Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 do not meet the expectations for alignment to the CCSSM. The instructional materials partially meet the expectations for Gateway 1 as they appropriately focus on the major work of the grade but did not always demonstrate coherence within the grade and across other grades. The instructional materials did not meet the expectations for Gateway 2 as they did not appropriately address rigor within the grade-level standards, and there are missed opportunities in the materials when it comes to attending to the full meaning of the standards for mathematical practice.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
11
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
9
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
22
31
38
0
31-38
Meets Expectations
23-30
Partially Meets Expectations
0-22
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 Everyday Mathematics partially meet the expectations for Gateway 1. Future grade-level standards are not assessed, and the materials devote a majority of the time to the major work of the grade. At times, the instructional materials connect supporting work with the major work of the grade, but often the materials do not. Although the materials provide a full program of study that is viable for a school year, students are not always given extensive work with grade-level problems. Connections between grade levels and domains are missing. Overall, the instructional materials meet the expectations for focusing on the major work of the grade, but the materials are not always consistent and coherent with the standards.

Criterion 1a

Materials do not assess topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced.
2/2
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Criterion Rating Details

The Grade 3 Everyday Mathematics materials meet the expectations for not assessing topics before the grade level in which they should be introduced. Future grade-level topics are assessed; however, those assessments could be removed without affecting the progression of learning for students. The number of above grade-level assessments is limited and could easily be removed by the teacher.

Indicator 1a

The instructional material assesses the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. Content from future grades may be introduced but students should not be held accountable on assessments for future expectations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for assessment because above grade-level assessment items could be modified or omitted without a significant impact on the underlying structure of the instructional materials.The program allows for a Beginning-of-Year, Mid-year, End-of-Year, and Unit Assessments which assess the Grade 3 standards. There are also eight unit assessments/progress checks. The unit assessments/progress checks have portions for Self Assessment, Unit Assessment, Open Response Assessment (odd numbered units), Cumulative Assessment (even numbered units), and a Challenge. These assessments can be found in the Assessment Handbook. The Individual Profile of Progress for tracking and class progress are present in both paper (pages 143-153 in the Assessment Handbook) and digital formats. Most lessons have an Assessment Check-in that can be used as either formative or summative assessment as stated in the implementation guide.

Assessment Check-Ins are part of most lessons and mostly assess grade-level content. For example, in the teacher guide on page 240 of lesson 3-3, the Assessment Check-In focuses on 3.NBT.2; this Check-In addresses the partial sums from second grade and extends the work into Grade 3.

Students are exposed to different units of measure within one problem on the Unit 8 Cumulative Assessment but remain on grade level since the accompanying picture shows the same units throughout.

The Unit Assessments, the End of the Year Assessment, and some of the Assessment Check-Ins do have a few off, grade-level assessments included. The following off, grade-level content are assessed in the Grade 3 Materials:

  • On the End of the Year Assessment, question 7 assesses 5.OA.A.1; students are asked to use parentheses to solve an equation. Question 13b assesses 4.NF.A.2; students are asked to compare two different fractions with different denominators and different numerators.
  • In Unit 6, on the end of the unit assessment, questions 6, 7 and 9 ask students to use parentheses to solve an equation, 5.OA.A.1. Additionally, the unit self-assessment for students has them self-assessing the use of parentheses.
  • In Unit 8, on the end of the unit assessment, question 6 asks students to find factors, 4.OA.B.4.

Overall, most unit assessment items are on a Grade 3 level. All of the off, grade-level assessments could be removed by the teacher without affecting the sequence of learning for students. There are no scoring rubrics provided for the educators; however, all assessments do provide answer keys.

Criterion 1b

Students and teachers using the materials as designed devote the large majority of class time in each grade K-8 to the major work of the grade.
4/4
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Criterion Rating Details

The Grade 3 Everyday Mathematics materials do meet expectations for devoting the large majority of class time to the major work of the grade level. The Grade 3 Everyday Mathematics engages students in the major work of the grade approxiamately 69 percent of the time.

Indicator 1b

Instructional material spends the majority of class time on the major cluster of each grade.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for focus by spending the majority of the time on the major clusters of the grade. This includes all the clusters in 3.OA and 3.NF and clusters 3.MD.A and 3.MD.C.

The Grade 3 materials do spend the majority of class time on the major clusters of the grade. Work was not calculated by units since the units spiral and are not clustered by groups of standards. There are nine units with approximately 8-13 lessons per unit. Assessment days were not included in these calculations. Additionally, each unit has a 2-day open response lesson; the Open Response Lessons were counted as one lesson. At the lesson level, the lessons are divided into Warm Up, Focus, and Practice. Each day consists of approximately 5-10 minutes on Warm Up, 30-45 minutes of a Focus, and 15-25 minutes of Practice. To determine the amount of time on major work, the standards covered in the focus lessons were considered since that is where direct instruction takes place, and the majority of the lesson takes place during this time.

