Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

Core Knowledge Language Arts Grade 5 instructional materials meet expectations of alignment to the standards. Texts included with the materials are of quality and consistently demonstrate appropriate and growing complexity for the students and related tasks. Texts are organized and bolstered with evidence-based questions and tasks to support students’ growing literacy skills. These evidence-based questions and tasks build students’ knowledge on topics while engaging them in rich, rigorous discussions, grounded in evidence and providing meaningful opportunities for academic vocabulary practice. The materials may need to be supplemented to fully engage students in the development of their foundational skills and to support grammar practice out of context. Writing instruction over the course of the school year is consistent and organized to support students’ development of different types of writing as outlined in the standards. Students build writing stamina and technique in on-demand and process writing activities. The materials provide practical opportunities for students to demonstrate both growth and proficiency at grade level in reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
37
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
28
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
32
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations of Gateway 1. Many of the texts students read are rigorous and rich, attending to a balance of fiction and nonfiction. Materials provide some support for teachers to ensure students can read at-grade level texts at the end of the year, although the teacher may need to supplement work with foundational skills to support all students, including those who struggle. The materials include consistent use of text-dependent questions and tasks that build to culminating tasks. Students work on speaking and listening by engaging in rich discussions related to the texts as they are practicing academic vocabulary. Writing instruction allows for practice of on-demand and process work across multiple text types. The teacher may need to supplement or amend grammar instruction to include out-of-context practice consistently over the course of the school year.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
19/20
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations of indicators a through f. Texts students are reading and working with are of high quality and engaging, and attend to the balance outlined in the standards. There is some information regarding text complexity of units as a whole, but does not support teachers' implementation by including text-specific information. There is some range and depth to what students read. There are some opportunities to build skills so students can navigate grade level texts at the end of the school year.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for anchor texts of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and considering a range of student interests. Across the year, selections should appeal to a wide range of student interests, and some materials (e.g. A Midsummer Night's Dream immersive Quest in Unit 7) are presented in novel ways to enhance student engagement. Many texts are by well-known, published authors.

  • Unit 1 The Personal Narratives that serve as anchor texts are from published works and are by well-known authors or historical figures including Richard Blanco, Jennifer Lou, Rosa Parks, Bertie Bowman, and Michael Massimino.
  • Unit 2 The primary text for Unit 2 consists of 8 chapters of informational text, one chapter combining informational text with myths of the Aztecs and Incas, and two optional enrichment selections-- one including an adaptation of a letter from explorer Hernan Cortes to King Charles V of Spain, and one informational piece on a scientific discovery in the Andes Mountains.
  • Unit 3 focuses on developing an understanding of poetry and poetic devices. The “Poet’s Journal” serves as both the student text and activity book for the unit and includes 17 poems by well-known poets. drawing from various literary traditions over the last several centuries, and they range from William Blake to contemporary writers as Virgil Suárez and Marie Howe.
  • Unit 4 is centered around an adapted version of Don Quixote paired with Miguel de Cervantes's Adventures of Don Quixote.
  • Unit 5 The reader Patrons, Artists, and Scholars focuses on western Europe, particularly Italy, during the cultural movement known as the Renaissance. "Students will be exposed to works of art from such renowned artists as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Donatello, Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Bruegel, Dürer, and Van Eyck, among others. Students will learn about the impact of Renaissance writers, such as Machiavelli, Castiglione, Cervantes, and Shakespeare.”(TG, Unit 5, p.2)
  • Unit 6 texts focus on the topic of the Reformation movement in European history.
  • Unit 7 focuses on Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Nights Dream in the form of a learning quest. The original play is excerpted and is accompanied with summaries of Shakespeare's play. Summaries are in different styles and structures to provide engaging challenges to students.
  • Unit 8 includes Native American myths and stories from different tribes as well as nonfiction accounts. "The Reader also includes two selections that may be used for enrichment. “The Navajo Code Talkers” explores the unique role Native Americans played during World War II, and “Ancestors’ Words” discusses the struggle to transmit and preserve the diverse languages spoken by Native Americans." (TG, Unit 8, p. 3)

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Across the year, student materials include a variety of informational text, stories, poetry, and dramas with selections highlighting a variety of cultures. Units also include many illustrations and diagrams related to the featured texts.

  • Unit 1- Personal narratives in both fiction and nonfiction.
  • Unit 2- The primary text for Unit 2 consists of 8 chapters of informational text, one chapter combining informational text with myths of the Aztecs and Incas, and two optional enrichment selections-- one including an adaptation of a letter from explorer Hernan Cortes to King Charles V of Spain, and one informational piece on a scientific discovery in the Andes Mountains. “The Reader for this unit, Maya, Aztec, and Inca, includes complex text and prepares students in Grade 5 for the increased vocabulary and syntax demands aligned texts will present in later grades. Maya, Aztec, and Inca focuses on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations. Students will read about each civilization’s geographic location, way of life, developments, and downfall.” (TG, Unit 2, p.4)
  • Unit 3- focuses on poetry, and includes poems from many eras and styles. Included poems come from writers across the world and include varying poetry types.
  • Unit 4- The main text of Unit 4 is “a full-length adapted version of Don Quixote.”(TG, Unit 4, p.1). This is coupled with a trade book, Adventures of Don Quixote, as the Reader. Students also read the non-fiction text “Gloomy Castles and Jousting Knights” to build background knowledge before reading the novel.
  • Unit 5- Students read a variety of informational texts that can be found in the student reader Patrons, Artists, and Scholars, which focuses on western Europe, particularly Italy, during the cultural movement known as the Renaissance. Students will read about the rise of the middle class due to increased trade with other countries, the importance of patrons in supporting the work of artists, and increasing attention to and inspiration from the works of ancient Greek and Roman philosophers and artists. Students will be exposed to works of art from such renowned artists as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Donatello, Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Bruegel, Dürer, and Van Eyck, among others.
  • Unit 6- presents students with informational text and historical fiction.
  • Unit 7- fiction (Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night's Dream) and associated supporting texts.
  • Unit 8- incorporates narrative nonfiction, historical fiction, and informational texts. Unit 9 includes informational texts that focus on science. Some texts are couched in a fictional structure.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations of indicator 1c of texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. According to the Program Guide, the texts meet the text complexity criteria for the grade.

Some representative samples of how the materials attend to the quantitative measures for the grade band include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • the Student Reader from Unit 2- Eureka! Files: Eureka! Student Early American Civilizations: Maya, Aztec, and Inca- a traditional informational text life in the Early Americas which has a Lexile of 890L.
  • the Student Reader from Unit 5-The Renaissance: Patrons, Artists, and Scholars, a traditional informational text with a Lexile of 930L.
  • the Student Reader from Unit 7- a Folger Library-approved adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare with a Lexile of 860L.
  • the Student Reader from Unit 8—Native Americans: A Changing American Landscape, with a traditional informational text with a Lexile of 970L.

When taken in aggregate over the course of the school year, the majority of texts appear to have the appropriate quantitative and qualitative measures for students' reading in this grade level. Quantitatively, the texts within the Grade 5 materials fall within a 880-1010 Lexile level (the standards call for materials to range from 640-1010 Lexile within the 4-5 grade band). Read-aloud texts are at appropriately accelerated quantitative and qualitative levels, while texts students read on their own and for core instruction fall at the appropriate levels. It is noted that the poetry texts are qualitatively appropriate (as they would not be measured quantitatively) and are accompanied with appropriate tasks and questions. Qualitatively, the materials are appropriate for 5rd grade readers as well. The relationship of the texts to their associated student tasks are appropriate to the grade level, and a rationale for their inclusion is provided in the introduction of each unit.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials (texts and sets of texts) for Grade 5 meet the requirements of indicator 1d, supporting students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. Texts and their associated student tasks provide students with increased rigor over the course of the school year and provide a variety of non-fiction texts to help students grow in their content knowledge and their mastery of content-specific and academic vocabulary. By the end of Grade 5, students have opportunities to read and comprehend grade level texts.

Placement of texts across the year provide students with increasing challenges in content and complexity. The first unit, revisits personal narratives, and includes The Prince of Los Cocuyos: The First Real San Giving Day by Richard Blanco and Rosa Parks: My Story, by Jim Haskins. Both the Blanco and Haskins stories have an approximate Lexile of 970L—approximately in the middle of the stretch band for Grade 5. An adapted version of the classic tale, Don Quixote paired with a non-fiction text about the middle ages written for the program is the focus of Unit 4. While, quantitatively, the adaptation of Don Quixote is approximately at the 910L Lexile level, the use of Spanish names and terminology raise the complexity of the text. Unit 7 focuses on a non-fiction text about The Reformation that is at the 990L Lexile level. Portions of the Student Reader for Unit 7 are rich in content and subject matter is complex and laden with new, content-specific vocabulary. Sections of this reader also feature narrative featuring snippets of historical fiction to dramatize portions of the informational text. For example, Chapter 2 of the Unit 7 reader features a story about father and son and their first encounter with a printing press in a print shop as the boy becomes a printer’s apprentice and eventually learns to read. While this text is written at the 980L Lexile level, the students are asked to draw more sophisticated inferences from the readings (e.g., Why might it be surprising to some that Martin Luther was an early reformer who wanted to reform the Catholic Church?). Unit 9 features a realistic fiction story about students on a paleontological dig. The story has an approximate Lexile of 1120—slightly outside of the stretch band for Grade 5. However, this story is written in a narrative style with common, modern language and scaffolded with teacher support for unfamiliar content vocabulary words woven throughout the text.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 5 meet the expectations that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level. Text complexity analysis information is available for the Grade 5 texts as a whole and rationales for purpose and placement of texts are found at the beginning of each unit.

Text complexity information is provided for the grade-level or units as a whole. Beginning on page 56 of the 3-5 Program Guide (PG), there is prose describing the quantitative measures, qualitative features, and reader characteristics and task demands that were considered when selecting and creating texts for the program. According to the Program Guide, the texts for Grade 4 fall within the 880-1010L band, with the exception of poetry, which does not receive a Lexile rating. Lexile information is not provided for individual texts, though the Teacher’s Guide states that the texts in Grades 4 and 5 become “increasingly sophisticated”. The inclusion of poetry in the Grade 4 materials gives students opportunities to grapple with “highly complex, archaic language” as well texts with more modern, straightforward language that allows them to consider the deeper message of the work.

The beginning of each Grade 5 reading unit includes an introduction that describes why the texts were chosen for the program. For example, Unit 7 features A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare. The Unit Guide describes the importance of the inclusion of Shakespeare’s work in any literacy program as it provides students with the opportunity to engage in close reading of an engaging and complex text. The excerpts and rewritten passages were constructed with the assistance of the Folger Shakespeare Library to make the text more accessible for students while maintaining the integrity of the language and the storyline.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for support materials providing opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to be able to read grade-level texts by the end of 5th grade. Regular read-aloud selections provide ample opportunities for the teacher to model oral reading, but fewer opportunities are provided for students to practice building to independent reading at grade level and build stamina. Students frequently have opportunities to read sections of text independently and to reread selections read aloud by the teacher. While the volume of reading is often high, range of reading with regards to levels is low.

Some activities support building students' independence by providing questions and strategies to employ while reading:

  • “Independently reread ‘A View of the Earth’ from the beginning through ‘...and we’ll never know’ (Reader pages 51–55). As you read, (a) find two sentences or passages that show the author’s point of view about your assigned topic and copy the passages; (b) underline whether the passage shows a positive, negative, or neutral feeling about the topic; and (c) explain how it shows the author’s point of view.” (TG, Unit 1, p.237)
  • “Have students take home Activity Page 8.1 to continue reading and taking notes on their topic for the Aztec civilization.” (TG, Unit 2, p.188)
  • “Have students read page 23 silently. • Have students work independently to answer question 5 on Activity Page 2.2. Have students compare their answers with a partner” (TG, Unit 6, p.61)

There is some guidance to the teacher to differentiate texts to keep students accelerating their skills according to their point of entry with the material:

  • “The enrichment selections in Maya, Aztec, and Inca are intended to be used at your discretion. They are intended for more advanced readers, as they are more difficult to read and include more challenging vocabulary than Chapters 1–9. You may wish to assign these selections to students who need more challenging reading material.” (TG, Unit 2, p.6)

There are directions to the teacher to have students read texts silently or out loud. There is inconsistent support for the teacher to identify struggles students may have during these activities:

  • “Explain that both students will read the first page silently, then one partner will read that page aloud. Next they will both read the second page silently, then the other partner will read that page aloud, and so on. Students can ask their partners for help with sounding out or defining words as necessary.” (TG, Unit 2, p.134)
  • “Tell students that today they will continue reading Blanco’s narrative, this time in pairs. Direct them to Activity Page 2.1 and have them individually read the guidelines for partner reading. Then have a couple of students explain the guidelines in their own words.” (TG, Unit 1, p.29)
  • “Have a student read aloud the last paragraph at the bottom of page 50, continuing to the end of the first full paragraph on page 51” (TG, Unit 6, p.200)
  • “Tell students they will take home Activity Page 13.2 to read aloud to a family member to build fluency, and then to answer questions.” (TG, Unit 2, p.298)
  • "Explain that both students will read the first page silently, and then one partner will read that page aloud. Next, they will both read the second page silently, and then the other partner will read that page aloud, and so on. Students can ask their partner for help with sounding out or defining words as necessary." (TG, Unit 9, p. 36)
  • “In Lesson 2, use a safe choral reading approach to help students learn some lines that they will encounter later in the play. For the choral reading, divide the class in half and have the students reading lines together in a sort of dialogue. Lesson 3 goes a bit further by giving each student a line that he or she reads aloud and “tosses” to another student” (TG, Unit 7, p. 2)

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for text-dependent questions, tasks, and assignments requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). Each unit focuses on a topic that supports students in making self-to-text and text-to-text connections. A variety of activities and questions are designed to support the development of deeper understanding of both content and literary craft.

Some examples of text-dependent questions, tasks, and assignments include (but are not limited to) the following. In some instances, students are required to support inferences with evidence from the text. Discussion questions often require students to cite textual evidence.

Unit 1

  • “Why didn’t Blanco mention Thanksgiving to Abuela for a few days? For help, look at the last three paragraphs of the Lesson 1 selection from the text (Reader pages 4–5).” (TG, Unit 1, p.35)
  • “Ask students to describe Abuela’s opinion in the first passage. Have them support their answer with a quote from the text. Then do the same for the second passage.” (TG, Unit 1, p.59)
  • “Find a line of dialogue that helps show what the relationship between Mamá and Abuela is like. Copy the quote and then explain how it describes the relationship.” (TG, Unit 1, p.84)
  • “Ask students if they can infer anything about Rosa Parks’s family and how she lived from the three sentences. Ask students to support their answers with words from the passage.” (TG, Unit 1, p.143)
  • “Read the rest of Step by Step from the paragraph beginning ‘Later, after I had eaten my lunch’ (Reader page 48 ) to the end of the narrative. As you read, write down at least two Think as You Read ideas. In describing each idea, include a word or phrase from the text. Review the Think as You Read poster for a reminder of some of the kinds of things you might think and write about.” (TG, Unit 1, p.169)

Unit 2

  • “What interesting detail or fact have you learned about the ancient Maya civilization? Why do you find it interesting? Use information from the Reader to support your answer.” (TG, Unit 2, p.69)
  • “What words does the narrator use in the myth to show that the corn men were powerful like the jaguar, as the gods intended?” (TG, Unit 2, p.123)
  • “What words from the text help you find the Templo Mayor in the image across the pages?” (TG, Unit 2, p.177)
  • “Based on the text, how do we know that Viracocha cared about the well- being of the people he had created?” (TG, Unit 2, p.292)

Unit 3

  • “Ask for student volunteers to share something they learned from the information in the biography. Remind students that this is a tool they may use to learn more about the author.” (TG, Unit 3, p.13)
  • “Based on stanza 2, what does the speaker think the ‘you’ was going to do with the plums?” (TG, Unit 3, p.29)
  • “The father gives another way to respond to the worms in stanza 2. Which of the two responses does the father seem to think is the best? Give a reason from the poem for your answer.” (TG, Unit 3, p.101)
  • “The arrangement of items in each stanza seems to follow a pattern. For example, the watch appears before the house, and the cities appear before the continent. What pattern seems to exist here?” (TG, Unit 3, p.128)
  • “According to the poem, why does the speaker feel isolated in his new country?” (TG, Unit 3, p.151)

Unit 4

  • ““Have students silently read the remainder of page 4 and lines 1–3 on page 5Inferential. What does the strange knight mean when he says his lady, Casildea, gives him “such tasks as those imposed on Hercules”?”(TG, Unit 4, p.201)
  • “ The strange knight thinks he may have defeated Don Quixote. How does Don Quixote explain this situation?”(TG, Unit 4, p.203)
  • “The Duke and the clergyman react to Don Quixote differently. In what way are their reactions different?”(TG, Unit 4, p.233)

Unit 6

  • “Ask students: “How did Gutenberg’s printing press influence the Church and the Reformation movement? How is the title of the last section of the Reader, ‘The Power of Communication,’ related to your answer?”(TG, Unit 6, p.40)
  • “Tell students that they will reread parts of Chapter 4, “The Reformation Movement,” to review the key events and focus on the motives, or reasons, why key figures of the Reformation did the things they did” (TG, Unit 6, p. 147)
  • “Ask students how Johann Gutenberg, Martin Luther, Frederick III, and John Calvin contributed to the Reformation movement” (TG, Unit 6, p. 147)

Unit 7

  • “Have students complete the rest of the “Character Organizer” in pairs. Tell them that for now they need only write one adjective in the final column and that multiple answers are possible for all questions, as long as students can support their answer with textual evidence” (TG, Unit7, p. 37)
  • “Do you think Hermia is being brave? Support your answer with examples from the text”(TG, Unit 7, p.64)
  • “Does the scene look like verse or prose? Write “verse” or “prose” in the margin and give a reason that explains your answer” (TG, Unit 7, p. 137)
  • “Ask students what they know about this character based on the similarities in these interpretations. Remind them that many interpretations can be correct as long as they are grounded in the text. (TG, Unit 7, p. 153)

Unit 8

  • "Approximately how many Native Americans and how many different tribes existed in California before Spanish settlers arrived?" (TG, Unit 8, p. 93)
  • "In the introduction, the narrator states that Raven is a trickster. How does Raven behave like a trickster in this story?" (TG, Unit 8, p. 176)

Unit 9

  • "What two reasons does Tess give for the earth’s drying out so fast?" (TG, Unit 9, p. 95)
  • "Check for Understanding- How did new compounds get to Achy Breaky when he was covered in sand that became rock?" (TG, Unit 9, p. 114)

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for sets of high quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks building to a culminating task that integrates skills (writing, speaking, or a combination.) Each unit focuses on a specific topic. Culminating tasks integrate student learning about writing and speaking while developing a deeper understanding of the content. Some units feature smaller, more frequent tasks that assist the teacher in assessing formatively; some units feature more complex or formal tasks that stretch across many lessons and assist the teacher with summative assessment.

