Many writing prompts ask students to use the skill of summarization or to write summaries, models of summaries, or protocols for how to write a summary are not included. Teachers would need to find or develop their own lessons, models, or protocols of how to write a summary. For example, during the Second Nine Weeks of Interactive Read-Aloud, Day 1, A Single Shard, the following task is included: “Write a summary of how Tree-ear spent his day.”

Writing topics chosen are appropriate and engaging for the grade level in which they are presented and varied in type of writing asked to do.

Examples of the writing tasks present (which include the protocol of including text evidence) for Grade 5 students include the following:

  • In the First Nine Weeks of Interactive Read-Aloud, Day 8 of Tuck Everlasting: “Draw a map of the places we have been reading about. Include Treegap, Charleytown, the Tucks’ house, the road, and the pond. Of course, you can’t draw an exact map, but use your knowledge of the story as evidence. Be sure to label the map.”
  • In the Second Nine Weeks, Week 2, Day 8 of Oceans: “Pretend you’re a member of Congress. Someone has proposed that money be spent on predicting the next El Niño. Others say it would be a waste of money because we can’t change the weather anyway. Write a paragraph arguing that predicting the next El Niño would be a good idea. Make your claim and then give your reasons.”
  • In the Third Nine Weeks of Interactive Read-Aloud of Underground Railroad: “One day, President Lincoln met Harriet Beecher Stowe. Write a conversation between the two of them. [Point out later what Lincoln actually said to her: “So you're the little woman who wrote the book that made this great war!”]”
  • In the Fourth Nine Weeks of Sharing Reading, Week 1, Day 4 of The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg: “Compare and contrast Reed and Brewster to Stink and Smelt. How are they similar and different?”

If teachers would like to incorporate the writing process into lessons (in order to meet the standards), they would need to generate their own materials and allocate more time than originally budgeted by the curriculum. It is noted there are suggested external resources within the program to achieve this.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 partially meet expectations that materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. Students engage with components of the research process over the course of the year and complete short projects. There are minimal opportunities for students to complete full research projects that have gone through a process of revision. The component pieces included, however, do support students in getting ready for that kind of work. Teachers will have to identify outside materials for students to complete full research projects.

Students at the 5th grade level are asked daily to meet the some of the research standards using print materials (although the curriculum occasionally incorporates digital sources). Students are offered the opportunity to read, reflect, re-read, and synthesize what they have read to draw conclusions to share with others.

The research tasks for 5th grade are in labeled in the lessons as “Follow Up” for Shared Reading and “Written Response” for Interactive Reading. Students have opportunities to summarize, paraphrase, or analyze daily in both shared and interactive reading with these short research tasks; however, explicit instruction in how to summarize, paraphrase or analyze are not evident. In the teacher materials, the design of the sequence of instruction can build towards independence and allows students chances to apply familiar skills to new contexts.

Examples of some of the short research projects are as follows:

In the 1st nine weeks students write to the following prompt after reading the text The Porcupine Year (Interactive Read-Alouds, Day 4)

  • What advice would you give the group about where to go? Should they try to find their relatives up north or should they wait for the government to make a place for them? Tell why?

In the 2nd nine week unit of the Shared Reading component, the teacher guide reads as follows for day 1 of Volcano:

  • “We are going to read about the eruption of a volcano in 1980 in the state of Washington. We can see what happened during the eruption and some of what happened later in this video.” Students watch a video clip, read the text, as well as engage with comprehension questions, text structure and vocabulary instruction. Then students are then given the following prompt: “Make a brief timeline of the events leading up to the eruption of Mt. St. Helen beginning in March, 1980.”

In the 3rd nine weeks student write to the following prompt after reading Wright Bros (Interactive Read-Alouds, Day 4).

  • Write a short paragraph about the four forces at work as an airplane flies. Your paragraph should have five sentences: a topic sentence stating that there are four forces, and then one sentence for each force. Use the diagram to help you as you write.

In the 4th nine weeks students write to the following prompt after reading The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg. (Shared Reading, Week 3)

  • Write a journal entry describing the Caravan of Miracles. Include the most important facts and details. Then make up a description of The Amazing Pig Boy.

Research projects that extend across texts and use various sources would need be developed by the teacher. No research guidelines such as summarizing or paraphrasing information in notes or providing sources is evident. (W.5.8) Teachers would need to develop organizational tools and research protocols to assist students with more in-depth research projects that span across texts or sources as well as to assist in investigation of different aspects of a topic. (W.5.7)

It is also noted that there are few opportunities to research using digital sources (W.5.8), so teachers would need to be supplement this component in order to fully support students’ success with the research standards.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 do not fully meet expectations that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. There is some guidance for the teacher to engage a program of independent reading. For example, in the Fifth-grade Manual, page 49: "The most beneficial homework may be wide reading. Teachers may opt to adopt a reading log for homework, provided that books from the library are sent home with all children." It is also noted in the Fifth Grade manual that students first work on their on-demand writing, and then engage in self-selected reading with a reading log (page 10).

The Literacy Block consists of three 45 minute blocks.

  • Interactive Read Aloud Block
  • Shared Reading Block
  • Differentiation Block (Students are divided into 3 groups. One group meets with the teacher while other students are engaged in writing and self-selected reading). (Teacher’s Manual, pg.8)

The Grades 3-5 Teacher's’ Manual states that the three 45 minutes blocks offer time in the schedule for self-selected reading and indicates that students should use their reading logs. Materials will need to be developed by the teacher for supports/scaffolds to foster independent reading.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Sun Apr 09 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Bookwormsreading.org Copyright: 2016 0

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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