  • Approximately 64 lessons out of the 99 are focused on the major work. This represents approximately 65 percent of the lessons. Additionally, another 4 lessons, or 4 percent, are supporting work which truly supported the major work of the grade bringing the time spent on major work to approximately 69 percent.
  • Fourteen lessons out of the 99 are focused on the supporting work of the grade. This work was treated separately from the major work of the grade.
  • Sixteen lessons out of the 99 are focused on off grade-level work. For example, lesson 1-3 is focused on 2.MD.C.7 (tell and write time to the nearest 5 minutes), and lesson 1-7 is focused on 2.MD.D.10, (draw a bar graph with a single scaled unit). Lesson 3-7 is focused on 2.G.A.2 (partition a rectangle into rows and columns). Lesson 4-4 is focused on 2.G.A.1 (recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes). Lessons 6-8, 6-9, 6-10 and 6-11 all focus on 5.OA.A.1 (use parentheses in numerical expressions and evaluate the expressions). Lessons 8-3 and 8-5 focus on 4.OA.B.4 (find all factors for a whole number). Lesson 8-6 focuses on 4.OA.A.3 (solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and have whole-number answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted). Lesson 9-5 focuses on 4.NBT.B.5 (multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number).
  • One lesson out of the 99 focuses on other content. This lesson is focused on using the student reference book.

Criterion 1c - 1f

Coherence: Each grade's instructional materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.
5/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for coherence. At times, the instructional materials use supporting content as a way to continue working with the major work of the grade, but often the materials do not. For example, connections between geometry and major work of the grade are missed. The materials include a full program of study that is viable content for a school year, including approximately 31-32 weeks of lessons and assessments. Content from prior and future grades is not clearly identified or connected to grade-level work, and students are not always given extensive work with grade-level problems. Material related to prior and future grade-level content is not clearly identified or related to grade-level work. These instructional materials are shaped by the cluster headings in the standards; however, only surface-level connections are made between domains. Overall, the Grade 3 materials partially support coherence and are not consistent with the progressions in the standards.

Indicator 1c

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet expectations that supporting content enhances focus and coherence by engaging students in the major work of the grade. In some cases, the supporting work enhances and supports the major work of the grade level, and in others, it does not.

At times supporting content does enhance focus and coherence by engaging students in the major work of the grade. Examples of the connections between supporting work and major work include the following:

  • In Exploration C in Lesson 3-7, supporting standard 3.G.2 enhances work with 3.MD.5, 3.MD.5.A, 3.MD.5.B, 3.MD.6, 3.MD.7, and 3.MD.7.A. This exploration helps to connect student work with partitioning shapes into parts with equal areas to work with area.
  • In Lesson 5-3, supporting standard 3.G.2 enhances work with 3.NF.A. This lessons allows students to use shapes partitioned into equal areas to develop understanding of fractions as numbers.

At times, supporting work does not enhance and support the major work of the grade. At times, standards listed at the beginning of each unit are logically connected to each other; however, when the specific work of the unit and lessons is examined, some connections are missed or not specifically noted for teacher or students. Also, many lessons address supporting work in isolation from major work of the grade. Examples of units and lessons without connections between supporting and major work include the following:

  • In Unit 1, supporting standards 3.NBT.1, 3.NBT.2 and 3.MD.3 are the focus of four lessons while standards 3.MD.1, 3.MD.2, 3.OA.1, 3.OA.2, 3.OA.3, 3.OA.6, 3.OA.7 and 3.NF.1, all major work, are the focus of the remaining lessons in Unit 1.
  • Unit 1, Lesson 3 includes 3.NBT.2, 3.MD.1, 3.MD.4 and 3.G.1. The "Using Mathematical Tools" math journal addresses each of these standards individually, and there is no explicit connection made for either the teacher or the student between the supporting and major work.
  • The "Finding Equivalent Names" activity in Lesson 3-13 addresses 3.OA.7, major work, and 3.NBT.2, supporting work. This activity, however, focuses more on equivalence than a relationship between addition and subtraction and multiplication and division. The "Frames and Arrows" Math Masters worksheet in the same lesson has students either adding, subtracting, or multiplying to create a number pattern; again, the work with addition and subtraction is not used to enhance the work with multiplication.
  • Lessons 4-6, 4-7, 4-10 and 4-11 are focused on supporting cluster 3.MD.D.
  • Lessons 4-4, 4-5, 4-12 and 6-5 focus on supporting cluster 3.G.A.

