Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The Springboard Language Arts Common Core Edition 2017 materials for Grade 11 fully meet the alignment expectations. The materials include appropriately rigorous texts to engage students in reading and writing as well as working to build research skills. Tasks and questions provided offer students practice in academic speaking and listening as well as comprehensive writing skills development over the course of the school year. The materials are designed to grow students' knowledge and academic vocabulary as they engage with increasingly rigorous texts and tasks.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
31
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
32
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
34
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The SpringBoard Grade 11 instructional materials meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and that support students’ advancing toward independent reading. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
16/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The SpringBoard Grade 11 instructional materials meet expectations for text quality and complexity. The materials include an appropriate distribution of texts suggested in the CCSS for Grade 11. In addition to literary texts, the program supports student access to strong informational texts. Anchor texts within the materials are of publishable quality, worthy of especially careful reading, and consider a range of student interests. Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Over the course of the year, materials support students’ increasing literacy skills through a series of texts at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for Grade 11. The materials are accompanied by text complexity analyses and rationales for purpose and placement in the grade level, and the program’s anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

NOTE: Indicator 1b is non-scored and provides information about text types and genres in the program.

Indicator 1a

Anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for SpringBoard Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1a. Anchor texts within the Grade 11 materials are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

Materials for Grade 11 include well-known and diverse authors such as Emily Dickinson, Jonathan Edwards, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Dan Gioia Lorraine Hansberry. Patrick Henry, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, John F. Kennedy, Jon Krakauer, Alain Locke, Abraham Lincoln, Arthur Miller, Barack Obama, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Tupac Shakur, Mark Twain, Phyllis Wheatley, Walt Whitman, and Anzia Yezierska. Most, if not all, of the texts--print, film, and audio recording-- have been published in some form as books or in notable newspapers and/or journals and magazines, as well as on the screen, in video, or audiocast.

Five thematic units provide anchor texts and supplementary texts encompassing a range of topics relevant and interesting to Grade 11 students: The American Dream, The Power of Persuasion, American Forums, The Pursuit of Happiness, and An American Journey. Books, dramas, short stories, poems, essays, graphic novels, film excerpts, articles, and editorials are among the text types studied throughout the year. Using these materials as a touchstone, students explore a variety of American voices to define what it is to be an American. The year begins in Puritan New England with The Crucible and continues through a study of historic American speeches, Transcendentalism, and an exploration of the Harlem Renaissance. Students analyze models of effective persuasion, learning to discern news from opinion and satire. Students draw on their reading and learning to craft a personal narrative reflecting on how they have been shaped by first-hand experience and research and create a multi-text type project on a topic of choice.

Unit 1: The American Dream, a unit of multiple texts

  • “What is an American?” from Letters from an American Farmer by St. John de Crevecoeur
  • “I Hear America Singing,” a poem by Walt Whitman
  • “America and I,” a short story by Anzia Yezierska
  • The Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson

Unit 2: The Power of Persuasion, a unit anchored in the study drama and historic speech

  • The Crucible, a screenplay by Arthur Miller
  • “First Inaugural Address,” a speech by Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • “The Gettysburg Address,” a speech by Abraham Lincoln

Unit 3: American Forums, a unit anchored in the study of editorials and satire

  • “Facing Consequences at Eden Prairie High,” an editorial printed in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Star Tribune
  • “How the Rise of the Daily Me Threatens Democracy,” an editorial by Cass Sunstein
  • “Advice to Youth,” a satire by Mark Twain.

Unit 4: The Pursuit of Happiness, a unit anchored by a study of Transcendental thought

  • Into the Wild, a biography and New York Times bestseller by Jon Krakauer
  • excerpt from Self-Reliance, an essay by Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • excerpt from Walden, by Henry David Thoreau

Unit 5: An American Journey, a unit anchored by study of the Harlem Renaissance

  • Their Eyes Were Watching God, a novel by Zora Neale Hurston
  • excerpt from “Introduction to The New Negro,” an essay
  • “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” a poem by James Weldon Johnson, leading figure in the Harlem Renaissance
  • “Mother to Son,” a poem by Langston Hughes

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
*Indicator 1b is non-scored (in grades 9-12) and provides information about text types and genres in the program.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for SpringBoard Grade 11 reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. The materials include an appropriate distribution of texts aligned to the CCSS for Grade 11. In addition to literary texts, the program supports student access to seminal U.S. documents, and strong informational texts including articles, editorials, speeches, as well as media text including paintings, photographs, and films.

Unit 1, The American Dream, includes historical documents, essays, speeches, short stories, and poetry among other text types. The following is a sample of titles and authors:

  • “Veteran Day: Never Forget Their Duty,” by John McCain
  • “The Four Freedoms,” speech by Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • The Declaration of Independence, historical document
  • “The Bill of Rights,” historical document
  • “Is the American Dream Still Possible?” article by David Wallechinsky
  • “I Hear America Singing” poem by Walt Whitman
  • “I, Too, Sing America” poem by Langston Hughes
  • “Who Burns for the Perfection of Paper” poem by Martin Espada
  • Working, by Studs Terkel

Unit 2, The Power of Persuasion, includes historical documents, sermons, articles, drama, and speeches among other text types. The following is a sample of titles and authors:

  • The Crucible, drama by Arthur Miller
  • The New England Primer, historical document
  • “The Trial of Martha Carrier,” essay by Cotton Mather
  • “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” sermon by Jonathan Edwards
  • “Speech to the Virginia Convention,” speech by Patrick Henry
  • “Second Inaugural Address,” speech by Abraham Lincoln

Unit 3, American Forums--The Marketplace of Ideas, includes historical documents, informational texts, cartoons, editorials, articles, satires, and parodies among other text types. The following is a sample of text titles and authors:

  • First Amendment to the United States Constitution, historical document
  • “The Role of the Media in a Democracy” informational text by George A. Krimsky
  • “How the Rise of the Daily Me Threatens Democracy,” editorial by Cass Sunstein
  • “In Depth, but Shallowly,” parody by Dave Barry
  • “The War Prayer,” satire by Mark Twain
  • “How to Poison the Earth,” satire by Linnea Saukko

Unit 4, The Pursuit of Happiness, includes historical documents, essays, poetry, art, and biography among other text types. The following is a sample of text titles and authors:

  • The Oxbow, painting by Thomas Cole
  • Kindred Spirits, painting by Asher Durand
  • “Sparky,” biographical sketch by Earl Nightingale
  • “In the Depths of Solitude,” poem by Tupac Shakur
  • “Remember,” poem by Joy Harjo
  • “A Light Exists in Spring,” poem by Emily Dickinson
  • “Where I Lived and What I Lived For,” excerpt from Walden, by Henry David Thoreau
  • “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten,” credo by Robert Fulghum
  • Into the Wild, biography by Jon Krakauer
  • “The Lessons of Salem,” essay by Laura Shapiro
  • “A View from Mount Ritter,” essay by Joseph T. O’Connor

Unit 5, An American Journey, includes literary criticism, poetry, essays, film, a novel, and an anthology among other text types. The following is a sample of text titles and authors:

  • “Sweat,” short story by Zora Neale Hurston
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God, novel by Zora Neale Hurston
  • “To Usward,” poem by Gwendolyn Bennett
  • “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” lyrics by James Weldon Johnson
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God, film directed by Darnell Martin
  • “The Harlem Renaissance,” informational text adapted by Kathleen Drowne and Patrick Huber
  • The New Negro, an anthology by Alain Locke
  • “On ‘From the Dark Tower,’” literary criticism by Eugenia W Collier
  • “How It Feels to Be Colored Me,” essay by Zora Neale Hurston

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level (according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for SpringBoard Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1c, Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

SpringBoard Online provides a Text Complexity Analysis for each of the Grade 11 texts. Each text analysis provides a quantitative rating based on Lexile Measures and a qualitative measure based on the qualitative factors described in Appendix A: Research Supporting Key Elements of the Standards (pages 5-6): Levels of Meaning or Purpose, Structure, Language, and Knowledge Demands. The Text Complexity Analysis also describes the student task associated with the reading and the teaching of text and considers those activities in assigning an overall level of text complexity. Most texts fall within the College and Career Expectations for Lexile Ranges in the 11-12 grade band, and those that do not are balanced with higher level qualitative measures.

  • In Unit 1, Activity 1.2, students read Senator John McCain’s speech, “Veteran’s Day: Never Forget Their Duty.” The text has a Lexile measure of 1150L, below the College and Career Readiness range expected for the 11-12 grade band. The Text Complexity Analysis provides an overall rating of complex, identifying the qualitative measurement as moderate and the task demand as challenging, together offsetting the lower Lexile measure. The analysis explains the purpose and levels of meaning are “somewhat complex as McCain connects the anecdote of his imprisonment in Vietnam...to the abstract nature of the subject of allegiance.” Additionally, the language is somewhat abstract, “containing exemplification and symbolism connected to the theme.” Moreover, knowledge demands require “some familiarity with the Vietnam War, the abstract concept of patriotism, as well as of the allusion to the Hanoi Hilton and the characteristics of the definition essay genre.” The Text Complexity Analysis rates the task as challenging because it involves “creating.” Indeed, the activity introduces students to the elements of writing a definition which will later support the completion of an embedded assessment. The task in this activity is to: “Write a brief response that explains how this extended definition has impacted your own understanding of the word.”
  • In Unit 3, Activity 3.2, students read the primary document, “First Amendment to the United States Constitution.” The text has a Lexile measure of 1000, below the College and Career Readiness range expected for the 11-12 grade band. The Text Complexity Analysis indicates the overall document to be accessible with a qualitative rating as moderate and a task's demand as challenging. Qualitatively, the purpose is explicit: “to assert the freedoms of the individual and the press” and the structure “conforms to the expectations of the genre.” However, the language is primarily “formal” and “archaic,” and the reading is one long complex sentence requiring careful reading. The task is rated as complex because students “create a new version of this text” by “diffusing and paraphrasing” and then “draft a statement that expresses their opinion on the balance between the freedoms guaranteed in the First Amendment and individual responsibility in our society.”
  • In Unit 4, Activity 4.2, students read an excerpt from “Self-Reliance” by Ralph Waldo Emerson. The text has a Lexile measure of 1000, below the College and Career Readiness range expected for the 11-12 grade band. The Text Complexity Analysis indicates the overall document to be complex with a qualitative measure of high difficulty. Additionally, the task demand of analysis is categorized as moderate. Qualitative factors influencing text difficulty include an implied purpose developed through a series of parallel statements. The use of archaic language and complex sentence structures with phrases such as “Whoso would be a man must be a nonconformist” further raise the challenges to the reader. Knowledge demands, too, are high as several “misunderstood” historical figures are referenced in the text: Pythagoras, Socrates, Jesus, Luther, Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton. The task is complex because it requires students to summarize and analyze the main ideas in each paragraph (RI.11-12.2) and select ideas that state strong opinions (RI.11-12.1). Then students are asked to further demonstrate an understanding of this text by citing textual evidence and recording ideas developing the concept of the pursuit of happiness (RI.11-12.4). Students then compare the ideas of Emerson with the ideas of another writer (RL.11-12) and their own ideas and eventually generate a definition of Transcendentalism (RI.11-12.7).
  • In Unit 5, Activity 5.8, students read “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” by Zora Neale Hurston. The text has a Lexile measure of 930, below the College and Career Readiness range expected for the 11-12 grade band. The Text Complexity Analysis indicates moderately challenging qualitative measures and cognitive demands. Qualitative factors influencing a moderate difficulty include a “somewhat implied” purpose and a shifting structure, from the “witty hook” to anecdotal childhood memories, followed by a “discussion of issues related to feeling ‘colored,’” and concluding with a metaphor. The students' task is appropriately challenging because they are asked to analyze the text and evaluate it as a primary source (RH.11-12.5). Using the SOAPSTone strategy, students cite textual evidence (RI.11-12.1) and analyze the text for ideas shared by Hurston and the Harlem Renaissance, but they are also asked to find evidence proving Hurston follows her own path. (RI.11-12.1, RL.11-12.9).

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for SpringBoard Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1d. Over the course of the year, materials support students’ increasing literacy skills through a series of texts at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for Grade 11.

Students progressively build literacy skills through work with a variety of texts over the course of the school year. Texts sets are at various complexity levels, quantitatively and qualitatively, and therefore support learners as they develop literacy skills and background knowledge to support independent and proficient reading practices.

In Unit 1, students read a range of texts measuring in complexity levels from 790 Lexile Measure to 1260 Lexile Measure. Initially, students read texts, such as “Veteran’s Day: Never Forget Their Duty” by John McCain, which measure in the 9-10 grade band and Address on the Occasion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Statue of Liberty by Franklin Roosevelt, measuring in the low end of the 11-12 grade band. Through the unit, texts such as William Zinsser’s “The Right to Fail” move into 11-12 grade band, making Unit 1 a transition from the Grade 10 course to the Grade 11 course. In Unit 1, Activity 1.17, students engage with two texts, an excerpt from the “Keynote Address to the 2004 Democratic Convention,” measuring 1110L with moderate qualitative and task measurement, and Zinsser’s essay, “The Right to Fail.” Teacher Wrap provides instructions for supporting readers through guided reading, text annotation, and/or using the Persuasive/Argument Writing Map graphic organizers found in the resource materials.

In Unit 2, as students prepare to read The Crucible, they are introduced to the complex texts of Jonathan Edwards and Cotton Mather: “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” and “The Trial of Martha Carrier.” The texts are introduced as a means of developing context for the drama; both texts have complexity measures at the higher end of the 11-12 grade band, Edwards’s sermon measuring at 1360L and Mathers’ essay measuring at 1420L. The Teacher Wrap offers instruction for supporting readers through the complexities of these two texts, suggesting graphic organizers, chunking, and contextualizing. Following the study of The Crucible, students transition to the second half of the unit and a study of argument through a series of speeches with complexity measures in the higher end of the 11-12 grade band. A series of texts, Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address in Activity 2.18, Gettysburg Address in Activity 2.20, and John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address in Activity 2.22 focus student study on rhetoric. The Teacher Wrap suggests teachers provide historical context for each text and engage their students in highlighting or marking the text as they read and it also advises teachers to use their professional expertise in determining how to structure the first and second reads: independent, pairs, small groups, whole class.