Examples include (but are not limited to) the following:

In Unit 1, students use the main texts as examples to read and analyze, and then they incorporate this learning into their own personal narratives.

  • “This unit examines the genre of personal narratives, which consists of works of nonfiction written by a first-person narrator involved in the events being described. Students read five personal narratives, identifying the elements of the genre and, throughout the unit, using these elements in writing a variety of their own personal narratives. ” (TG, Unit 1, p.1)
  • “Tell students that before they begin writing their narrative, we will take a look at how many writers structure their paragraphs.” (TG, Unit 1, p.14)
  • Writing lessons support students’ development of their own personal narratives.
    • “Write about a time, outside of school, when you taught something to somebody or someone taught you something. Think carefully about what you said to each other so that you can include dialogue in your narrative.” (TG, Unit 1, p.85)
    • “In Lesson 6, you will begin reading and writing a personal narrative about names. In order to get you thinking about names and what they mean to us, we are going to engage in a brainstorming activity called ‘free writing.’” (TG, Unit 1, p.98)
    • “Using an event or time that both you and the students experienced (for example, a class trip, unusual weather, a fire drill), model telling a brief narrative with a point of view.” (TG, Unit 1, p.132)
  • “Have students share their event sequences with the class. Write some of their logical event sequences on the board and ask students to describe why the sequence makes sense.” (TG, Unit 1, p.181)
  • “Have students rewrite their narratives on Activity Page 13.3, incorporating their revisions into their second drafts.” (TG, Unit 1, p.243)
  • “Students listen to classmates’ narratives and provide positive and specific feedback.” (TG, Unit 1, p.262)

In Unit 2, "students will use information from the Reader to compare and contrast the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations and create an informative or explanatory project, called the Codex Project, which encompasses all three civilizations.” (TG, Unit 2, p.5) Students do close readings of the materials, answer text-specific questions about the Mayan, Aztec, and Incan civilizations, and learn and practice literary devices embedded in the texts. Students take notes and engage in writing exercises: “By the end of this lesson, students will have developed paraphrased information into a logical explanatory paragraph for their Codex Project.” (TG, Unit 2, p.163) Students then build their Codex Project using full process skills.

Throughout Unit 4 students are working towards writing a persuasive essay: “In the writing lessons, students will engage in an extended writing project. In this unit, students will build on the practice they had in earlier units in writing paragraphs, and will write a four-paragraph persuasive essay arguing whether they think Don Quixote’s good intentions justify his often calamitous actions. Students will support their claims with reasons and evidence from the text.”(TG, Unit 4, p.4)

Some of the tasks students complete to build up to a completed writing project include the following, which are guided with references and discussion/ teaching questions for the teacher:

  • Learning the importance of supporting your opinion
  • Explaining the parts of a persuasive essay
  • Practice drafting an opinion and supporting it
  • Working through conclusion paragraphs
  • Sharing and evaluating writing process

In Unit 6, students work toward writing a friendly letter, a unit timeline, and an informative slide presentation.

  • “Explain the five parts of a typical friendly letter: heading; greeting, or salutation; body; closing; and signature. Have students correct their colorcoding on Activity Page 2.6 as needed and add labels for each part” (TG, Unit 6, p. 69)
  • “Tell students some letters try to convince the reader of something by offering an argument and evidence. Ask students to identify the argument in the sample letter and the sentence in which it appears.” (TG, Unit 6, p. 70)
  • “Ask students to identify the five parts of a friendly letter. Have students reference Activity Page 2.6 as needed.◦ Think-Pair-Share. Circulate as students discuss. Have a few pairs share out. • Clarify the five parts of a letter: heading, greeting, body, closing, and signature. Remind students that letters may also contain a postscript, or a note that comes after the signature. • Explain that students will write a friendly letter from Jacques’s point of view after he has learned to read and write. The letter will contain each of the parts of a friendly letter, as well as a clear purpose” (TG, Unit 6, p. 93)

Students work independently, in small groups, and in whole-class structures to give and receive feedback and check for understanding and task completion and quality. They complete a presentation for the class as well.

Unit 7 works toward the culmination of performances of scenes in a play and a memorize a speech.

  • “In this lesson, students combine their reading and acting skills to perform a very short selection from Act 3, Scene 1. After sharing their scenes, students will write a profile of one character using both the text and the performance as evidence” (TG, Unit7, p. 220)
  • “For the first time in the unit, students combine all the elements of a theater performance. Be sure to reinforce that, although everyone is basing his or her choices on the same text, different groups may make different choices. If they are well-supported by text, all these choices are right. Debating the merits of various choices can lead to fruitful discussions, and you should encourage students to defend their decisions. If these arguments are well-supported by the text, tell students it is okay to agree to disagree!” (TG, Unit 7, p. 220)
  • “Tell students that today they will be staging, rehearsing, and performing their mini-scenes in the groups that were assigned in the previous lesson.• Tell students that performances have many components, but they are all grounded in, and must be supported by, the text. Tell students that they must, therefore, be certain they know what happens in their scenes” (TG, Unit 7, p. 222)
  • “Students also begin learning Puck’s final speech by heart. This speech has been selected for several reasons. It’s one of Shakespeare’s most famous speeches, and the length and regular meter and rhyme make it ideal for memorization. Because students have already done in-depth character work on Puck, they are now well prepared to understand and perform it with some depth. And because Puck’s final speech concludes the play, this also sets up a class-wide finale to the unit” (TG, Unit 7, p. 232)
  • “Have students individually select four moments in the scene (“a moment” = one to two lines). Tell them they will be creating a storyboard panel of each of those moments for a stage production” (TG, Unit 7, p. 268)

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. Vocabulary words are identified in the teacher guides and vocabulary words are highlighted in student texts. However, limited teacher guidance is provided for introducing and reinforcing vocabulary. Discussion questions accompany reading selections in the teacher guides. In some instances there are inconsistent supports for teachers to build students' independent skills when they exhibit struggle in this area.

There are some lesson components that provide protocols for students to learn, practice, and apply how to discuss and present their vocabulary. One example includes a frame protocol to support students' discussion:

  • “Write or display the following sentence frames as guidance to students on feedback:Your narrative taught me something about you I didn’t know.The words(s)_____ taught me that _____.Your narrative taught me something interesting about what your name means to you. The words____taught me that_____.The visual element added to the meaning of your narrative. It showed that me that_____.When you described_____ with the words_____, I could really picture it in my mind.” (TG, Unit 1, p.173)

Some discussions are developed around key vocabulary, although support to engage in the discussion (protocols, support for misunderstandings, etc.) are minimal. Support to ensure each student is engaging in the modeling and practice with vocabulary is not ensured. If students exhibit misunderstanding or need more support to fully comprehend and apply the learning, there are few consistent directions for the teacher. Some examples include the following:

  • "Circle the word personal. Facilitate a whole-class discussion around the words and ideas students associate with it. As they respond, create a word map by writing students’ responses around the word personal and connecting them with lines. Possible student responses to personal: private, person, people, individual, secret, and owning.” (TG, Unit 1, p.9)
  • As a whole class, analyze the next two sentences, calling on students to read a sentence or phrase from the text and then think out loud.” (TG, Unit 1, p.25)

Academic vocabulary is frequently identified for the teacher and prominently highlighted for the student, but there is limited teacher guidance on how to reinforce the meaning, use, and modeling of these words. There are frequent notes for the teacher to remind students of the initial vocabulary presented at the start of units.

  • From lessons associated with the student reader, the teacher is directed to highlight the vocabulary: “Preview the core vocabulary words before reading the chapter.
    • Begin by telling students the first vocabulary word they will encounter in this chapter is domesticate.
    • Have them find the word on page 2 of the Reader. Explain that each vocabulary word is bolded the first time it appears in the chapter.
    • Explain that the glossary contains definitions of all the vocabulary words in this Reader. Have students refer to the glossary at the back of the Reader, locate domesticate, and then have a student read the definition.
    • Instruct students to turn to a peer and explain what the word domesticate means. Provide clarification as needed.
    • Explain the following:
      ◦ The part of speech
      ◦ Alternate forms of the word” (TG, Unit 2, pp.19-20)
  • While academic vocabulary words are previewed by the teacher, few opportunities are provided for students to practice using the words as they speak. “Remind students that definitions of all of the chapter’s vocabulary words can be found in the glossary at the back of the Reader. Have students reference Activity Page 9.1 while you read each word and its meaning.” (TG, Unit 2, p.194)
  • “Tell students they will reread parts of Chapter 3, “Setting the Stage for Reform.” Explain that during this second reading they will focus on the details used by the author, such as certain vocabulary words and sayings and phrases, to gain a deeper understanding of the influence and practices of the Church, and why some practices needed to be reformed” (TG, Unit 6, p. 102)
  • “Point out to students that they’ve learned a very important line from the play: “The course of true love never did run smooth.” Remind them that course in this context means “route” or “direction.”(TG, Unit 7, p42)

Lessons 1-14 in Unit 4 all contain a Word Work component. Some sample words included in this part are honorable, meddle, quixotic, deceive, fortune, dumbfounded. Directions for this part of the lesson all follow the same format. The format is as follows:

  • “1. In chapter 7, you read, “You must agree that fortune was not with us.” 2. Say the word fortune with me. 3. Fortune means “luck.” 4. Some people believe a four-leaf clover brings good fortune. 5. Have you ever experienced good fortune? Be sure to use the word fortune when you talk about it. • Ask two or three students to use the target word in a sentence. If necessary, guide and/or rephrase students’ responses to make complete sentences: “I experienced good fortune when…” 6. What part of speech is the word fortune? • Use a Making Choices activity as a Check for Understanding. I am going to read you several sentences that all involve fortune (or luck). Fortune can be either good fortune or bad fortune. Raise your hand if what I describe is good fortune; keep your hand down if what I describe is bad fortune: 1. Andrea thought she misplaced her homework and would have to redo it, but she found it in her desk. » good fortune (hands up) 2. Mika spilled ketchup on her new sweater. » bad fortune (hands down) 3. Don Quixote and Sancho did not find any spoils or islands for Sancho to govern. » bad fortune (hands down) 4. Jose learned that the book he wanted to read was already checked out of the library. » bad fortune (hands down).”(TG, Unit 4, p.161)
  • “In the chapter you read, “If they persisted in doing something wrong, or in holding to beliefs that did not follow Church doctrine, and refused to recant, they could be accused of heresy.” 2. Say the word recant with me. 3. Recant means to publicly take back an opinion expressed in the past. 4. In the Middle Ages, the Church wanted people to recant their statements if those statements conflicted with Church doctrine. 5. Have you ever expressed an opinion that you later had to recant? • Ask two or three students to use the target word in a sentence. If necessary, guide and/or rephrase students’ responses to make complete sentences: “I once stated ___, but I later had to recant because ___.” 6. What part of speech is the word recant? » verb • Use a Synonyms and Antonyms activity for follow-up. “What does recant mean? What are some synonyms of, or words that have a similar meaning to, recant?”(TG, Unit 6, p. 92)
  • “Create a word bank of linking verbs for the first section: are, look, sounded, were, feels, was (used twice), felt, smells, am. • Guide students in referencing the Present Tense and Past Tense posters. • Color-code the different types of linking verbs: being, and the senses verbs. • Have students pantomime the looking, seeing, tasting, smelling, sounding verbs and add a “thumbs up” for sentences with a linking verb and adjective and a “thumbs down” for sentences with an action verb and noun. • Have student turn their heads to look over their shoulder while they say past tense verbs, and face forward while they say present tense verbs. • Provide sentence frames to guide students in creating sentences. Refer them to the previous word bank or create a new word bank.” (TG, Unit 6, p.100)

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for supporting students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence. The Unit 7 "Quest" unit is particularly strong in this area with many of the activities supporting high levels of student engagement while integrating writing, speaking, and listening. Throughout the units, students have frequent opportunities to interact and engage with the topics they are reading and researching.

Examples of listening and speaking opportunities include:

Unit 1

  • Reading selections are accompanied by questions and suggestions that may be used by the teacher to generate student discussion. Examples include:
    • The teacher models “Think As You Read”: “Tell them that you will begin and that as you read you are going to think out loud about how the text shows the conflict.” (TG, Unit 1, p.24)
    • “Blanco writes that Abuela followed his instructions faithfully and did not add any Cuban spices. What do these details show?” (TG, Unit 1, p.78)“Ask students if they can infer anything about Rosa Parks’s family and how she lived from the three sentences.
    • “In the first paragraph of this section, the author writes, ‘There’s no way I’m gonna get a house call on this one.’ What do you think he means? As a clue, look at the next sentence: ‘No one can help me.’” (TG, Unit 1, p.238)

Unit 2

  • Reading selections are accompanied by questions and suggestions that may be used by the teacher to generate student discussion. Examples include:
    • “What evidence is provided in this paragraph as to why this era was called the golden age for the Maya?” (TG, Unit 2, p.45)
    • “The author uses a metaphor in the sentence, “Its religious and ceremonial center was located at the heart of the city.” Why does the author compare the religious and ceremonial center to a heart? What do they have in common?” (TG, Unit 2, p.175)
    • “Based on the text, how do we know that Viracocha cared about the well- being of the people he had created?” (TG, Unit 2, p.292)
  • “For each question, have students cite the specific passage in the text that provides the information needed to answer the question. If students have difficulty responding to the questions, reread pertinent passages of the chapter and/or refer to specific images or graphics. If students give one- word answers, and/or fail to use appropriate vocabulary in their responses, acknowledge correct responses by expanding students’ responses using richer and more complex language. Have students answer in complete sentences by restating the question in their responses. It is highly recommended that students answer at least one question in writing and that several students share their writing as time allows.” (TG, Unit 2, p.32)

Unit 3

  • Poetry selections are accompanied by questions and suggestions that may be used by the teacher to generate student discussion. Examples include:
    • “In this poem the speaker knew that the plums belonged to someone else, but he ate them anyway. Does his description of the plums make him sound sorry for what he did? Give a reason to support your answer.” (TG, Unit 3, p.29)
    • “There is a purpose in using anaphora. What does the speaker here seem to be stressing by repeating the word when? Give a reason based on the poem that helps explain your answer.” (TG, Unit 3, p.45)

Unit 4

  • “Think-Pair-Share. We have described Don Quixote as idealistic and Sancho as realistic, comparing and contrasting these character traits. Nonetheless, is there any evidence in these chapters that suggests Don Quixote is, even momentarily, realistic? Be sure that you provide evidence from the text. Ask several students to share the information exchanged between partners in the Think-Pair-Share activity.”(TG, Unit 4, p.261)

Unit 6

  • “Summarize the motives of Reformation figures, cite page numbers, and act out roles while answering questions aloud” (TG, Unit 6, p. 142)
  • “What Is at the Center of the Universe?” Answer questions about the chapter while reading and discussing, using complete sentences, citing evidence, and listing page numbers” (TG, Unit 6, p. 160)

Unit 7

  • “Because A Midsummer Night’s Dream was created to be performed, this Quest pairs reading and writing with theatrical activities. These games, rehearsals, and performances provide another set of tools to help students explore and take ownership of Shakespeare’s text. While these activities are not designed to teach acting or directing—and should not be presented to students as such— students will also improve their speaking and listening skills and their public-presentation confidence through these exercises” (TG, Unit 7, p. 5)
  • “Students will memorize Puck’s speech in Act 5, Scene 1 and develop gestures to physicalize key words in the speech” (TG, Unit 7, p. 230)

Unit 8

  • "Lesson Wrap Up: Bring the class back together as a group, and use the following questions to discuss the chapter: 1. Inferential. What did European settlers in North America usually do when they encountered Native Americans in the areas they wanted to settle? Refer to Chapters 1 and 2 of A Changing Landscape to obtain evidence to support answer to this question. 2. Literal. What did the Spanish do in California when they encountered Native Americans living there? Cite evidence from Chapter 4 to support your answer. Have students turn to the last page of Activity Page 4.2. After you read the following question to the class, have students respond to the question in writing. After students finish writing their responses, discuss them as a class. 3. Evaluative. Compare and contrast the way Spanish settlers interacted with Native Americans in what is now California with the way other European settlers interacted with Native Americans in other regions of the country. 4. Evaluative. What impact did the arrival of explorers, miners, missionaries, and settlers in what is now California have on Native Americans’ way of life? Optional: Turn to a partner and discuss." (TG, Unit 8, p. 108)

Unit 9

  • "Facilitate a class discussion on the similarities and differences between the two modes. First ask someone from the “scientist” half to read one of the sentences from Tess’s rules. Then ask someone from the “detective” side to comment on a similarity or difference with one of their rules. Then swap sides." (TG, Unit 9, p. 59)

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects incorporating digital resources where appropriate. Lessons provide varied and frequent opportunities for on-demand and everyday writing. Many on-demand tasks incorporate responses that assess student comprehension of primary student and read-aloud texts. Opportunities for process writing are distributed throughout the year and are the focus of some units such as the Personal Narratives unit. Students engage in pre-writing with graphic organizers that assist with information gathering and categorizing. Frameworks are provided to support student collaboration for sharing feedback and engaging in peer editing. Supplemental resources, including digital content, are suggested for student research in some lessons.

