Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Reading Wonders Grade 5 partially meet expectations of alignment. The materials meet the expectations of Gateway 1. Texts students encounter over the course of the year are of high quality and interest, providing appropriately rigorous questions and tasks to engage students in each grade. The materials organize most speaking and listening activities to support the teacher’s implementation of practice with academic vocabulary and text-focused discussion. Writing tasks and activities attend to the balance and types intended by the standards, often connecting back to associated texts. The materials for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations of Gateway 2. There is some support for building students’ knowledge and academic vocabulary, but consistent guidance and focus in these areas does not appear over the course of the school year. The materials provide some planning for academic vocabulary and writing development, although the teacher may need to engage in additional planning to ensure the schedule can accommodate the intended lesson sequences.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
39
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
24
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The Grade 5 instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 1. Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention. Texts are of quality, are rigorous, and meet the text complexity criteria for grade 5. The materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Grammar and conventions instruction is embedded to facilitate students’ application of language skills but is taught mainly out of context. The materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
18/20
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet the expectations of texts being high quality, rigorous, and worthy of multiple close reads. Text selections are appropriately rigorous, but only partially support the students as they build their reading skills over the course of the school year. The program has a balance of genres and text types included to provide students opportunities to read broadly and deeply as they build their literacy skills. Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 ELA meet expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading. Anchor texts are found in the student edition of the Literature Anthology as the main texts for each week. Texts are of publishable quality and address several topics of interest which are engaging for Grade 5 students while expanding big ideas and broadening students’ knowledge base and personal perspectives. Anchor texts include a variety of interesting topics that include, but are not limited to realistic fiction, narrative nonfiction, poetry, biographies, and expository texts.

Multiple texts are authentic, published, well-written texts from a variety of text types and genres. These anchor texts contain rich language and engaging characters or content. Some examples of quality anchor texts are:

  • Unit 1, One Hen by Katie Smith Milway - This encouraging text will engage readers. It has colorful illustrations which support and help extend students’ understanding of one child’s dream.
  • Unit 2, The Boy Who Drew Birds, by Jacqueline Davies - This picture book about perseverance acquaints readers with the study of birds. It contains beautiful illustrations resembling watercolor paintings.
  • Unit 3, Weslandia, by Paul Fleischman - This uplifting story about being unique is well-crafted with small, yet important details in the illustrations.
  • Unit 3, Winter’s Tail: How One Little Dolphin Learned to Swim Again, by Juliana, Isabella, and Craig Hatkoff - This true story contains a fascinating main character, a dolphin. Photographs of the dolphin’s journey through rehabilitation hook young readers.
  • Unit 4, Rosa, by Nikki Giovanni - This narrative nonfiction contains well-written details and sophisticated vocabulary, which enhances the collage like illustrations.
  • Unit 5, Global Warming, by Seymour Simon - This nonfiction text contains facts and information about earth’s changes in child-friendly language, while still introducing readers to scientific vocabulary. The vibrant photos are intriguing.
  • Unit 6, Planting the Trees of Kenya, by Claire A. Nivola - This inspiring story displays many redeeming character qualities such as hard work and determination. This engaging story about being an environmental steward helps student build knowledge about ecology.

Some anchor texts, are of high quality, include only an excerpt of the original text such as Bud, Not Buddy and Where the Mountain Meets the Moon, which may impede students’ full understanding of the text.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Texts which all students access include a balanced mix of literature and informational text. Text genres represented include but are not limited to expository texts, narrative nonfiction, articles, biographies, folktales, historical fiction, poetry, realistic fiction, and drama.

Anchor text selections include 15 literary texts and 15 informational texts.

  • Literature examples include Second Day, First Impression, by Michelle Knudsen, Blancaflor, by Alma Flor Ada, They Don’t Mean It! by Lensey Namioka, Davy Crockett Saves the World, by Rosalyn Schanzer, Bud, Not Buddy, by Christopher Paul Curtis, and The Friend Who Changed my Life by Pam Muñoz Ryan.
  • Informational examples include: The Boy Who Invented TV, by Kathleen Krull, Who Wrote the U.S. Constitution, by Candice Ransom, “Machu Picchu: Ancient City,” One Well, by Rochelle Strauss, When is a Planet Not a Planet? by Elaine Scott, and Survival at 40 Below, by Debbie S. Miller.

Paired text selections include 12 literature texts and 18 informational texts.

  • Literature examples include Lost in the Museum Wings, The Princess and the Pea, A Story of How a Wall Stands,” New Moon, and Why the Evergreen Trees Never Lose Their Leaves.
  • Informational examples include A Walk with Teddy; From Tale to Table; Plants with a Purpose; Our Voices, Our Votes; When Volcanoes Erupt; and The Park Project.*

Weekly differentiated texts and complex extended texts are also a mix of text types and genres.

*Texts listed without an identified author usually indicate that they were written by the authors of the series.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation that texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task. The majority of texts are at the appropriate quantitative level and qualitative level.

Examples of texts that are of the appropriate complexity are:

Unit 1, Week 3: Camping with the President

  • Quantitative: Lexile 760; TextEvaluator 37
  • Qualitative: This text has a clear, sequential structure with illustrations that enhance the text. Sentence structure is complex with many sentences containing clauses. Opportunities to learn academic vocabulary are prolific. The text contains moderate levels of discipline-specific language about conservation.
  • Reader and Task: Prior to reading this text, there is a lesson on narrative nonfiction (page T120). This lesson introduces students to the characteristics of narrative nonfiction. The teacher models identifying characteristics of the genre. Prior to reading Camping with the President, there are lessons about the reading strategies (cause and effect, ask and answer questions). As students read Camping with the President, they take notes in a cause and effect graphic organizer. In “Access Complex Text,” the Teacher Edition contains information about Theodore Roosevelt to fill in students’ background knowledge. To conclude their understanding, students summarize what they learned about President Roosevelt’s trip to Yosemite.