Indicator 1d

The amount of content designated for one grade level is viable for one school year in order to foster coherence between grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for the amount of content designated for one grade level being viable for one school year in order to foster coherence between grades. The suggested pacing includes 107 days of lessons (98 lessons total) and another 18 days allowed for assessment, making 125 days of materials. According to the Teacher Guide on p.xxxvi, each lesson is expected to last between 60-75 minutes. The online curriculum states to use Fridays as a Flex Day for games and intervention work. With Fridays being included as Flex Days, this curriculum allows for approximately 31 to 32 weeks of instruction.

Indicator 1e

Materials are consistent with the progressions in the Standards i. Materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards. If there is content from prior or future grades, that content is clearly identified and related to grade-level work ii. Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems iii. Materials relate grade level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectation for being consistent with the progressions in the standards. Content from prior and future grades is not clearly identified or connected to grade-level work, and students are not given extensive work with grade-level problems.

Material related to prior and future grade-level content is not clearly identified or related to grade-level work. The third grade materials have some instances where prior and future grade-level content is present and not identified as such. Lessons with prior and future grade-level content include the following:

  • Lesson 1-3, which is focused on 2.MD.C.7, tells and writes time to the nearest 5 minutes, yet it is labeled with 3.MD.A.
  • Lesson 4-4 is focused on 2.G.A.1, recognizing and drawing shapes having specified attributes, yet it is labeled with 3.G.1.
  • Lessons 8-3 and 8-5 focus on 4.OA.B.4, finding all factors for a whole number.
  • Lesson 8-6 focuses on 4.OA.A.3, solving multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted.

The content does not always meet the full depth of standards. This mainly occurs because of a lack of lessons addressing the full depth. For example, there are fifteen lessons which address 3.OA.1; however, they only ever specifically address multiplication of 0,1, 2, 5, and 10. 

Everyday Mathematics Grade 3 materials provide some examples of extensive work with grade-level standards. For example, the instructional materials do not provide extensive work with the following standards:

  • 3.OA.A.1: Lesson 1-10 develops multiplication for 2, 5 and 10, and Lesson 2-6 develops multiplication for 0 and 1. The remaining 13 lessons present strategies for multiplication; however, multiplication for 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8 are never addressed specifically.
  • 3.OA.B.5: There are 13 lessons aligned to this standard; however, only one lesson has students understanding the relationship between multiplication and division, lesson 6-3. Cluster heading 3.OA.B “Understand the properties of operations and the relationship between multiplication and division.”  
  • 3.OA.C.8: There are 18 lessons aligned to this standard; however, only four lessons, 2-4, 2-5, 3-2 and 5-10, have students doing two-step problems within the focus section of the lesson.  There are other places including practice pages and math boxes where students are practicing.  

In lessons where prior knowledge is needed, the instructional materials do not state that prior knowledge is being used. When future, grade-level concepts are introduced, there is no mention that the concept will be used in future grades. If the teacher uses the spiral trace at the beginning of the lesson or unit, the teacher will know where prior knowledge is used based on the spiral trace and when the student will use the skill/concept again in the future. The spiral tracker is listed by lessons and not connecting standards. At the beginning of each unit, the spiral trace provides an explanation of what will occur by the end of the unit, but the spiral trace does not explain any further and does not connect to the next standard.

Indicator 1f

Materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards i. Materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. ii. Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for fostering coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and when the standards require. Overall, materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings, but there are missed opportunities to provide problems and activities that connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains when these connections are natural and important.

Instructional materials shaped by cluster headings include the following examples:

  • Lesson 2-7, "Multiplication Arrays," is shaped by 3.OA.A.
  • Lesson 3-2, "Estimating Costs," is shaped by 3.NBT.A.
  • Lesson 5-3, "Equivalent Fractions," is shaped by 3.NF.A.
  • Lesson 7-10, "Justifying Fraction Comparisons," is shaped by 3.NF.A.

While the materials have many instances where two or more domains are connected, often the connections are only surface-level connections. For example, lesson 7-4 shows a connections between 3.NF.1, 3.NF.3, 3.NF.3.A, 3.NF.3.B, 3.NF.3.C, 3.NF.3.D, and 3.G.2. However, the lesson is divided into parts, and the parts only truly address one standard at a time.

Gateway Two

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

Does Not Meet Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 do not meet the expectations for rigor and MPs. The instructional materials do not meet the expectations for the indicators on rigor and balance, nor do they meet the expectations of the indicators on practice-content connections. Overall, the instructional materials are stronger in regards to procedural skill and fluency and identifying MPs, although improvements are still needed to for those to fully meet the standards as well.

Criterion 2a - 2d

Rigor and Balance: Each grade's instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards' rigorous expectations, by helping students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application.
4/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 do not meet expectations for rigor and balance. The instructional materials do not give appropriate attention to conceptual understanding or application. The materials do a better job of giving attention to procedural skill and fluency; however, the full meaning of procedural skill and fluency is still not met. Overall, because of not fully meeting expectations for procedural skill and fluency, application, and conceptual understanding, the instructional materials do not reflect the balances in the CCSSM.