Evidence of on-demand and process writing includes (but is not limited to) the following examples from the materials:

  • “In addition to specific writing lessons, the CKLA program provides numerous writing opportunities. For example, students regularly engage in writing short answers in response to text-based questions. In these writing opportunities, students will focus on the use of evidence from the text and on individual sentence construction.” (TG, Unit 2, pp.5-6)
  • “A primary goal of the unit is for students to write frequently and, indeed, to begin to identify themselves as writers. To this end, students write every day, often full-paragraph or multi-paragraph narratives, in a low-stakes environment that encourages students to develop their writing skills. We want students to realize that they are all capable of personal writing, that they all have something of interest to say about themselves, and that writing personal narratives can be a fun creative outlet. Most of the writing assignments are connected to practicing a skill, such as writing dialogue or using strong descriptive verbs, which students will have studied in connection with the narratives they are reading. In addition, over the course of the unit, students will have multiple opportunities to share their writing in safe and supportive sessions, with their classmates offering concrete and positive feedback.” (TG, Unit 1, p.3)
  • “A wide range of supplementary material is available online for digital display during instructional time. This includes Reader passages to be used to model close reading, sentences and paragraphs demonstrating literary devices and elements of the personal narrative genre, and sentence frames to guide students in providing positive and specific feedback on their classmates’ writing.” (TG, Unit 1, p.4)
  • “Choose one of the first-time experiences you outlined in the chart and write a narrative paragraph showing why it was a memorable first. Remember to include a topic sentence, supporting sentences, and a concluding sentence.” (TG, Unit 1, p.14)
  • “Write about a time, outside of school, when you taught something to somebody or someone taught you something. Think carefully about what you said to each other so that you can include dialogue in your narrative.” (TG, Unit 1, p.85)
  • “Tell students that although they will still be writing personal narratives, their writing today will also be persuasive (they will write to convince their reader of something); like Rosa Parks, they will bring evidence to support a point of view about a personal experience.” (TG, Unit 1, p.149)
  • “Using full sentences, describe at least four events, in the order they happened, that were part of the surprise. Think about what happened before, during, and after the surprise. Think about how you felt inside and how you reacted outside. Think about specific moments you can describe in detail.” (TG, Unit 1, p.181)
  • “In the writing lessons, students will review the stages of the writing process and engage in an extended writing project. In this unit, students will use information from the Reader to compare and contrast the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations and create an informative or explanatory project, called the Codex Project, which encompasses all three civilizations. During the first few lessons, students will plan and draft a paragraph about the Maya and practice paraphrasing and note-taking. Next students will plan and draft a paragraph about the Aztec. They will also incorporate images into the project that are related to their topic. Students will practice using linking words and phrases to compare the Maya and the Aztec. Finally students will plan and draft a paragraph about the Inca. Students will also have an opportunity to edit their writing in all three paragraphs. Students will then integrate their writing and images to complete their Codex Project.” (TG, Unit 2, p.5)
  • “Earlier grades in the CKLA program include five steps in the writing process: planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing. Beginning in Grade 4, the CKLA writing process expands to include the following components: planning, drafting, sharing, evaluating, revising, and editing (and the optional component of publishing). In Grades 4 and 5, the writing process is no longer conceptualized as a series of scaffolded, linear steps (an important change from the Grade 3 writing process). Rather, students move among components of the writing process in a flexible manner similar to the process mature and experienced writers follow naturally (see Graham, Bollinger, Booth Olson, D’Aoust, MacArthur, McCutchen, & Olinghouse [2012] for additional research-based recommendations about writing in the elementary grades).” (TG, Unit 2, p.5)
  • “Tell students that today they will plan by organizing notes about geographical features of the land where the Maya civilization developed and use these notes to draft an explanatory paragraph.” (TG, Unit 2, p.80)
  • “Tell students that today they will practice identifying key information and paraphrasing text related to a cultural aspect of the Maya. Refer to the SR.3 Writing Process Graphic and explain to students that taking notes and paraphrasing key information is part of the planning process as outlined in the graphic.” (TG, Unit 2, p.127)
  • “Refer to the Paragraph about a Paragraph and the Codex Project Rubric as you review the three types of sentences in a paragraph. Use the three paragraph components listed below as a checklist for paragraph development.” (TG, Unit 2, p.163)
  • “Tell students that noting the source for an image requires writing down the web address and the date you accessed the website to get the image. Write the web address on the board/chart paper using the format of the sample website reference written on the board/chart paper: title of the website; date accessed; web address. Point out where this information would be placed on the Reference List.” (TG, Unit 2, p.186)
  • “Tell students they will use an editing checklist to edit their paragraphs and captions. Explain that editing will help them present writing that is free of errors, which would distract a reader from understanding the ideas.” (TG, Unit 2, p.296)
  • “In the writing lessons of this unit, students work either independently or collaboratively to create original poems that model the structure and style of those studied in each lesson.” (TG, Unit 3, p.6)
  • “A wide range of supplementary materials are available online. These include “Reading Poetry,” a guide to reading poetry aloud, which is accompanied by multimedia examples, critical commentary on each poem in the unit, and additional resources.” (TG, Unit 3, p.7)
  • “Students will use the poetic device anaphora to create their personal poem.” (TG, Unit 3, p.49)
  • “Students will use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast two characters in a poem.” (TG, Unit 3, p.65)
  • “Students will create and share an original poem utilizing parallel structure to contrast scenes.” (TG, Unit 3, p.141)
  • “Students will compose and original poem in which two characters respond differently to the same circumstance.” (TG, Unit 3, p.146)
  • “In the writing lessons, students will engage in an extended writing project. In this unit, students will build on the practice they had in earlier units in writing paragraphs, and will write a four-paragraph persuasive essay arguing whether they think Don Quixote’s good intentions justify his often calamitous actions. Students will support their claims with reasons and evidence from the text.” (TG, Unit 4, p.4)
  • “Tell students they will write a persuasive essay arguing that the actions of the main character, Don Quixote, are or are not justified or acceptable. Explain that to argue in writing means to present an opinion in a reasoned, logical way. Students will be asked when writing this essay to support their opinion using examples from the text. Explain that the purpose of the essay is to persuade, or convince, someone else that the student’s opinion is right.”(TG, Unit 4, p.90)
  • “Students will draft the concluding paragraph for their persuasive essay.”(TG, Unit 4, p.299)
  • “Explain that the activity page contains four excerpts from Adventures of Don Quixote. Students will use each excerpt to write a one-sentence opinion about Don Quixote based on the actions and dialogue described in that excerpt. Students will provide a reason for their opinion that is supported by evidence from the excerpt.” (TG, Unit 4, p.124)
  • “Writing lessons include multiple opportunities for peer collaboration and teacher scaffolding. Additionally, when students write, you should circulate around the room and check in with students to provide brief, targeted feedback” (TG, Unit 6, p.4)
  • “Use the following to write your letter from Jacques. (Greeting) (Heading) (Body) (Closing) (Signature) PS (postscript)” (AB, Unit 6, p. 61)
  • “Compare and contrast the scientific discoveries made by Copernicus, Kepler, and Galileo with the reforms Luther and others were seeking in the Catholic Church” (TG, Unit 6, p. 183)
  • “Finally, students are introduced to a recurring writing activity in which they take on the role of an advice columnist (“course smoother”) to the A Midsummer Night’s Dream characters. These informal writing activities are generally freestanding, so you should feel free to collect them at the end of the lessons in which they appear and to take a couple of days to review them” (TG, Unit 7, p. 32)
  • “Write a paragraph describing the physical appearance of Oberon, Titania, or one of their fairy followers. Think about the adjectives you have used to describe them and what you know about them from the summary” (AB, Unit 7, p. 38)
  • “Read this letter and respond with a one-to-two-paragraph letter to Helena. What clues from the text help you think about her questions? Use these details to support your advice. Underline the places in your response that use evidence from the play” (AB, Unit 7, p. 60)
  • “After sharing their scenes, students will write a profile of one character using both the text and the performance as evidence” (TG, Unit 7, p. 220)
  • "Students will use a graphic organizer to identify the argument and supporting evidence in a persuasive essay explaining the relationship between Native Americans and the land." (TG, Unit 8, p. 79)
  • "Students will choose an image to serve as the foundation for a persuasive essay and will find and use relevant information to summarize or paraphrase information in notes." (TG, Unit 8, p. 135)
  • "Have students turn to their writing journals (or use a word processor) and draft a conclusion based on their existing argument and body paragraphs, incorporating the argument and supporting evidence." (TG, Unit 8, p. 284)
  • "As time permits, have students recopy their revised and edited persuasive essay drafts onto clean pages. (If students are using a word processor, have them make the edits they have marked on their paper copies.)" (TG, Unit 8, p. 303)
  • "Students should not be expected to complete more than a rough first draft in the time available. As noted in the advance preparation, this writing activity can be extended to additional activities, continued at home, or used as written." (TG, Unit 9, p. 31)
  • "Ask students to complete the writing prompt on Activity Page 13.5 Think about Amy or Dr Forester. Do you think the reader provided a satisfying resolution for their character? Explain your answer using evidence from the text. Ask students to either choose one of the characters, direct them to write about one, or ask them to write about both." (TG, Unit 9, p. 215)

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. For grade 5, the standards require a mix of opinion, informational/explanatory, and narrative writing. Units emphasize a variety of genres and include many activities including poetry writing, journaling, drafting letters, and writing with dialogue. Over the course of the year, students have many opportunities to learn about author's craft and apply numerous literary devices to their own writing.

Evidence of a variety of text types of writing includes:

Unit 1 writing focuses on personal narratives and practicing components of other writing types to be applied over the course of the school year. Students are provided sentence frames and protocols for feedback.

  • “A wide range of supplementary material is available online for digital display during instructional time. This includes Reader passages to be used to model close reading, sentences and paragraphs demonstrating literary devices and elements of the personal narrative genre, and sentence frames to guide students in providing positive and specific feedback on their classmates’ writing.” (TG, Unit 1, p.4)
  • "Choose one of the first-time experiences you outlined in the chart and write a narrative paragraph showing why it was a memorable first. Remember to include a topic sentence, supporting sentences, and a concluding sentence.” (TG, Unit 1, p.14)
  • “One of students’ Lesson 3 writing options will be expanding on a moment from their First Time Narratives. Consider reading students’ First Time Narratives to support them in choosing a moment to develop.” (TG, Unit 1, p.17)
  • “In Lesson 6, you will begin reading and writing a personal narrative about names. In order to get you thinking about names and what they mean to us, we are going to engage in a brainstorming activity called 'free writing.'” (TG, Unit 1, p.98)

In Unit 2, students engage further in the writing process via work with informational writing activities. They practice and engage in note taking and information organization work.

  • “In the writing lessons, students will review the stages of the writing process and engage in an extended writing project. In this unit, students will use information from the Reader to compare and contrast the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations and create an informative or explanatory project, called the Codex Project, which encompasses all three civilizations. During the first few lessons, students will plan and draft a paragraph about the Maya and practice paraphrasing and note-taking. Next students will plan and draft a paragraph about the Aztec. They will also incorporate images into the project that are related to their topic. Students will practice using linking words and phrases to compare the Maya and the Aztec. Finally students will plan and draft a paragraph about the Inca. Students will also have an opportunity to edit their writing in all three paragraphs. Students will then integrate their writing and images to complete their Codex Project.” (TG, Unit 2, p.5)
  • “Students will gather relevant facts about the geographical features of Mesoamerica and paraphrase sentences into note format for planning and drafting a paragraph.” (TG, Unit 2, p.61)
  • “Tell students that today they will plan by organizing notes about geographical features of the land where the Maya civilization developed and use these notes to draft an explanatory paragraph.” (TG, Unit 2, p.80)

Unit 3 focuses on poetry. Students learn components and apply to their own drafts.

  • “In the writing lessons of this unit, students work either independently or collaboratively to create original poems that model the structure and style of those studied in each lesson.” (TG, Unit 3, p.6)
  • “Students will compose their own poems with emphasis on presenting two different tones in their work.” (TG, Unit 3, p.32)
  • “Students will use the poetic device anaphora to create their personal poem.” (TG, Unit 3, p.49)
  • “Students will use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast two characters in a poem.” (TG, Unit 3, p.65)
  • “Students will create original list poems and peer-edit their partner’s poems.” (TG, Unit 3, p.116)
  • “Students will compose and original poem in which two characters respond differently to the same circumstance.” (TG, Unit 3, p.146)

In Unit 7, students work with first-person paragraphs, mostly focusing on narrative writing.

  • Have students work individually to write a short, first-person paragraph describing what happened in the story in the previous lesson from the perspective of the character” (TG, Unit 7, p. 54)
  • “Write a speech in which Puck explains some trouble he’s caused in modern life. The speech should be eight lines long and describe two to four tricks he has played. It does not have to rhyme or use a particular rhythm, but it may do these things if you like” (AB, Unit 7, p. 52)
  • “Answer the following questions from Bottom’s point of view. Include examples from the text to support your answer. Then write Bottom a ballad that reflects his story. Your ballad does not need to rhyme or be set to music, but it may do these things. It’s up to you (and Bottom)” (AB, Unit 7, p. 90)

Unit 8 brings students to extended writing. "They will write a persuasive essay in which they convince the reader that a chosen image best shows the connection between Native Americans and the land. Students will focus on note-taking, incorporating evidence, and crafting an argument. Students will also revise, edit, and share their writing." (TG, Unit 8, p. 4) Students use writing journals and incorporate their process practice to create a fully produced essay.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. Students are asked to provide evidence from texts in many writing activities with frequent opportunities to communicate and defend their thinking. Activities highlighting feedback and editing provide additional opportunities for students to refine how they convey claims and analyses. Activities including organizational charts and strategies support students in using rubrics to ensure that their thinking is clearly supported.

Some examples that represent how the program engages students in evidence-focused writing include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • “Tell students to finish reading the projected paragraph and, as an exit slip, to write down one quote from the paragraph that shows Abuela’s strong connection to Cuban culture.” (TG, Unit 1, p.25)
  • “Have them imagine that they are the frozen turkey mocking Blanco and write down one or two sentences of what the turkey would say to him.” (TG, Unit 1, p.61)
  • “Students will gather relevant facts about the geographical features of Mesoamerica and paraphrase sentences into note format for planning and drafting a paragraph.” (TG, Unit 2, p.61)
  • “Remind students of the paragraph they drafted in Lesson 7 about a cultural aspect of the Maya civilization. Remind students to begin by choosing words and phrases to introduce the main idea or topic of the paragraph; to then choose supporting details that go together and add information or explain the main idea; and to then think about words and phrases they want to use to state a final thought or opinion.” (TG, Unit 2, p.229)
  • Students “will write a four-paragraph persuasive essay arguing whether they think Don Quixote’s good intentions justify his often calamitous actions. Students will support their claims with reasons and evidence from the text.”(TG, Unit 4, p.4)
  • “Explain that the activity page contains four excerpts from Adventures of Don Quixote. Students will use each excerpt to write a one-sentence opinion about Don Quixote based on the actions and dialogue described in that excerpt. Students will provide a reason for their opinion that is supported by evidence from the excerpt.” (TG, Unit 4, p.124)
  • “Answer each question thoughtfully, citing evidence from the text and the page number(s) where you found evidence for each answer. Remember to answer in complete sentences, and to restate the question in your answer whenever possible.1. Why did people in the past believe in the geocentric model of the universe? Page(s) 2. How does the heliocentric model of the universe differ from the geocentric model?” (AB, Unit 6, p. 79)

In addition to examples that are driven by texts at hand, there are also writing assignments that provide direction and practice that explicitly promotes students' applying these skills to other text engagements, such as:

  • “Tell students that, when writing a persuasive essay, they will first need to develop a claim. In persuasive writing, a claim is a strong opinion that can be backed up (supported) with a reason and evidence from the text. A claim is introduced in the introductory paragraph. In the body paragraphs, students must defend their opinions with reasons and supporting evidence. The claim is an important part of persuading, or convincing, readers. It suggests that students have 'proof' to support their ideas.”(TG, Unit 4, p.149)
  • “Have students turn to Activity Page 5.4. Explain that this activity page is a graphic organizer that will guide them through the process of drafting a strong claim.”(TG, Unit 4, p.150)

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. While some units contain multiple opportunities for students to learn, review, or practice grammar and conventions skills, other units assume student understanding of grade-level grammar and conventions. In the context of writing projects, students are reminded of specific areas where they should be mindful of elements of grammar and conventions.