Unit 2, Week 4: Blancaflor

  • Quantitative: Lexile 870; TextEvaluator 42
  • Qualitative: With multiple levels of meaning and portrayed experiences that are uncommon to most readers, the meaning and knowledge demands have a high level of complexity; however, the clearly organized text structure and moderately complex language features keep the qualitative features of this text at a level appropriate for Grade 5 readers.
  • Reader and Task: Throughout the close reading of the text, students are instructed to take notes in their graphic organizers, focusing on the effects of the characters’ actions and dialogue. During the close reading, the teacher poses questions about the author’s craft, the theme, making predictions, illustrations, and the folktale genre. The “Access Complex Text” notes guide teachers to help students with elements of the genre, text features, specific vocabulary, and implicit meaning/theme. These tasks are appropriate for most Grade 5 students.

Unit 3, Week 5: Machu Picchu

  • Quantitative: Lexile 990; TextEvaluator 40
  • Qualitative: This persuasive article is organized around main ideas and details of each argument. The photos and captions enhance the content of the article. The language features of the text are very complex to moderately complex with some unfamiliar vocabulary and many sentences with clauses. The purpose of the text moderately complex. The subject matter knowledge is complex with a moderate level of discipline-specific content.
  • Reader and Task: In order to access the genre of this article, there is a 10-minute mini lesson on author’s point-of-view. Furthermore, there is a 10-minute mini lesson about persuasive article characteristics. To access this text, teachers are directed to use a map or globe to show Machu Picchu’s location. As students read the article, there are suggested stopping points for students to pause and check understanding. On page 257, students stop to summarize. On page 258, students respond to the text by summarizing, writing about the author’s details, and make text-to-world connections.

Unit 4, Week 3: Rosa

  • Quantitative: Lexile 860; TextEvaluator 51
  • Qualitative: This narrative nonfiction text is organized sequentially. The illustrations enhance the content of the text. The conventionality and vocabulary are very complex, such as “The needle and thread flew through her hands like the gold spinning from Rumpelstiltskin’s loom” (page 299). The sentence structure is complex and contains clauses. The purpose of the text is implied but easy to identify. The knowledge demands are moderately complex for Grade 5 students.
  • Reader and Task: Prior to reading the text, background knowledge is built through a 10-minute mini-lesson about people working for change. There is a 10-minute mini-lesson about reading a biography. In “Access Complex Text” the teacher is to remind students that biographies do not necessarily have to start with a person’s birth. In another “Access to Complex Text,” the teacher is to inform students about the end of slavery. Students are to take notes in a graphic organizer about details and author’s point-of-view. At the end of the text, students summarize Rosa.

Unit 5, Week 2: Bud, Not Buddy

  • Quantitative: Lexile 950; TextEvaluator 44
  • Qualitative: This excerpt of a chapter book has a clear and organized structure. The illustrations support the text, but are not essential to understanding text’s meaning. Language features are moderately complex with some dialect that may be unfamiliar to Grade 5 readers. In most places, certain dialectical terms are defined for the reader, as the terms are also unfamiliar to the main character. Meaning and knowledge demands are of a slightly higher complexity. The theme is subtle, and the story is set in the Depression era, with an orphaned boy as the main character and uniquely named adult band members as the supporting characters.
  • Reader and Task: Throughout the close reading of the text, students are instructed to take notes in their graphic organizer, comparing the response of multiple characters to particular events. During the close reading, the teacher poses questions on dialect, making predictions, vocabulary, the genre, author’s craft, and making inferences. The “Access Complex Text” notes guide teachers to help students with prior knowledge of the Great Depression, connecting ideas in the story, understanding character relationships, understanding specific vocabulary, and understanding slang. These tasks are appropriate for most Grade 5 students.

Unit 5, Week 3: Global Warming

  • Quantitative: Lexile 980; TextEvaluator 46
  • Qualitative: The text structure is moderately complex with mostly explicit, but some implicit connections between ideas. Graphics and text features are simple and not essential for the reader to understand the text. Language features have a higher level of complexity with many subject-specific and unfamiliar terms. While some of these terms are defined for the reader, others, such as carbon dioxide, energy economy, and incandescent, are not. Because of undefined scientific terms like these, knowledge demands are high. Additionally, percentages are used throughout the text without further explanation, as in this example: “There is 30 percent more carbon dioxide in the air than there was 150 years ago” (Student Edition, page 388). Clear understanding of percentages will be necessary for full comprehension.
  • Reader and Task: Throughout the close reading of the text, students are instructed to take notes using a Venn diagram, comparing and contrasting various aspects of global warming. During the close reading, the teacher poses questions on text features, author’s craft, asking and answering questions, making inferences, author’s purpose, and context clues. The “Access Complex Text” notes guide teachers to help students with text organization, connection of ideas, and specific vocabulary. Independently, these tasks may difficult for students, but with adequate guidance from the teacher, the tasks are appropriate.