In Unit 4, students study the Transcendental perspective reading several texts within the 11-12 grade band, among them, Emerson’s Self-Reliance and Thoreau’s “Where I Lived and What I Lived For.” The Teacher Wrap suggests teachers use these texts to build students' skill in paraphrasing, offer graphic organizers, encourage journal writing, and differentiate to develop academic vocabulary. The Emerson and Thoreau texts introduce the unit’s focus, the personal journey in the pursuit of happiness, which culminates in reading the novel, Into the Wild by Krakauer, with a Lexile measure of 1210 but an overall complex measure related to the student task requirements. Completion of the novel requires students to read more extensively and more independently than other texts in the unit, showing a steady progression toward becoming more proficient, independent readers.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for SpringBoard Grade 11 meet the criteria of Indicator 1e. The Grade 11 materials provide anchor texts and series of texts connected to them. The materials are accompanied by text complexity analyses and rationales for purpose and placement in the grade level.

SpringBoard Online provides a Text Complexity Analysis complete with rationales for purpose and placement within the online Teacher Resources. Each analysis offers users a choice to download the file or preview the analysis online. The format for each analysis is identical, providing information and discussion in five areas: the context for use, a quantitative analysis with justification if the Lexile level is below grade, a qualitative review, an overview of task and reader considerations, and placement considerations in light of grade level standards.

Indicator 1f

Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for SpringBoard Grade 11 meet Indicator 1f. The program’s anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

Over the year, students are provided with a variety of texts, primarily representing the disciplines of literature, history, and social science, from a wide distribution of media including newspaper, journals, music, film, and the internet. Among the text types are seminal U.S. historic documents, short stories, poems, drama, novels, speeches, editorials, and informational texts; full text listings are provided within Planning the Unit and Resources at a Glance in the Unit Overview. The former lists all titles in the unit and the latter lists the titles in relation to the unit pacing guide and related activities. Additionally, grade level texts are listed in the End Matter PDF found through the Teacher Resources tab among the Book PDFs.

All units are developed thematically. Some units are structured around an anchor text accompanied by supplementary texts while other units provide multiple texts supporting the thematic and skill-based instruction. Regardless, students have the opportunity to achieve grade level reading proficiency through independent reading and study as well as supported reading, e.g., paired reading, small group reading, choral reading, and chunked reading. With the introduction of each new text, the Teacher Wrap encourages teachers to use their “knowledge of their students” to select the most effective format for the first reads. Each reading activity specifically addresses the reading and learning purpose for the text to follow and offers specific lessons designed to support diverse readers in text comprehension and analysis.

Embedded in each lesson are activity features to encourage rereading: Academic and Social Language Preview, Interpret the Text Using Close Reading, Interacting in Meaningful Ways, Academic Collaboration, and Working from the Text. These activity features specifically support close reading, thinking protocols, word consciousness, and grammar and language, all skills that move readers towards greater reading independence. Within all activities, the sidebar Teacher Wrap offers ideas and tips to support diverse readers in the classroom. Additional reading supports are delineated and defined in the Teacher End Materials PDF available through the Resources tab on the grade-level home page. Included in this Resource handbook is a comprehensive list of reading strategies, along with definitions, and purposes for use. Also included in the Resource are numerous graphic organizers aligned to activities specifically noted in the Teacher’s Edition, e.g., OPTIC, SMELL, SOAPStone, Web Organizer, and Word Map. Additionally found in the Teacher’s Edition Teacher Wrap is specific guidance for adapting teaching methods in the development of grade-level reading skills among diverse readers. Under headings Teacher to Teacher, Adapt, and Leveled Differentiated Instruction are explanations and references for additional supports that are also found in the Resource handbook, e.g., sequencing events, analyzing key ideas and details, charting cause and effect, and unknown word solvers.

Six supplementary close reading lesson sets are also included among the instructional materials: informational/literary nonfiction, poetry, argument, Shakespeare, informational STEM texts, and informational texts in social studies and history. Each lesson set offers three unique texts and instruction for each text follows a four-activity pattern supporting students work toward reading independence:

  • Activity 1: provides guided reading instruction that emphasizes multiple readings, vocabulary development, and close-reading strategies with a complex text.
  • Activity 2: gradually releases students from teacher-guided instruction and modeling to a collaborative analysis of a visual text to which students apply the skills and strategies of close reading.
  • Activity 3: releases students to closely read texts independently to respond to analysis questions and to make connections to previous texts.
  • Activity 4: requires students to respond to synthesis writing, presentation, or discussion prompts to demonstrate their mastery of the close-reading skills they have practiced in the workshop.

In addition to reading as part of classroom activities, students are expected to complete independent readings. In each unit, Planning this Unit provides a section titled Suggestions for Independent Reading and offers a “wide array of titles which have been chosen based on complexity and interest.” At the beginning of each unit, students develop an Independent Reading Plan and are instructed to discuss their reading plan with a partner through a series of questions: “How do you go about choosing what to read independently? Where can you find advice on which books or articles to read? What genre of texts do you most enjoy reading outside of class? How can you make time in your schedule to read independently? How do you think literary theory might change your perspective of the texts you read independently?

As a mechanism for monitoring their reading progress, students are accountable for monitoring their independent reading using an Independent Reading Log provided in the Resource handbook available in the Teacher End Materials PDF and the Student Front Matter, both found through the Resources tab on the grade-level home page. Independent Reading Link: Read and Connect is a sidebar activity bridging the unit’s reading instruction and the students’ independent reading. In Unit 3, Activity 3.1, students are told, “During this unit, you will read a local, national, or online newspaper every day. Create a log to keep track of what and when you read, and write down the titles of significant articles that you encountered in each section. Don’t just read the first page or landing page (if you are reading an online publication); navigate through all the sections...Choose a publication that interests you, since you will be spending considerable time with it.” Independent Reading Checkpoints are also embedded in each unit. For example, in Unit 5, Activity 5.1, students were instructed to select a title from the Harlem Renaissance for their independent reading. They were also told their selection would become part of the embedded assessment. In Activity 6, during the unit’s study of the Harlem Renaissance, students are told to review “the independent reading you have completed so far. Review any notes you took about how the texts relate to the Harlem Renaissance. Look for information in the texts that you can use as source material for your multimedia presentation.” In building a volume of reading, students are also encouraged to do their own research, selecting their titles and topics “that intrigue them.”

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The SpringBoard Grade 11 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the CCSS with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent and require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text. The materials contain sets of high quality, sequenced, text-dependent, and text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding. Culminating tasks are rich and varied, providing opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know and are able to do in speaking and/or writing over the year. The materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions--small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class-- that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax, and most materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence. The instructional materials also include instruction of grammar and conventions/language standards for Grade 11 and are applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts with opportunities for application context. The materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts and revisions over time); short, focused projects incorporating digital resources where appropriate; and frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate to the grade level. While the program provides a variety of opportunities for students to write in the modes of argument, explanation, and narrative with writing assignments connected to texts and/or text sets, most writing assignments are explanatory.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for SpringBoard Grade 11 meet the expectations of indicator 1g. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent and require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text.

Most questions, tasks, and assignments over the course of instruction are designed to encourage students’ interaction with the texts under study. Within each unit are recurrent activities such as Setting a Purpose and Second Read which cause students to consider text-dependent questions regarding concepts related to key ideas and details, craft and structure, and integration of knowledge and ideas. Additionally, Writing to Sources activities require students to engage directly with the text using explicit and valid inferential textual support in the development of analytic and explanatory writing.

Following are some representative examples of how Grade 11 materials employ text-based questions and tasks over the course of the school year:

  • In Unit 1, Activity 1.4, after reading “I Hear America Singing” by Walt Whitman and “I, Too, Sing America” by Langston Hughes, students work through a series of text-dependent questions provided in Second Read addressing key ideas and author’s craft. Working from the Text asks students to complete a two-column chart comparing the tone in each of the poems and providing evidence through examples of diction and imagery. Writing to Sources follows these activities asking students to compare and contrast the poems through a consideration of the “denotative and connotative meanings of the word sing...include examples of diction and imagery from both texts to support each specific claim you make.”
  • In Unit 3, Activity 3.10, after reading several published editorials, students are to select one editorial for analysis. Students are asked to find examples of various types of evidence authors use to support claims, including: illustrative examples, hypothetical cases, analogies, expert testimony, statistics, and causal relationships. For each type of evidence, students must define the type, explain its use, state its limitations, evaluate the type of appeal it makes (logos, pathos, ethos), and state whether the evidence logically supports the author’s claim in that instance.
  • In Unit 5, Activity 5.8, after reading “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” by Zora Neale Hurston and an excerpt by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. describing Hurston’s place in Harlem Literature, Second Read asks students to use a two-column note organizer to consider Hurston’s philosophy and to identify why Gates described Hurston as a "unity of opposites." Students are to enter their inferences and cite textual evidence to support those inferences.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/ text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for SpringBoard Grade 11 meet the criteria for indicator Ih. The materials contain sets of high-quality, sequenced, text-dependent, and text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding. Culminating tasks are rich and varied, providing opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know and are able to do in speaking and/or writing over the year.

Each of the five units presents two embedded assessments followed by a logical progression of instruction and practice in preparing students to successfully demonstrate their skills and understandings. Preview of Embedded Assessment 1 occurs on the first day of the unit as students unpack the skills required for the task which culminates midpoint in the unit. Following the completion of Embedded Assessment 1, students are introduced to Embedded Assessment 2, again unpacking the skills necessary to successfully accomplish the end task. For each Embedded Assessment, the sequence of activities that follows the unpacking sequentially develops the skills necessary to complete the requirements of the assessment.

  • The Unit 1, Embedded Assessment 1 asks students to write a multi-paragraph essay defining “what it means to be an American” and develop an iconic image within their writing. During the nine-lesson unit, students learn to define a word or concept using four definition strategies: example, classification, function, and negation. Additionally, they read mentor texts exemplifying most strategies in practice. Activity 1.1 provides instruction on the extended definition and examples of the four definition strategies. Activities 1.2 and 1.3 introduce definition essays as mentor texts to explore the terms “patriot” and “America’s promise.” Through a sequence of text-dependent questions, students come to better understand the key ideas as well as the craft and structure of the extended definition. Language Checkpoint 3 supports student writing by using the mentor texts to further analyze writer’s craft in the use and misuse of a modifier. In Activity 1.6, students begin to plan their own essay by developing a graphic organizer to capture their thoughts on being an “American” as they read the various unit texts. The unit continues by juxtaposing definition essays and historical documents with lessons on writing techniques. Throughout, students learn about and practice the skills of quoting and citing texts, developing iconic images, and structuring the definition essay. The culminating task provides a checklist and rubric.
  • The Unit 4, Embedded Assessment 2 asks students to create a multi-genre research project based on their reading and research related to Jon Krakauer’s Into the Wild. The project should express “research and perspectives on a person, event, or movement that embodies the American ideal of the pursuit of happiness.” To prepare students for this task, nine lessons precede the culminating assessment. Activities 4.18 and 4.19 are a close reading of Chapter 18 as text dependent questions guide readers into author’s craft in both tone and structure. Graphic organizers prompt students to explore the various genres Krakauer uses in his own writing as they plan their multi-genre project. Activity 4.20 provides an exemplum of the multi-genre project, while Activity 4.21 uses a biography (of Sparky, a.k.a., Charles Schulz) as a springboard for students to develop their own thesis statement as the basis for their research project. Activity 4.22 builds on the biography of the previous activity, adding yet another genre to the growing exemplar. Text-dependent questions guide the student reader to better value the juxtaposition of genres in both content and context. Activities 4.23 - 4.25 engage the students in a recursive process as they look back on mentor pieces while drafting and revising their own work in progress. Activity 4.26 provides tips for planning, drafting, evaluating, revising, checking, and editing as well as providing a performance rubric.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for SpringBoard Grade 11 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions--small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class-- that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Each unit throughout Grade 11 engages students in a variety of evidence-based discussions within the whole class, as small group conversations, and as partners sharing text-based ideas and information. Embedded within each unit are several Academic Collaboration lessons focused on the current text under study and designed to promote meaningful interaction. The lessons provide a discussion protocol guiding “academic conversation” and sometimes extend into a Language Checkpoint where students work with partners examining syntax related to the anchor text. Academic and Social Language Previews also appear in each unit. These collaborative investigations promote student exploration of word meaning by asking students to determine meaning through the context and then apply the word in a new context. Additionally, the Teacher Wrap supports activities with additional protocols, ideas for increasing pair and small group speaking and listening interactions, instructional advice for differentiation, modeling suggestions, and technology tips for heightening student interaction in effective evidence-based discussion.

Following are some representative examples of how Grade 11 materials provide opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax:

  • In Unit 1, Activity 1.13, after reading “The Declaration of Independence” and lessons on transition and quotations in Writer’s Craft and lessons on the placement of modifiers in Language Checkpoint, students are instructed to “[r]eread the text [Declaration of Independence] with a partner and note the language, phrases, and rhetorical appeals as elements of argument using a graphic organizer.
  • In Unit 2, Activity 2.3c, after reading an excerpt from The Crucible by Arthur Miller, Interacting in Meaningful Ways: Academic Collaboration asks students to develop and answer questions about a drama, support an opinion, and adapt language to context. These objectives are met by having students work as partners or in small groups to address a series of questions regarding characterization, main idea, conflict, and inflection, a term studied earlier in the unit. The activity continues by citing a provocative line from the play and asking students what question they would pose to the speaker. Additionally, the activity points out that The Crucible is “an example of persuasive art meant to change society” and asks students, “If you could ask the author, Arthur Miller, one question about persuasion, what would it be?”
  • In Unit 5, Activity 5.11, after the second reading of Langston Hughes’ “Mother to Son,” students are asked to mark metaphors and “[d]etermine how Hughes choice of words, syntax, and metaphor contribute to meaning.” The students then read chapter 2 of Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God and “track metaphors that Nanny and Janie use to describe their lives.” The Teacher Wrap indicates students should think-pair-share examples of figurative language and “discuss the effect of Hurston’s use of figurative language to construct and reflect a character’s identity.” Additionally, the Teacher Wrap offers adaptations for small groups of students as they identify metaphors and develop comparisons. Finally, in Text-to-Text Comparisons, students are to compare the voice and advice given between the two texts.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for SpringBoard Grade 11 meet the expectations of indicator 1j. Most materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

Throughout the year, students are engaged in a variety of listening and speaking activities from pairing with peers to discussion in small groups, participating in Socratic Seminars, and staging class presentations. Most collaborative activities occur after reading a text and/or a combination of texts sometimes paired with multimedia sources. In most instances, students are required to engage in evidence-based discussions relevant to text themes, structure, development, and purpose. Discussion questions encouraging students to draw on academic vocabulary and syntax are provided within both teacher and student materials and support students’ preparation for collaboration to follow. Additionally, students are taught to generate text-related open-ended questions to propel ensuing conversations and discussions. Guidance for differentiating, extending, and monitoring student learning is provided to the teacher in the Teacher Wrap section provided with each activity.