Indicator 2a

Attention to conceptual understanding: Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials partially meet the expectation for developing conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings. Frequently, opportunities are missed. Opportunities for students to work with standards that specifically call for conceptual understanding occur by use of pictures, manipulatives, and strategies, but they frequently fall short by not providing higher-order thinking questions to truly determine students' understandings.

Standards 3.OA.1 and 3.OA.2 focus on interpreting products of whole numbers and interpreting whole-number quotients of whole numbers.

  • Lesson 1.8 begins students on 3.OA.1 by using pictures and discussing grouping. In lesson 1.10, students subitize and practice doubling, then fact families. In lesson 1.12, there is more work with 2s, 5s and 10s. In lesson 2.6, students practice making sense of equal groups using pictures, counting, skip counting, arrays, and repeated addition. Lesson 3.9 begins with word problems to reinforce the mathematics of 3.OA.1. Lesson 3.11 has students build arrays with counters. Lesson 5.6 returns to doubling; this time using area. In lesson 7.2, there are arrays and estimation. Few questions directly address students' conceptual understanding. Rather, it appears the totality of the activities is designed to encourage students to develop understanding. Teachers are not provided many opportunities to check this understanding.
  • Lesson 1.9 begins students on 3.OA.2 by posing leading questions and facilitating students procedures and explanations. Opportunity is not provided for students to really question their strategy nor to relate it in a meaningful way.

Cluster 3.NF focuses on developing understanding of fractions as numbers.

  • Fractions first begin in lesson 1.12 in Exploration B. Here students are asked to cut out circles, use dice to determine the number of pancakes and the number of people, and then answer "How much does everyone get if everyone gets an equal share?" Depending on the help teachers provide, this could develop conceptual understanding. The practice section then has students work with number stories involving halves. The progression is fragmented and does not lend itself to students developing an understanding but rather a need to rely on a procedure. For example, the "Equal Shares at a Pancake Breakfast" activity provide an answer of "one-half of a pancake" and then states that "drawings vary." The teacher is not provided with sample answers to see examples of student conceptual understanding.
  • Lesson 2-9 "Math Message" asks "4 friends equally share 6 granola bars. How many granola bars will each friend get?" It encourages students to use sketches to show their thinking. This problem lends itself to conceptual understanding if teacher's focus on students' thought processes during the follow-up.
  • The best conceptual understanding problems generally occur in the "Open Response" problem in each unit. However, much of the conceptual understanding is limited due to heavy teacher involvement, direct instruction, leading questions, and emphasis on procedures.
  • Lesson 2-12 focuses on 3.NF.1 but has students work on vocabulary and familiarity with fraction circles instead of developing understanding from any meaningful manipulation or questioning with the fraction circles. Teachers are prompted to ask "What fraction of a ______ piece is a ________piece? How do you know?" However, the example answer is only "a yellow piece is one-fourth of the red circle."
  • "Exploring Fractions" in lesson 5-1 sets the stage for students conceptual understanding by having students note what makes one-fourth.
  • Lesson 5.2 allows students to demonstrate conceptual understanding in the Math Message by explaining one-third. The remainder of the lesson is procedural in nature as it ends the Math Message with a note to "(t)ell children that today they will continue to represent fractions with fraction circles, words, and numbers."
  • Lesson 7.4 allows students to develop conceptual understanding as students divide shapes into equal parts and connect those to fractions.

Some attention to Conceptual Understanding is found in the Professional Development boxes throughout the Teacher Edition.

  • On page 452 of the Teacher Edition, the Professional Development box explains unit fractions and shows an example of how representing non-unit fractions by counting unit fractions can help build student understanding of the relationship between the numerator and denominator.
  • On page 660 of the Teacher Edition, the Professional Development box explains that children are already familiar with two area models of fractions, fraction circles and fraction strips, and this lesson will introduce the number line as a different model for fractions.

Indicator 2b

Attention to Procedural Skill and Fluency: Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectation for giving attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency. While lessons do exist to work on fluencies required at the Grade 3 level, the lessons do not build upon each other to help students reach fluency for all facts, particularly those associated with 3.OA.7.

The instructional materials lack activities to build fluency multiplying and dividing within 100, 3.OA.7. The online spiral tracker shows 125 exposures to 3.OA.7 in focus lessons. When analyzing the lessons, many of the instances noted in the tracker show multiple exposures for the same lesson, and a few lessons were noted as Grade 4 lessons. For example, lessons 2.8, 2.9 and 2.10 all have students using remainders in division which is a Grade 4 standard. Twenty-eight lessons have students multiplying and dividing. Only three (lessons 6.6, 8.2 and 8.6) have students dividing, and in one (lesson 8.2) of those, there are only two division problems. Additionally, in the other 25 lessons, only the multipliers 0, 1, 2, 5, 9 and 10 are explored specifically. Since there is not a consistent progression of learning, it is difficult to be assured all students will have the teaching available to them to reach mastery of fluencies and skills.