Unit 6, Week 2: The Friend Who Changed my Life

  • Quantitative: Lexile 860; TextEvaluator 56
  • Qualitative: The structure of this text is sequential and easy to predict. The illustrations are slightly complex and not essential to understanding the text. The conventionality is very complex with figurative language such as “I wore my vulnerability like a brand-new pair of milk-white sneakers--all too ready to be scuffed” (page 451). There are many unfamiliar vocabulary words such as atrocity, wallop, corralled, ceremoniously, and fraught. The theme of the text is implied and is revealed throughout the text. The subject matter is only slightly complex since most Grade 5 students experience schooling daily.
  • Reader and Task: During “Interactive Read Aloud” students learn about getting along with others, which sets up students with appropriate background knowledge for the Companion Text and for The Friend Who Saved my Life. The “Access Complex Text (ACT)” directions in the Teacher Edition provides guidance to the teacher about helping students find the meaning of difficult words. During the reading of the text, students fill in a theme graphic organizer with details about what the character does and says and how the character is influenced. Students use the graphic organizer to summarize what happened to the characters.

Two texts are significantly below the quantitative stretch grade band, but the texts are appropropriate when qualitative measures and reader and task are considered:

  • Unit 1, Week 4: A Crash Course in Forces and Motion with Max Axiom, Super Scientist, by Emily Sohn: This text is below the stretch grade band with a 630 Lexile. The qualitative features of this text help bolster it to an appropriate level. The text is a graphic novel. It has speech bubbles, which are not necessarily in order from left to right. The vocabulary is subject-specific to physical science. There are references to scientific topics such as friction in space and Isaac Newton. These references are supported with separate text boxes containing definitions.
  • Unit 3, Week 2: Aguinaldo, by Lulu Delacre: This text is below the stretch grade band with a 650, but the Text Evaluator places the text above the grade level with a 54. The qualitative features of this text are complex. It contains difficult vocabulary such as coquettishly and caressed. Some Spanish terms such as besito de coco are not directly defined when the word is used. The theme of the story is revealed over the entirety of the text.

One text has the appropriate quantitative measures for the grade band, but contains exceedingly complex language features and knowledge demands.

Unit 2, Week 1: Who Wrote the U.S. Constitution?

  • Quantitative: Lexile 760; TextEvaluator 38
  • Qualitative: This excerpt has a slightly complex text structure with mostly chronological organization and simple text features and graphics. Although the sentence structures are moderately complex, much of the vocabulary is subject-specific and will likely be unfamiliar for Grade 5 readers. With this, the knowledge demands are very complex, and although the text does explain most of the new information, the excessive volume of new names, places, conventions, committees, and abstract governmental concepts will present most Grade 5 students with difficulty in fully comprehending the text. Some, but not all, of these names and concepts from just the first seven pages include the following: Revolutionary War, Articles of Confederation, Edmund Randolph, taxes, France, Netherlands, rebels, Northampton, Worcester, Shay’s Rebellion, delegates, Confederation Congress, James Madison, Virginia Plan, legislature, House of Representatives, Senate, federal, legislative, executive, judicial, Congress, one-vote-for-one-state system, proportional representation, plantations, William Paterson, New Jersey Plan, Supreme Court, amendments, and national government coming from people, not the states.
  • Reader and Task: Throughout the close reading, students are instructed to complete a graphic organizer with a focus on problem and solution. Students may have difficulty completing this independently, but with guidance from the teacher, they will have a better understanding of the text. During the close reading, the teacher poses questions about author’s purpose, text features, context clues, inferences, and author’s craft. The “Access Complex Text” notes guide teachers to help students with prior knowledge they may be lacking along with subject-specific vocabulary. With such a high quantity of prior knowledge and vocabulary needs, however, many students may struggle to fully comprehend the text in the one day allocated for it in the Suggested Lesson.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation of supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. While the anchor texts, paired-texts, and leveled readers typically fall within the grade band and increase across the school year, the task demands do not increase in complexity throughout the school year. Students complete similar tasks during each week’s readings (summarizing) and after each week’s readings (Write to Two Sources) throughout all six units, even though the texts usually increase in complexity. Tasks are not consistently tailored to meet the needs and demands of the texts in order for students to reach independence with grade-level materials by the end of the school year.

Anchor and supporting texts increase in complexity based on quantitative and qualitative components over the school year. Each week, students build knowledge and read about a different topic or concept.