Grade 11 speaking and listening expectations are based on the establishment of discussion norms corresponding to the Common Core Speaking and Listening standards. Students grow their speaking and listening skills by moving beyond discussions of prepared questions to developing sets of questions for the purpose of discussion and developing goals for collaborative work, setting group deadlines, and establishing roles within the group. Additionally, students become more independent in marshaling conversation to ensure all voices are heard. Many speaking and listening activities center around seminal United States documents and move from analysis to taking a position and working to persuade others. Throughout, students are not only expected to verify and clarify ideas, but to a growing degree, advance differing views and work to persuade others by supporting all information with credible and sufficient evidence. Opportunities to talk and ask questions of peers and teachers about research, strategies, and ideas are present throughout the year. The curriculum includes a host of protocols and graphic organizers to promote and scaffold academic discussions.

Following are some representative examples of how Grade 11 materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading, researching, and presenting with relevant follow-up questions and evidence:

  • In Unit 1, Activity 1.9, after reading an excerpt from Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s 1941 State of the Union speech, “Four Freedoms,” the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States of America, and a transcription of the “Bill of Rights,” students prepare and conduct a Socratic Seminar discussing these seminal texts. Preparation for the seminar includes an annotated first reading of each text followed by Second Read, a series of text dependent questions intended to tease out ambiguities in the texts. After a brief whole-class discussion on the nuances between the terms “freedom” and “rights,” students are to work in groups completing a graphic organizer illustrating the connection between the two texts. Students are asked to “synthesize the comments made by everyone and use relevant details from each text to support your comparison.” Students are then provided time to prepare for the Socratic Seminar by reviewing the readings and writing a response, with textual support, to three pre-seminar questions:
    • Why is freedom important to Americans?
    • Which of the freedoms mentioned in the text is most important?
    • To what extent are individuals responsible to ensure all Americans have their rights and freedoms?

Before beginning the Socratic Seminar, students are reminded of delineated discussion norms: come prepared, talk to discussion participants not the teacher, refer to the text, and paraphrase what others have said before challenging the opinion.

  • In Unit 2, Activity 2.19c, after reading Patrick Henry’s “Speech to the Virginia Convention,” students prepare for an academic discussion wherein they will form, express, and support opinions. Students begin by working in small groups or pairs to discuss questions posed on the Collaborative Dialogue graphic organizer, a teaching tool posing a series of what and how questions alongside response stems, e.g., “What explicit evidence... indicates Patrick Henry is using allusions…” and the response stem, “In paragraph _____, Patrick Henry alludes to _____." After students have conversed, they are to capture their thinking on the graphic organizer. Next, students use the graphic organizer to engage in the academic discussion. If students need further support in small-group discussion, Teacher Wrap suggests calling upon a student to model a discussion using the Collaborative Dialogue Organizer. The teacher asks the student the first question on the organizer, “What is the central idea of 'Speech to the Virginia Convention?'” The student responds, and the teacher comes back with follow-up questions: “How do you know?” “Which lines from the speech support your answer?” or “I am not sure I agree…” The respondent is coached in how to support a position, how to respond to a dissenting view, and how to persuade the listener to agree. Question 2 exchanges roles--the questioner becomes the respondent, and the respondent becomes the questioner. The activity is given over to the small groups or pairs of students who work through the collaborative dialogue in the same manner.
  • In Unit 5 Activity 5.15, while reading Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston, student-led discussion groups move to greater independence considering “aspects of the Harlem Renaissance to trace throughout the novel: historical context, philosophy/beliefs, the arts, daily life.” Students are asked to take responsibility as a group, “to create a schedule for reading.” Independently, they are to read chunked chapters of the text and “write literal, interpretive, and universal questions” to guide their group discussions. To ensure full-hearing of ranging ideas, the materials suggest appointing a timer in each group. Additionally, to support students’ increasing abilities, the materials provide a note-taking guide to use while reading and a discussion guide for capturing the comments of the group after reading.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the indicators for 1k. Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts and revisions over time) and short, focused projects incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

On-demand writing tasks are present within most unit activities and focus on specific text/s and/or on a specific writing skill: e.g., quickwrites, double entry journals, reflections, note taking, and answering writing prompts. Standard features of each unit--Working from the Text, Writing to Sources, Argument Writing Prompts, Explanatory Writing Prompts, and Narrative Writing Prompts--ask students to write shorter, on-demand responses that require attention to development, textual evidence, and incorporation of writing skills studied. Additionally, the program offers opportunities for student revisions of many on-demand writing activities.

Following are some representative examples of how Grade 11 materials employ on-demand writing alongside technology, editing, and/or revision tasks over the course of the school year:

  • In Unit 1, Activity 1.3, after reading and listening to Roosevelt’s speech on the 50th Anniversary of the Statue of Liberty and viewing a variety of illustrations, Writing to Sources asks students to write an explanatory essay drawing on the details of both texts in defining “America’s Promise.” They are directed to begin with a clear thesis, use significant details from each, and use effective transitions. Activity Lc.1.3 follows with a lesson on modifiers. Students are asked to return to the essay written in Activity 1.3 and, “working with a partner, underline modifying words, phrases, and clauses” to review for correct placement of modifiers and to “rewrite sentences to correct any misplaced or dangling modifiers.”
  • In Unit 3, Activity 3.3-Activity 3.5, students engage in a study of media. Students examine a survey of hard copy and digital media, including but not limited to newspapers, local television news, cable news, podcasts, internet, websites, and social media, to analyze the medium’s target audience and possible bias.
  • In Unit 5, Activity 5.3, after viewing a documentary on the background of the Harlem Renaissance, students work in “expert discussion groups” to research an assigned artist and art of the period. Included in this research project are visual and performance arts. Digital availability is necessary.
  • In Unit 5, Activity 5.17, students read four reviews over Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God before constructing an argumentative on-demand response. “Once [they] have discussed the critical reviews [students are to] connect [their] understanding of the critical review to the connection it makes to the values, historical context, arts, or daily life championed by the movement known as the Harlem Renaissance, [being] sure to: begin [their] response with a thesis sentence that states [their] opinion and gives direction to [their] writing; establish the significance of the claim, distinguishing it from alternate or opposing claims; weave in evidence in the form of quotations and commentary from the review and the novel to support [their] thesis.”

Process writing is supported in each unit through two Embedded Assessments preceded by a series of instructional and practice activities with concepts ranging from ideation to grammar and syntax choices, writing structures, revision and editing. The ten Embedded Assessments offer a breadth of ELA writing purposes: Writing a Definition Essay; Writing a Synthesis Essay; Writing a Persuasive Speech; Creating an Op-Ed News Project; Writing a Satirical Piece; Writing a Personal Essay; Creating a Multi-Genre Research Project; Presenting a Literary Movement; Writing an Analytical Essay. Each Embedded Assessment is outlined in Planning the Unit and Unit Overview sections of the Teacher’s Edition, and the Teacher Wrap provides general guidance to the teacher in the areas of revision and editing. Each Embedded Assessment also includes a scoring rubric and set of questions encouraging students to consider the elements of planning, drafting, and revising throughout the writing process.

Following are some representative examples of how Grade 11 materials employ process writing in longer written tasks featuring technology, revision, and/or editing over the course of the school year:

  • In Unit 3, Embedded Assessment 1, after a study of the editorial as a diverse journalistic form, students are to work in groups to “plan, develop, write, revise, and present an informational article on a timely and debatable issue of significance to your school community, local community, or national audience.” After the group has completed the informational article, students independently “develop a variety of editorial products that reflect [your] point of view (agreement, alternative, or opposing) on the topic.” Students can choose among cartoons, editorials, letters, posters, photos, or come up with other ideas. Over the unit’s time, students are introduced to and study model texts, drafting their own informational text in Activity 3.5 before continuing on to study aspects of editorials, preparing them for the individual component of the assessment.
  • In Unit 4, Embedded Assessment 1, after a study of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, students are asked to work as a group to write and perform an original dramatic script making “a statement about a conflict that faces society.” The Teacher Wrap indicates students are to “draft their scene using something like Google Docs so they can mutually participate in the creation of dialogue and the plotting of the scene… Online file sharing programs will encourage constant revision and refining.” Teacher Wrap further suggests students should record their rehearsals using video to enhance their critiques and revisions. It suggests the final performance, too, should be in video form as an archive of the work.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different types/modes/genres of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

While the program provides a variety of opportunities for students to write in the modes of argument, explanation, and narrative with writing assignments connected to texts and/or text sets, the distribution of the writing is not appropriate for Grade 11. Nearly half of Grade 11 writing assignments are of the explanatory mode. The argument mode represents just over one-third of the writing tasks and narrative writing prompts make up the remainder. Optional Writing Workshops in all writing modes are available in the supplementary materials. This program falls short in balancing writing tasks between the modes of inform/explain and argument. The program offers little support for teachers or students to monitor progress within the shorter, on-demand writing tasks. There are few rubrics, checklists, or exemplars provided in either the teacher or student materials. Embedded Assessments offer support through a checklist of questions intended to promote student thinking on the processes of planning, drafting, editing, and revising. Additionally, the Embedded Assessments provide a rubric.

In Unit 1, Activity 1.13, after reading the Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States, and the Bill of Rights, students write an essay “explaining how you think the ideas in this document [the Declaration of Independence], as well as those in the Preamble to the Constitution to the United States and the Bill of Rights, contribute to the idea of the American Dream.” Examples of other explanatory prompts include Activity 1.12, Explain how an Author Builds an Argument, Activity 1.6 writing a short summary, and Embedded Assessment 1, Writing a Definition Essay. Embedded Assessment 2 asks students to synthesize “three to five sources and your own observations to defend, challenge, or qualify the statement that America still provides access to the American Dream.” Prior to the culminating argument, in Activity 1.16, students “develop an argument on the differences between an immigrant’s and a citizen’s sense of opportunity in the United States," and in Activity 1.17, students write a narrative including the dialogue of argument based on the texts of Barack Obama and William Zinsser.

In Unit 2, students primarily write explanatory responses. In Activity 2.13, after reading most of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, students write “an explanatory essay that analyzes the role of irony in Miller’s play thus far.” Students also practice narrative writing in the form of script writing, creating an original scene, and writing and performing a monologue. Embedded Assessment 2 asks students to “write and present an original, persuasive two- to three-minute speech that addresses a contemporary issue.” Drafting of this speech begins early in the unit sequence and continues to final delivery. Prior to the embedded assessment, students write essays explaining how historic authors build arguments to persuade.

In Unit 3, students primarily write explanatory essays. However, both embedded assessments ask students to develop elements of argument: an op-ed news piece and a satirical piece, “to express an opinion...critiquing some aspect of society.” In Activity 3.16, after studying the elements of satire, students evaluate a series of satirical cartoons and write an essay explaining “how each cartoon seeks to affect the reader’s perception of the subject;” they are specifically reminded to use “precise language, including metaphor, simile, or analogy, to explain your ideas.”

In Unit 4, students write to a balance of prompts: argument, explanatory, and narrative. Students are also asked to “write an original poem that explores your beliefs about the pursuit of happiness. Link to one of the transcendentalist ideals you have identified in this unit, and emulate one of the three poems you explored.” In Activity 4.2, after reading Emerson’s “from Self-Reliance,” students select several lines from the text and write a short argument response stating agreement or disagreement and comparing Emerson’s views to their own. Additionally, in that activity, student read an excerpt from Thoreau’s Walden and write a summary of Thoreau’s societal criticisms. Embedded Assessment 1 asks students to write a reflective narrative about a “significant personal experience that involves the pursuit of happiness and/or transcendental ideals…” Embedded Assessment 2, on the other hand, asks students to research and write a multi-genre research project about a “single person, event, or movement that embodies the American ideal of the pursuit of happiness.”

Unit 5 develops the mode of argument to a greater degree, building towards Embedded Assessment 2, a blend of explanatory and argumentative writing: “Discuss how Zora Neale Hurston’s writing is both a reflection of and a departure from the ideas of the Harlem Renaissance. Include aspects of the Harlem Renaissance that you see reflected in Hurston’s writing as well as characteristics of Hurston’s writing that are departures from selected aspects of the Harlem Renaissance.” Prior to the embedded assessment in Activity 5.17, students read critical reviews of Their Eyes Were Watching God and choose one to defend, challenge, or qualify. Students are directed to “[e]stablish the significance of the claim, distinguishing it from alternate or opposing claims.” Additionally, in preparation for the embedded assessment, Activity 5.14 asks students to practice qualifying arguments “supporting the claim that Zora Neale Hurston’s work is both a natural product of and a departure from the ideas of the Harlem Renaissance.”

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1m. The Grade 11 materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate to the grade level.

The instructional materials for Grade 11 support the indicator’s focus on writing to sources, a key task to grow students’ literacy skills. Writing tasks build over the course of the school year, providing students with varied opportunities of growing complexity to learn, practice, and demonstrate evidenced-based writing. Students are asked to analyze texts, create claims, and include clear information and evidence from texts read within the unit as well as texts read independently. Students are often reminded by the materials to “create an organization that logically sequences claims, counterclaim(s), reasons, and evidence” (CCSS W.11-12.1a.) as well as to select the “most relevant” (CCSS W.11-12.2b) evidence in developing the topic or argument. Application of these skills is evident within the on-demand writing assignments as well as in the embedded assessments within each unit.