Examples of support for teachers to employ the grammar and conventions lessons to support students include (but are not limited to):

  • “Tell students they will have a chance to practice showing, not telling through dialogue during the writing segment of the lesson, but first they will review some basic rules of capitalization, punctuation, and paragraphs for dialogue.” (TG, Unit 1, p.70)
  • The beginning of the year assessment, administered at the end of Unit 1, includes a grammar component. “Have students work independently to complete the Grammar Assessment on Activity Page A.5. Enter all student scores into the Grammar Assessment Scoring Sheet.” TG, Unit 1, p.283)
  • "You should use the results of the Grammar Assessment and the Morphology Assessment to determine the extent to which students (or your class) may benefit from certain Grammar and Morphology skills taught in CKLA prior to Grade 5." (TG, Unit 1, p.304)
  • “Explain that this sentence does not have an action verb, but instead has a special kind of verb called a linking verb. A linking verb is a word that connects or links the subject to a word or words in the predicate that describe it. Linking verbs show no action.” (TG, Unit 2, p.57)
  • “Explain that today students will focus on words and phrases that compare or contrast. Remind them that words can show the relationship between sentences or parts of sentences by connecting, or linking, ideas and pieces of information.” (TG, Unit 2, p.136)
  • “Tell students they will learn how choosing strong verbs will improve their writing. • Strong verbs not only describe an action, they also express the emotion, attitude, or nature of the action. The strength of a verb is determined by how precisely it depicts the emotion, attitude, or nature of an action” (TG, Unit 6, p. 119)
  • “Remind students that they have learned about a part of speech called a preposition. Ask students what a preposition does and have them give some examples. • Think-Pair-Share. Have a few pairs share out. Clarify that a preposition gives more information about where something happens, when something happens, or with whom or what the subject or object of the sentence is. A preposition often answers the questions Where?, When?, or With whom/what? • Remind students about prepositional phrases. A prepositional phrase contains a preposition and other words that could include an article, a noun, a possessive noun or pronoun, adjectives, and adverbs” (TG, Unit 6, p. 152)
  • “In this lesson, students read and analyze an excerpt from Act 3, Scene 2, paying special attention to strong verbs for performance, and create a director’s storyboard of the scene” (TG, Unit 7, p. 256)
  • “Remind students that the ends of sentences are marked by periods, question marks, or exclamation points. Point out that the end of a sentence may not be the end of the line, and that while a line may start with a capital letter, it may not be the beginning of a sentence” (TG, Unit 7, p. 175)

Examples of activities for students to practice include:

  • “Students will write sentences using strong (specific and descriptive) verbs and adjectives.” (TG, Unit 1, p.39)
  • “Students will use correct punctuation and capitalization when writing dialogue.” (TG, Unit 1, p.69)
  • “Students will identify subjects and predicates in sentences and differentiate between action verbs and linking verbs.” (TG, Unit 2, p.56)
  • “Explain that the subject, which tells who or what the sentence is about, includes nouns (persons, places, things) and pronouns (words used to replace nouns, such as he, she, it, etc.). The predicate, which tells what the subject is doing, did, or will do, begins with a verb and often includes more information that helps to describe what the subject is doing, did, or will do.” (TG, Unit 2, p.56)
  • Students complete activities identifying words and phrases in sentences that compare and contrast ideas. Although the activities are out of context, the text is related to the primary text. “Refer students to Activity Page 6.2. Review the directions and tell students they will complete the activity page for homework.” (TG, Unit 2, p.138) (AB, Unit 2, pp.51-53)
  • “Students will explain how adding the prefix inter–changes a root word and how to correctly use words with the prefix inter– in sentences. (TG, Unit 2, p.138) Understanding is reinforced out of context as students complete an activity book page. (AB, Unit 2, pp.55-56)
  • “Students will differentiate between action verbs and linking verbs and identify them in sentences.” (TG, Unit 2, p.308) An activity page is provided to reinforce understanding. “Have students complete Activity Page 14.2 for homework.” (TG, Unit 2, p.310)
  • “Students will complete sentences by selecting the correct word with the root tract.” (TG, Unit 2, p.310) An activity book page is provided for student practice. “Have students turn to Activity Page 14. Briefly review the directions and have students complete it for homework. Remind students to read the sentences carefully, as not all the answers will be words with the root tract.” (TG, Unit 2, p.311)
  • Unit 3 focuses on poetry. Although many lessons are provided to assist students in understanding and
  • “’Noun Subject-Action Verb Agreement’” Grammar worksheet students will use to write simple sentences (or expanded sentences) during class, and will later complete for homework.”(TG, Unit 4, p.32)
  • “Use the chart below to match each subject with its predicate (including one of the verbs from the middle column). Hint: You may want to number each subject, verb, and predicate. See the example in the chart. Then, write complete sentences on the lines below, making sure to use capital letters, proper punctuation, and any additional words necessary.”(AB, Unit 4, p.139) This activity uses sentences from Don Quixote.
  • The following activity is designed to review words that compare and contrast. “Use words and phrases from the following chart to compare and contrast the two things in each numbered item below. Be sure to write your answers in complete sentences. The first one has been done for you.”(AB, Unit 4, p.159) The items used in the questions are ones that can be found in the text that students include. Some examples include country inn to magnificent castle, windmills to giants, and princesses to peasant girls.
  • “Write a response to each situation that includes an interjection. Remember to include the correct punctuation following the interjection” (AB, Unit 6, p. 30)
  • “Create a word bank of linking verbs for the first section: are, look, sounded, were, feels, was (used twice), felt, smells, am. Guide students in referencing the Present Tense and Past Tense posters. Color-code the different types of linking verbs: being, and the senses verbs” (TG, Unit 6, p. 100)
  • "Model how to choose the correct transitional word or phrase for the first blank. If necessary, model again for the second blank. Have students fill in the remainder of the blanks independently." (TG, Unit 8, p. 160)
  • "Explain that students will practice 12 words related to the suffixes –tion and –sion and the root mem they have studied in morphology. Apart from these suffixes and root, these words do not follow one single spelling pattern. Tell students they will be assessed on these words and will write a dictated sentence related to one or more of these words in Lesson 10." (TG, Unit 8, p. 165)
  • "Students form and use the perfect verb tense. Emerging—Practice saying sentences aloud using the past perfect tense, and then say the sentence again incorrectly. Ask students to identify the correct use. Expanding—Provide students with additional events and ask them to orally provide sentences using the past perfect tense. Bridging—Ask students to describe two events they experienced this morning, linking them using the past perfect tense." (TG, Unit 9, p. 195)

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
3/6
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Criterion Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for materials, questions, and tasks that address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression. While each unit presents foundational skills lessons addressing phonics and word recognition, information about the research base is not provided. Each unit’s topic supports deeper understanding since all read-aloud texts and student texts are focused on the same information with core/academic vocabulary highlighted throughout. Fluency lessons and activities do not always inform the teacher of the purpose of fluency activity and how fluency components such as accuracy, rate, and expression should be practiced by the students.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for materials, questions, and tasks that address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression. While each unit presents foundational skills lessons addressing phonics and word recognition, information about the research base is not provided.

According to the Program Guide, phonics and word analysis skills are addressed in Units 2-9. The phonics and word analysis skills are not explicit lessons though.

  • Unit 1 includes a Beginning-of-the-Year assessment that addresses some foundational skills including morphology and fluency. However, no specific lessons and supports for struggling students as identified by the assessment are provided.
  • “Students will apply grade level phonics and word analysis skills to decode and encode targeted spelling words” (Teacher’s Guide, Unit 2, pp. 140, 201, 311).
  • “Students will apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills during an assessment of targeted words” (Teacher’s Guide, Unit 2, p. 207).

According to the Program Guide, letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology are addressed in Units 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 9.

  • In Unit 2, “Students will explain how adding the prefix inter–changes a root word and how to correctly use words with the prefix inter–in sentences” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 138).
  • In Unit 4, “Write the correct word to complete each sentence. It may help to remember that words with the suffix –ness are nouns, while the other choices without this suffix are adjectives” (Activity Book, p. 27).
  • In Unit 4, "Add the suffix –ness to great and have students read the new word; then discuss the meaning of the new word. (Greatness means “in the state or condition of being much better than average.”) Also, point out that adding the suffix –ness changed the part of speech of great. Great is an adjective; greatness is a noun" (Teacher’s Guide, p. 59).

Grade 5 materials include a Decoding and Encoding Supplement. It contains assessments, additional instruction, and remediation for foundational skills.

Most lists of core, academic, and literary vocabulary words provide only general information for teachers in providing a “preview” and “exposure” to words as students are expected to develop an understanding of highlighted vocabulary.

  • Each reading lesson suggests previewing vocabulary words prior to reading the selection. For example, in Unit 2, “Preview the core vocabulary words before reading the chapter” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 19).
  • Students use the glossary to read definitions. “Explain that the glossary contains definitions of all the vocabulary words in this Reader. Have students refer to the glossary at the back of the Reader, locate domesticate, and then have a student read the definition” (Teacher’s Guide, Unit 2, p. 19).
  • “Word Work” activities are found throughout the unit. The activities highlight specific vocabulary words from the provided list. “Word Work” activities guide students in examining each selected word’s definition, function, and use. Students are asked to use the word in sentences. “ Ask two or three students to use the target word in a sentence. If necessary, guide and/or rephrase students’ responses to make complete sentences: “There are diverse land features in Mesoamerica, such as ___” (Teacher’s Guide, Unit 2, p. 33).

Although opportunities for students to work on reading fluency are provided, activities are typically unstructured or included in optional supplemental materials. Overall, a progression of activities supporting fluency development (accuracy, rate, automaticity, prosody) is not evident. According to the Program Guide, fluency standards are addressed in Units 1-9.

  • Many explicit fluency lessons and activities are take-home and/or optional.
  • “Fluency (optional)- If students were assigned a selection from the Fluency Supplement, determine which students will read the selection aloud and when. See the introduction of this Teacher Guide for more information on using the Fluency Supplement” (Teacher’s Guide, Unit 2, p. 112).

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for materials, questions, and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding and make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading. Each unit’s topic supports deeper understanding since all read-aloud texts and student texts are focused on the same information with core/academic vocabulary highlighted throughout. Understanding is developed through vocabulary study; however, most vocabulary activities do not engage students beyond providing simple answers.

  • There are opportunities for students to determine the meaning of words based on context.
    • In Unit 2, “Based on information in the text, what do conquistador and conquered each mean?” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 31)
  • Sometimes the teacher is to provide the meaning of a word, then students make text-to-self connections to the vocabulary word.
    • In Unit 2, “Explain that litter has multiple meanings, which will be explored during Word Work, after they read Chapter 7. Explain that the word litter as used in Chapter 7 means ‘a covered bed with long poles at the bottom for carrying someone of high importance.’ Ask students to think about a story they have read or a movie they have seen that may have featured a litter. Allow students to share ideas” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 209).
  • The materials contain suggestions for helping students understand the definitions of words.
    • In Unit 4, "If students do not understand the definition of dub, reread the first paragraph of page 21 of Activity Page 1.1 and point to the image in the top right-hand corner of the king knighting a squire. Remind students that in the previous lesson you modeled the dubbing process when you used a ruler to dub a student volunteer a knight" (Teacher’s Guide, p. 41).
  • The materials provide opportunities for students to learn suffixes.
    • In Unit 4, "Refer to the Suffixes Poster you displayed in the classroom. Review what a suffix is and review the suffix –ness that you added to the poster in Lesson 2, as well as its meaning: the state or condition of being. Remind students that –ness, which is usually added as a suffix to adjectives, changes the word to a noun" (Teacher’s Guide, p. 123).
    • In Unit 6, “You have learned about John Calvin and his role in the Reformation. Based on what you know about the suffix –ist, what do you think the word Calvinist means? Here is a sentence that may help you: Calvinists traveled to France, the Netherlands, and Scotland to spread their beliefs to new groups. Meaning of Calvinist.” (Activity Book, p. 72).
  • Students have opportunities to apply vocabulary words to entire chapters.
    • In Unit 4, "Which event in these two chapters best supports the idea that Don Quixote is idealistic or quixotic?" (Teacher’s Guide, p.235).
  • Some opportunities to learn word meanings are limited to looking up the words in the dictionary rather than using morphology and syllabication patterns.
    • In Unit 7, “Ask students if they would like to discuss any other underlined words. Ask for their guesses from context and how they came to that conclusion. If you do not get to all the unknown words, tell students to look up the remaining words in a dictionary for homework and compare the answers with their guesses” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 71).

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for providing frequent opportunities for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression. Fluency lessons and activities do not always inform the teacher of the purpose of fluency activity and how fluency components such as accuracy, rate, and expression should be practiced by the students.

There are opportunities provided for students to practice oral reading skills. Examples of activities supporting the development of oral reading fluency include:

  • Students are provided opportunities to read fluently with a partner or in small groups.
  • In Unit 1, “Break the class into pairs for partner reading and have them begin the activity, reading first independently and then with their partners” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 144).
  • In Unit 1, “Have students read their assigned passages aloud. Read aloud any passages that students are not reading” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 195).
  • Sometimes, fluency is paired with comprehension activities. In Unit 6, “Pair students within the groups you prepared in advance to read and complete Activity Page 6.1. Using established procedures, have students read the chapter in pairs. Students may ask their partner for help sounding out or defining words, as necessary. Have students make a note of vocabulary, phrases, or concepts they do not understand, noting the page number, so they may seek clarification” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 148).
  • There are opportunities to read drama aloud. In Unit 5, “You may wish to make copies and highlight parts for Lorenzo, the assistant, and the narrator for a dramatic reading of the “Story of Michelangelo and Lorenzo de’ Medici,” which is located in the Teacher Resources section of this Teacher Guide. This story could also be used as a fluency selection" (Teacher’s Guide, p. 122).
  • Reading with enthusiasm and expression is emphasized in some lessons.
    • In Unit 7, “Have students read each line aloud. If students read without much enthusiasm, pause and tell them to say the line loudly and stress the O. Have them restart” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 16).
    • In Unit 7, “With these suggestions, have the actors walk through and read the scene with expression” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 73).
    • In Unit 7, “Have the class read the line together several times. You may wish to give them directions about how to say it—scared, excited, annoyed” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 77).
  • Students read aloud chorally. In Unit 7, “Divide the class in half and have the students stand on opposite ends of the room. Assign one half the part of Lover 1 and the other the part of Lover 2. Have the groups read the dialogue chorally” (Teacher’s Guide p. 43).
  • Sometimes, opportunities to read silently and read aloud are mixed in partner reading activities. In Unit 9, the directions to the teacher state: "Explain that both students will read the first page silently, and then one partner will read that page aloud. Next, they will both read the second page silently, and then the other partner will read that page aloud, and so on. Students can ask their partner for help with sounding out or defining words as necessary" (Teacher’s Guide, p. 36).
  • Opportunities to read-aloud at home are provided such as:
    • In Unit 2, “Have students take home a text selection from the Fluency Supplement if you are choosing to provide additional fluency practice” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 34).
    • In Unit 4, students can take home “Back to La Mancha” Chapter 6 to practice fluency with and/or annotate”(Teacher’s Guide, p.154).
    • In Unit 6, students are to read a chapter from the beginning to the end without stopping to a family member in order to build fluency (AB, p. 102).
  • Optional fluency supplements are provided.
    • In Unit 8, "Have students take home a text selection from the Fluency Supplement if you are choosing to provide additional fluency practice" (Teacher’s Guide, p. 166).

The materials contain opportunities for students to practice reading silently.

  • In Unit 1, “Have students finish reading the narrative from ’So that is how I ended up with two names’ (Reader page 26) to the end independently” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 127).
  • In Unit 3, “Explain that this section, which appears at the end of each lesson, contains brief biographies of each poet and may be useful in thinking about the poems and learning about their authors. Ask students to read the section silently” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 34).
  • In Unit 7, “Tell students to read the narrative adaptation silently and then complete Activity Page 8.1, the Character Organizer for Oberon and Puck” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 154).

Fluency assessments are included. For example:

  • In Unit 1, “The Beginning-of-Year Assessment also includes two components to be administered individually to students: an oral assessment of word reading in isolation and a fluency assessment. Explicit administration instructions are included in this Teacher Guide on Beginning-of-Year Assessment Day 2” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 3).
  • In Unit 9, students are individually assessed for fluency using a selection called “Birds” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 245).
  • Optional fluency assessments are also provided. The teacher is directed to choose a text selection from the online Fluency Supplement for students to practice. When the teacher chooses to do an assessment, the materials direct them to particular lessons. For example:
  • In Unit 2, “Fluency (optional) - Choose and make sufficient copies of a text selection from the online Fluency Supplement to distribute and review with students for additional fluency practice. If you choose to do a fluency assessment, you will assess students in Lesson 14” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 236).
  • In Unit 4, “Determine how many students will be assessed for fluency. Make that number of copies of the Recording Copy of “Christopher Columbus” as well as the Fluency Scoring Sheet” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 343).

A supplementary section called “Reading Poetry” is available online, which guides the teacher in teaching students how to read poetry aloud in Unit 3. Students read and re-read poems aloud.

Directions to the teacher as to what aspect of fluency should be practiced are sometimes vague. This is a missed opportunity for students to practice reading aloud with a particular fluency purpose. For example:

  • In Unit 1, “Have the students who have been assigned passages read aloud to the class from ‘I hopped back on my bike…’ (page 9) through ‘...took the pumpkin pie out of the freezer’ (page 13). Read aloud any passages that are not read by students” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 53).
  • In Unit 3, “Have students work in pairs to practice reading the dialogue aloud in different ways” (Teacher’s Guide, p. 26). The different ways for reading the dialogue are not specified.

Many activities supporting fluency are take-home or optional. Overall, a clear progression of activities supporting fluency development (accuracy, rate, prosody, and automaticity) is not evident.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 fully meet the expectations of indicators 2a through 2h (Gateway 2). Materials are organized around topics to support students' building knowledge, and questions and tasks promote the integration of ideas within and across texts. Focused and consistent vocabulary instruction extends this learning and supports growing independent literacy skills across content areas. A coherent and comprehensive year-long plan to support writing instruction provides a platform for students to practice and extend skills. Research projects that work coherently over the school year to build skills are inconsistently supported by robust guidance for the teacher to attend to students' areas of struggle. There is minimal support for implementation of a year-long independent reading plan.

Criterion 2a - 2h

28/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for organization of texts around topics for building students’ ability to read and comprehend texts independently and proficiently. All student reading materials and read-aloud selections are related by topic in each unit with academic and core vocabulary words identified and emphasized throughout.

Unit 2

All texts and activities in Unit 2 are organized around the topic of "early American civilizations":

  • The primary text for Unit 2 consists of 8 chapters of informational text, one chapter combining informational text with myths of the Aztecs and Incas, and two optional enrichment selections-- one including an adaptation of a letter from explorer Hernan Cortes to King Charles V of Spain, and one informational piece on a scientific discovery in the Andes Mountains.
  • “The Reader for this unit, Maya, Aztec, and Inca, includes complex text and prepares students in Grade 5 for the increased vocabulary and syntax demands aligned texts will present in later grades. Maya, Aztec, and Inca focuses on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations. Students will read about each civilization’s geographic location, way of life, developments, and downfall.” (TG, Unit 2, p.4)

Unit 5

Unit 5 is organized around the topic of "the Renaissance." Students learn about the time period as they read passages and texts about the scholars, philosophers, and artists of the time. Through exposure to important figures of the time (such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Donatello, Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Bruegel, Dürer, Van Eyck, Machiavelli, Castiglione, Cervantes, and Shakespeare) students learn about the history and impact of the events on Europe and beyond.

Unit 6

Unit 6 is organized around the topic of "The Reformation." In this unit, students extend knowledge from Unit 5 and learn about the history of the religious and political upheaval that happened in this time period. Students build knowledge about the intersection of the arts, science, and religion with innovation (e.g. Gutenberg's invention of the printing press) and how these led to further advances

Unit 8

Unit 8 focused on building students' knowledge around Native American history during the 1800s. Students explore history of how the policies of the American government in the 1800s affected Native American groups, and how interactions among different tribes, settlers, missionaries, and others affected the changing landscape. Students also learn about the many different indigenous peoples and some efforts to preserve native languages, story, and cultures.