There are some places where fluency is given attention in the materials.

  • Most lessons in the materials have a "Mental Math and Fluency" piece which allows for students to practice fluencies required in Grade 3.
  • Several online games help students with the expectation of fluency, including Baseball Multiplication, Multiplication Top-It, Beat the Computer, and Multiplication Bingo. It is important to note none of the online games have students practicing division.
  • Some games on the Activity Cards develop fluency, for example: Roll to 1000 on page 153, Beat the Calculator on page 721, and Multiplication Top-it on page 823 help build fluency. These appear throughout the year, sometimes in unrelated lessons.
  • Online is a reference sheet called "Do Anytime Activities" with suggestions to help students practice fluencies at home.
  • There is a fact check in the assessment book for teacher's to mark when mastery of facts is accomplished.

Indicator 2c

Attention to Applications: Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics, without losing focus on the major work of each grade
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials partially meet the expectation for being designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics, without losing focus on the major work of each grade.

Most problems are presented in the same way throughout the entire curriculum. There is little variety of problems or types of problems. Problems are presented as short, one-correct-answer problems. Some of the problems are tied together through concepts and ideas, but many times lessons are completely disjointed from one anther.

Each unit contains a two-day "Open Response" lesson which engages students in application of mathematics. For example, lesson 4-11 has students engaging in application of the math building a rabbit pen. Online in the resource section, some "Projects" are available to help students with application of math.

Standard 3.OA.3 has 161 exposures within the curriculum and is listed as the focus of 27 days of Focus lessons.

  • The Focus portions of Lessons 1-8, 1-9, 2-5, 2-6, 2-7, 2-8 (2 days) 2-9, 2-10, 3-10, 3-11, 3-12, 5-5, 5-10 (2 days) 5-11, 6-6, 7-2, 7-3, 8-2, 8-3, 8-4 (2 days) 8-6, 9-2, 9-3, and 9-5 are aligned to 3.OA.3.
  • In Lesson 1-8, the first Focus lesson addressing 3.OA.3, students are given one-step multiplication word problems. At the end of the lesson, students write their own number story to match a number sentence. The activities in this lesson requiring students to write their own word problems takes away from the time that students would spend applying this standard and multiplying and dividing to solve word problems.
  • In Lesson 2-9, students are given one-step division word problems in the "Equal-Sharing Number Stories" activity. Of the three problems, two problems have a dividend that is a multiple of 10 and 1 has a dividend that is a multiple of 5. The problems are very similar to the sample problems done during the Focus portion of the lesson, so true application of the standard is not required.
  • Lesson 5-11 is aligned to 3.OA.3. In this lesson, students learn to divide rectangles/arrays in different ways. Although some of the situations are presented with a context, these problems are not true application problems, and the focus of the lesson is not on multiplication and division within 100.
  • Lesson 6-6 contains a "More Number Stories" Math Journal worksheet. The worksheet contains multiplication and division word problems. The worksheet begins with a bulleted set of directions for approaching each problem, and the problems themselves are scaffolded. For example, each problem includes a table to fill in before providing the solution. This procedure for students to follow when solving number stories along with the scaffolding accompanying the problems detracts from the true application of the standard.
  • Lesson 7-2 contains an "Estimating the Number of Plants" activity that is aligned to 3.OA.3. This activity is only one problem. The context of the problem is thin, and the problem is really more about estimation than multiplication and division within 100. In the problem, students are provided with a diagram, and the solution path is clear. Students can get the answer of 40 by skip-counting.
  • The "Solving Number Stories with Measures" activity in Lesson 7-3 is aligned to 3.OA.3. However, problems 3 and 4 do not require multiplication or division.
  • Lesson 9-3 includes the "Using Mental Math to Multiply" and "North American Bird Number Stories" activities. Both of these activities include one-step problems. The focus of this lesson is not on using multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems. Many of the products are above 100. This lesson focuses on strategies for "breaking apart factors into numbers that can be multiplied mentally." As a result, the focus of these activities is on strategies for mental multiplication and not application of this standard.
  • Lesson 9-5 only contains one worksheet addressing 3.OA.3. The "Jonah's Garden" activity is asking students to determine how many seeds can be planted if nine seeds are planted in each of 16 rows. The problem is very scaffolded. Students are first provided with a rectangle and asked to divide it into two sections: one section of 10 rows and one section of 6 rows. Although dividing this garden and using the scaffolding does allow students to work with two multiplication equations that are within 100 as required by the standard, if a student attempts to solve the word problem without using the provided scaffolding, the multiplication is not within 100 as required by the standard.