  • In Unit 1, Activity 1.10, after reading two historical documents and a definition essay, Writing to Sources: Explanatory Text asks students write an extended definition for the term freedom. The writing activity allows students to “draw on three texts that address the issue of freedom—Roosevelt’s speech, the Bill of Rights, and the essay by Jellison and Harvey” but indicates their position “should reflect your own thinking about this concept.” Students are reminded to “begin with a clear thesis that defines freedom; develop your extended definition with specific examples of how you can experience freedom and what it means to you; use each of the four definition strategies to support your points; include clear transitions between points and a concluding statement that reinforces your thesis.”
  • In Unit 2, Activity 2.14, after reading Margaret Chase Smith’s speech “Declaration of Conscience” and Arthur Miller’s essay “Why I Wrote The Crucible,” students are asked to choose one of the texts and analyze how the author develops his/her argument: “Write an essay in which you explain how the author builds an argument to persuade the audience of the social agenda promoted in a speech or essay. Select one passage as the focus for your essay: In your essay, analyze how the author uses three or more of the rhetorical techniques you have studied to strengthen the logic and persuasiveness of the argument.”
  • In Unit 3, Embedded Assessment 1, students are asked to work in groups to “plan, develop, write, revise, and present an informational article on a timely and debatable issue of significance to your school community, local community, or national audience.” After completing the collaborative work, students individually “develop a variety of editorial products that reflect [your] point of view (agreement, alternative, or opposing) on the topic...and include at least two different pieces, such as cartoons, editorials, letters, posters, photos.” The Assessment Scoring Guide indicates an exemplary response “explicitly represents multiple and varied editorial perspectives; is extremely persuasive throughout every piece, demonstrating a thorough understanding of persuasive techniques; provides evidence of thorough and original research throughout; and each piece demonstrates appropriate and ample evidence to support the thesis.” In preparation for the assessment, Activity 3.12 asks students to “[i]dentify fallacious logic, appeals, and rhetoric in sample texts” and to use “logical fallacies and refute the fallacies of others in a debate.” Additionally, Activity 3.13 asks students to analyze “the format, style, and conventions of editorial cartoons…[a]pply knowledge from this analysis to create an editorial cartoon.” These activities support students as they acquire skills in argumentation and analysis of topics, including an analysis of rhetoric using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • In Unit 4, Activity 4.8, while reading Into the Wild, students are asked to write an analytical essay explaining how the author “uses structure and style to show his shifting feelings toward his subject.” Students are instructed to use “commentary to link reasons and evidence” to their central claim. Additionally, students are reminded to develop their thinking with “relevant details and quotations from the text.”
  • In Unit 5, Embedded Assessment 2, students are asked to “discuss how Zora Neale Hurston’s writing is both a reflection of and a departure from the ideas of the Harlem Renaissance. Include aspects of the Harlem Renaissance that you see reflected in Hurston’s writing as well as characteristics of Hurston’s writing that are departures from selected aspects of the Harlem Renaissance.” The Assessment Scoring Guide indicates an exemplary response “presents a convincing, thorough, and perceptive understanding of Hurston’s writings, as well as aspects of the Harlem Renaissance; contains analysis that demonstrates an exceptional insight into Hurston’s writings and the Harlem Renaissance; uses clear and effective specific and well-chosen examples that yield detailed support for the analysis; employs stylistic choices in language that are exceptional; successfully weaves textual evidence from the novel into its own prose...” In preparation for the assessment, Activity 5.17 asks students to “[e]valuate multiple critical reviews in light of the ideas of the Harlem Renaissance...and evaluate multiple thematic interpretations of a novel,…[citing] evidence in the form of quotations and commentary from the review and the novel to support your thesis.”

Indicator 1n

Materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1n. The instructional materials include instruction of grammar and conventions/language standards for Grade 11 and are applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts with opportunities for application context.

Direct instruction and practice with grammar and conventions/language standards are explicitly delineated and also embedded within the activities of unit lessons. Each of the five Grade 11 units is introduced with Planning the Unit, a Teacher Resource page explaining the unit purpose, followed by the Instructional Activities and Pacing chart, listing instructional activities including grammar and language skills as they are taught and applied in the text selections and writing activities. An additional chart, Unit Resources at a Glance, provides a categorical list of unit features: Language Skills comprised of Language and Writer’s Craft featured on activity pages; Grammar and Usage, identified on activity pages through a sidebar; Writing Workshop with Grammar Activities, available through Teacher Resources; and English Language Development. Beneath each of these categories are specifically listed conventions and applications of grammatical structures taught and practiced throughout the unit. The unit’s activities, Word Connections, Academic and Social Language Preview, and some Check Your Understanding activities, address specific language concepts (L.11-12.4-6) and provide opportunities for student practice.

For example, in Unit 3, the Instructional Activities and Pacing Guide indicates Activities 3.4-3.8 and Activity 3.14 offer instruction and practice with language goals. Unit 3 Resources at a Glance lists diction and tone as well as cumulative or loose sentence patterns among the studies in Language and Writer’s Craft. In Activity 3.4, the Grammar and Usage callout box defines and discusses the concept of a rhetorical question, noting they often occur “immediately after a comment and suggest the opposite….” Embedded within the Second Read questions are supports for considering language standards. Questions on topics of Craft and Structure regarding word meaning dependent on context clues and word parts support L.11-12.4-6 as well as the general Note on Range and Content of Student Language Use; students must come to “appreciate that language is as at least as much a matter of craft as of rules and be able to choose words, syntax, and punctuation to express themselves and achieve particular functions and rhetorical effects (CCSS, page 51). Activity 3.5 explores the relationship of bias and nuance (L.11-12.5b) as students learn to determine bias based on selection and omission, placement, photos, and source control among other influential--though nuanced--factors. A Literary Terms callout box in Activity 3.14 introduces domain-specific vocabulary (L.11-12.6): satire, Horatian satire, and Juvenalian satire. Activity 3.15 builds on the previous domain-specific vocabulary lesson and introduces students to the relevance of diction in satire, pointing out in general terms that “satire benefits from careful diction.” Activity 3.19 introduces students to the role of cumulative sentence structures. The Language and Writer’s Craft exercise asks students to examine cumulative sentence structures using a mentor text, identify the main clause and the modifying phrase or clause, then explain the effect of this loose sentence pattern. The study of these elements of grammar and conventions allows students to develop skills they need to write their own satirical pieces for Embedded Assessment 2, thereby demonstrating an increasingly sophisticated context with opportunities for application.

Word Connections, a sidebar featured throughout many unit activities, supports L.9-10.4-6, language standards related to Vocabulary Acquisition and Use. For example, in Unit 5, Activity 3, a callout box discusses the various contexts of the word metamorphosis. A second Word Connections callout box immediately follows to discuss the multiple meanings of the word concentrations. In both instances, the word is discussed in relationship to a scientific context as well as a more generic context. Word Connections and Literary Terminology support students as they grow in skill to determine word meaning and as they “acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases” (CCSS, page 53).

Additionally, found in all Grade 11 units are lessons titled Academic and Social Language Preview, typically preceding lessons titled Interpreting the Text Using Close Reading. Unit 3 offers three such lessons. Academic and Social Language Preview offers an opportunity for students to determine word meaning through a context sentence prior to reading an entire text and then check their definitions against a formal source (L.11-12.4a & 4d). The lesson is followed by the close reading and study of the associated mentor text. Optional Language Checkpoint, a class period activity, is also included in all Grade 11 units. Among the Grade 11 checkpoints are lessons in placing modifiers, writing logical comparisons, using commas, parentheses, and dashes, using subject-verb agreement, and punctuating complete sentences. For example, Language Checkpoint Activity Lc.3.4 engages students in a study of frequently-confused words, a language standard first introduced as L.4.1g and urged by the standards for “continued attention in higher grades as they are applied to increasingly sophisticated writing and speaking” (CCSS, page 30).

Among the resource materials found under the Teacher Resource tab on the SpringBoard landing page are Grammar Activities aligned to specific grades, units, and activities (currently bearing the 2014 copyright date) as well as a Grammar Handbook for grades 9-12 (2014 copyright). Writing Workshops (copyright 2014), accessed through the Teacher Resources tab, also include instruction and practice with Language and Writer’s Craft using mentor texts. For example, Writing Workshop 7: Narrative Nonfiction Reflective Essay, Revising for Language and Writer’s Craft provides instruction on paradox and asks students to “[c]onsider the following classic examples, using the space provided to explain what [you] think is implied by the paradox” (L.11-12.5a). They then return to their own essays and “consider spots where using a paradox may help to engage the reader, express the narrator’s sense of confusion or conflict, or clarify the central ideas in the text,” an activity that shows sophistication in advancing the standards from identification and analysis to application in creation.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The SpringBoard Grade 11 instructional materials meet the expectations for building knowledge. The instructional materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.

Criterion 2a - 2h

32/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students' knowledge and their ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2a. Texts and text sets are organized around a topic/topics to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend complex texts proficiently.

Grade 11 units and corresponding text sets are developed around a thematic focus on the "American Dream." The concept is broad and encompasses many aspects of the “American Experience,” including freedom of speech, the pursuit of happiness, and the American journey. Each of the units develops one or more of these aspects throughout the year, helping the student to develop a better understanding of American perspectives and experiences and a more developed definition of the American Dream.

  • Unit 1, The American Dream, leads students to examine the abstractions of freedom and patriotism. Students read a variety of genres, e.g., poetry, nonfiction, drama, and short stories in the process of developing a working definition of the American Dream. Among the texts in this study are Walt Whitman’s “I Hear America Singing” and Langston Hughes’ “I, Too, Sing America,” iconic examples of American literature illustrating “differing aspects of the spirit of America.”
  • Unit 2, The Power of Persuasion, “highlights America’s commitment to freedom of speech by looking closely at the rhetorical tools used by writers and speakers to persuade an audience and to make a statement about American society.” Students read a range of texts from Arthur Miller’s The Crucible to Senator Margaret Chase Smith’s “Declaration of Conscience” and Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address. These texts, along with other speeches in the unit, culminate in Embedded Assessment 2, a student exercise of freedom of speech.
  • Unit 3, American Forums, continues the study of freedom of speech by “exploring the thematic issue of the relationship between news media (newspapers in particular) and the free exchange of ideas in a democracy,” as a means of helping students distinguish between “arguments that use careful reasoning based on sound evidence and those that rely instead on manipulation, biased language, and fallacious reasoning.” The unit establishes the role of free speech in relationship to the responsibility of the writer/speaker through reviewing the First Amendment and studying George Krimsky’s “The Role of Media in Democracy.”
  • Unit 4, The Pursuit of Happiness, continues to thread the year’s thematic purpose as students analyze “the American Dream from the viewpoint of what it means to be happy and to pursue happiness…[and] link this pursuit to the American Transcendentalist movement that finds its spiritual moorings in the natural world.” Students study Emerson and Thoreau’s perspective on Transcendentalism and examine literature, past and present, that share similar perspectives on happiness. The unit culminates in original student poetry exploring personal beliefs about the pursuit of happiness.
  • In Unit 5, An American Journey, students experience a cultural journey through the literature of the Harlem Renaissance, focusing on the writing of Zora Neale Hurston through “Sweat,” “How it Feels to be Colored Me,” and Their Eyes Were Watching God. The unit culminates in students applying their knowledge through an analysis of how Hurston is both “a reflection of and a departure from” philosophies of the Harlem Renaissance.

The sequence of texts and lesson scaffolds are designed to support students as they read to comprehend complex texts. Students read text independently, in small groups, and as whole group read alouds. In addition, students are asked to actively monitor their reading comprehension through the guiding questions of the Setting a Purpose for Reading and Second Read sections. Unit texts are distributed at varying levels within the quantitative and qualitative measures appropriate to the grade band. Finally, in each Activity, students are provided with text-dependent questions to engage them actively and provide scaffolding for students in need.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2b. Grade 11 materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

While students have been introduced to argument and written arguments in earlier grades, the activities and texts in the Grade 11 program tend to focus on argument to foster independence in students’ ability to analyze the various facets of a text. Students read a variety of seminal historic texts, consider the context of their origination, and reflect on multiple viewpoints as they come to “understand the complex and difficult task of synthesizing information to create a clear and insightful argument” related to the thematic focus of Grade 11: the American Dream. Within most activities of each unit students work independently, in small groups, and as a whole group responding to questions and completing tasks that require analysis of individual texts and text sets. The sequence of texts and tasks are designed to support students as they build knowledge and skills through progressively more complex text-based interactions.

Each unit activity introducing a new text follows a common pattern. An activity feature, Preview, explains the what and why of the lesson/activity followed by Setting a Purpose, an activity feature fostering self-monitoring through “while-reading” task engagement with the text. For example, in Unit 3, Activity 7, Preview tells students what they will be reading, an editorial, and the why, “[to] investigate slanters in action,” an essential skill for the successful completion of the unit’s Embedded Assessment 1 when students will create their own “editorial products that reflect [your] point-of-view.” Setting a Purpose asks students to “highlight slanters...circle unknown words and phrases…[p]ut a question mark next to anything that raises a question for you…[p]ut an exclamation point next to anything” that raises a strong reader response. Following the first reading, Second Read asks students a series of increasingly rich, text-dependent questions, each classified as a question related to better understanding Key Ideas and Details or Craft and Structure. In some question sets, Integration of Knowledge and Ideas is also included within this portion of the lesson.

Following Second Read, students become engaged in Working from the Text, a frequently collaborative activity typically engaging students in a directed but more personally responsive work, e.g., working with a graphic organizer, preparing a summary, classifying text ideas, comparing and contrasting concepts and approaches, etc. In Unit 3, Activity 7, students use the SMELL strategy to analyze the editorial, looking at the sender-receiver relationship, message conveyed, emotional strategies, logical strategies, and language. A second Working from the Text activity asks students to “Copy five of the more slanted passages from Schroth’s editorial to the spaces below and revise them to be less rhetorically manipulative.” After having worked through the activity text/s in various ways, Check Your Understanding asks students to respond briefly, typically in writing but sometimes through discussion, to a guiding question. For example, in Unit 3, Activity 7, students are asked to respond to this question: “How does a writer use tone to advance an opinion?”