Unit 9

This unit supports students' building knowledge about how the world's diversity is transformed by physical and chemical changes. Students explore texts to understand the concepts of matter, physical and chemical changes, and elements and compounds. Students work with literary and informational texts.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for containing sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Similarly structured lessons consistently present core and academic vocabulary words that are analyzed and revisited throughout each unit. Read-aloud selections paired with independent readings assist students in developing a deeper understanding of key ideas. Language lessons provide opportunities for students to explore word choices and text structure.

Examples from the program that demonstrate this include (but are not limited to) the following examples. Some questions are marked to guide the teacher's implementation (e.g. inferential, literal).

  • “As a whole class, analyze the next two sentences, calling on students to read a sentence or phrase from the text and then think out loud.” (TG, Unit 1, p.25)
  • “Copy a quote from the text that contains an example of personification.” (TG, Unit 1, p.60)
  • “Using context clues, can you determine the meaning of the word domesticate?” (TG, Unit 2, p.23)
  • “What evidence is provided in this paragraph as to why this era was called the golden age for the Maya?” (TG, Unit 2, p.45)
  • “What tone does the speaker have, and what details in the poem help you recognize that tone?” (TG, Unit 3, p.31)
  • “The word 'fantastic' has several different meanings. You are probably most familiar with the word meaning “great or wonderful.” The word fantastic also means “far-fetched or created by someone’s imagination.” What words in this sentence give you a clue about the way in which the author uses fantastic?”(TG, Unit 4, p.23)
  • “How does the author use the phrase 'on the contrary'?”(TG, Unit 4, p.313)
  • “Carlo says, 'If it doesn’t work, I’ll be history!' 'I’ll be history' is an idiom, or a phrase that does not make sense using the literal meaning of the individual words, but that has a meaning of its own. What does Carlo mean by saying, 'I’ll be history!'? (TG, Unit 5, p.102)
  • “In this lesson, students read and analyze an excerpt from Act 3, Scene 2, paying special attention to strong verbs for performance, and create a director’s storyboard of the scene” (TG, Unit 7, p. 256)
  • “What words, phrases, or sentences in descriptions A–D provide clues to the ways in which Native Americans were affected by the region in which they lived? Draw a circle around the words, phrases, or sentences in the descriptions that provide clues to the ways in which Native Americans were affected by the region in which they lived.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 12)
  • "What words and phrases contribute to the imagery of the rainforest in these two paragraphs?” (TG, Unit 8, p. 146)
  • “The word 'tan' has several different meanings. What is a common meaning of the word tan, and what is the meaning of the word as it is used here?” (TG, Unit 8, p. 150)
  • “Ask students to identify the clue that Amy is still uncomfortably hot (she “edges towards” the one square of shade.) Ask students if this is a literary detail of the text, or an informational detail of the text. Students should be able to identify that this clue gives information about Amy’s character and experience and is therefore a literary detail.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 36)

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet requirements for coherently sequenced sets of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. While many of the questions & tasks require students to reference the text being studied, fewer opportunities are provided for students to integrate knowledge and ideas across multiple texts. In Unit 4, for example, students read an abridged version of the novel Don Quixote. Many of the related discussion questions and tasks require analysis of knowledge and ideas, but they are related to a single text. Other units focus on multiple selections of text related to the same topic. Students have opportunities to integrate knowledge from multiple readings.

Other examples of text-dependent questions and activities that support students' analysis and integration of knowledge include the following:

In Unit 1, students are asked to recall narratives and apply learning to the text at hand: “Tell students that they will now read another narrative that deals with segregation but that has a different tone from Ros Parks’s ‘My Story.’ (TG, Unit 1, p.163) “Ask students for some examples of points of view in the narratives they have already read. The teacher is provided some possible answers:

  • Rosa Parks was strongly against segregation.
  • Jennifer Lou, as a girl, was unhappy with her name.
  • Richard Blanco thought a traditional American Thanksgiving would be better than a Cuban celebration.” (TG, Unit 1, p.227)

In Unit 3, students summarize poetry and study how the use of figurative language can affect he meaning. After students engage in this with one poem, they build knowledge of this by comparing it to another piece of poetry: "Ask students to name things that make the poem seem different from other poems they have read.” (TG, Unit 3, p.87) Some activities also support students' synthesizing skills as they use texts to compose their own poetry: “In this exercise you will plan the next poem you will write. This poem will be like Carrie Allen McCray’s ‘Strange Patterns,’ because it will compare and contrast two situations that are similar but not exactly alike.” (TG, Unit 3, p.142)

In Unit 5, students consider different information about the Renaissance and answer questions about art, politics, architecture, and more. They are then challenged with activities and questions, such as:

  • What does Michelangelo’s leaving Florence tell you about the lives of artists during the Renaissance?”(TG, Unit 5, p.160)
  • “Why did Machiavelli decide to write The Prince, a book about the art of politics?”(TG, Unit 5, p.220)
  • “Give students a few minutes to work with a partner, rereading pages 12–15 and looking for what the text says about the techniques and features of Renaissance art and architecture. Bring students back together to share whole group, modeling looking for what the text says and writing down quotes from the text as necessary.”(TG, Unit 5, p.55)

Unit 6 provides some opportunities for Grade 5 students to synthesize new knowledge with previously learned concepts, although specific direction for the teacher to identify struggle is limited: "Compare and contrast the scientific discoveries made by Copernicus, Kepler, and Galileo with the reforms Luther and others were seeking in the Catholic Church.” (TG, Unit 6, p. 183) “Tell students they will reread parts of Chapter 5, “What Is at the Center of the Universe?” to examine how the author uses certain words, phrases, and devices to describe the relationships between Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and the Church during the Reformation.” (TG, Unit 6, p. 193)

Throughout the Grade 5 materials, activities and questions are provided to begin considering and building knowledge across concepts and texts, but there is limited support beyond the initial question and direction sets to ensure conceptual understanding and attend to misunderstandings and difficulties.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for questions and tasks that support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening). Many tasks offer students opportunities to share information and knowledge; however not all tasks provide the opportunity for students to integrate skills learned throughout the unit. Students do have frequent opportunities to share their work with peers, although guidance for teachers to identify misconceptions is inconsistent.

Examples of culminating activities include:

Unit 1

Writing lessons support students’ development of their own personal narratives. Examples include:

  • “Tell students that when writing dialogue, there is nothing wrong with using the word said. Sometimes people say things very simply, and said is the best verb to use. However, students should always think about whether or not a stronger, more specific verb would make the narrative clearer to the reader.” (TG, Unit 1, p.84)
  • “Write about a time, outside of school, when you taught something to somebody or someone taught you something. Think carefully about what you said to each other so that you can include dialogue in your narrative.” (TG, Unit 1, p.85)
  • “In Lesson 6, you will begin reading and writing a personal narrative about names. In order to get you thinking about names and what they mean to us, we are going to engage in a brainstorming activity called ‘free writing.’” (TG, Unit 1, p.98)
  • “Using an event or time that both you and the students experienced (for example, a class trip, unusual weather, a fire drill), model telling a brief narrative with a point of view.” (TG, Unit 1, p.132)
  • “Students will define tone and write in multiple tones.” (TG, Unit 1, p.155)
  • “Students plan personal narratives by outlining a sequence of events.” (TG, Unit 1, p.176)
  • “Have students share their event sequences with the class. Write some of their logical event sequences on the board and ask students to describe why the sequence makes sense.” (TG, Unit 1, p.181)
  • “Have students rewrite their narratives on Activity Page 13.3, incorporating their revisions into their second drafts.” (TG, Unit 1, p.243)
  • “Students listen to classmates’ narratives and provide positive and specific feedback.” (TG, Unit 1, p.262)

In Unit 2, students complete an extended writing project, using information from the Reader to compare and contrast the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations and create an informative or explanatory project, called the Codex Project, which encompasses all three civilizations.” (TG, Unit 2, p.5)

  • “Students will describe, compare, and contrast the key geographical features of the regions in which Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations developed.” (TG, Unit 2, p.19)
  • Comprehension questions designed to develop student understanding of the topic accompany each reading lesson. Examples include:
    • “What evidence is provided in this paragraph as to why this era was called the golden age for the Maya?” (TG, Unit 2, p.45)
    • “The author uses the idiom a golden age to describe the success of a particular period of the Maya civilization. Gold is a valuable metal and represents wealth and prosperity. Why might this period be described as a golden age?” (TG, Unit 2, p.73)
    • “The author tells us that the two swampy islands in the middle of Lake Texcoco may seem like an unlikely choice. In what ways did this turn out to be a good place to settle?” (TG, Unit 2, p.152)
    • “Who or what do you think was ultimately responsible for the Aztec Empire’s coming to an end? Use the text to support your argument.” (TG, Unit 2, p.197)
    • “The author uses a literary device called imagery in the opening paragraph. Imagery helps the reader visualize something. The author tells the reader to ‘travel south in your mind now.’ What are some examples of the imagery used as you travel south in your mind?” (TG, Unit 2, p.239)
  • “Students will gather relevant facts about the geographical features of Mesoamerica and paraphrase sentences into note format for planning and drafting a paragraph.” (TG, Unit 2, p.61)
  • “Students will compose sentences from notes and construct a logical paragraph describing the geographical features of Maya civilization.” (TG, Unit 2, p.78)
  • “Have students look at the Writing Process Graphic on display. Ask students to identify what stage of the writing process we are working within as we paraphrase our notes and develop our paragraphs.” (TG, Unit 2, p.80)
  • “Students will revise, edit and rewrite a paragraph using the criteria outlined in a provided rubric.” (TG, Unit 2, p.107)
  • “Students will identify and paraphrase key information relevant to their selected cultural aspect for the Codex Project.” (TG, Unit 2, p.127)
  • “By the end of this lesson, students will have developed paraphrased information into a logical explanatory paragraph for their Codex Project.” (TG, Unit 2, p.163)
  • “Students will select specific words that reflect the relationship between two different cultures and apply these word choices to their paragraph writing within the Codex Project.” (TG, Unit 2, p.228)
  • “Students will differentiate between action verbs and linking verbs and use these verbs to write sentences.” (TG, Unit 2, p.248)
  • “Students will synthesize the skills they have developed throughout the unit as they compose paragraphs about how their codex topic relates to the Inca.” (TG, Unit 2, p.274)
  • “Students will have edited a paragraph for their Codex Project, using the editing checklist criteria.” (TG, Unit 2, p.296)
  • “Refer to the Writing Process Graphic (Activity Page SR.3). Tell students that today they will edit their writing. As time allows, they will also recopy their edited paragraphs and assemble the pieces of their Codex Project. They will be able to read, look at, and learn from their classmates’ codices. Tell students that displaying finished work is a form of publishing.” (TG, Unit 2, p.296)
  • “Have students who have assembled the pieces share their Codex Project with another student who is also ready to share.” (TG, Unit 2, p.297)

Unit 3 focuses on poetry, and students create multiple types of poems, using the poetry texts as models. There are directions for the writing process

  • “Students will use the poetic device anaphora to create their personal poem.” (TG, Unit 3, p.49)
  • “Students will write and share original rhyming poems.” (TG, Unit 3, p.79)
  • “Students will revise previously written metaphors and incorporate them in an originally crafted poem.” (TG, Unit 3, p.103)
  • “Students will create original list poems and peer-edit their partner’s poems.” (TG, Unit 3, p.116)
  • “Students will compose their own original villanelles incorporating their personally created motto/slogan.” (TG, Unit 3, p.129)
  • “Students will apply learned poetry skills to compose a final, original, ars poetica.” (TG, Unit 3, p.167)

Unit 4

  • The questions students are answering after reading in their Student Reader are independent from their culminating task which states “In this unit, students will build on the practice they had in earlier units in writing paragraphs, and will write a four-paragraph persuasive essay arguing whether they think Don Quixote’s good intentions justify his often calamitous actions. Students will support their claims with reasons and evidence from the text.” (TG, Unit 4, p.4) Activities supporting successful completion of the culminating task include:
    • “In this lesson, students will answer questions to support their opinion in a group discussion. Allow students to refer to the chart when answering questions, and encourage the use of evidence and extreme words when expressing their opinions.”(TG, Unit 4, p.38)
    • “Model Distinguishing between Fact and Opinion: Have students share the definition of an opinion and how an opinion differs from a fact. Share an example of an opinion and an example of a fact, and reiterate what makes each example an opinion or a fact. Being able to distinguish (tell the difference) between what is said or written as a fact and what is said or written as an opinion is a very important skill.” (TG, Unit 4, p.62)
    • “In this writing lesson, you will be reading the Example Persuasive Essay aloud while students follow along using Activity Page 3.3. You will then point out and discuss key features of the essay’s structure while you guide students to annotate these elements in the activity book. You may find it helpful to access and display a digital version of Activity Page 3.3 in the digital components for this unit.”(TG, Unit 4, p.68)
    • “As you are explaining and pointing out the parts of the persuasive essay, point to the corresponding shapes of the essay structure you already prepared on the board/chart paper. Have students copy the image of the essay structure into their notebooks. Tell them that they will be writing inside the triangles and boxes, so the image they draw should be large and have ample space for writing.”(TG, Unit 4, p.92)
    • “Explain that the activity page contains four excerpts from Adventures of Don Quixote. Students will use each excerpt to write a one-sentence opinion about Don Quixote based on the actions and dialogue described in that excerpt. Students will provide a reason for their opinion that is supported by evidence from the excerpt.”(TG, Unit 4, p.124)
    • “Tell students that, when writing a persuasive essay, they will first need to develop a claim. In persuasive writing, a claim is a strong opinion that can be backed up (supported) with a reason and evidence from the text. A claim is introduced in the introductory paragraph. In the body paragraphs, students must defend their opinions with reasons and supporting evidence. The claim is an important part of persuading, or convincing, readers. It suggests that students have “proof” to support their ideas.”(TG, Unit 4, p.149)
    • “Tell students that today they will draft the introductory paragraph of their persuasive essays. Remind students that in the previous writing lesson they drafted an opinion stating a claim that will be argued and supported in their persuasive essays. Students will incorporate that claim in the introductory paragraph as the last sentence.”(TG, Unit 4, p.187)
    • “Tell students that in this lesson they will plan the two body paragraphs of the persuasive essay. Refer to the Example Persuasive Essay. Tell students you are going to underline the opinion (the last sentence of the introductory essay) and the two reasons given to back up the opinion (the first sentences of the two body paragraphs).” (TG, Unit 4, p.215)

Unit 8

  • “Tell students they will write their own persuasive essay about the relationship between Native Americans and land using an image they choose.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 70)
  • “Write a paragraph summarizing this excerpt, using the core vocabulary words remnant and scout. Remember, scout can be used both as a noun and as a verb.” (AB, Unit 8, p. 35)
  • “Students will choose an image to serve as the foundation for a persuasive essay and will find and use relevant information to summarize or paraphrase information in notes.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 135)
  • “Review one previous Word Work word from Lessons 1–6 (distinct, nimble, immunity, remnant, custom, tension). Ask students to turn to a partner and recall the definition. If needed, put the word into a sentence, or provide a synonym to prompt thinking. If time permits, review another word.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 180)
  • “Have students share with a partner their descriptive paragraph and the three pieces of evidence they identified to support their argument on Activity Page 7.4. The listening partner should be able to identify how each piece of evidence is linked to something in the descriptive paragraph.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 209)
  • “Have students turn to a partner and share their conclusion paragraphs. The listening partner should then be able to restate the argument to the presenter.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 285)
  • “Wrap Up Question: Compare and contrast the way Spanish settlers interacted with Native Americans in what is now California with the way other European settlers interacted with Native Americans in other regions of the country.” (AB, Unit 8, p. 46)
  • “Describe what life was like for Native Americans living in what is now known as California before European settlers arrived in the area.” (AB, Unit 8, p. 51)

Unit 9

  • “Ask students to Think-Pair-Share and consider how the text is presented, and what characteristics of the text–both in content and organization–identify it as informational.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 23)
  • “Ask students to Think-Pair-Share and consider how the text is presented, as well as the characteristics of the text–both in content and organization.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 25)
  • “Facilitate a class discussion on the similarities and differences between the two modes. First ask someone from the “scientist” half to read one of the sentences from Tess’s rules. Then ask someone from the “detective” side to comment on a similarity or difference with one of their rules. Then swap sides.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 59)
  • “Using a graphic organizer, students will summarize information from the Reader.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 73)
  • “Debate whether the sheriff should investigate the missing fossil, using evidence from multiple sources.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 82)
  • “Pair two small groups together. Ask groups to listen to each others’ presentations and complete the rubric in Activity Page 7.4 as they listen. Remind students to listen carefully and respectfully.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 119)
  • “Describe how Amy’s point of view influences how characters are described.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 132)
  • “Ask students to complete the writing prompt on Activity Page 13.5 Think about Amy or Dr Forester. Do you think the reader provided a satisfying resolution for their character? Explain your answer using evidence from the text. Ask students to either choose one of the characters, direct them to write about one, or ask them to write about both.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 215)

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. A rationale for “maximizing vocabulary acquisition through contextualized, content-based, and constant exposure” is provided in the Program Guide. Some recurring strategies supporting vocabulary development are provided throughout the program, but a “cohesive, year-long plan” is not clearly evident. Information about the process and rationale for the selection of core and academic vocabulary words is not provided.

From the Program Guide:

  • “In 3rd–5th grade the teacher remains central to vocabulary acquisition—fostering structured and informal discussions and helping students become accustomed to using complex vocabulary in a scaffolded and supported context. These conversations are combined with increasingly independent exposure to complex text. This combination allows students to build up an internal web of vocabulary which has both a common foundation and is unique to the individual. We continue learning words throughout our lives by linking to vocabulary we already understand. The coherent and systematic sequence of knowledge domains gives student a mental encyclopedia of vocabulary and understanding they can access and build upon throughout their lives. (Grades 3-5 Program Guide, p.26)

Highlighted vocabulary words for each unit are unique to that unit’s topic, typically content and domain specific and critical to understanding the texts. Teachers are provided with a vocabulary list at the beginning of each lesson and are typically instructed to "preview" the list. It is not always clear, however, how or to what extent the words should be previewed and reinforced. Students are encouraged routinely to use the glossary for assistance with unfamiliar core vocabulary words, although teacher support to ensure comprehension is not consistently applied.