Standard 3.OA.8 has 129 exposures within the curriculum and is listed as the focus of 21 days of Focus lessons.

  • The Focus portions of Lessons 2-2, 2-3, 2-4, 2-5, 3-2 (2 days), 3-3, 3-4, 3-5, 3-6, 4-12, 5-10 (2 days), 6-1, 6-7, 6-8, 6-9 (2 days), 6-10, 6-11 and 7-2 are aligned to 4.OA.3.
  • Lessons 2-2 and 2-3 are aligned to 3.OA.8, but the lessons only include one-step word problems, not two-step word problems.
  • Lessons 2-4 and 2-5 both include two-step word problems. However, problems are scaffolded for students, thus the problems limit the entry points for students. For example, on the Lesson 2-4 Math Journal worksheet "Multistep Number Stories, Part 1," students are required to write a number model before they write their answers.
  • Lesson 3-3 is aligned to 3.OA.8. Students do not solve two-step word problems in this lesson. Although estimation is used during the process of learning partial-sums addition, there is no evidence of application of standard 3.OA.8 in the Focus portion of this lesson.
  • Lesson 3-4 is aligned to 3.OA.8. Students do not solve two-step word problems in this lesson. Although estimation is used during the process of learning column addition, there is no evidence of application of standard 3.OA.8 in the Focus portion of this lesson.
  • Lesson 3-5 is aligned to 3.OA.8. Students do not solve two-step word problems in this lesson. Although estimation is used during the process of learning counting-up subtraction, there is no evidence of application of standard 3.OA.8 in the Focus portion of this lesson.
  • Lesson 3-6 is aligned to 3.OA.8. Students do not solve two-step word problems in this lesson. Although estimation is used during the process of learning "expand-and-trade subtraction," there is no evidence of application of standard 3.OA.8 in the Focus portion of this lesson.
  • Lesson 6-1 is aligned to 3.OA.8. Students do not solve two-step word problems in this lesson. Although estimation is used during the process of learning "trade-first subtraction," there is no evidence of application of standard 3.OA.8 in the Focus portion of this lesson.
  • Lessons 6-8 and 6-9 include parentheses in number sentences. This is not appropriate for grade 3; parentheses are not introduced in the Standards until grade 5. Although Lesson 6-8 is aligned to 3.OA.8, there are no word problems in the lesson. Lesson 6-9, "Connecting a Number Story and a Number Model," includes a two-step word problem, but the word problem is very scaffolded. The number sentence is already written out for students, and the provided number sentence included parentheses.

Indicator 2d

Balance: The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the 3 aspects of rigor within the grade.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 3 Everyday Mathematics instructional materials partially meet the expectations for balance. Overall, the three aspects of rigor are neither always treated together nor always treated separately within the materials. However, the lack of lessons on conceptual understanding and application do not allow for a balance of the three aspects.

The teacher's guide states that conceptual understanding, procedural skills and fluency, and application are all dimensions of Everyday Math which is certainly true. This curriculum most emphasizes procedural skill and fluency frequently through the spiral curriculum and daily practice. Conceptual understanding is developed in some clusters but lacking in other clusters. Application is minimally present in the curriculum. The evidence for these conclusions are stated in each of the earlier indicators (2A, 2B and 2C).

The unbalanced aspects of rigor in lessons and assignments lead to a heavy emphasis on procedural skills and fluency. All aspects of rigor are almost always treated separately within the curriculum including within and during lessons and practice.

Criterion 2e - 2g.iii

Practice-Content Connections: Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice
5/10
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 do not meet the expectations for practice-content connections. The materials only partially meet the expectations for attending to all the indicators 2e- 2g. Overall, in order to meet the expectations for meaningfully connecting the Standards for Mathematical Content and the MPs, the instructional materials should carefully pay attention to the full meaning of every practice standard, especially MP3 in regards to students critiquing the reasoning of other students and the use of correct vocabulary throughout the materials.

Indicator 2e

The Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout each applicable grade.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for identifying the MPs and using them to enrich the Mathematics content.

The MPs are identified in the Grade 3 materials for each unit and the focus part of each lesson.

  • For Unit 1, page 13 discusses how MP4 and MP5 unfold within the unit and lesson.
  • For Unit 3, page 219 discusses how MP2 and MP7 unfold within the unit and lessons.
  • For Unit 5, page 433 identifies which MPs are in the focus parts of the lessons within the unit.
  • For Unit 7, page 633 explains the development of MP4 and MP5 in this unit.
  • Within the lessons, there are spots where the MPs are identified.