Although some of the unit activities end with Check Your Understanding, a more developed writing activity is offered by Writing to Sources, a feature found in many unit activities. For example, in Unit 3, Activity 8, after instruction in reading an editorial and lesson activities of Preview, Setting a Purpose, Second Read, Working from the Text, and Check Your Understanding, the lesson continues with a culminating activity, Writing to Sources. In this activity, students are instructed to “independently analyze a second editorial of your choice. Then write a text explaining how the writer tailors the language and argument to a target audience.” Students are reminded to include “a clear summary of the argument...cite specific examples from the text...comment on the effect the author’s language has on the intended audience.” The unit activities and texts work progressively, leading students toward the first of two Embedded Assessments appearing midway through the unit and again at the unit end. In Unit 3, Embedded Assessment 1, students are tasked with working collaboratively “to plan, develop, write, revise, and present an informational article on a timely and debatable issue of significance to your school community, local community, or national audience.” Thereafter, each student is to independently develop a variety of editorial products, e.g., cartoons, letters, posters, etc. The Embedded Assessment draws on skills and knowledge that has been practiced through the various activities of Unit 3, Activities 3.1 through 3.13.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2c. Grade 11 material contains a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts. Within most activities of each unit, the sequence of questions, texts, and tasks are designed to build student knowledge and strengthen student skills. Teaching and learning materials provide explicit instruction in research-based reading strategies and text annotation, analytic discussion, and academic writing.

Reading closely is a central activity of every unit: “During the first read, students are encouraged to engage with the text and annotate it with questions and thoughts. When they return to the text for a second read, students search for answers and evidence in response to thoughtful text-dependent questions found after each passage. The questions have been written to tap into the complexity of the text: thematic complexity, structural or linguistic complexity, or content knowledge demands.” Overall, these questions are text-specific and/or text-dependent and are not framed across texts; however, some Second Read questions reference generalities related to themes, literary elements, literary devices, or conventions, further supporting the acquisition of knowledge within and across texts.

In addition to discussions fueled by text-dependent questions, a mix of argumentative, explanatory, and narrative writing prompts provide opportunities for students to demonstrate their understanding and analysis of texts through written expression. Performance tasks allow students to integrate the knowledge and skills they have acquired to demonstrate proficiencies in reading and language standards through writing. Most embedded assessments ask students to expand on unit texts by conducting independent research to integrate knowledge acquired on their own with knowledge gained in the classroom.

Unit activities are typically threaded together through a thematic focus connecting one day’s lesson to the next day’s lesson and therefore, the text of study in one activity to the text of study in the following activities. Additionally, Embedded Assessments occur twice in each unit; they ask students to use knowledge and skills gained through previous lessons to demonstrate proficiencies and growth. Each unit follows a similar pattern in developing student ability to successfully build knowledge from single texts and synthesizing knowledge among texts. Day one of each unit begins with Preview, an overview of the unit’s first Embedded Assessment; thereafter, most activities or lessons build to develop student skills and knowledge in the performance of that assessment. After the completion of the first Embedded Assessment the second half of the unit begins, this time with a preview of the second Embedded Assessment which culminates the unit study. Thereafter, most ensuing activities progress to build student proficiencies to complete the second assessment. Through this reiterative process, students gain knowledge and skills to the immediate text under study while simultaneously considering how to integrate their learning into the upcoming performance task.

For example, in Unit 2, Activity 14, after reading The Crucible in the first half of the unit, students read the speech, “Declaration of Conscience” by Margaret Chase Smith and “Why I Wrote The Crucible: An Artist’s Answer to Politics” by Arthur Miller. Preview indicates that students are reading to “conduct research into McCarthyism to better understand the society Arthur Miller was commenting on in his writing of The Crucible. Setting a Purpose instructs students to underline or highlight “portions of the text in which you find especially powerful use of language for the purpose and audience” and “circle unknown words and phrases” during the first reading the “Declaration of Conscience.” Second Read engages students in a closer reading of the text, prompting students to connect this text to their background knowledge. For example, students are asked, “What is the difference between ‘trial by jury’ and ‘trial by accusation’? How is one a ‘witch hunt’?” This question requires students draw on their knowledge of the Constitution, alluded to in this speech but not directly cited, and integrate their knowledge to derive an inferential response. Check Your Understanding asks students to complete a quick write, identifying what part of the speech they find most powerful and explaining why. Following the two reads and discussion of the Smith speech, students engage in their first read of “Why I Wrote The Crucible,” again highlighting the most powerful portions of the essay. Second Read engages students in a closer reading of the text, prompting students to consider questions that are both text-based and text-dependent. Regarding Miller in paragraph 2: "How have his memories of the time he wrote The Crucible changed? What purpose for writing does this suggest?’” and the slightly more inferential text-dependent question, “As Miller finds connections between the Salem witch trials and the McCarthy hearings, what central idea regarding human nature begins to emerge?” Working from the Text asks students to complete a topical chart comparing Miller’s feelings towards McCarthyism to Hollywood’s feelings, Miller’s fascinations with the Salem witch trials, and the critical and public reactions to his work. Explain How an Author Builds an Argument culminates Activity 2.14 with an assignment asking students to write an essay explaining “how the author builds an argument to persuade the audience of the social agenda promoted in a speech or essay.” Students are to use the elements of argument learned in Unit 1, Activity 13 to analyze The Declaration of Independence and to examine “how the author uses three or more of the rhetorical techniques...to strengthen the logic and persuasiveness of the argument,” choosing one of the texts read during Unit 2, Activity 14.

Unit 2, Activity 19 continues to build knowledge as students analyze Patrick Henry’s argument in his “Speech to the Second Virginia Convention.” Following the standard lesson protocol, Preview, Setting a Purpose, Second Read, Working from the Text, and Check Your Understanding, students conduct the first read marking “elements of the argumentative structure,” highlighting “rhetorical devices used by the speaker,” and circling “unknown words and phrases.” Second read engages students in deeper thinking with text-based and text-dependent questions, e.g., “Which element of the typical structure of an argument does Henry present in paragraph 5? Explain his rhetorical response.” and “What kinds of appeals does Henry use to convince Virginia to begin to prepare for war with Great Britain?” Explain How an Author Builds an Argument asks students to write an essay explaining “how Patrick Henry builds an argument to persuade his audience that the colonies should declare their independence from Great Britain.” Further building knowledge, Unit 2, Activity 20 introduces rhetorical appeals and employs them in the analysis of Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address.” After following the teaching and learning protocols, Independent Reading Link asks students to demonstrate their knowledge by using their Reader/Writer Notebook and comparing and contrasting “one of the speeches you have read independently with your analysis of Abraham Lincoln’s use of rhetorical appeals.”

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2d. The Grade 11 questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. a combination of reading, writing, speaking, and listening).

During each unit, students complete two Embedded Assessments, one midpoint in the unit and the second at the unit’s end; the Embedded Assessments ask students to work collaboratively as well as independently. Each one is a unique performance task that allows students to show knowledge proficiency with texts, concepts, and skills representative of multiple grade-level standards and taught through previous lesson sets. The Embedded Assessments require students to deepen learning through analysis and synthesis, presenting their findings through a variety of products: essays, multimedia presentations, speeches, dramatic interpretations, and anthologies. Each unit strategically builds towards the culminating assessment and provides teachers with usable information about student readiness. Skills needed to complete the performance tasks, e.g., writing processes, technology fluency, and speaking and listening skills, are modeled and directly taught as well as practiced in relationship to the performance task. Further supports exist within the student and teacher materials to ensure students are able to complete the performance task. Additionally, many of the text-dependent questions related to Second Read as well as the questions and activities in Check Your Understanding align to the culminating tasks.

In Unit 1, Embedded Assessment 2 asks students to synthesize “at least three to five sources and your own observations to defend, challenge, or qualify the statement that America still provides access to the American Dream.” The performance task asks students to integrate a variety of sources into a coherent, well-written argumentative essay. Students are told to refer to the sources and “employ your own observations to support your position,” noting the argument should be the focus of the essay while the sources and personal observations are in support of the position. Prior to the embedded assessment, students prepare for the task by reading historical documents, including The Declaration of Independence, poetry, drama, and essays addressing a similar theme. They also participate and rehearse their ideas in Unit 1, Activity 18 in the Position Presentation, a paired activity asking students to take a position, research the position, and “present your position and evidence to the groups with the opposing argument.” The Teacher Wrap for this activity guides students in preparing for the embedded assessment noting the teacher should point out “this is the last activity before the Embedded Assessment. Have students glance through the Embedded Assessment requirements again. Ask them whether they are prepared, and have them note on an exit slip any concepts they are still uncertain about. Review those concepts.”

In Unit 2, Embedded Assessment 1 asks students to integrate multiple skills to show mastery of a variety of standards to accomplish the task: “Your assignment is to work with a group to write and perform an original dramatic script in which you make a statement about a conflict that faces society.” The completion of this task offers students not only the opportunity to perform, but also to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of concepts related to Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, speaking out about the “persecution of suspected communists” through a drama written in a time far removed but with corresponding events, the “persecution of suspected witches.” The completion of this task requires students to work and write collaboratively and “make a statement about a social conflict or issue” through a dramatic interpretation; work and write collaboratively. Other aspects of the task related to the unit’s study related to use of setting “as a backdrop for social commentary.” Additionally, students are to demonstrate an understanding of script-writing conventions, theatrical elements, and literary elements, all areas of study during Unit 2. In preparation for the assignment, students read and analyze The Crucible and practice the skills needed to complete the assessment, such as Activity 2.9, which has students study the diction and figurative language of the Puritan culture and then put it into practice in the narrative writing prompt: “Write an original scene between two characters from The Crucible. In this scene, emulate the language Miller creates to develop or extend a conflict related to one of the themes of the play.” Students are reminded to include appropriate language echoing Puritan speech and write stage directions establishing the context and supporting actors in their actions and delivery. Teachers are asked to monitor students’ progress in the Teacher Wrap of this activity by reviewing “students’ dialogue for formatting, appropriate language, stage directions, and central conflicts” to ensure the student work complements the original text.

In Unit 4, Embedded Assessment 2, asks students to “create a multi-genre research project that expresses your research and perspective on a person, event, or movement that embodies the American ideal of the pursuit of happiness.” In completing the task students will demonstrate the following skills and knowledge: “Select a topic, generate research questions, and conduct research; read analytically from a variety of sources; draft and revise a working thesis to guide research; collect, record, and synthesize information; understand the essential features of a variety of genres; use genres and their conventions appropriately; create a cohesive project that establishes a connection among genres selected; write and revise in multiple genres for multiple purposes.” In Activities 4.19-4.25, students review a student example of the multi-genre research paper and work collaboratively on a multi-genre research paper over Charles Schultz before working independently on their own in the Embedded Assessment. The Teacher Wrap for Activity 4.25 gives teachers means of assessing student understanding and for addressing concerns: “While students complete the steps of this activity in groups or individually, you might consider having mini-conferences. Use this time to check in with each student to determine where he or she is in his or her progress toward completing the project and to clear up any questions or concerns.”

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/ language in context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2e. Grade 9 materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials include a consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic and figurative language in context.

Opportunities to build vocabulary are found throughout the instructional materials. A cohesive, year-long description of vocabulary instruction is found in the Language Development section of The Front Matter, Teacher’s Edition found in the listings under the Teacher Resource tab on the program’s landing page. The Front Matter describes the program’s approach to language skills and knowledge as “part of an integrated approach to reading, writing, speaking, and listening with instruction that focuses on language as a flexible tool that can be adapted for specific contexts.” The section goes on to specifically outline four instructional features embedded within each unit: Academic Vocabulary featuring Tier Two terms and concepts; Literary Terms equipping students with Tier Three language from the ELA domain; Word Connections featuring roots and affixes etymology, cognates, word relationships, and multiple-meaning words; and Academic Vocabulary in Context featuring glossed terms at the point of use for words with insufficient context clues to aid in comprehension. Additionally, Language and Writer’s Craft activities along with Grammar and Usage sidebars provide language instruction and grammar support in the context of reading and writing within the unit. Language Checkpoint activities offer optional practice opportunities for students to develop or refresh their knowledge of standard English conventions.

Other unit features support teacher instruction and student use of vocabulary in various contexts. The Unit Overview, a feature page of each unit, presents a sidebar listing of Academic Vocabulary and Literary Terms introduced, taught, and studied in each unit. Within the activities or lessons, the Setting a Purpose for Reading feature frequently asks students to identify “unknown words or phrases” and determine their meaning using “context clues, word parts, or a dictionary.” Additionally, Planning the Unit offers two features, Supporting Students’ Language Development and Digital Resource: English Language Development Activities, offering additional supports in scaffolded language instruction to ensure students have opportunities to learn, practice, apply, and transfer the language needed to “develop the content knowledge, skills, and academic language needed to perform well on the Embedded Assessments.” The application of words across texts or in ways that support accelerated vocabulary learning in reading, speaking, and writing tasks is most strongly supported through Tier 3 study of language related to literature, rhetoric, and other studies of the ELA domain and reiteratively applied in analysis and communicated through speaking and writing.

In Unit 1, Unit Overview lists Academic Vocabulary and Literary Terms for study across the next 18 activities or lessons. Academic terms listed are primary source, defend, challenge, qualify; literary terms listed are exemplification, imagery, personification, synecdoche. Over the course of the unit, students frequently interact with these words in the context of texts, activities, and tasks. Unit 1 Activity 2 is a lesson on extended definitions. The lesson delineates four means by which a definition can be extended: exemplification, function, classification, and negation. The word, “exemplification” is featured in a sidebar and defined as “to define by showing specific, relevant examples that fit the writer’s definition.” Activity 1.2 focuses further on the term exemplification by explaining, “Successful extended definitions go beyond dictionary definitions...to extend a definition, writers use a variety of strategies. One definition strategy is to define by example, which is showing specific, relevant examples that fit the writer’s definition.” The discussion of exemplification and its meaning integrates into Setting a Purpose. Students are asked to conduct the first reading of an essay by John McCain and while reading, underline “phrases that exemplify the author’s definition of patriot.” All terms listed in the Unit Overview are featured in activity sidebars and each activity provides similar treatment of featured words; terms are fully defined and contextualized and, thereafter, repeated many times through the unit’s study in both receptive and expressive modes. Sidebars supported through activities such as this provide rich, multidimensional interaction with language and accelerate vocabulary learning. These types of activities are foundational as students build academic vocabulary, read diverse literary texts, research among primary and secondary sources, and become college and career ready.