  • With One Hen at 810L, Unit 1 text, starts a little above the beginning of the stretch Lexile grade band with qualitative complexity in prior knowledge, specific vocabulary, sentence structure, organization, and connection of ideas. The tasks associated with One Hen are for students to identify the character, setting, plot, and sequence by taking notes during the first and second readings of the story. Students summarize the important events. In the reread, the task is to analyze the author’s craft while using the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to the leveled readers and “A Fresh Idea.” Students write to two sources by writing a diary entry based on One Hen and the paired reading text.
  • Unit 2 contains The Boy Who Drew Birds with a Lexile of 790 and qualitative complexity in purpose, specific vocabulary, genre, organization, and connection of ideas. The tasks associated with the text are for students to take notes on the sequence of events with a graphic organizer. In the reread, the task is to analyze the author’s purpose and author’s craft of word choice while using the Close Reading Companion. At the end of the first read, students summarize how John James investigated birds. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to the world. Students also Write to Sources based on the anchor text and paired text: “Compare and contrast the ways that John James Audubon and Daedalus investigated birds.”
  • Unit 3 contains The Story of Snow, with a Lexile of 890 and a low TextEvaluator score of 17, which is below grade level. Its qualitative complexity is in specific vocabulary, genre, connections of ideas, and organization. The tasks associated with The Story of Snow are for students to take notes on main idea and details. Again, like in previous weeks, student’s summarize the text after the first read. In the reread, the task is to analyze the author’s craft and text structure while using the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to the world. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor text and paired-text: “How do the diagrams in The Story of Snow and 'Fibonacci’s Amazing Find' help us better understand certain patterns in nature?”
  • Unit 4 contains Davy Crockett Saves the World, with a Lexile of 1050, which is above the stretch Lexile grade band. Only two days are dedicated to the reading of the complex text. This is the same number of days dedicated to reading a text at a lower Lexile level and complexity level. The qualitative complexity is in genre, prior knowledge, specific vocabulary, organization, and the connection of ideas. The tasks associated with Davy Crockett Saves the World are for students to use details to figure out point-of-view. Students summarize the story after the first reading. In the reread, students analyze the author’s craft of humor, hyperboles, and sensory language while using the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to the world. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor text and paired text in order to make comparisons of characters.
  • Unit 5 contains “The Case of the Missing Bees,” with a Lexile of 950 with a high TextEvaluator score of 59. The qualitative complexity is in purpose, organization, vocabulary, sentence structure, genre, and connection of ideas. All three texts in Week 5 contain Lexiles near the end of the stretch Lexile grade band. The Companion Text also has a high TextEvaluator score of 57. The tasks associated with “The Case of the Missing Bees” are for students to identify details in order to determine author’s point-of-view. As with other weeks, students take notes and summarize the text after the first reading. In the reread, the task is to analyze the author’s purpose and text features while using the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to the world. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor text and paired-text.
  • Unit 6 contains The Unbreakable Code, with a Lexile of 640, which is below the stretch Lexile grade band. The qualitative complexity is in sentence structure, specific vocabulary, prior knowledge, and connection of ideas. The tasks associated with this text are for students to identify what the character does and states and how that affects the character. This leads to figuring out the theme. Students take notes in a graphic organizer and write a summary. In the reread, the task is to analyze the author’s craft and purpose with the use of dialogue and figurative language while using the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to the world about money. Students also Write to Two Sources based on the anchor text and paired-text. This the final unit of the year, yet students read The Unbreakable Code, which is below the quantitative Lexile level with qualitative features in the moderate complexity range. Instruction around this text is similar to instruction to more complex texts in previous units.

Teacher materials include direction for differentiation to increase students’ literacy skills through the ACT (Access Complex Text) directions and the Research Base Alignment resource book. The directions guide teachers through scaffolded activities such as rereading and paraphrasing, student generated questions, citing text evidence, evaluating the strength of evidence cited, writing about texts, teacher modeling, use of text-dependent questions, graphic organizers, think-alouds, student collaboration, and note-taking. Although scaffolded activities are provided throughout the materials, every text gets the same amount of time spent reading it and analyzing it. More complex texts may not get more instructional time focused on understanding it and analyzing it, since there are fixed routines in place every week for close reading and rereading.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation that anchor texts and the series of texts connected to them being accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade.

The Differentiate to Accelerate Chart in the Teacher Edition explains the text complexity attributes of each whole class text, the Lexile and TextEvaluator levels of the texts, and the places within the lesson that will help the teacher determine if the text is appropriate in terms of reader and task.

The following example is from Unit 1, Week 2 page T72:

"Whitewater Adventure" - 760L TE 39

  • Qualitative: What Makes the Text Complex?
    • Organization
    • Connection of Ideas: Characters T85
  • See Scaffolded Instruction in the Teacher Edition pages T81 and T85.
  • Reader and Task: The Introduce the Concept lesson on pages T74-T75 will help determine the reader’s knowledge and engagement in the weekly concept. See pages T80–T89 and T102–T103 for questions and tasks for this text.

Second Day, First Impressions - 800L TE 46

  • Qualitative: What Makes the Text Complex?
    • Specific Vocabulary: Context
    • Genre: Realistic Fiction T89C
    • Connection of Ideas: Clues T89C, Inferences T89G, Characters T89I, T89O
    • Sentence Structure: T89F
    • Prior Knowledge: Football T89G
  • See Scaffolded Instruction in the Teacher Edition pages T89A–T89R.
  • Reader and Task: The Introduce the Concept lesson on pages T74–T75 will help determine the reader’s knowledge and engagement in the weekly concept. See pages T89A–T89P and T102–T103 for questions and tasks for this text.

The Teacher Edition also contains the Instructional Path at the beginning of each week. This path lists all texts read, why students are reading each text, the educational focus, and how the texts connect to one another during the week.