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for supporting students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Introducing and integrating writing skills is the focus of many lessons and serves as the centerpiece of some units. Students working with writing activities are frequently reminded to practice and apply skills learned earlier in the school year, and opportunities for self, peer, and teacher examination is consistently applied.

Examples illustrating how this program supports students progression of writing skills include (but are not limited to) the following:

Unit 1

Students write every day in Unit 1, often full-paragraph or multi-paragraph compositions, in a low-stakes environment. "Most of the writing assignments are connected to practicing a skill, such as writing dialogue or using strong descriptive verbs, which students will have studied in connection with the narratives they are reading.” (TG, Unit 1, p.3)

  • "Choose one of the first-time experiences you outlined in the chart and write a narrative paragraph showing why it was a memorable first. Remember to include a topic sentence, supporting sentences, and a concluding sentence.” (TG, Unit 1, p.14)
  • “Tell students that they will now write a narrative that shows (not tells) a brief period of time. They can call it their ‘moment’ narrative, though the moment can be more than just a few seconds.” (TG, Unit 1, p.63)
  • “Students will draft the first part of a narrative about their name.” (TG, Unit 1, p.122)
  • “Tell students they will now practice writing from different points of view.” (TG, Unit 1, p.132)
  • “Tell students that although they will still be writing personal narratives, their writing today will also be persuasive (they will write to convince their reader of something); like Rosa Parks, they will bring evidence to support a point of view about a personal experience.” (TG, Unit 1, p.149)
  • “Using full sentences, describe at least four events, in the order they happened, that were part of the surprise. Think about what happened before, during, and after the surprise. Think about how you felt inside and how you reacted outside. Think about specific moments you can describe in detail.” (TG, Unit 1, p.181)
  • “Provide students with written feedback on their surprise narratives in preparation for their revision work during the Writing segment.” (TG, Unit 1, p.226)
  • “Students will add showing details to classmates’ telling sentences.” (TG, Unit 1, p.269)

Unit 2

In Unit 2, students synthesize information through writing lessons, using information from the Reader to compare and contrast the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations and create an informative or explanatory project, called "the Codex Project," which encompasses all three civilizations.

  • During the first few lessons, students will plan and draft a paragraph about the Maya and practice paraphrasing and note-taking. Next students will plan and draft a paragraph about the Aztec.
  • Students will practice using linking words and phrases to compare the Maya and the Aztec.
  • Finally students will plan and draft a paragraph about the Inca. Students will also have an opportunity to edit their writing in all three paragraphs. Students will then integrate their writing and images to complete their Codex Project.” (TG, Unit 2, p.5)
  • “Students will gather relevant facts about the geographical features of Mesoamerica and paraphrase sentences into note format for planning and drafting a paragraph.” (TG, Unit 2, p.61)
  • “Tell students that today they will plan by organizing notes about geographical features of the land where the Maya civilization developed and use these notes to draft an explanatory paragraph.” (TG, Unit 2, p.80)
  • “Students will revise, edit and rewrite a paragraph using the criteria outlined in a provided rubric.” (TG, Unit 2, p.107)
  • “Tell students that today they will practice identifying key information and paraphrasing text related to a cultural aspect of the Maya. Refer to the SR.3 Writing Process Graphic and explain to students that taking notes and paraphrasing key information is part of the planning process as outlined in the graphic.” (TG, Unit 2, p.127)
  • “Refer to the Paragraph about a Paragraph and the Codex Project Rubric as you review the three types of sentences in a paragraph. Use the three paragraph components listed below as a checklist for paragraph development.” (TG, Unit 2, p.163)
  • “Tell students that noting the source for an image requires writing down the web address and the date you accessed the website to get the image. Write the web address on the board/chart paper using the format of the sample website reference written on the board/chart paper: title of the website; date accessed; web address. Point out where this information would be placed on the Reference List.” (TG, Unit 2, p.186)
  • “Remind students of the paragraph they drafted in Lesson 7 about a cultural aspect of the Maya civilization. Remind students to begin by choosing words and phrases to introduce the main idea or topic of the paragraph; to then choose supporting details that go together and add information or explain the main idea; and to then think about words and phrases they want to use to state a final thought or opinion.” (TG, Unit 2, p.229)
  • “Students will synthesize the skills they have developed throughout the unit as they compose paragraphs about how their codex topic relates to the Inca.” (TG, Unit 2, p.274)
  • “Tell students they will use an editing checklist to edit their paragraphs and captions. Explain that editing will help them present writing that is free of errors, which would distract a reader from understanding the ideas.” (TG, Unit 2, p.296)

Unit 3

  • “In the writing lessons of this unit, students work either independently or collaboratively to create original poems that model the structure and style of those studied in each lesson.” (TG, Unit 3, p.6)
  • “A wide range of supplementary materials are available online. These include “Reading Poetry,” a guide to reading poetry aloud, which is accompanied by multimedia examples, critical commentary on each poem in the unit, and additional resources.” (TG, Unit 3, p.7)
  • “Students will compose their own apostrophe poem.” (TG, Unit 3, p.18)
  • “Students will compose their own poems with emphasis on presenting two different tones in their work.” (TG, Unit 3, p.32)
  • “Students will use the poetic device anaphora to create their personal poem.” (TG, Unit 3, p.49)
  • “Students will use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast two characters in a poem.” (TG, Unit 3, p.65)
  • “Students will write and share original rhyming poems.” (TG, Unit 3, p.79)
  • “Students will create similes and metaphors describing the movements of animals.” (TG, Unit 3, p.92)
  • “Students will create original list poems and peer-edit their partner’s poems.” (TG, Unit 3, p.116)
  • “Students will compose their own original villanelles incorporating their personally created motto/slogan.” (TG, Unit 3, p.129)
  • “Students will create and share an original poem utilizing parallel structure to contrast scenes.” (TG, Unit 3, p.141)
  • “Students will compose an original poem in which two characters respond differently to the same circumstance.” (TG, Unit 3, p.146)
  • “Students will apply learned poetry skills to compose a final, original, ars poetica. (TG, Unit 3, p.167)

Unit 5

  • “In the writing lessons, students will engage in an extended writing project. In this unit, students will conduct research using two sources about a famous Renaissance artist to compose a biography. The writing project includes a diary entry that will be revised, edited, published, and presented during Lessons 16–19. These lesson days are unique to this unit as days devoted exclusively to writing instruction.”(TG, Unit 5, p.3)
  • Since the writing in this unit is research based, the unit begins by teaching students how to paraphrase information. “Explain to students that they will now paraphrase the information they collected about the techniques and features of Renaissance art and architecture. Tell students they will do this by putting the quotes about these techniques and features into their own words.”(TG, Unit 5, p.57)
  • “Explain to students that they will now use their Informational Paragraph Plans to write a paragraph about Leonardo da Vinci’s ideas and accomplishments. Tell them that before they begin writing, they must first review how strong informational paragraphs are structured. Have students turn to Activity Page SR. 2. Remind them they used this paragraph during their Codex Project in Unit 2, Early American Civilizations.”(TG, Unit 5, p.113)
  • “Remind students of the informational paragraph they planned and wrote in Lessons 3 and 4 about Leonardo da Vinci’s ideas and accomplishments, and share that they will write another informational paragraph about a piece of art they have seen in the Reader—The School of Athens, by Raphael. Review how to compose an effective informational paragraph by reviewing the Paragraph about a Paragraph.”(TG, Unit 5, p.146)
  • “Tell students they will choose one of their informational paragraphs composed in Lesson 4 and Lesson 5 to present to a small group. They will listen to each other and identify the points a classmate makes in his or her paragraph, and explain how the points are supported by reasons and evidence.”(TG, Unit 5, p.208)
  • “Tell students they will be using what they have been learning about the artists of the Renaissance to research and write a longer informational piece. Tell students they will choose from one of the artists they have been learning about to research further: Brunelleschi, Leonardo, or Michelangelo.”(TG, Unit 5, p.233)
  • “Display the Chapter 4: “Michelangelo and Raphael” from the Reader and model searching for information for each note-taking category. Underline or highlight relevant information in the text and think aloud about which category the information falls under.”(TG, Unit 5, p.235)
  • “Tell students they will begin drafting their biography by referring to the completed Biography Notes Chart from Activity Page 8.4.”(TG, Unit 5, p.318)
  • “Tell students they will write a historical fiction narrative using what they have been learning about artists in the Renaissance. Explain to students that the format of the narrative will be a diary entry to include at the beginning of their biography about Brunelleschi, Leonardo, or Michelangelo. Explain that a diary entry is writing people do, usually just for themselves, to record life experiences and includes their own thoughts and feelings. Remind students they focus on a piece of writing by selecting one specific moment, object, or idea and use precise details to write about it. The focus of the diary entry will be what the subject of their biography experienced while completing one of his famous projects.”(TG, Unit 5, p.396)
  • “Tell students they will follow the same process they did for their biography writing by taking notes and then referring to those notes to compose their writing. However, students will write the diary entry from the perspective of the artist who is the subject of their biography. That is, the diary entry will be written from the first-person point of view, using words like I, me, and my.” (TG, Unit 5, p.397)
  • “Tell students they will work in the revising stage of the writing process to expand on important and interesting details in their biography writing.”(TG, Unit 5, p.404)
  • “As students complete the detail expansion portion of Activity Page 17.2, pair them to share their biography writing with each other. Tell students they may read each other’s writing silently or take turns reading aloud. Explain that they should give each other at least one compliment and ask at least one question to help the writer evaluate his or her own writing. Remind students that they should be giving feedback to their partners based on expanding ideas and details in his or her writing.”(TG, Unit 5, p.407)

Unit 7

  • “Finally, students are introduced to a recurring writing activity in which they take on the role of an advice columnist to the A Midsummer Night’s Dream characters. These informal writing activities are generally freestanding, so you should feel free to collect them at the end of the lessons in which they appear and to take a couple of days to review them” (TG, Unit 7, p. 32)
  • “In this lesson, students read the Act 3, Scene 2 summary and track the many times “true love” changes in this play. Students learn the definitions of comedy and tragedy. They apply their knowledge of character and these definitions to write from the perspective of one of the young Athenians” (TG, Unit 7, p. 232)
  • Have students work individually to write a short, first-person paragraph describing what happened in the story in the previous lesson from the perspective of the character. • Tell them to make sure their character discusses how he or she felt about what was happening and who has made him or her feel angry or happy. • After five minutes, have students stop writing and share their paragraphs within their groups. Tell students they are allowed to add to their paragraph based on their group conversation.” (TG, Unit 7, p. 54)
  • “Read the prompt and have students write their responses. Remind students that the “course smoother” provides advice to characters in the play. • Consider collecting students’ “course smoother” assignment for a review of student writing.” (TG, Unit 7, p. 90)
  • “Students will write a journal entry from the perspective of a character using evidence from Act 3, Scene 2.” (TG, Unit 7, p. 230)
  • “The writing assignments in this unit appear in the Activity Book. In general, they ask students to use both creative and analytical skills to reflect on character. In a recurring activity, students take on the role of “Dear Course Smoother,” an advice columnist assigned to respond to characters facing sticky situations.” (TG, Unit 7, p. 4)
  • “Read this letter and respond with a one-to-two-paragraph letter to Hermia. What clues from the text help you think about how Egeus might react if Hermia runs away? Use these details to support your advice.” (AB, Unit 7, p. 18)
  • “Write a paragraph describing the physical appearance of Oberon, Titania, or one of their fairy followers. Think about the adjectives you have used to describe them and what you know about them from the summary.” (AB, Unit 7, p. 38)
  • “Read Titania’s letter to the Course Smoother, then compose a one-to-two-paragraph answer. Use one to two details from the play to help you think about your answer. Underline any parts of your answer that relate to those details from the play.” (AB, Unit 7, p. 48)
  • “In the first paragraph, imagine what the woods outside Athens might look like. Use descriptions in the text as guidelines, but add details. Your forest does not have to be realistic—after all, this is the home of the fairies. What might you see there? What kinds of plants and flowers grow there?” (AB, Unit 7, p. 68)
  • “Put yourself in the place of one of the four young Athenians: Hermia, Helena, Demetrius, or Lysander. Imagine that before you fall asleep, you stop to write a diary entry. Write one to two paragraphs answering the questions below. 1. Does your life feel like a comedy or a tragedy? Why? What do you think is going to happen to you next? Do you have any hope? (AB, Unit7, p. 74)

Unit 8

  • “In the writing lessons, students will engage in an extended writing project while continuing to practice the various stages of the writing process. They will write a persuasive essay in which they convince the reader that a chosen image best shows the connection between Native Americans and the land. Students will focus on note-taking, incorporating evidence, and crafting an argument. Students will also revise, edit, and share their writing.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 4)
  • “Help students identify and describe the purpose of each of the paragraphs in the persuasive essay using the following chart to guide discussion. Have students follow along using Activity Page 2.6.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 70)
  • “Have students turn to the Sample Persuasive Essay on Activity Page 3.4. Have students work in partners to first reread the persuasive essay and then underline any sentences or phrases that contain the writer’s argument. From these phrases and sentences, have partners discuss what the writer’s argument is.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 80)
  • “Support, Model how to record the evidence as bulleted notes and phrases in the correct column on Activity Page 3.5 by projecting the digital version.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 80)
  • “Have students turn to Activity Pages 3.4, 3.5, and SR.2, and refer to the Persuasive Essay Rubric you prepared in advance. Explain that the Persuasive Essay Rubric is a guide that shows what should be included in the persuasive essay and how the essay will be assessed.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 112)
  • “Tell students that because this image refers to a Native American from the Great Plains, you will look at the table of contents in the Reader to find a chapter on the Great Plains. When you determine that Chapter 2 includes information about the Great Plains, you will skim the chapter to find information that might add additional evidence to your argument. Have students follow along in their Readers, beginning on page 12, as you model how to collect relevant information from the Reader.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 136)
  • “In their writing journals (or using a word processor), have students draft an introduction, incorporating a lead/hook and the argument.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 182)
  • “Feedback. If the listening partner is not able to link the evidence to something in the descriptive paragraph, the presenting student may wish to revise his or her descriptive paragraph to include evidence from the descriptive paragraph.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 209)
  • “Feedback. On the “Glow and Grow” Feedback Form that was created in advance, provide reinforcing (Glow) or corrective (Grow) feedback for body paragraph drafts, such as the following:
    • I like how you have focused on one piece of evidence in each paragraph.
    • I see that you are writing about two different pieces of evidence in one paragraph. Which piece of evidence do you want to be the focus of this paragraph? Which piece of evidence is different and can go in a separate paragraph?
    • I like how you are using your notes from the activity pages to help you write your body paragraphs.” (TG, Unit 8, p. 239)

Unit 9

  • “As with other literary units in Grade 5, writing is integrated with the reading process in these lessons. Students use the insights they have gained from close reading and apply them to a variety of writing tasks. Because the unit is both literary and informational, writing tasks vary accordingly.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 3)
  • “The culminating writing task for this unit asks students to write Amy’s next case: another detective story which uses scientific content to solve a mystery. This is a deliberately open ended task, asking students to apply the skills they have learned through Grade 5 (and before). It is also intended to be an enjoyable final task of the year.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 3)
  • “Writing lessons include multiple opportunities for peer collaboration and teacher scaffolding. Additionally, when students write, you should circulate around the room and check in with students to provide brief, targeted feedback.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 3)
  • “Tell students their task is to describe the matter just as a scientist would: by presenting factual information clearly and accurately. Point out that scientists only describe what they can observe or measure.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 21)
  • “If time allows, ask a couple of volunteers to share out their work. Remind the rest of the class how to listen and respond respectfully and constructively.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 31)
  • “Model this by asking for a volunteer to read their piece aloud to the class. (Or, read an example you created.) Praise the strengths of the work, focusing particularly on organization, concise summaries of events, using facts rather than opinions and evidence from the text. Model asking respectful questions of the volunteer and making concrete suggestions for revision.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 81)
  • “Students will use textual evidence to distinguish between mixtures, solutions, and compounds, and then organize their writing to allow others to make the same distinctions.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 107)
  • “Ask students to turn to Activity Page 10.2 and write a letter to the Sheriff explaining Amy’s plan, and why it is a good way of identifying the culprit. Remind students that the Sheriff is not a chemistry expert so he will need help understanding the plan. There is an optional graphic organizer below to help students work.” (TG, Unit 9, p. 165)

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet expectations for including a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic and using multiple texts and source materials. The structure of units focusing on one topic each supports enhanced student understanding and knowledge development around the unit materials. However, as students engage in research, few activities involve multiple texts or source materials, and there is not a consistently clear progression nor design to build research skills to prepare them for further independent research activities.

Some examples of how the program supports research include (but are not limited to) the following:

Unit 1

“Name Research" combines some personal family research with texts about Rosa Parks. Some components include:

  • Ask your family about your name, including any questions you are curious about
  • “Tell students they will now take some time to look closely at the pictures, graphs, and charts of “Hello, My Name Is,” and that they should start thinking about what sort of images they might want to add to the name narratives they will be writing.” (TG, Unit 1, p.118)
  • “Begin to analyze the image you have been assigned by answering the first three questions below. After you have spent some time thinking and writing about your image, you will join your expert group to discuss your analysis. Working with your expert group, answer questions 4–6 to help plan your teaching.” (TG, Unit 1, p.119)
  • “Students will identify the evidence Rosa Parks brings to support her point that segregation was unjust.” (TG, Unit 1, p.139)
  • “Then read the excerpt below with a partner, pausing to underline evidence of the injustice of segregation. When you have finished reading the excerpt, copy the quotes into the first column, making sure to include the page number. In the second column, list the evidence of injustice found in the quotes.” (TG, Unit 1, p.145)

In Unit 2, students research key facts about an ancient civilization. Some components include specific questions about the content as well as some practice with the skills of collecting, documenting, analyzing, and recording evidence:

  • “Students will describe organizational structures of the Maya civilization and explain ways the Maya adapted to the diverse region in which their city-states thrived.” (TG, Unit 2, p.39)
  • “Explain that in order to take notes on a topic and use information from an author, it is important to use the information without plagiarizing. Plagiarizing is taking ideas or words exactly or very closely as written by an author and using them in your own writing, without giving the author credit for the ideas or words. Explain that paraphrasing is an important step to use when taking notes from a text, to avoid plagiarizing.” (TG, Unit 2, p.61)
  • “Students will describe the organizational structures of the Maya and explain ways in which they adapted to the diverse landscape in Mesoamerica.” (TG, Unit 2, p.69)
  • t for the image they select and write a caption explaining how their image relates to their topic.” (TG, Unit 2, p.184)
  • “Tell students that while they are planning and drafting their paragraphs, they will:
    • Search the Internet for images related to their draft paragraph.
    • Select images from reputable websites and compose a caption for each to connect the image with the text.” (TG, Unit 2, p.184)
  • “Tell students that not all sites are trustworthy. Explain that sometimes websites are written by people who are not experts in the field or who have an interest in persuading the audience to agree with a particular point of view. Explain that even if information is found on what students consider a reputable website, they should try to verify the information by finding at least one other source that presents the same information.” (TG, Unit 2, p.185)

While the research skills listed may build students' abilities, there is minimal accountability built in to ensure they are understanding and able to transfer these skills as they grow.