In Unit 5, Unit Overview lists two Academic Vocabulary and six Literary Terms for study across the next 18 activities or lessons. The unit feature, Supporting Students’ Language Development Section notes that numerous “resources are available in this unit to help teachers differentiate instruction for English language learners or other students who need extra support in English language development.” The associated ELL Support Document found on the listings under the Teacher Resource tab on the program’s landing page indicates teachers should “consistently apply and practice strategic vocabulary development support for Academic Vocabulary with tools such as interactive word walls, diffusing, vocabulary graphic organizers, and QHT work.” The Digital Resources feature indicates where ELD-focused activities for three texts within the unit can be found, i.e.: Academic and Social Language Preview, Interpreting the Text Using Close Reading, and Collaborative Academic Discussion. Each of these activities uses an excerpt from the text under study to support language learning essential to understanding the isolated text, the concepts under study, and the larger goals of the unit. For example, Unit 5, Activity 5.3a Academic and Social Language Preview draws on vocabulary from the Activity 5.3 text, an excerpt from “On, ‘From the Dark Tower.’” The activity begins by providing a three-column chart listing selected words for study, e.g., restrained, dignified, and poignant. The second column of the provides a contextual reference as a direct quotation from the text. In the third column, students are asked to “work with a partner to see if you can determine the word’s meaning using context clues or your knowledge of word parts.” Following completion of the chart, students work through a series of Language Practice exercises. In Activity 5.3a, among the exercises are talking with a partner using 4 specific words from the vocabulary list, writing an octave, an eight-line poem, using four specific words, and writing novel sentences using pairings of vocabulary words provided by the activity. Unit 5, Activity 3c, Collaborative Academic Discussion, engages students in small group or paired discussions around academic language and literary concerns. For example, Activity 5.3c asks students. “How does Collier incrementally develop the idea that Cullen embraces the color black?” It then provides a sentence frame for student response, “Collier incrementally develops the idea that Cullen embraces the color black by ______. ” The activity ends with the feature, Asking Questions, which typically begins by providing an explanation of the text’s content or message and then asks students to write a response. For example, in Activity 5.3c, students are told, “Countee Cullen’s poem is full of symbols, including fruit, seeds, stars, buds, and reaping. If you could ask the poet one question about these symbols, what would it be?” Two additional questions follow, and students are to share their questions with the class.

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and practice which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2f. Grade 11 materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

Opportunities to build and communicate learning of topics and texts through written expression are found throughout the instructional materials. A cohesive, year-long description of writing instruction is found in the Effective Expression section of The Front Matter, Teacher’s Edition found in the listings under the Teacher Resource tab on the program’s landing page. The Front Matter explains the program provides “multiple opportunities for authentic, task-based writing and writing to sources. As students are learning to write, they learn to consider task, audience, and purpose in structuring and organizing their writing. Direct instruction in writing in different modes—narrative, argumentative, and explanatory—is a primary focus of unit instruction.” The section goes on to delineate five areas integrated within unit activities and additional resources available through the teacher resource tab: guided instruction in the major modes of writing; direct instruction emphasizing incorporation of details, reasons, and textual evidence; short and extended research writing focused on evaluating sources, gathering relevant evidence, and citing and reporting findings accurately; integration of research-based strategies supporting the writing process; and formative writing prompts, performance-based embedded assessments and optional mode-specific writing workshops.

Several unit features also support student growth in writing skills. Language and Writer’s Craft and Language Checkpoints features “build students’ knowledge of grammar and conventions, making them more proficient, confident, and creative writers and more effective self- and peer-editors.” Explain How an Author Builds an Argument, another frequent unit feature, presents formative writing prompts encouraging the use of academic vocabulary in various contexts. Additionally, each unit presents two performance-based embedded assessments and a corresponding rubric outlining performance expectations. Instruction is progressive, incorporating strategies and protocols to support students' writing independence as they work towards mastery. Finally, a portfolio of student work is cultivated over the course of the year and acts as a final assessment of student writing development.

Unit 1, Activity 2 Writing to Sources asks students to write a brief response to an extended definition essay by John McCain. In preparation for the writing assignment, students study the concept of an extended definition and conduct a close reading of McCain’s essay, an extended definition of the word “patriot.” In the subsequent student generated essay, they are to explain how McCain’s interpretation “impacted your own understanding of the word.” Students are directed to have a clear thesis explaining their new understanding of “patriot” and include appropriate transitions and a concluding statement. Teachers are urged to use this activity as an assessment of student “ability to choose appropriate evidence and explain it in their own words,” a skill they will need for a later embedded assessment. The Teacher Wrap provides adaptations and tips for students needing additional support, offering additional resources as explicit examples of the extended definition: “A Cause Greater Than Self” by John McCain and “A Faith in Simple Dreams” by Barack Obama,” both available online. This formative writing task previews and supports student practice in preparation for Embedded Assessment 1, “a multi-paragraph essay that defines your interpretation of what it means to be an American.”

Unit 3, Activity 11 Writing to Sources asks students to write a letter to the editor in response to an editorial. In preparation for the writing activity, students are provided instruction in the form and process of writing a letter to the editor followed by a close reading of an editorial, “Why I Hate Cell Phones.” During the close reading discussion, students reflect on the juxtaposition of words, the author’s point-of-view, and tone. They also make inferences about the author’s choices of words and implications. In their writing of a letter to the editor, students are urged to sequence claims logically and provide reasons and evidence for their claims as well as respond to counterclaims. Additionally, students are to use a variety of rhetorical techniques, including anecdotes studied throughout Unit 1 and reviewed earlier in Unit 3, and case studies, or analogies, studied in Unit 2. Following this lesson, Unit 3, Activity 12 asks students to identify “fallacious logic, appeals, and rhetoric in sample texts...and use logical fallacies [to] refute the fallacies of others in a debate.”). As a formative assessment to check student understanding of and proficiency with fallacies, the Writing to Sources: Argument prompt instructs students to review “the letter to the editor that you wrote in Activity 3.11 and revise it using at least one of the types of fallacy from this activity.” These assignments and others are designed to prepare and support students in the completion of Embedded Assessment 1, a writing task asking students to “plan, develop, write, revise, and present an informational article on a timely and debatable issue of significance to your school community, local community, or national audience.”

Unit 5, Embedded Assessment 2 asks students to write an analytical essay critiquing Zora Neale Hurston’s writing “as both a departure from and a reflection of the ideas of the Harlem Renaissance.” To complete this task, students must determine which elements of the Harlem Renaissance they recognize in Hurston’s writing and which elements of her writings seem to be departures from those aspects. The subsequent claim must be stated as a single thesis statement and the essay must use an organizational structure allowing for comparison of Hurston’s work to aspects of the time period. Students are expected to use and cite textual evidence as well as provide commentary to explain how the evidence relates to the thesis.

While the content for this assignment comes directly from Unit 5 as a culminating task, this paper requires students to demonstrate all writing skills practiced throughout the year. Guiding questions help students to frame their thinking on the writing process: planning, drafting and revising, and editing and publishing. The Scoring Guide outlines student expectations. After completing the assignment, students are prompted to write a reflection that asks them to think about “how you went about accomplishing this task, and respond to the following question: How did the use of both primary and secondary sources help you examine how writers’ works can be a product of both their time and their own personal perspective?”

Throughout the year, students have the option to add formative and summative writing to a writing portfolio. Teachers are encouraged to have students perform self-evaluations using the work collected over the year as evidence of growth in learning. The Teacher Wrap indicates self-evaluations can be conducted in a variety of ways, “but it should reflect a level of self-discovery about individual strengths and challenges faced during the academic year. Students may choose to write a letter to next year’s teacher or to create a final portfolio of samples of best work with a description of each work, or they could even write a final reflection that synthesizes all the reflective thinking about learning over the year.”

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2g. Grade 11 materials include a progression of focused, shared research, and writing projects to encourage students to synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

Opportunities to build skill in research as well as synthesize knowledge and understanding across classroom activities and research-based projects are found throughout the SpringBoard materials. The Front Matter of the Teacher’s Edition indicates that “SpringBoard provides multiple opportunities for authentic, task-based writing and writing to sources” with many writing tasks requiring students seek evidence beyond those texts provided as part of the curriculum. Additionally, students are engaged in short-term tasks and longer-term projects wherein they practice and demonstrate proficiencies in “evaluating sources, gathering relevant evidence, and citing and reporting findings accurately.” Specifically, the Grade 11 materials include a steady “progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.” Students begin with basic research skills, which build in complexity and are applied in diverse ways throughout the year, both collaboratively and independently. The Teacher Wrap provides teachers with support in “employing projects that develop students’ knowledge of different aspects of a topic,” as well as “resources for student research.” Students are given opportunities to complete short projects as they develop the foundational skills necessary to move on and complete long projects typically encompassed in the embedded assessments.Unit 1, Activity 1.8 engages students in a short research project, Researching Images of America, to analyze “the use of imagery in a poem and a visual text” and to examine “the historical significance behind an iconic American image.” After reading and annotating Langston Hughes’, “Let America Be America Again,” students collectively view and analyze the photograph, Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima. Following a discussion on what makes the image iconic, including the evocative feeling of the image, students research to find their “own idea of an iconic American image.” As part of this task, students submit an image for the classroom’s “Gallery of America and provide an explanation of your choice to share with your fellow students.” Students use the internet, print media, and history textbooks to help select a topic and research an image.

Unit 3, Embedded Assessment 1 asks students to “plan, develop, write, revise, and present an informational article on a timely and debatable issue of significance to your school community, local community, or national audience.” Prior to the task, Unit 1, Activities 8, 9, and 11 provide lessons in the editorial format, opportunities to evaluate the “effectiveness of multiple editorials,” and practice for editorial writing. As part of the performance task, students gather evidence to support a stated position, use models of argumentative writing, and incorporate effective rhetorical elements. Additionally, students are to use examples of either print or online newspapers to create a realistic layout for their editorial products to reflect their point-of-view, including “at least two different pieces, such as cartoons, editorials, letters, posters, photos, and so on.”

Unit 5, Embedded Assessment 1 asks students to “create an interactive multimedia research presentation about a topic related to the Harlem Renaissance” that includes a variety of media and an annotated bibliography. Students must choose and research a topic that focuses on some aspect of the era representing the values and ideas of the Harlem Renaissance, e.g., historical context, philosophy and beliefs, the arts, or daily life. Prior to the task, in Activity 5.2, students read an informational text to develop literal, interpretive, and universal research questions. In Activity 5.3, students research the historical context of the Harlem Renaissance, including drawing “information from both primary and secondary sources” and select “appropriate sources to answer a research question.” In Activity 5.4, students “record factual information from research sources." All facets of activities preceding the actual assessment presentation support student proficiencies in completing the larger and more independent summative task.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2h. Grade 11 materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Grade 11 materials provide students with numerous opportunities for independent reading both in and outside of classroom. Each unit incorporates two independent reading assignments connected to an aspect of the unit study or theme and sometimes directly related to the embedded assessments. Six close reading workshops of various genres or modes are found in the Teacher Resources tab and provide opportunities for enrichment or accelerated learning. Each workshop provides three texts, each with explicit instruction advancing students' independent reading skills. Each text moves through four activities: a guided activity, a collaborative activity, an independent activity, and assessment opportunities for the entire workshop. Additionally, literature studied by the whole class, e.g., novels and plays, sometimes require independent reading beyond the classroom. Accountability is maintained through double-entry journals, reader/writer notebooks, independent reading links, independent reading checkpoints, and in-class discussions for which students must be prepared. Teachers, meanwhile, are provided with guidance for the inclusion of independent reading within the text and with ideas and suggestions for fostering reading independence through the Planning the Unit guide and the Teacher Wrap.

Unit 1 exemplifies how independent reading is established throughout the year. Each unit requires the students to read two texts independently, one during the first half of the unit and the second during the latter half of the unit. Independent reading suggestions for each unit are found in Planning the Unit page and “have been chosen based on complexity and interest.” While typically related to the unit’s theme, students have a variety of fiction and nonfiction texts from which to choose. Texts are equally varied by Lexile measures. For example, in Unit 1, suggested selections range from Illegal by Bettina Restrepoe (540L), Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich (780L), Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (630L), A River Runs Through It, Norman Maclean (1160L), and Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger (1220L), and The Color of Water: A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother by James McBride (1240L). Teachers are urged to “encourage students to do their own research and select titles that intrigue them.”

In the first days of each unit, students create their Independent Reading Plan and share their plan with a partner: “How do you go about choosing what to read independently? Where can you find advice on which books or articles to read? What genre of texts do you most enjoy reading outside of class? How can you make time in your schedule to read independently?” Additionally, students are given guidance in their reading selection and how their reading may apply to the unit’s theme. For example, in Unit 1 the Independent Reading Link notes, “To enhance this unit’s focus, look for nonfiction essays, memoirs, autobiographies, or biographies that that will help you understand how others define the American Dream. Consider how these readings connect to what you read in the unit and to your own perspectives.”

The Teacher Wrap gives teachers guidance in setting up the Independent Reading as well: “Review expectations as noted in the Independent Reading Link. Include a deadline by which selections should be made and reading should begin.” Additionally, the Teacher Wrap suggests differentiated approaches to support those who struggle gain independence as readers: “As students develop their independent reading plans, consider giving students who are at an early stage of English language development the option of reading a text in their home language. These students can build on native language literacy as they begin to develop academic English.”

As students proceed through the unit, connections are drawn between their independent reading and in-class readings through the Independent Reading Links found as sidebars throughout the teaching materials. For example, in Activity 1.4 the sidebar notes, “Select a person in your independent reading who identifies an important symbol that keeps the American Dream alive. Compare this symbol to a symbol selected by an author of a reading in this unit. In your Reader/Writer Notebook, note similarities and differences.” Teachers, likewise, are guided by the Teacher Wrap to engage students in their independent reading throughout the unit and are reminded to draw students attention to connections between their independent reading and the texts studied in class.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

SpringBoard Grade 11 meets the criteria of Gateway 3 for providing instructional supports to support high quality instruction. The materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the standards as well as providing tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. Materials provide teachers with strategies to meet the needs of all learners and support effective use of technology.