Unit 1, Week 3 Instructional Path T131-T132

  1. Talk about seeing for yourself: Guide students in collaborative conversations. Discuss the essential question: How can experiencing nature change the way you think about it? Develop academic language and domain-specific vocabulary on nature. Listen to “Capturing the Natural World” to summarize how an individual views nature.
  2. Read “A Life in the Woods”: Model close reading with a short complex text. Read “A Life in the Woods” to learn how experiencing nature changed the way Thoreau thought about it, citing text evidence to answer text-dependent questions. Reread “A Life in the Woods” to analyze text, craft, and structure, citing text evidence.
  3. Write About “A Life in the Woods”: Model writing to a source. Analyze a short response student model. Use text evidence from close reading to write to a source.
  4. Read and write about seeing for yourself: Practice and apply close reading of the anchor text. Read Camping with the President to learn how President Roosevelt's trip to Yosemite changed his view of the land. Reread Camping with the President and use text evidence to understand how the author presents information about President Roosevelt’s experience. Write a short response about Camping with the President. Integrate information about Roosevelt's camping trip to Yosemite and his trip to England. Write to two sources, citing text evidence to compare Camping with the President and “A Walk with Teddy.”
  5. Independent Partner Work: Gradual release of support to independent work. Tasks include text-dependent questions, scaffolded partner work, talking with a partner, citing text evidence, completing a sentence frame, and guided text annotation.
  6. Integrate Knowledge and Ideas: Connect texts, text-to-text. Discuss how each of the texts answers the question "How can experiencing nature change the way you think about it?" Text to photography: Compare information about seeing nature in the texts read with the photograph of the eagle. Conduct a short research project to create a promotional map of a national park.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet expectations that materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading. There are supports to build students’ comprehension of grade-level texts in oral and silent reading.

Texts available daily to students include close reading texts, the literature anthology, paired texts, interactive work text, differentiated texts, and extended complex texts.

Weekly routines include opportunities for students to practice choral reading, partner reading, repeated reading, timed reading, echo reading, oral reading modeling, and independent reading of a variety of texts.

For example, in Unit 3, Week 3 students participate in an interactive read aloud introducing the following essential question: “Where can you find patterns in nature?” This leads to students participating in a shared reading and rereading of “Patterns of Change,” then a close reading and rereading from the Literature Anthology of The Story of Snow. Students also read a paired text, “Fibonacci’s Amazing Find,” and then a small group reading where students are working with a differentiated text and are either being read to, echo reading, or reading with the support of a partner. Extended complex texts are also available for students to read. Students are given a purpose for reading with each reread and complete graphic organizers or answer questions to support comprehension.

In Unit 5, Week 4, students participate in an interactive read aloud introducing the following essential question: “How can scientific knowledge change over time?” A shared reading and rereading of “Changing Views of Earth” is followed by a close reading and rereading from the Literature Anthology of When Is a Planet Not a Planet? Students read a paired text of “New Moon” and participate in small group reading where students are working with a differentiated text and are either being read to, echo reading, or reading with the support of a partner. Extended complex texts are also available to read. Students are given a purpose for reading with each reread and complete graphic organizers or answer questions to support comprehension.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Grade 5 meet the expectations that students will have opportunities for rich, rigorous discussions and writing tasks that are evidence based. Questions and tasks associated with the texts focus students’ attention back to the texts and are organized to build their speaking and listening skills. Grammar and conventions instruction is embedded to facilitate students’ application of language skills but is taught mainly out of context. Each unit includes opportunities for on-demand and process writing, and the materials include culminating tasks at the end of each unit.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for text-dependent questions, tasks, and assignments requiring students to engage directly with the text and to draw on textual evidence to support what is explicit as well as make valid inferences.

During each whole-group selection, students are asked to answer a variety of literal, inferential, and evaluative questions. During whole-group reading of primary texts, students are asked to re-read to find answers to text-dependent questions. Question sets are included with each page of text. Many teacher-directed tasks support students in making connections between the text and illustrations. Questions and activities engage students in text-dependent writing and speaking opportunities.

Examples of text-dependent questions found throughout the units:

  • “After you read the first paragraph of ‘A Life in the Woods’ on page 51, you might ask yourself: Why did Thoreau have to find a place of his own? Reread the paragraph to find the answer.” (Unit 1, T147)
  • “Is the feeling the queen has in her heart correct? How do you know?” (Unit 2, T217D)
  • “How does the first paragraph on page 205 relate to what Wesley learned in school?” (Unit 3, T96G)
  • “On page 3, which clues in the sidebar explain the meaning of sediment?” (Unit 4, On Level Small Group T281C)
  • “Reread the last four paragraphs on page 375. Turn to a partner and say a name you predict the band might give Bud. Look for details in the story that may help you.” (Unit 5, T89L)
  • “Have students point to the two parenthetical sentences. Why does the author set these references in parentheses?” (Unit 6, T89C)

Examples of text-dependent tasks and assignments found throughout the units:

  • “Remind the students to take notes as they read. Have them fill in the graphic organizer on page 22 of the Your Turn Practice Book. Ask them to record the cause-and-effect relationships in each section. They can also note words they don’t understand and questions they have.” (Unit 1, T153B)
  • “Reread Chapter 4. Look for clue words that signal the sequence of events in Norman Borlaug’s life. Paraphrase the events.” (Unit 2, T177, on-level small group)
  • “What are the key details on pages 220-221? What do the key details on these pages have in common? Add the main idea and details to your organizer.” (Unit 3, T153E)
  • “Prompt students to apply the strategy in a Think Aloud. Have them turn to a partner and paraphrase the things Rosa is tired of. Then have them provide a brief summary.” (Unit 4, T153G)
  • “Have partners figure out the meanings of the idioms 'the cat’s pajamas' (page 325), and 'like there was no tomorrow' (page 327). Encourage students to use context clues in the surrounding sentences to help them determine each idiom’s meaning.” (Unit 5, T88)
  • “Reread page 481. Generate a question and share it with a partner. Look for the answer, then paraphrase the text for your partner. ” (Unit 6, T153M)

The Close Reading Companion, the Student Literature Anthology, and Reading/Writing Workshop include text-dependent questions, writing prompts, and discussion prompts that require students to engage in the text directly. The Respond to the Text questions at the end of the main literature anthology selections include summarization, writing, and making connection questions. The "make connection" questions ask students to provide evidence from the texts in the unit to answer the connection questions. Write to Source Lessons included in each weekly lesson routine include writing tasks that require student to provide evidence from the Literature Anthology texts in their writing. The Practice Book also provides questions/tasks that are tied directly to text unless the practice is a very specific skill (such as decoding).