However, within the lessons, limited teacher guidance on how to help students with the MPs is given. Because there is limited guidance on implementation, it is difficult to determine how meaningful connections are made. An Implementation Guide is provided on pages 7-16; however little guidance is provided throughout the lessons. Additionally, it is difficult to determine if the MPs have meaningful connections since the materials break them into small parts and never address the MPs as a whole. The broken apart MPs can be seen on pages EM8-EM11.

Indicator 2f

Materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 3 Everyday Mathematics instructional materials partially meet the expectation for treating each MP in a complete, accurate, and meaningful way. The lessons give teachers limited guidance on how to implement the standards.

Below are examples of where the full intent of the MP is not met.

  • MP5: Lesson 5.5 cites MP7, look for and make use of structure; however, in the lesson, students are simply doubling and not looking for and making use of structure. Lesson 7.1 cites MP5, use appropriate tools strategically. The intent of this MP is for students to choose their own tools and not be given the tool. In this lesson, students are given the tools to use, so it doesn't meet the intent.
  • MP 6: Lesson 6.4 cites MP6, attending to precision, and during the lesson, one of the places where the MP is highlighted has students deciding if a calculator would be faster.
  • MP7: Lesson 8.8 cites MP7, look for and make use of structure. Simply asking what is the same about all of these shapes doesn't meet the intention of a student looking for and making use of structure.

In some Lessons, the MPs are treated in an accurate and meaningful way. For example, in Lesson 5.3, students are modeling with mathematics using fractions.

Indicator 2g

Emphasis on Mathematical Reasoning: Materials support the Standards' emphasis on mathematical reasoning by:
0/0

Indicator 2g.i

Materials prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials partially meet the expectation for prompting students to construct viable arguments and analyze the evidence of others. MP3 is not explicitly called out in the student material. Although the materials at times prompt students to construct viable arguments, the materials miss opportunities for students to analyze the arguments of others, and the materials rarely have students do both together.

There are some questions that do ask students to explain their thinking on assessments and in the materials. Little direction is provided to make sure students are showing their critical thinking, process or procedure, or explaining their results. Sometimes there are questions asking them to look at other's work and tell whether the student is correct or incorrect and explain. It should be noted, though, that student materials never explicitly call out entire MPs at once; MP3 is broken into GMP 3.1 and GMP 3.2 in the materials.

The open response lessons could be opportunities for students to construct arguments for or against a mathematical question. However, besides just working in groups, there is little prompting from the teacher for students to discuss the answers of other groups or students. The following are some examples of where the materials indicate that students are being asked to engage in MP3:

  • In the Unit 2 assessment on page 18, question 7 asks students to decide if Jeremiah's number model fits the number story.
  • In the Math Journal on page 80, problem 5 asks students how the number model they created fits the story problem.
  • In the Math Journal on page 117, problem 5 asks students if they agree with Nicholas' reasoning; Nicholas is a fictional student.
  • In Lesson 7-2, on the "Exploring Equivalent Fractions" Math Masters worksheet, students are asked "Do you agree or Disagree? Explain." However, this worksheet has two fractions cards, and the conjecture that students are analyzing is simply that the two cards show equivalent fractions.
  • In Lesson 7-3, the Math Message follow-up says to "(h)ave partners share their problem-solving strategies with each other, and then invite a few volunteers to explain how their partner solved the problem." Although some students might analyze the arguments of others, the prompt does not require it, and only volunteers will participate in the activity.

There are many missed opportunities for students to construct viable arguments and/or to analyze the reasoning of others. An example of this is in lesson 7.7 where students read a journal page about the volume of a 1-liter container. They are discussing the conservation of mass (in this case liquid). The teacher is prompted to have the students complete the problem independently and then have a class discussion and listen to students answers. Teachers are instructed to provide support for answers that state all containers hold 1-liter of liquid. The opportunity missed here is encouraging the rich conservation students could have to defend answers by constructing reasonable arguments and defending arguments of others. The materials do not include explicit directions to prompt this conversation.

Indicator 2g.ii

Materials assist teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials partially meet the expectation for assisting teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards. The Grade 3 materials sometimes give teachers questions to ask students to have them form arguments or analyze the arguments of others, but typically the materials do not give both at the same time.

Usually only one right answer is available, and there is not a lot of teacher guidance on how to lead the discussion given besides a question to ask. There are many missed opportunities to guide students in analyzing the arguments of others. Students spend time explaining their thinking, but not always justifying their reasoning and creating an argument.