Criterion 3a - 3e

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8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

SpringBoard Grade 11 materials meet the criteria for being well designed. Materials take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Materials can reasonably be completed within an academic year. There are ample resources as well as publisher produced standards alignment documentation.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed (i.e., allows for ease of readability and are effectively organized for planning) and take into account effective lesson structure (e.g., introduction and lesson objectives, teacher modelling, student practice, closure) and short-term and long-term pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3a. Grade 11 materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

Grade 11 materials are purposefully arranged around five units, each with a range of activities or lessons designed with a consistent instructional plan. Each of the five units is divided into two halves, each half concluding with an embedded assessment. Each unit opens with teacher guidance: Planning the Unit and Unit Overview. Planning the Unit describes all instructional and assessment goals for the unit as well as providing the pacing structure and listing unit texts. Instructional activities are designed to be delivered over single and multiple days while the lessons within activities are designed for a 50-minute class period. The Unit Overview provides a descriptive narrative of the unit’s breadth and a sequential listing of unit activities and associated texts.

The first lesson in each unit provides learners with a preview of the unit’s general learning targets and learning strategies and is followed by Making Connections to develop links between new learning, existing knowledge, and the culminating assessments. Thereafter, each activity or lesson opens with an introduction of specific learning targets, followed by a specific learning strategy, grammar structure, or reading strategy, and the establishment of the reading purpose. The prereading activities are followed by the text or texts, Second Read questions, Working from the Text practice, and Writing to Sources, all crafted to support learning targets in developing literacy skills Throughout, teachers are supported by Teacher Wrap, “the inclusion of an instructional roadmap alongside the student pages” indicating the suggested pacing for the activity. The pacing of individual lessons is appropriate for classes with time allowed for supplementary activities as well.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3b. Grade 11 materials are designed to allow the teacher and student to reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

The five-unit curriculum can be effectively delivered over the course of a 30-36 week academic year allowing sufficient time for practice with instructional materials to ensure opportunities for standards’ mastery by the end of the course. Instructional Activities and Pacing Guide, provided in Planning the Unit, indicate the total number of 50-minute class periods for the unit’s completion and further delineates the associated activity number and suggested class periods for delivery of those lessons. Additionally, the Teacher Wrap, within the margins of the Teacher’s Edition, indicates the time to be allotted for each lesson and offers support for block scheduling by indicating combinations of 50-minute sessions or extensions of lessons, optional instructional materials, and the expectation of homework as part of enrichment and/or the class assignment.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3c. Grade 11 student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions and explanations, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.)

The student resources include a variety of resources demonstrating specific and clear directions, easy-to-find references and accurate labels. Other resources available to students include text collections, close reading, performance tasks, independent reading plans, as well as digital interactive tools such as Writer’s Notebook, text boxes to record answers, and highlighting tools for annotations.

Close reading questions and guides provide students with questions for key details, craft, and structure. Second Read materials include guiding questions engaging students in careful textual analysis. Text-dependent and text specific writing opportunities and writing workshops appear with regularity throughout the units to deepen thought and allow practice with newly taught skills as well as integration of ideas among concepts and skills. Directions for activities are clear and often make use of graphic organizers and rubrics to help students more clearly see the relationship of concepts as well as understand the expectations set before them.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3d. Grade 11 materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

Examples of materials of publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed include the Common Core Correlations page which can be found on the homepage of the digital materials adjacent to the login portal. Additionally, the Teacher Wrap lists The College and Career Readiness Standards associated with each activity and delineates both Common Core focus standards as well as additional Common Core Standards addressed in each lesson.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3e. The visual design of Grade 11 materials (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The SpringBoard visual design, whether referencing the textbook or online curriculum, supports student engagement in literature and literacy without distraction. The units offer engaging visual prompts and graphics appropriate for Grade 11 students. The materials are logically presented through balance in layout and appropriate use of white space, uniform throughout. Activities with essential information and tasks are found at the center of the page while supplementary and enrichment information are found in the margins. Additionally, the pdf version of the student text includes space for notes in the margins when there is no additional information provided.

Graphic Organizers are large enough for students to fit their notes in them and are free of pictures and distractions. Additionally, these graphic organizers are also available to be copied from the end matter of the teacher text.

Marginalia is presented as colorized text boxes separated from the page body: Grammar and Punctuation, blue; Word Connections, red; Independent Reading Links, orange; Literary Terms, yellow; Level 2 Academic Vocabulary, beige; and Level 3 Academic Vocabulary, lavender. Standard unit activities are identified through colorized title fonts. For example, Learning Targets, Learning Strategies, Preview, Setting a Purpose for Reading, Second Read, and Working from the Text appear in green font while literary titles are printed in green. Assessments and writing assignments are also coded in colorized fonts, i.e., Check Your Understanding in purple, and Writing to Sources in green.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The SpringBoard Grade 11 materials meet the criteria for supporting teacher learning and understanding of the standards. Materials contain useful annotations and suggestions as well as adult-level explanations and examples of advanced literacy concepts. The Specific ELA/Literacy standard roles, instructional approaches and research based strategies are identified and explained. Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders about the ELA/Literacy program.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3f. Grade 11 materials contain a teacher’s edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

Planning the Unit, opening each of the five units, offers teachers a roadmap in preparation for the unit’s presentation while Teacher Wrap and Teacher to Teacher, found in the digital and print versions respectively, provide teachers daily step-by-step instructions for delivery. Sample student responses are found in the digital teacher edition. In addition to detailing discrete components of the unit, e.g., goals, pacing, assessments, etc., Planning the Unit unpacks the embedded assessments, suggests texts for independent reading, lists English Language Development resources available for each activity, describes instructional activities within the pacing guide, suggests advance preparation of learning guides for differentiated instruction, provides a detailed unpacking of language demands for embedded assessments, and suggests cognates appropriate to the unit for inclusion on a word wall.

Daily support and suggestions are provided to the teacher through Teacher Wrap and Teacher to Teacher following SpringBoard’s 4-step approach to instruction: Plan-Teach-Assess-Adapt. Additionally, the marginal guides offer suggestions for student support with instruction on approaches found effective for other teachers and methods for scaffolding questions to differentiate instruction to support student learning. For example, in Unit 1, Activity 2, the Teacher Wrap suggests, “In this activity, students may need support understanding the basic definition of the word patriot before developing an extended definition. Model how to determine the meaning of words based on cognates. For example, the Spanish word for patriot is patriota. Use the Unknown Word Solver graphic organizer and focus on the question, “Does it look or sound like a word in another language?”

Within the digital teacher edition, sample responses to Second Read questions and completed graphic organizers provide teachers an indication of what student responses should include.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3g. Grade 11 materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The Teacher’s Edition Front Matter supports teacher knowledge regarding the relevance of academic vocabulary as well as knowledge differentiating between Tier 2 and Tier 3 vocabulary, i.e. “Academic Vocabulary features that discuss Tier 2 terms and concepts that students will use in academic discourse” and “Literary Term features that equip students with Tier 3 language from the domains of literature, literary analysis, writing, and rhetoric.” Additionally, the front matter establishes the relevance of text features and rigor to preparation for College and Career Readiness. Key Themes of English Language Arts Instruction explains: “SpringBoard is designed to help students make meaning of complex texts and prepare them for the rigorous textual analysis expected of them in Advanced Placement (AP) English and college courses. The skills students acquire in SpringBoard allow them to think critically about and respond thoughtfully to important topics in all disciplines, and in society.”

The Teacher Edition End Matter provides teachers with a complete list of reading and writing strategies both defining strategies and establishing purpose behind the strategies. For example, the definition of the reading strategy SIFT is “Analyzing a fictional text by examining stylistic elements, especially symbol, imagery, and figures of speech in order to show how all work together to reveal tone and theme,” and its purpose is “To focus and facilitate an analysis of a fictional text by examining the title and text for symbolism, identifying images and sensory details, analyzing figurative language and identifying how all these elements reveal tone and theme.”

Teacher Wrap provides teachers with information necessary to frame lessons and establish relevance for students. For example, in Unit 1, Activity 3 provides framing in Step 1: “Read the Preview and the Setting a Purpose for Viewing sections with your students. Discuss the illustration of the immigrants passing the Statue of Liberty, modeling for students how to think about a source, using details from the illustration and the questions provided to guide their thinking. Note: The Statue of Liberty was dedicated on October 28, 1886.”

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3h. Grade 11 materials contain a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

Connections between specific ELA/literacy standards and the context of the overall curriculum are offered within the Teacher Edition Front Matter, Planning the Unit, and Teacher Wrap. Specifically, the Teacher Edition Front Matter explains the “instructional design assures teachers and students that everyday activities are building a foundation of skills and knowledge that will help students perform on the assessments, which ultimately align with the standards” and promises to help “students develop the knowledge and skills needed for Advanced Placement as well as for success in college and beyond without remediation.” The Front Matter continues by explaining, “While not every student will take an AP class, we believe strongly that ALL students should be equipped with the higher-order thinking skills, knowledge, and behaviors necessary to be successful in AP classes and post-secondary education. SpringBoard focuses on content connections, pre-AP strategies, and writing tasks anchored in the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful on the AP exams.”

Planning the Unit provides a list of activities within the unit that focus on refining “important skills and knowledge areas for AP/College Readiness.” Found in the 2014 Edition of SpringBoard Digital but not in the 2018 edition, are clickable CC icons linked to standards associated with the task at hand. Inclusion of a similar link in the 2018 Edition would aid in promoting the connection between specific ELA/literacy standards and unit activities.

Teacher Wrap lists Focus Standards and Additional Standards Addressed at the beginning of each lesson. Within the instructional guide are also listed the Common Core standards associated with each of the Second Read questions.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3i. Grade 11 materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

The Teacher Edition Front Matter provides both clear explanation of instructional approaches and identification of research-based strategies relied on throughout the text. Additionally, the text provides an explanation for SpringBoard’s instructional approach. The section “Research-Based Pedagogy” sites the use of Wiggins and McTighe’s Understanding by Design instructional model and the American Institute for Research “focus on students moving through multiple levels of cognitive engagement: progressing fluidly from understanding and comprehension, to analysis, and ultimately to synthesis.” SpringBoard also sites application of Charlotte Danielson’s facilitation and flexibility methodologies, Marzano and Pickering’s research on “building students’ background knowledge in the area of Academic Vocabulary development” and “Robyn Jackson’s work on rigorous instruction.”

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3j. Grade 11 materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students and parents or caregivers, about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Found under Teacher Resources of the SpringBoard Dashboard are Family Letters for each of the program's five units. Letters are available in English and Spanish. Each letter provides an overview of the unit including the unit’s essential questions, a description of the unit’s two embedded assessments, a narrative description of the skills students will practice and learn, as well as a brief overview of the texts students will be reading. The letter concludes with specific tips on how parents can support their child’s progress in learning. Also available in the Student PDF Front Matter is a letter from SpringBoard to the student introducing the benefits of the SpringBoard program and highlighting key features of the text and its methods to increase learning and achievement.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for offering teachers multiple resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities, denote standards being emphasized, and indicate how students are accountable for independent reading.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3k. Grade 11 materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

Short-cycle and long-term assessments integrated within each of the five units provide opportunities for measuring student progress both formatively and summatively. Most activities/lessons feature Check Your Understanding and Writing to Sources, short-cycle assessments allowing teachers to measure student proficiencies and adjust or adapt instructional methods. Long-term assessments are offered twice during the unit, one midway through the unit’s activities and the second at the unit’s end. Lessons and related formative assessments preceding the embedded assessments typically lead towards the culminating performance task.

Also provided within the program materials are supplementary workshops for close reading, writing, and foundational skills as well as supplementary materials for grammar instruction. Each of these lesson sets also includes assessment components consistent with the organization and structure of the core curriculum. Additionally, the SpringBoard Digital dashboard provides an Assessments link offering teachers short-cycle End of Lesson/Activity assessments and End of Unit assessments as well as choices between SpringBoard-developed assessments or custom-built assessments.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
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Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3li. Grade 11 assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

Common Core Standards emphasized by instruction and assessment are noted in the Common Core Correlations chart found on the SpringBoard Digital log-in page. Each ELA Common Core Standard is correlated to unit and activity numbers and/or embedded assessments (denoted by EA) addressing the listed standard. Additionally, Teacher Wrap lists both Focus Standards and Additional Standards Addressed for each embedded assessment.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3lii. Grade 11 assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

SpringBoard’s four-step structure, Plan-Teach-Assess-Adapt, provides a roadmap towards assessment that includes checkpoints and suggestions for adapting lessons and strengthening student skills before they are asked to demonstrate specific skills on culminating embedded assessments. The progression of these four steps is found in Teacher Wrap on the margins of the digital page of the Teacher Edition. For example, after following Plan and Teach steps in Unit 1, Activity 10, Assess instructs teachers to review “student writing responses to both the Check Your Understanding activity and the writing prompt. Student work should demonstrate the ability to use definition strategies effectively and cohesively, with appropriate transitions.” After the assessment, Adapt suggests, “To support learning, encourage groups of students to co-construct a draft of a model response to the prompt utilizing the best segments of their original efforts. If students struggle with any aspect of the writing, display and discuss a successful student model.”

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3m. Grade 11 materials include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Teacher Wrap indicates opportunities for monitoring student progress in reading and expression of ideas. Teacher Wrap provides sequentially detailed steps for teaching each lesson. Included within instructional notes for teachers are guides and prompts for monitoring student progress. Additionally, instructional notes indicate what teachers should be monitoring. For example, in Unit 1, Activity 6, teachers are instructed to be sure students “are engaged with the text and annotating details and examples to use in the vocabulary tree.” The Assess portion of the Teacher Wrap indicates what teachers should be assessing in each activity and offers suggestions for adapting the lesson for students who are struggling or needing more practice.

The Front Matter of the Teacher Edition introduces teachers to two supplemental resources that “support the development of foundational reading skills for students who need continued support with these foundations to become successful at the secondary level.” The first of these resources is the Foundational Skills Workshop which “supports teachers in planning and delivering intervention instruction to those students who will benefit from one-on-one or small-group lessons in phonics, word recognition, and fluency.” These materials include Observational Look-Fors, Foundational Reading Skills Screening Assessment, Diagnostic Checklist, Individual Progress Monitoring Chart, and Group Planning Chart. The second resource is Routines for Teaching Foundational Skills which “presents mini-lessons and techniques that teachers can incorporate into the core ELA instruction to differentiate for students who need it.”