Teacher modeling for text-dependent tasks is provided throughout instruction.

There are also “Text to Self” questions that are not text-dependent but relate to the theme of the text being read such as, “How have others helped you achieve a goal? Explain how you all worked together to meet the challenge.” (Unit 3, Week 4, TE page T209) and “When have you followed a plan in order to accomplish a task? Briefly describe the steps of the plan.” (Unit 2, Week 4, TE page 209).

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation for containing sequences of text dependent questions and activities that building to a culminating task integrating skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination). Students are provided with a Unit Big Idea and a weekly Essential Question. Students discuss the questions, make connections, and usually create a graphic organizer to be used at the end of the unit. There is repetition of this process built into the culminating tasks over the course of the school year.

Each week, an Essential Question is addressed throughout the texts and tasks. This Essential Question is revisited at the end of each text with a Make Connections Question. At the end of the week, students Integrate Ideas through Text Connections to revisit the Essential Question and create a graphic organizer using notes from the weekly read. At the end of the Unit, students Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea. Students use their weekly graphic organizers and notes to participate in a collaborative conversation about the Unit Big Idea. Students present their ideas and create a top five most important list as a class and are encouraged to continue building knowledge through research and discussions.

Unit 1 Big Idea:

  • Where can an idea begin?

Unit 1, Week 3 Essential Question:

  • How can experiencing nature change the way you think about it?

Questions at the end of the week’s texts:

  • Talk about how Thoreau’s experiences at Walden Pond changed his view of nature.
  • Talk about how the camping trip changed the President's view of nature.
  • Talk about how Roosevelt's experience in England changed the way he thought about birds.

End of Week Integrate Ideas: Text Connections:

  • Students create a four-door foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information they have learned about seeing things for oneself.

End of Unit: Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea:

  • The teacher writes “Where can an idea begin?” on the board. In small groups, students will compare the information they have learned throughout the unit in order to answer the Big Idea Question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things, students vote to narrow down the list to the top five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea.


Unit 5 Big Idea:

  • In what ways can things change?

Unit 5, Week 3 Essential Question:

  • What changes in the environment can affect living things?

Questions/tasks at the end of the week’s texts:

  • Talk about how how wildfires change the environment for plants.
  • How has a change in climate affected wildlife in different locations?
  • Talk about ways that a volcano affects living things.

End of Week Integrate Ideas: Text Connections:

  • Students create a shutter foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information they have learned about the changing Earth.

End of Unit: Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea:

  • The teacher writes “In what ways can things change?” on the board. In small groups, students will compare the information they have learned during the course of the unit in order to answer the Big Idea Question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things, students vote to narrow down the list to the top five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for frequently providing opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax (small group and whole class). Each week, unfamiliar words are introduced and taught through a variety of activities and strategies that include discussions, writing, word morphology, and a define/example/ask routine. Each page identifies academic language that can be found in the text on that page.

Protocols and routines are presented in “Start Smart” pages at the beginning of Unit 1. Teachers are instructed to teach these procedures and routines to students in the first days of the school year. These procedures and routines will be used throughout the school year.

  • “Build Background” (pages S5-S6 and pages S19-S20): introduces the concept of the weekly Essential Question. Protocol is introduced for using concept words related to the big idea, academic language, and domain-specific words in partner discussions.
  • “Collaborative Conversations”: Teachers are instructed to have students watch a video outlining procedures for partner and small group conversations, then share discussion guidelines revolving around turn-taking, careful listening, adding new ideas, preparing for discussions, asking and answering questions, taking on discussion roles, and being open to all ideas.
  • “Comprehension: Theme” (pages S11-S12): Teachers are guided to teach students how to answer a question by paraphrasing part of the text.
  • “Genre: Literature” (pages S13-S14): Teachers are guided to teach students about close reading to analyze and evaluate what they read and to use direct quotes to cite text evidence.
  • “Comprehension: Author’s Point of View” (pages S23-S24): Teachers are guided to teach students about citing text evidence when making an inference.
  • “Genre: Informational Text” (pages S25-S26): Teachers are guided to teach students about using facts, details, graphs, charts, and diagrams as text evidence.

During weekly lessons, multiple collaborative opportunities are presented daily, with modeling and explicit directions provided to facilitate evidence-based discussions with a focus on academic vocabulary and syntax.

  • Academic language is highlighted in the margins of the Teacher Edition, providing ease of reference and use.
  • Routines and procedures are provided as periodic reminders for collaborative conversations and peer conferences.
  • The vocabulary routine attends to speaking and listening skills associated with evidence-based discussions, academic vocabulary, and syntax. Students utilize a wide variety of graphic organizers and sentence frames throughout the school year.
  • In Unit 3, week 5 students discuss during the first read of Machu Picchu: Ancient City: “What is the meaning of the word dwellings in paragraph four? Which words in the sentence helped you determine the meaning?”
  • In Unit 5. week 5, students collaborate to identify important details in “New Arrivals Welcome” and write them in their graphic organizer. Students then work together to identify the author’s point of view. Modeled directions are provided for students about author’s point of view.