The following are examples of lessons aligned to MP3 that have missed opportunities to assist teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others:

  • Lesson 2.7 states "Could those numbers work as factors of 24? Explain." The missed opportunity here is for teachers to guide students in a rich discussion about what strategies they used and why. There is not that type of guidance for teachers.
  • Lesson 3.4 states to have the students trade journals and make sense of their partners work. Again, there is no instruction or guidance for the teacher to support students as they complete the activity.
  • Lesson 5.5 has students sketch their thinking, which is not engaging in creating or analyzing arguments. Teachers are not given specific guidance around what to do with the sketches in order to really help students construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others.
  • Lesson 6.7 states "work together to resolve discrepancies by showing and making sense of their solutions." Again, there is no instruction or guidance for the teacher to help the students do the work.
  • Lesson 8-4, "Setting Up Chairs," is a 2-day lesson designed to get students to make, discuss, and revise conjectures. More teacher guidance is needed in order for teachers to support students. For example, on page 753, the text states "Once children have begun working on their conjectures and arguments, try to minimize intervention." The second day of this lesson does provide some sample student work with some sample answers for teachers in the "Planning a Follow-Up Discussion" section on pages 754-755. However, one sample answer for each question is provided, and teachers are not given guidance on how to handle different answers.

Indicator 2g.iii

Materials explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for explicitly attending to the specialized language of Mathematics. Overall, the materials for both students and teachers have multiple ways for students to engage with the vocabulary of mathematics; however, often the correct vocabulary is not used.

  • Each unit includes a list of important vocabulary in the unit organizer which can be found at the beginning of each unit.
  • Vocabulary terms are bolded in the teacher guide as they are introduced and defined but are not bolded or stressed again in discussions where students might use the term in discussions or writing.
  • Each regular lesson includes an online tool, "Differentiating Lesson Activities." This tool includes a component, "Meeting Language Demands," that contains vocabulary, general and specialized, as well as strategies for supporting beginning, intermediate, and advanced ELLs. An example of this, from Lesson 3-5 includes "For beginning ELLs use visual aids to scaffold understanding of task directions."
  • Everyday Math comes with a Reference book that uses words, graphics, and symbols to support students in developing language.
  • Correct vocabulary is often not used. For example, "Turn-around fact" is used rather than the term commutative property, number sentence is used instead of equation, "name-collection box" instead of equivalent equations or equivalent expressions.  Other non-mathematical vocabulary includes “closer but easier number”, “expand and trade subtraction”, “helper fact”, “break apart strategy”, “near squares”, and “fact powers”. 

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

Use and design facilitate student learning: Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/8

Indicator 3a

The underlying design of the materials distinguishes between problems and exercises. In essence, the difference is that in solving problems, students learn new mathematics, whereas in working exercises, students apply what they have already learned to build mastery. Each problem or exercise has a purpose.
0/2

Indicator 3b

Design of assignments is not haphazard: exercises are given in intentional sequences.
0/2

Indicator 3c

There is variety in what students are asked to produce. For example, students are asked to produce answers and solutions, but also, in a grade-appropriate way, arguments and explanations, diagrams, mathematical models, etc.
0/2

Indicator 3d

Manipulatives are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and when appropriate are connected to written methods.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or online) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3l

Teacher Planning and Learning for Success with CCSS: Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students' mathematical development.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that explains the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade twelve.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials provide a list of lessons in the teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials), cross-referencing the standards covered and providing an estimated instructional time for each lesson, chapter and unit (i.e., pacing guide).
0/0

Indicator 3k

Materials contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Indicator 3l

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/0

Criterion 3m - 3q

Assessment: Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/10

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies for gathering information about students' prior knowledge within and across grade levels.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials provide strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.
0/2

Indicator 3o

Materials provide opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials offer ongoing formative and summative assessments:
0/0

Indicator 3p.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3p.ii

Assessments include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3q

Materials encourage students to monitor their own progress.
0/0

Criterion 3r - 3y

Differentiated instruction: Materials support teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades.
0/12

Indicator 3r

Materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.
0/2

Indicator 3s

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.
0/2

Indicator 3t

Materials embed tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.
0/2

Indicator 3u

Materials suggest support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics (e.g., modifying vocabulary words within word problems).
0/2

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.
0/2

Indicator 3w

Materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.
0/2

Indicator 3x

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/0

Indicator 3y

Materials encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.
0/0

Criterion 3aa - 3z

Effective technology use: Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.). In addition, materials are "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform) and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology.
0/0

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. i. Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. ii. Materials can be easily customized for local use. For example, materials may provide a range of lessons to draw from on a topic.
0/0

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices.
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Mon Apr 11 00:00:00 UTC 2016

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
null 978-0-02-130757-9 null null null
null 978-0-02-136464-0 null null null
null 978-0-02-138323-8 null null null
null 978-0-02-138355-9 null null null
null 978-0-02-140941-9 null null null
null 978-0-02-140996-9 null null null
null 978-0-02-141000-2 null null null
null 978-0-02-143087-1 null null null
null 978-0-02-143091-8 null null null

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Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

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Math K-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The K-8 review rubric identifies the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubric supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complement the rubric by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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