The Teacher Edition provides an Independent Reading Log for students to record “progress and thinking” about “independent reading during each unit.” Also provided are a range of graphic organizers for ELA and ELD tasks that can be used to monitor student reading and understanding before moving students into writing assignments.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3n. Grade 11 materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

SpringBoard allows for students to read independently based on choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation and asks students to show accountability for their independent reading in a variety of ways. Students are required to select a text for independent reading “twice a unit, at the beginning and after the first Embedded Assessment.” Reading selections should relate to the themes of the unit. While SpringBoard provides a list of suggested readings, students should not be limited by the list. Rather, students should be urged “to do their own research and select a title that intrigues them.” As students progress in their reading, they are held accountable through an independent reading log and encouraged through independent reading links with activities asking them to respond to questions, conduct further research, connect classroom texts and themes, discuss ideas in book talks, and make recommendations to peers. To further support and encourage independent reading, related tasks appear as independent reading checkpoints in the margins of the student edition.

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for providing strategies for teachers to meet the needs of a range of learners so that they can demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards. Teachers are provided with strategies to support all learners within the core curriculum and through the Teacher Resources tab on the SpringBoard dashboard. Every lesson in the SpringBoard program offers opportunities for students to work in groups.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3o. Grade 11 materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

SpringBoard curriculum provides accessible content through the integration of texts at varied Lexile level texts in the core curriculum and as suggested titles for independent reading. The unit texts range from slightly below grade level, typically used with introducing a new concept, to at grade level and above grade level. “The Practice of Reading Closely,” found in The Teacher Edition Front Matter explains the range of texts as a means of bringing “readers up to the level of the text, not the level of the text down to the reader.” Each unit also offers a list of text titles for the Independent Reading Assignments occurring twice in each unit. As in the core curriculum, suggested texts range from below grade level to above grade level, allowing students to choose a text of interest that also connects at reading level.

Teachers are provided with strategies to support learners within the core curriculum and through the Teacher Resources tab on the SpringBoard dashboard. Within the core curriculum, Teacher Wrap provides step-by-step guidance in teaching each lesson. Within most steps, teachers are offered advice, alternatives, and suggestions for connecting new and existing knowledge and skills, and methods for scaffolding in-class reading and assignments. Additionally, Teacher to Teacher and Leveled Differentiated Instruction call out boxes within Teacher Wrap provide specific instruction and guidance for learners needing extra support and English language development.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3p. Grade 11 materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Specific resources for below grade-level students and English language learners are provided within the Teacher Resources accessible through the SpringBoard Digital dashboard. English Language Learner Support Guides, available at each grade, offer general guidelines for instructional strategies associated with each of the five units. “Differentiation in SpringBoard is organized around Process, Product, and Content. For ELL support, it may be necessary to adapt the content, the product...or the formative assessments...” The resource guide urges teachers to “refer to the Differentiated Instruction call-outs in the TE Wrap.” Call-outs typically provide additional ideas for practice with the lesson concepts. For example, in Unit 4, Activity 13, the call-out box suggests teachers ask students to dig deeper into the text by asking a series of questions: “What happened to Krakauer at Devil’s Thumb? How did he respond to this incident? What reflections does he provide in his essay?”

Also provided within the Teacher Resources tab at each grade level is an English-Spanish Glossary, although currently the resource bears a 2014 copyright. Foundational Skills Workshop material provides resources for interventions at grades 7-11. Seventeen lessons range from phonics and word recognition to fluency as well as an Initial Screening Assessment “that provides teachers with essential information about students’ education history, home language proficiency, and English language proficiency.” Also provided within the Teacher Resources tab is a Flexible Novel Unit allowing teachers to replace the novel suggested in the core curriculum with a novel differentiated for student needs. The Flexible Novel Unit provides a teacher planning dashboard, a student view of the adjusted embedded assessment, and a teacher view complete with marginalia guidance following the four-step Plan-Teach-Assess-Adapt protocol. Also provided within the Teacher Resources tab are materials for grammar instruction and interventions, graphic organizers (also provided in the Teacher Edition End Matter), and learning strategies.

Within the core curriculum, Planning the Unit, a detailed teacher tool is provided at the beginning of each unit. Planning Support for English Learners is included in the planning page and outlines “unit-specific resources for differentiation.” Found in this section of the unit planning are Digital Resource: English Language Development Activities correlated to specific text selections and unit activities, guidance on logging onto ELD resources on SpringBoard Digital, Leveled Differentiated Instruction providing “suggestions on how to differentiate challenging tasks for students at various levels of language proficiency,” and a Cognate Dictionary specifically designed for each unit. Also provided are directions for Unpacking the Language Demands of the Embedded Assessments, a resource unpacking the “word-, sentence-, and text-level features of academic language that English learners may need to develop as they work toward the Embedded Assessments.” Integrated into each unit are at least three English Language Development Activities which are “supplementary digital activities for every unit that offer a scaffolded approach to vocabulary study, guided close reading, and collaborative activities.”

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3q. Grade 11 materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

The Leveled Differentiated Instruction text box within the Teacher Wrap offers opportunities to extend the learning for those students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level. For example, in Unit 1, Activity 12, Leveled Differentiated Instruction suggests teachers extend the activity by challenging “students to add to their argument response by discussing an additional ‘call to action’ Wallechinsky could have suggested.”

Occasionally, the Adapt step of Teacher Wrap or the Teacher to Teacher call-out will provide an extension for learning through a challenge. For example, in Unit 5, Activity 5, Adapt suggests teachers extend learning by asking students to search “for varying points of view regarding the group’s topic. For instance, even though the popularity of the Cotton Club provided black artists an avenue for expression, how were they also controlled and restricted?”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3r. Grade 11 materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Every lesson in the SpringBoard program offers opportunities for students to work in groups whether reading, writing, or speaking and listening about texts. “Specific strategies for collaboration and oral communication are taught and practiced leading to the development of independent, skillful conduct of academic discussions.” Both the Teacher Edition and the Student Edition regularly and repeatedly ask students to work as partners and in small groups. Among the means used to and for grouping are Think-Pair-Share, heterogeneous groups, simple partnering, forming small groups based on interest, working as whole class in discussions and guided writing, and forming jigsaw groups to build and share information and ideas. Additionally, students are grouped for purposes of peer editing and feedback, practice with speaking and speech delivery, and reading discussion groups.

Indicator 3s

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 3s. Grade 11 digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The materials work relatively well on multiple digital platforms and using multiple internet browsers. However, the program does not work on all mobile devices. The digital materials are effectively accessed through Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, and Internet Explorer. However, when access is attempted using Android devices, an error message indicating screen size and resolution are not supported. The message suggests site visitors to use a larger device to log into SpringBoard.

Indicator 3s3v

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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. The materials work relatively well on multiple digital platforms and using multiple internet browsers. However, the program does not work on all mobile devices. The digital materials are effectively accessed through Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, and Internet Explorer. However, when access is attempted using Android devices, an error message indicating screen size and resolution are not supported. The message suggests site visitors use a larger device to log into SpringBoard. Provided within the Teacher Resources on the SpringBoard Digital dashboard are a number of tools allowing teachers to customize the curricular content of the materials. Also, the digital SpringBoard Dashboard offers a link to Professional Development for teachers as well as a link to the Springboard Community where teachers can collaborate with other teachers who have SpringBoard.

Indicator 3t

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3t. Grade 11 materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

SpringBoard digital effectively uses technology by providing interactive tools for close reading exercises, vocabulary work, populating graphic organizers, and supporting evidence-based writing. In both the digital Teacher Edition and the digital Student Edition, space is provided to enter answers to questions, attach sticky notes, highlight and mark text with annotations. Students and teachers can add vocabulary to the existing lists provided by the program as well as edit close-reading questions. Additional opportunities for learning provided within the Teacher Resources tab on the SpringBoard dashboard offer consistent organization and structures for using technology as a tool in the learning process. The Teacher Edition provides tips for sharing documents via external programs such as Google Docs. Additionally, there is a digital SpringBoard community supporting conversations among teachers from across the hall or across the country. The additional resources also include online workshops/webinars.

Indicator 3u

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Indicator 3u.i

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 3ui. Grade 11 digital materials include some opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for students.

Using a generally accepted definition for adaptive technology as objects or systems specifically designed to increase or maintain the capabilities of people with disabilities, reviewers conclude there are few examples of such in the materials. Indeed, the technology available through the digital version allows users to change font size, populate graphic organizers, use word processing technologies, annotate text, and hear audio pronunciations of some vocabulary words, but there is no text-to-speech or speech-to-text adaptations which would truly be adaptive and useful to those with hearing disabilities, vision disabilities, and disabilities related to the hands. Additionally, the program allows teachers to edit questions and use alternative texts, but these means of personalizing instruction are not within the realm of adaptive technology.

Indicator 3u.ii

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3uii. Grade 11 materials can be easily customized for local use.

Provided within the Teacher Resources on the SpringBoard Digital dashboard are a number of tools allowing teachers to customize the curricular content of the materials. At each grade and within each unit, a Flexible Novel Unit supports a teaching decision to replace the suggested novel in the core curriculum with a novel differentiating for local needs. The Flexible Novel Unit provides a teacher planning dashboard, a student view of the adjusted embedded assessment, and a teacher view complete with marginalia guidance following the four-step Plan-Teach-Assess-Adapt protocol. Also provided within the resources is a Custom Assessment builder to create Common Core aligned questions to check for understanding. The Letter to Parents, also available through Teacher Resources, is customizable for local needs. Additionally, many features within the unit activities are customizable, supporting the professional judgment of classroom teachers.

Indicator 3v

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3v. Grade 11 materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

The digital SpringBoard Dashboard offers a link to Professional Development for teachers as well as a link to the SpringBoard Community where teachers can collaborate with other teachers who have SpringBoard. SpringBoard also provides the ability to create “digital ‘sticky’ notes that can be inserted on-screen and offer on-demand planning and notation for teacher suggestions or student work” as well as “the ability to edit teaching commentary, personalizing it by adding notes and comments to a lesson.” Where appropriate, the Teacher Wrap suggests teachers have students work together on a shared document for greater collaboration on projects and assignments.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. The materials work relatively well on multiple digital platforms and using multiple internet browsers. However, the program does not work on all mobile devices. The digital materials are effectively accessed through Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, and Internet Explorer. However, when access is attempted using Android devices, an error message indicating screen size and resolution are not supported. The message suggests site visitors use a larger device to log into SpringBoard. Provided within the Teacher Resources on the SpringBoard Digital dashboard are a number of tools allowing teachers to customize the curricular content of the materials. Also, the digital SpringBoard Dashboard offers a link to Professional Development for teachers as well as a link to the Springboard Community where teachers can collaborate with other teachers who have SpringBoard.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. This qualifies as substitution and augmentation as defined by the SAMR model. Materials can be easily integrated into existing learning management systems.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 3s. Grade 11 digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The materials work relatively well on multiple digital platforms and using multiple internet browsers. However, the program does not work on all mobile devices. The digital materials are effectively accessed through Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, and Internet Explorer. However, when access is attempted using Android devices, an error message indicating screen size and resolution are not supported. The message suggests site visitors to use a larger device to log into SpringBoard.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate and providing opportunities for modification and redefinition as defined by the SAMR model.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3t. Grade 11 materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

SpringBoard digital effectively uses technology by providing interactive tools for close reading exercises, vocabulary work, populating graphic organizers, and supporting evidence-based writing. In both the digital Teacher Edition and the digital Student Edition, space is provided to enter answers to questions, attach sticky notes, highlight and mark text with annotations. Students and teachers can add vocabulary to the existing lists provided by the program as well as edit close-reading questions. Additional opportunities for learning provided within the Teacher Resources tab on the SpringBoard dashboard offer consistent organization and structures for using technology as a tool in the learning process. The Teacher Edition provides tips for sharing documents via external programs such as Google Docs. Additionally, there is a digital SpringBoard community supporting conversations among teachers from across the hall or across the country. The additional resources also include online workshops/webinars.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
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Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 3ui. Grade 11 digital materials include some opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for students.

Using a generally accepted definition for adaptive technology as objects or systems specifically designed to increase or maintain the capabilities of people with disabilities, reviewers conclude there are few examples of such in the materials. Indeed, the technology available through the digital version allows users to change font size, populate graphic organizers, use word processing technologies, annotate text, and hear audio pronunciations of some vocabulary words, but there is no text-to-speech or speech-to-text adaptations which would truly be adaptive and useful to those with hearing disabilities, vision disabilities, and disabilities related to the hands. Additionally, the program allows teachers to edit questions and use alternative texts, but these means of personalizing instruction are not within the realm of adaptive technology.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized by schools, systems, and states for local use.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3uii. Grade 11 materials can be easily customized for local use.

Provided within the Teacher Resources on the SpringBoard Digital dashboard are a number of tools allowing teachers to customize the curricular content of the materials. At each grade and within each unit, a Flexible Novel Unit supports a teaching decision to replace the suggested novel in the core curriculum with a novel differentiating for local needs. The Flexible Novel Unit provides a teacher planning dashboard, a student view of the adjusted embedded assessment, and a teacher view complete with marginalia guidance following the four-step Plan-Teach-Assess-Adapt protocol. Also provided within the resources is a Custom Assessment builder to create Common Core aligned questions to check for understanding. The Letter to Parents, also available through Teacher Resources, is customizable for local needs. Additionally, many features within the unit activities are customizable, supporting the professional judgment of classroom teachers.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3v. Grade 11 materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

The digital SpringBoard Dashboard offers a link to Professional Development for teachers as well as a link to the SpringBoard Community where teachers can collaborate with other teachers who have SpringBoard. SpringBoard also provides the ability to create “digital ‘sticky’ notes that can be inserted on-screen and offer on-demand planning and notation for teacher suggestions or student work” as well as “the ability to edit teaching commentary, personalizing it by adding notes and comments to a lesson.” Where appropriate, the Teacher Wrap suggests teachers have students work together on a shared document for greater collaboration on projects and assignments.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Fri Mar 16 00:00:00 UTC 2018

Report Edition: 2018

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Springboard English Language Arts Grade 11 Student Edition 978-1-4573-0840-6 Copyright: 2018 College Board 2018
Springboard English Language Arts Grade 11 Teacher Edition 978-1-4573-0847-5 Copyright: 2018 College Board 2018

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