Unit 5

Students conduct some research to complete writing assignments. Samples of how students work in this Unit include (but are not limited to) the following examples from the unit:

    • “In this unit, students will conduct research using two sources about a famous Renaissance artist to compose a biography”(TG, Unit 5, p.3).
    • “Photocopy the relevant chapter from the Reader for students to highlight and underline text evidence when researching the artist of their choice”(TG, Unit 5, p.214).
    • “Students will use several sources to gather their research. Ask students what texts they have read so far in this unit that they could draw from. Listen for students recognizing the Reader as a possible source. Explain that the Reader will be their main and most important source of information for their biography research” (TG, Unit 5, p.233).
    • Choose a portrait from the Renaissance Portrait Gallery at the end of the Reader, and use what you learned about the individual and about Renaissance style to write about the person”(TG, Unit 5, p.422).

Unit 8 engages students with more structured research practice as they work to synthesize information read into writing prompts. Some components of the projects include the following directions:

    • "Show students the US Regions Map you prepared in advance. Tell students the map shows different geographic regions of what is now the United States. Tell students you will read four descriptions of tribes, or groups of Native Americans, who lived in North America long ago. Students will then make inferences to match those descriptions to one of the four specific regions shown on the US Regions Map” (TG, Unit 8, pgs. 10-11)
    • “Think-Pair-Share. Have students work in partners to complete the rest of the chart for question 4 on Activity Page 2.2. They should take bulleted notes on information about the homes and food of tribes from the Great Plains, Great Basin, and Northwest Plateau. Note that tribes of the Great Basin and Northwest Plateau lived in similar homes, so their notes will span both areas. When students are finished, ask one pair to share their notes with the group” (TG, Unit 8, p. 52).
    • “Tell students that, after reading this description, you will go back to the Reader, A Changing Landscape, to find relevant information supporting your opinion that this image best shows the relationship between Native Americans and the land” (TG, Unit 8, p. 136).
    • “Have students turn to Activity Page 7.4, and explain that they will use it to plan their persuasive essay. Have students reference the information they collected on Activity Page 5.3 to complete Activity Page 7.4” (TG, Unit 8, p. 181).
    • “Tell students they will be completing Activity Page 4.2 as they read this chapter, but explain that the text does not provide enough information for them to complete all the cells on this activity page, and that those cells will remain empty. For example, the cell in the column labeled 'Central California' and the row labeled 'Religion and Ceremonies' will be left blank because the text does not provide any information about what type of religion or ceremonies tribes of the central region had. Remind students that, when they take notes, they should use sentence fragments rather than complete sentences” (TG, Unit 8, p. 87).
    • “Students may respond to any of the following writing prompts, conducting independent research necessary to support their responses” such as “Imagine you are a Native American. Write a paragraph in which you describe the land around you. What does it look like? How do you feel about it?; Challenge. Use figurative language and strong verbs to enhance your writing.; Choose one of the objects mentioned in Chapter 4. Research the object, and write one or two paragraphs in which you describe its appearance and use” (TG, Unit 8, p. 347).

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet expectations for providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. While there are opportunities for students to read independently from unit texts, most independent reading tasks are brief. Discussion questions and activity pages provide a source of accountability for those tasks. Reading options beyond the provided student texts are occasionally referenced in the teacher guide, but reading outside of class is typically comprised of activity sheets. There is inconsistent support for students to develop reading habits with self-chosen texts. Accountability for tracking and gauging independent reading is not fully supported.

Some examples of tasks identified specifically for independent reading include the following:

From Unit 1: “Direct students to Activity Page 1.3 and have them read it independently. Then have one or two students read it aloud.” (TG, Unit 1, p.14)

“Independently, read your assigned section of ‘The First Real San Giving Day' to find a quote from the text that shows the theme of the conflict of cultures.” (TG, Unit 1, p.92)

“INDEPENDENT READING (15 MIN.) Direct students to Activity age 5.2 (the final section of ‘The First Real San Giving Day.') Tell them they are reading the excerpt in their activity books so they can make notes on the page as they think as they read. Have them read the excerpt independently.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations of Gateway 3. Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing, materials support teacher learning and understanding of Standards, materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards, and provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners to that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards. Materials also support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Criterion 3a - 3e

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7/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

The materials are designed to immerse students in all areas of the standards and provide explicit lesson structure with embedded teacher direction as well as recommendations for supporting all learners. The teacher guide clearly instructs the teacher throughout each lesson on its implementation before, during, and after the readings and activities. There is clearly defined tiered vocabulary for each section as well as recommendations for scaffolded support throughout.

Every lesson is effectively broken down into time frames for coverage of material. At the beginning of each lesson there is “Lesson at a Glance” that maps out the skill being covered, grouping suggestions for students, the time each skill section should take and the materials that will be needed. For example, in Unit 8 Lesson 5 the Lesson at a Glance breaks the lesson down in a chart showing 45 minutes for reading activities and 45 minutes for a writing activities.

The Contents page of each unit states the topic of each lesson, the skills to be addressed in that lesson (reading, writing, speaking/listening, language, etc.) and the time allotted for each.

Materials include a curriculum map located in the program guide that tracks the “Knowledge Domains” that students will be working in through each grade. In each unit, students are immersed in a domain topic that centers on science, social studies, or literature. Included as a unit is also a “Core Quest” designed to immerse students in a writing, speaking, and listening experience that continues throughout more than one unit.

  • For example, the Program Guide states that during this quest, “Students are immersed in the mystery and magic of Shakespeare’s comedy, analyzing character and language and bringing the play to life. Over the course of the Quest students will read, write, act, direct, design, and watch A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

Out of the 8 Domains (units) in grade five , 1 is based in science, 4 social studies, and 3 literature. The science domain is a unit in ‘Chemical Matter”’ The social studies domains have units that cover ‘Early American Civilization,’ ‘The Renaissance,’ ‘The Reformation,’ and ‘Native Americans.’ The literature domains include ‘Personal Narratives,’ ‘Poetry,’ and ‘The Adventure of Don Quixote.’

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year. There are examples of extension and enrichment activities that can be completed outside of the allotted 90 minute instructional time, however, the pacing may not allow enough time for students to adequately engage in these activities while also allowing time for review, re-teaching enhancing and/or extending student learning for maximum understanding.

The pacing for the instruction, while well-defined and clearly broken down into time allotments for each section of the lesson, may be too ambitious to be accomplished within one year of instruction.

  • The Grade 5 curriculum is comprised of eight units totaling 131 lessons and 31 pausing points, for 180 instructional days including beginning of year review, Quest (13), and Collections (2). Each lesson is designed for 90 minutes of instruction each day.

While the program guide states that there are research and project based learning opportunities, there is not time built into the 90 minute instructional say for them to accomplish this within the school year. For example;

“Grades 3-5 have a number of research and other long projects (these can be identified in the scope and sequence and alignment charts for each unit). During this time, students can identify areas where they still have questions or want to know more and use online, classroom library, or other resources to conduct research.”

A specific example of research that could be conducted in fifth grade is ‘Fossil Creation’

The Program Guide also states, “Extension opportunities are often provided to allow teachers to adapt instruction to the resources available in their classroom and library.” However, these opportunities are not built into the pace of the core curriculum.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).

Materials include but are not limited to photos, captions, glossaries, charts, diagrams, illustrations, sentence strips, graphic organizers, rubrics, digital images, labeled supports, activity pages, timing reminders, tiered vocabulary charts, notes to teachers, image cards, writing prompts and journals.

  • For example, Unit 6, Lesson 7 states, “Display the Sample Slide Presentation again and have students raise their hands to identify each part: the introduction slide, the body slides, the conclusion slide, the titles/questions, the answers in bullets/phrases, and the images. Clarify any confusion about how these parts work together.”
  • Another example is in Unit 1, Lesson 6 where it states, “ Prepare to display the passage for close reading (Projection 6.1) during the Reading segment.”
  • An example of the use of captions with illustrations is in Unit 8, Lesson 5, “Oroville Dam is on the Feather River, east of the city of Oroville. It is the tallest dam in the U.S. Next to the dam is Lake Oroville. Lake Oroville is the second largest manmade lake in California. Long before there was a dam, or a reservoir, Native Americans lived on this land.”

Teacher and student resources include clear directions. Activities that are completed with teacher guidance have directions included throughout the lessons. Suggestions for grouping, additional supports, challenge ideas and direct instruction are clearly defined, explained and embedded throughout. Each lesson provides the ‘primary focus’ and advance preparation’ of the lesson, the ‘formative assessment(s)’ ‘lesson at a glance’, and ‘recommendations for universal access’ and a ‘check for understanding’ section. Activity pages correspond correctly to the teacher guide and make finding information seamless and efficient.

  • An example of a challenge question from UNit 8, Lesson 6 where it states, “What metaphor relates to the forest fl oor?
  • An example of teacher support can be seen in Unit 1, Lesson 6 where it states, “Ensure that students understand the non-literal use of the word navigate in the paragraph.”

Clear directions for teachers is seen in Unit 6, Lesson 7 where it states, “Tell students they should use bullet points to visually separate each complete idea. • Encourage students to use core vocabulary in their text”

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

Alignment to the CCSS is documented in multiple places throughout the curriculum. The alignment chart for the CCSS standards are documented in the 3-5 Program Guide, and in the contents pages of each unit. At the beginning of every lesson under ‘Primary Focus of the lesson” the standards being addressed are clearly stated as well as within the formative assessments for what is being measured. The same is true for the Unit Assessments in which the standards being measured are also found under the “primary focus” and formative assessments given through the activity pages. Within the sidebars of the teacher guide there are standards listed within the scaffolding of the lesson for “emerging/expanding/extending” the learning.

  • Examples of formative assessments are found at the start of each lesson. The formative assessments from Lesson 7 in Unit 1 states, “Compare and contrast the author’s changing points of view. [RI.5.1; ELD.PI.5.6]”
  • The primary focus of Lesson 8 in Unit 1 states, “Students will reread portions of informational text to examine the details the author used to describe the relationships among Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and the Church. [RI.5.8; SL.5.4; L.5.5; ELD.PI.5.9]
  • An example in Unit 8, Lesson 7 states, “Students plan a persuasive essay and draft an introduction. [W.5.1a; ELD.PI.5.11]”

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 contain visual design (whether in print or digital) that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
The design of the materials throughout the curriculum supports students learning through graphics, tables, charts, illustrations, digital images, pictures and consistent font. The teacher guide, student reader, and activity book present material in appropriate, easy to read font with bold and italicized words used to enhance understanding for teachers and students. There are often pictures and images of real life examples for expository/informational text as well as colorful illustrations to accompany stories and narratives throughout. Digital resources is also available to display media to students to enhance lessons throughout the units. There are no distracting images, and all space appears to be appropriately designed for the most beneficial use. Activity book directions are clear and suitable for student understanding. Illustrations and pictures for activities are appropriate and Illustrations are designed to enhance understanding of the information being presented.

  • The activity book in Unit 5 displays illustrations with clearly marked subtitles to enhance understanding. For example while showing a picture of a merchant fair, it states, “Merchants and artisans sold goods in town markets.” (page 9)
  • Teacher steps are clearly bulleted and outlined for understanding how to effectively present material. For example, in Unit 2, Lesson 3, it states, “Draft the topic sentence on the board/chart paper. Point out that the first sentence should be indented. “ Mesoamerica, home of the Maya civilization, has interesting and diverse geographical features.”
  • Materials to be used in each lesson are clearly defined and easily guided. For example, in Unit 1, Lesson 7 it states, “Direct students to Activity Page 7.1 and review the definition of point of view at the top. • Have students answer questions 1–3 independently.”

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Materials partially meet the expectations that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year. The pacing may not allow adequate enough time for review, re-teaching enhancing and/or extending student learning for maximum understanding. Materials meet expectations that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.). Materials meet the expectations for materials including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. Materials contain visual design (whether in print or digital) that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject. Materials meet the criteria for materials containing a teacher’s edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials containing a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary. Materials meet the criteria for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. Materials meet the criteria for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies. Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials containing a teacher’s edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning. Materials provide support instructional planning in multiple ways. The Teacher Guide gives clear annotations and suggestions on how to present content. At the beginning a unit, teachers are encouraged to read the introduction, alignment chart, assessments, and to review the pausing points for the lessons. At the beginning of each lesson, teachers are encouraged to use the Lesson at a Glance to review the primary focus and formative assessments. There is also an Advance Preparation section included in the Universal Access section that helps to support teachers. Throughout the lessons, sidebars are included to support teachers in how to present materials to both support and challenge student learning. There are also Additional Support activates at the end of lessons that provide assessment and remediation in skills lessons. Teachers are directed to consider whether additional activities in the Assessment and Remediation Guide or Decoding and Encoding Supplement should be utilized for students who may need additional support. Teachers are also instructed to review Language Studio content for English Language Learner students

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for materials containing a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary. The introduction section of each Teacher Guide fully explains the primary purpose and goals of the unit including readers, writing, vocabulary and beginning of year assessments where applicable. There are also teacher resources at the end of each unit that assist with the implementation and direct instruction of the lessons including, but not limited to, dialogue starters, rubrics, checklists, image cards, activity book answer keys and code charts. Teacher guidance throughout every step of the lesson is clear and explicit however, there are no evident examples of more advanced literacy concepts for teachers to improve their knowledge of the subject, although the scripted explanations for the students understanding is clear.

The Introduction in Grade 5, Unit 1 states, “At the back of this Teacher Guide is a section titled “Teacher Resources,” which includes the following: Dialogue Starter Pages to be used during Lesson 4 , Story Slips to be used during Lesson 10, and a Speaking and Listening Observational Checklist”

An example of informing the teacher of one of the primary goals in this unit for writing is seen in Unit 1 Introduction where it states, “A primary goal of the unit is for students to write frequently and, indeed, to begin to identify themselves as writers. To this end, students write every day, often full-paragraph or multi-paragraph narratives, in a low-stakes environment that encourages students to develop their writing skills. We want students to realize that they are all capable of personal writing, that they all have something of interest to say about themselves, and that writing personal narratives can be a fun creative outlet.”

An example of the reasoning for the teacher in the introduction of Unit 9 states, “The Big Idea of this unit is that matter can be transformed by physical and chemical changes, which result in the extraordinary diversity of our physical world. This unit introduces students to the concept of matter, physical and chemical changes, and elements and compounds. It is not presented as a standard informational text but written as a detective story. Chemical content is introduced gradually and through the context of the protagonist’s experiences, giving students constant examples of the practical interest of these ideas.”

The Grade 5, Unit 7 Introduction also explains to the teachers how they will be instructing the students when it states, “Core vocabulary is bolded on first appearance in the reading, and definitions/corresponding page numbers are included in the Teacher Guide and, in most cases, on the facing page in the Reader. In a few cases, we have opted to keep the definition out of student-facing materials in order to give students the opportunity to practice defining words in context as part of a key questions exercise. The definitions we provide reflect the way the word is used in the text. For Shakespeare’s language, this means that the part of speech may be nonstandard”

An example of explicit teacher instruction in Unit 1, Lesson 1 can be seen when it states, “During the Reading, you will read the first section of “The First San Giving Day” aloud to the class. The read-aloud serves as a way to model reading for meaning and following textual cues like punctuation. Therefore, we suggest practicing reading the text ahead of time, so that you can read it in a smooth and polished way, with expression, inflection, and variations in volume and pitch”

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. The Program Guide for grades 3-5 contains explicit instruction on the role of the standards in the overall curriculum. It details the qualitative and quantitative text complexity of each unit, language demands from literal to complex language including tiered vocabulary, the structure of text and breakdown of literature, informational and nonfiction text, as well as close reading and use of text dependent questions including literal, inferential and evaluative questions.

An explanation of the Quantitative Text Complexity is explained on page 56 of the Program Guide; “By 3rd grade students are increasingly reading grade level complex text independently. They also continue to be exposed to above-grade Read-Alouds. In 4th and 5th grade, students are exclusively reading grade-level complex text that increases in challenge from the beginning to the end of the grade.”

An explanation of the Qualitative Text Complexity is explained on page 56 of the Program Guide; “Qualitative Text Complexity requires a range of judgments, some of which are by necessity subjective (Which is more complex, Anna Karenina or War and Peace? Descartes or Aristotle?). In 3rd–5th grade students are exposed to texts that are increasingly open to multiple interpretations and have many layers of meaning.”

The Program Guide details the language conventions in each grade on page 56; “In 4th and 5th grade, the language demands of texts increases. Students spend significantly longer considering the precise use of words, including figurative and ambiguous phrasing, starting with the first unit (Personal Narrative). The poetry units in 4th and 5th grade expose students to poems that range from highly complex, archaic language, to seemingly simple but ironic text (such as William Carlos Williams’s “This is Just to Say”).”

The Program Guide page 60 details the types of text dependent questions that are addressed in every lesson.