Lessons include frequent opportunities for the teacher to frame and guide discussion during Collaborative Conversations.

  • In Unit 2, Week 3 during a Build Background mini-lesson students are advised to be open to all ideas. As students engage in partner, small group and whole-class discussions, encourage them to share and listen openly in their conversations. The teacher is directed to remind students that all ideas, questions, or comments are important and should be heard, so they should respect others’ opinions. Students are also told to not be afraid to ask a question if something is unclear or to offer opinions, even if they are different from others’ viewpoints.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3 during a Build Background mini-lesson students are advised to listen carefully. The Teacher Edition states, “ As students engage in partner, small group, and whole-class discussions, encourage students to follow discussion rules by listening carefully to speakers. Remind students to always look at the person who is speaking, respect others by not interrupting them, and to repeat peers’ ideas to check understanding.“

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

Protocols and routines for speaking and listening are presented in “Start Smart” pages at the beginning of Unit 1. Teachers are instructed to teach these procedures and routines to students in the first days of the school year. These procedures and routines will be used throughout the school year.

  • In Unit 1, Week 2 students reread the section “Whitewater Adventure” and list three details that show the story is realistic fiction. Students, while working in a collaborative group, also identify ways the author builds suspense.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3 students work with a partner to discuss and complete a graphic organizer that records key details, descriptions, reasons, and evidence about Frederick's life and use the to determine the author’s point of view. The class discusses each section as teams complete them.

Students are provided speaking and listening opportunities about the target vocabulary in the Reading/Writing Workshop throughout the year. In the Smart Start instructions to teachers in Unit 1, there are specific instructions about listening comprehension such as to take turns talking, listen carefully, add new ideas, use text evidence, prepare for discussions, ask and answer questions, take on discussion roles, and be open to all ideas.

There are also speaking and listening checklists in the online teacher resources and in the description of assessments in week 6 of each unit that instruct students as they engage in partner, small group, and whole class discussions.

There are varied weekly projects (i.e., class website, oral presentations, research displays, interviews, timelines, speeches) in which students work in pairs or small groups. Then, students work in small groups to present a project through the culminating unit project.

Listening comprehension lessons are included in each weekly Interactive Read Aloud. Students are prompted to think about the genre and the strategy prior to listening to the read aloud by the teacher.

A presentation checklist is provided in the materials for students to evaluate student presentations.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Writing projects, tasks, and presentations aligned to standards and allow students to learn, practice, develop, and apply writing skills across the course of the school year. Writing projects, tasks, and presentations are associated with texts of various genres, topics, or themes. Writing tasks are embedded throughout lessons and provide students opportunities for short and extended writings. For example, students write to sources, answer text-dependent questions, take notes, complete graphic organizers, and complete research projects and presentations. Students write informative, opinion, and narrative pieces focusing on topics such as ideas, voice, word choice, organization, and sentence fluency. Students are provided opportunities to work through the various stages of the writing process during which they revise their writings and conference with their peers and teacher. There are also anchor papers in the Assessment Handbook.

Each unit includes on-demand writing prompts.

  • Respond to the Text: Students respond immediately to a text that has been read. For example, in Unit 2, Week 2 students write to respond to the prompt, “How does Grace Lin show that the king and the male lion both give up something important to them?”
  • Write to Sources: This is a 5-day routine of evidence-based writing that repeats each week. For example, in Unit 5, Week 3 students write to respond to the prompt, “How do the photographs in this selection help you understand how living things are affected by climate change?”
  • After Reading the Differentiated Texts: For example, in Unit 3, Week 3 students reading the On Level text are prompted to identify the main idea about weather in Chapter 3 using details that support the main idea.
  • Research and Inquiry and Inquiry Space: writing, including evidence from researched texts. For example, in Unit 4, Week 4 students write and outline to begin a draft about the explorers Lewis and Clark. Students can collaborate digitally working with teams online through the online portal.

Each unit includes two Genre Writing process writing lessons that include 3-week process writing lessons. Students are provided with an expert model in Week 1; prewrite in Week 2; draft the writing in Week 3; and proofread, edit, publish, and evaluate during Week 3. Students can complete one or both of the lessons.

The following are examples of the writing lessons:

Unit 1: Narrative Writing

  • Autobiographical Sketch, T344–T349, Week 1 - expert model, prewrite; Week 2 - draft, revise; Week 3 - proofread/edit, publish, and evaluate.
  • Personal Narrative, T350–T355, Week 4 -expert model, prewrite; Week 5 - draft, revise; Week 6 -proofread/edit, publish, and evaluate.


Unit 3: Opinion Writing

  • Book Review, T344–T349, Week 1 - expert model, prewrite; week 2 - draft, revise; week 3 -proofread/edit, publish, and evaluate.
  • Book Review, T350–T355, Week 4 - expert model, prewrite; week 5 - draft, revise; week 6 -proofread/edit, publish, and evaluate.


Unit 5: Informative/Explanatory Writing

  • Informational Article, T344–T349, Week 1 - expert model, prewrite; Week 2 - draft, revise; Week 3 -proofread/edit, publish, and evaluate.
  • Book Review, T350–T355, Week 4 - expert model, prewrite; Week 5 - draft, revise; Week 6 -proofread/edit, publish, and evaluate.

Writer’s Workspace includes graphic organizers, tools, templates, model writing and organizers, scoring rubrics, writing traits mini-lessons, and editing checklists for informative, opinion and narrative writing.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. The writing prompts are balanced between informative and narrative.