  • “Literal questions assess students’ recall of key details from the text. These are text- dependent questions that require students to paraphrase and/or refer back to the portion of the text where the specific answer is provided. Literal questions generally address Reading Standards for Literature n1 RL.4.1) and/or Reading Standards for Informational Text 1 (RI.X.1).”
  • Inferential questions ask students to infer information from the text and to think critically. These are also text dependent, but require students to summarize and/or refer back to the portions of the text that lead to and support the inference they are making. These questions generally address Reading Standards for Literature 2–5 (RL.X.2– RL.X.5) and/or Reading Standards for Informational Text 2–5 (RI.X.2–RI.X.5).”
  • Evaluative questions ask students to build on what they have learned from the text using analytical and application skills, often to form an opinion or make a judgment. These questions are also text-dependent, but require students to paraphrase and/or refer back to the portion(s) of the text that substantiate the argument they are making or the opinion they are offering. Evaluative questions might ask students to: Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, addressing Reading Standards for Literature 6 (RL.X.6)”

The breakdown of genre in the 8 Domains (units) in grade five are as follows: 1 is based in science, 4 social studies, and 3 literature. The science domain is a unit in ‘Chemical Matter”’ The social studies domains have units that cover ‘Early American Civilization’, ‘The Renaissance’, ‘The Reformation’, and ‘Native Americans’. The literature domains include, ‘Personal Narratives’, ‘Poetry’, and ‘The Adventure of Don Quixote’.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies. A Research Guide:The CKLA CA Curriculum: Links to Research on Teaching and Learning serves as a companion to the Program Guide. The guide discusses the research in English Language Arts instruction including but not limited to print and phonological awareness, phonics and word recognition, reading fluency, prosody, vocabulary and background knowledge.

The Program Guide also includes footnotes to research as they are explaining their educational approaches. Also, during the English Language Learner section of the Program guide, teachers are provided with a Research Base: Why this Matters Explanation for instructional approaches.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement. Students are given a Take Home Letter that reinforces main lesson objectives and demonstrates vocabulary and knowledge content. Parents are also encouraged to read to their children to continue providing additional content knowledge that falls within the categories of the domains. Lists of specific resources are found on the website, and parents are also encouraged to use the internet and public library to gain access to further information. Short lists are also provided to parents in take-home letters in the Knowledge strand of the unit. Students are encouraged to return to the classroom to engage in small group or classroom discussions about new information that students have learned at home.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Assessments include Daily Checks for Understanding, Daily Formative Assessments, Content and Mid Unit Assessments, and Unit Placement and Assessments Benchmark Tests.

Checks for understanding are designed to allow teachers to amend instruction within the context of the lesson. Formative assessments range from in-the-moment adaption to opportunities for individual, small group, and whole class reteach and review. Checks for Understanding and Formative Assessments also provide information to decide whether additional supports and practice (found at the end of the lesson and in the additional guides) are appropriate. Mid-unit, end-of-unit, and benchmark assessments should be used to direct remediation, Pausing Point days, and to differentiate instruction.

There is ongoing tracking of student progress:

  • Student Progress Record. This form may be used against a large range of student activities to track how students are progressing over time and compared with others in the class.
  • Mid-and end-of-unit assessments

There are a range of formal assessment opportunities that are are accompanied by directions and support for analysis of performance. They are also accompanied by assessment charts to record student progress. These assessment opportunities include, but not limited to:

  • Spelling Assessments
  • Grammar and Morphology Assessments
  • Reading Comprehension Assessments
  • Writing Assessments

There are three benchmark assessments: Beginning of Year, Middle of Year, and End of Year. Students are offered additional support and remediation depending on their performance on benchmark assessments.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized. There are multiple ways that students are assessed throughout each unit including formative assessments, mid-unit assessment, pausing points, and end-unit assessments. Within each form of assessment, it is clear what standards are being addressed.

Examples of formative assessments and the standards that are being emphasized in them are as follows:

  • Unit 2, Lesson 5, using Activity Page 5.2, students will, “Read excerpts from “Myths of the Maya” and answer comprehension questions. [RL.5.2; ELD.PI.5.6a]”
  • Unit 8, Lesson 7, using Activity Page 7.2 students will, “Answer comprehension questions using information from the text ‘Myths from the Pacific Northwest’ [RL.5.9; ELD.PI.5.6]”

The Unit Assessment of Unit 8, Lesson 15, states, “The reading comprehension section of the Unit Assessment contains two selections and accompanying questions. The first selection is an informational piece about the National Museum of the American Indian. The second selection is a literary piece—a Native American myth. These texts are considered worthy of students’ time to read and meet the expectations for text complexity at Grade 5. The texts feature core content and domain vocabulary from the Native Americans unit that students can draw on in service of comprehending the text.”

The Unit Assessment in Unit 3, Lesson 13, provides a chart for the correct answers and rationales:

  • “The poem consists of rhyming couplets, so its rhyme scheme is AABBCCDDEE (stanza 1) FFGGHHIIJJ (stanza 2) KKLLMMNNOO (stanza 3). [RL 5.5, RF 5.4]”
  • ““Like birds in their nest” is an example of a simile. Students should cite the word as to support their deduction.[RL 5.1, RL 5.4, RF 5.4, STD L 5.5]

Unit 3, Lesson 13, also clearly states what specific standards are addressed in this unit assessment with the writing prompt

  • “The writing prompt addresses [W.5.1, W.5.3, W.5.4, W.5.9, L.5.2, L5.3, L.5.6]”

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

Assessment keys are provided, as well as multiple suggestions and protocols for teachers to provide feedback such as:

  • Teacher questioning to check for misconceptions.
  • Wrap-Up questions and Checks for Understanding to check for comprehension.
  • Writing feedback to provide immediate feedback and suggestions during the writing process.
  • Student work to monitor students’ mastery of skills.
  • Peer-to-peer feedback to provide immediate feedback on student performance.

There are a number of other tools that support teachers in providing specific feedback to students and monitoring and tracking student progress over time.

  • Rubrics
  • Portfolios
  • Editing Checklist

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for including routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Each lesson includes a formative assessment that is highlighted at the start of the lesson. These assessments are used to track student mastery of objectives.

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 6, the formative assessments listed include a partner-read of Chapter 4 with comprehension questions and an activity page for sorting spelling words in alphabetical order.

There are also Checks for Understanding throughout the lessons to be used by the teacher to determine if students are ready to move on to the next part of the lesson. The Check for Understanding questions are meant for quick formative assessments that happen during instruction to assess if students have mastered the key content and skills in the lesson.

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, the Check for Understanding states, “Invite students to reread the third and fourth sentences with a partner and correct any inappropriate shifts in verb tense. Cold call students to share out whole class. If necessary, remind students that the verbs should re ect the past tense and should make sense with the meaning the author is trying to convey.”

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 provide students with model book selection processes through class discussion and creation of a chart to refer to as they select books. Students are also given access to a virtual library containing hundreds of books at and above grade level. Students keep a reading log and teachers engage each student in a one-on-one-conferences. During the conference teachers direct students to think about questions such as: “Where, when, and how long they are reading and how their environment affects their reading experience. How did a student select a book based on interest, content, and difficulty? and How did their decision affect their reading experience?” Teachers are encouraged to explicitly teach and work with students to set independent reading goals that they can track. Students then evaluate their progress and create new goals. Teachers are encouraged to build time for engagement within in-class reading for activities such as Book Talks and Sharing, Discussion circles, One-on-one conferencing, Writing (book reviews, to the author, in journals, etc.) and Multisensory experiences (recording audio, videos, acting).Teachers are encouraged to communicate with parents and guardians regarding the content students read and by suggesting discussion topics at home. Take-Home letters that include student reading goals involve parents and guardians in the process.

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Materials meet the criteria for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized. Materials reviewed meet the criteria for assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.Assessment keys are provided, as well as multiple suggestions and protocols for teachers to provide feedback. Materials meet the criteria for including routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Each lesson includes a formative assessment that is highlighted at the start of the lesson. These assessments are used to track student mastery of objectives. Materials provide students with model book selection processes through class discussion and creation of a chart to refer to as they select books.Materials meet the criteria for materials providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards. Materials provide modeling, formative assessments, language and visual supports, and background knowledge in each lesson to ensure student understanding.Materials meet the criteria for regularly providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards. All students engage with grade level text. Materials meet the criteria for regularly including extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level. Materials provide multiple opportunities for challenge and enrichment. Materials meet the criteria for providing opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards. Materials provide modeling, formative assessments, language and visual supports, and background knowledge in each lesson to ensure student understanding.

Materials include sidebar notes that include suggestions for emerging, expanding, and bridging students. The sidebars also include access, support ,and challenge notes that provide strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners. Examples of sidebar strategies include:

  • Unit 6, Lesson 6
    • Emerging- Provide 1:1 support on Activity Page 6.1. Guide students in rereading, clarifying questions, recording and citing information, and acting out information about Frederick.
    • Expanding- Redirect students to particular excerpts of text to record and cite information about Frederick or the pope. Allow students to practice sharing with a partner.
    • Bridging- Offer guidance on Activity Page 6.1 as needed.
    • Support- Remind students that first-person means writing from the perspective of the person, using the pronoun I. Provide some examples of first-and third person to demonstrate the differences.
    • Challenge- Have students change an example sentence from third-person to first person, and vice versa. Ask for an example of second-person.
  • In the Advance Preparation section at the beginning of each lesson there are Universal Access instructions. For example in Unit 6, Lesson 5, the Universal Access states, “To provide historical context and review of BCE/CE, reference Timeline from Lesson 1, and the Sequence of Events: Martin Luther, the pope, and Frederick III found in the digital components.”

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for regularly providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards. All students engage with grade level text. Side bar supports are provided to ensure that students are supported during lessons. The Universal Access for each lesson provides additional supports for students who read, write, speak or listen below grade level. Lessons also include pausing Points which provide additional instruction on new skills at the end of each unit for small group work, reteaching, and differentiated instruction. Assessment and Remediation Guide/Encoding and Decoding Supplements can be used for additional lessons that support students who need extra practice or remediation on foundational skills and comprehension.

Materials include a Language Studio resource that provides lessons that focus on reading, writing, listening, speaking, vocabulary, and grammar to advance English Language Learner proficiency levels. The activities in Language Studio help teachers guide students in constructing meaning through interaction with the text and with each other. Such instruction supports ELs of all proficiency levels by helping them access grade-level content knowledge, make meaning, and develop academic English and effective expression across the disciplines.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for regularly including extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level. Materials provide multiple opportunities for challenge, and enrichment, including:

  • Challenge sidebars throughout the lesson providing stretching questions and activities.
    • Unit 4, Lesson 5, “In what way does having reason and evidence make your writing stronger? (Reason and evidence show that the writer is open-minded and doesn’t have a bias.)”
  • Pausing Point days include additional activities and more complex text for excelling students.
    • The Pausing Point in Grade 5, Unit 5 demonstrates a pausing point for differentiation of instruction. It states, “Please use the final four days of this unit (or three days if you chose to pause one day after Lesson 7) to address results of the Content Assessment, Unit Assessment (for reading comprehension; fluency, if applicable; grammar; and morphology), and spelling assessments.”
  • Independent Reading. There are a large number of “above level” books that are available for students through CKLA Independent Reading. These allow students to expand their knowledge with more challenging material.

There are also daily opportunities to allow students go deeper into the topic. Lessons in the Knowledge Strand offer opportunities for independent and small group research that can be extended by asking for alternative sources or deeper analysis.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for providing opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. Students are grouped in partners, small groups, and whole class. Teachers are provided with guidance on how to group students such as an page 54 of the Program Guide, “Teachers should use a range of strategies—sometimes employing students of the same comprehension level into the same group, and at other times mixing those with a higher comprehension with those that are struggling. Extension activities within the Pausing Points provide a large range of additional collaborative learning opportunities. These include large group activities such as rehearsing and performing Read-Alouds, plays, and other literary works in front of an audience.”

Examples of how grouping strategies are used in materials include:

  • Partner discussion: Partner discussions are used in all units. Students host informal discussions and rules-based formal discussions.
  • Think-Pair-Shares: Students discuss a topic, build on the remarks of others, and link their comments to evidence in the text.
  • Small group discussion: Multiple opportunities for small group instruction and expression are present.
  • Whole class discussion: Whole class discussion takes place daily. These provide ample opportunities for students to model and practice Effective Expression.

Indicator 3s

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructions materials reviewed for Grade 5 include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Some difficulties were encountered when downloading the materials. The downloads didn't work on a PC using Explorer or Firefox. The downloads didn't work on a Mac using Firefox 45.02 or safari.

On a laptop running Windows 10 Home version 1511, everything was accessible using Chrome version 49.0.2623.112. The teacher and student digital program were accessible using Firefox version 45.0.2, but the texts could not be accessed. Using Internet Explorer 11, the teacher and student digital program were accessible, but the texts could not be accessed. On HTC Android phone Chrome version 50.0.2661.89 everything was accessible, including texts, but it was difficult to move around the pages and see the full content on the program.

Indicator 3s3v

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The Digital Components Portal contains digital documents of materials. These digital components are mostly platform neutral, with some specific interface issues. They do provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations, and there is some opportunity for customization, although the program is designed for minimal disruption of the main scope and sequence.

Indicator 3t

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The Digital Components Portal contains digital documents of the Teacher Guides, Activity Books, Readers, Students Poet’s Journal, Language Studio, Amplify Virtual ebook Library, Quest for the Core Apps, and a Resource site. The Resource Site includes Projectable Media Files for use during lessons, Assessment Remediation Guides, Decoding and Encoding Supplements designed to be used to provide targeted remedial instruction to students who are struggling with foundational skills, Fluency Packets, Amplify Library (an online library with large range of texts for 4th and 5th grade students), and a Multimedia component for each unit.

The Teacher Guide includes references of when digital components are available and how they can be used within a lesson.

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 include digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. Digital materials include a digital planning guide that provides step-by-step lesson plans and online materials that include additional support in differentiated instruction. Unit quests combine reading, writing, speaking, and listening in a digital environment engage students. There are also digital guides for assessment, remediation and supplemental materials to personalise learning for students.

Indicator 3u.ii

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed may be customized for local use; however, the program states that texts should be taught in the order they are presented to support implementation. Customization may occur in scaffolding and in opting for digital or print materials use. Differentiation and extension opportunities available throughout the instructional materials allow many opportunities to personalize learning as appropriate for students.

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The Digital Components Portal contains digital documents of materials. These digital components are mostly platform neutral, with some specific interface issues. They do provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations, and there is some opportunity for customization, although the program is designed for minimal disruption of the main scope and sequence.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructions materials reviewed for Grade 5 include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Some difficulties were encountered when downloading the materials. The downloads didn't work on a PC using Explorer or Firefox. The downloads didn't work on a Mac using Firefox 45.02 or safari.

On a laptop running Windows 10 Home version 1511, everything was accessible using Chrome version 49.0.2623.112. The teacher and student digital program were accessible using Firefox version 45.0.2, but the texts could not be accessed. Using Internet Explorer 11, the teacher and student digital program were accessible, but the texts could not be accessed. On HTC Android phone Chrome version 50.0.2661.89 everything was accessible, including texts, but it was difficult to move around the pages and see the full content on the program.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The Digital Components Portal contains digital documents of the Teacher Guides, Activity Books, Readers, Students Poet’s Journal, Language Studio, Amplify Virtual ebook Library, Quest for the Core Apps, and a Resource site. The Resource Site includes Projectable Media Files for use during lessons, Assessment Remediation Guides, Decoding and Encoding Supplements designed to be used to provide targeted remedial instruction to students who are struggling with foundational skills, Fluency Packets, Amplify Library (an online library with large range of texts for 4th and 5th grade students), and a Multimedia component for each unit.

The Teacher Guide includes references of when digital components are available and how they can be used within a lesson.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 include digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. Digital materials include a digital planning guide that provides step-by-step lesson plans and online materials that include additional support in differentiated instruction. Unit quests combine reading, writing, speaking, and listening in a digital environment engage students. There are also digital guides for assessment, remediation and supplemental materials to personalise learning for students.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed may be customized for local use; however, the program states that texts should be taught in the order they are presented to support implementation. Customization may occur in scaffolding and in opting for digital or print materials use. Differentiation and extension opportunities available throughout the instructional materials allow many opportunities to personalize learning as appropriate for students.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Sat Apr 08 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2015

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
CKLA Grade 5 Activity Book Unit 2 Part 1 978-1-61700-132-1 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Unit 3 Poet's Journal 978-1-61700-142-7 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Reader Unit 2 978-1-68161-213-3 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Reader Unit 6 978-1-68161-214-0 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Reader Unit 5 978-1-68161-215-7 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Reader Unit 8 978-1-68161-216-4 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Reader Unit 7 978-1-68161-217-1 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Reader Unit 9 978-1-68161-236-2 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Activity Book Unit 4 978-1-68161-237-9 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Activity Book Unit 5 978-1-68161-238-6 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Activity Book Unit 6 978-1-68161-240-9 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Activity Book Unit 7 978-1-68161-241-6 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Activity Book Unit 8 978-1-68161-242-3 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Activity Book Unit 9 978-1-68161-243-0 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Teacher Guide Unit 1 978-1-68161-244-7 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Teacher Guide Unit 2 Part 1 978-1-68161-245-4 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Teacher Guide Unit 3 978-1-68161-246-1 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Teacher Guide Unit 4 978-1-68161-247-8 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Teacher Guide Unit 5 978-1-68161-248-5 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Teacher Guide Unit 6 978-1-68161-249-2 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Teacher Guide Unit 7 978-1-68161-250-8 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Teacher Guide Unit 8 978-1-68161-251-5 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Teacher Guide Unit 9 978-1-68161-252-2 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Reader Unit 1 978-1-68161-253-9 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Activity Book Unit 1 978-1-68161-254-6 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Language Studio Teacher Edition Volume 1 978-1-68161-298-0 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Language Studio Teacher Edition Volume 2 978-1-68161-299-7 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Language Studio Activity Book Volume 1 978-1-68161-300-0 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Language Studio Activity Book Volume 2 978-1-68161-301-7 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Language Studio Teacher Edition Volume 3 978-1-68161-788-6 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Language Studio Teacher Edition Volume 4 978-1-68161-789-3 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Language Studio Activity Book Volume 3 978-1-68161-790-9 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015
CKLA Grade 5 Language Studio Activity Book Volume 4 978-1-68161-791-6 Copyright: 2015 Amplify 2015

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

X