Process writing prompts include opportunities for students to address different types of writing:

  • Unit 1 - Narrative Text - Autobiographical Sketch and Personal Narrative
  • Unit 2 - Informative Text - Invitation with Directions and Explanatory Essay
  • Unit 3 - Opinion Writing - Book Review and Opinion Essay
  • Unit 4 - Narrative Text/Poetry - Fictional Narrative and Poetry
  • Unit 5 - Informative Text - Informational Article and Research Report
  • Unit 6 - Opinion Writing - Book Review and Opinion Essay

On demand prompts and quick writes include opportunities for students to address different types of writing:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2 students add an event to the story. “What did the Prince do and say in the beginning of his show, Dancing with the Prince?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 4 students write to answer the prompt, “Explain the meaning of Joseph Allen’s quote on page 355. Use text evidence to support your answer.”
  • In Unit 6, Week 4 students write to answer the prompt, “In your opinion, should all pesticides be banned? Use text evidence.”

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. The materials include weekly opportunities for students to respond to one or two texts in a variety of writing modes including informative, opinion, and narrative analysis.

Examples of opportunities for evidence-based writing are:

  • Unit 1, Week 3, students answer the prompt, “What effect did living in the woods have on Thoreau? Use text evidence to support your answer.”
  • Unit 2 , Week 4, students answer the prompt, “Add another event to the story. Describe a new obstacle Ping must overcome before he crosses the ocean.”
  • Unit 3, Week 2, students answer the prompt, “In your opinion, which friend was most helpful in surviving Survivaland? Provide reasons for your response.”
  • Unit 4, Week 3 students answer the prompt, “How did the events in Frederick Douglass’s early life shape his adult life? Use text evidence.”
  • Unit 5, Week 1 students answer the prompt, “In your opinion, were Ida B and Ravi justified in feeling upset about the changes in their lives? Use details from Ida B… and Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster, and (Possibly) Save the World and 'A Dusty Ride' in your writing.”
  • Unit 6, Week 4 the Teacher Edition states, “Explain that students will compare Planting the Trees of Kenya and 'The Park Project.' Provide students with the following prompt: In your opinion, what was the biggest effect that the actions of Wangari Maathai and the students from 'The Park Project' had on others?”

The Write to Sources weekly lesson objectives are to have students write in response to the texts of the week. Students write to the Reading/Writing Workshop text by writing in response to a prompt. Most prompts require text evidence to answer. Some prompts do not require text evidence.

  • Day 1: Writing Fluency – Students respond to a text-dependent question.
  • Day 2: Write to Reading/Writing Workshop Text – An evidence-based expert model is provided and discussed, students analyze their prompt, take notes with evidence, then write.
  • Day 3: Write to Literature Anthology Text – The teacher guides students in analyzing the prompt, identifying and collecting evidence, students write, then the teacher conferences with students (guidance is provided for conferencing).
  • Days 4 and 5: Write to Two Sources – The teacher guides students in identifying and collecting evidence, students write, then students conference with peers. Guiding questions are provided for peer conferences.
  • Throughout the week, the Teacher Edition and supplemental online materials provide instructional supports for analyzing models, analyzing prompts, collecting evidence, using graphic organizers, structuring responses, and conferencing.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Most grammar lessons are taught out of context and do not connect to the weekly theme, essential question, or texts read. Although explicit instruction is present each week, the activities and contexts used each week are repetitive and do not increase in sophistication of contexts. Grammar, Spelling, and Writing are three separate lessons that do not always connect with the texts being studied during the week.

Grammar and conventions are explicitly taught each week. This instruction is a part of every weekly lesson.

Weekly Grammar Instruction:

  • Each week, a specific grammar skill is identified for instruction.
  • Each day begins with a "Daily Language Activity" which is a sentence with errors for the students to correct.
  • On Day 1, the weekly skill is introduced in a 5-10 minute lesson, followed by a partner activity to reinforce the concept.
  • On Day 2, the weekly skill is reviewed in a 5-10 minute lesson, followed by a partner activity to reinforce the concept.
  • On Day 3, the weekly skill is not addressed. A lesson is included that focuses on a mechanics and usage skill, followed by a partner activity to reinforce the concept.
  • On Day 4, the lesson focuses on proofreading. Students work with a partner to complete the activity.
  • On Day 5, students are assessed on the weekly skill through a reproducible with isolated sentences and/or words.
  • Grammar Practice Reproducibles pages are provided for students who need additional support.

Grammar routines are described in the “Instructional Routine Handbook” on page R67. Grammar instruction is separate from writing instruction. Once a week students are provided an opportunity to edit for errors related to the grammar instruction for that week. This weekly opportunity occurs on Day 2 of the “Write to Sources” activities for each unit and week. Materials do not consistently build to students being able to apply conventions and other aspects of language within their own writing.

  • For instance, Unit 3, Week 2 page T193 instructs teachers to “Have students use Grammar Handbook page 458 in the Reading/Writing Workshop to review past-tense verbs.”

Spelling lists are designed to practice language standards and foundational skills. The students learn these skills in a five-day routine that includes word sorts. For example, students learn to spell number prefixes uni-, bi-, tri-, and cent- in Unit 6, Week 4. Throughout the year, students use spelling patterns and generalizations. For example, students practice consonant + le syllables in Unit 3, Week 4.

The Unit and Benchmark Assessments assess grammar, mechanics, and usage in context. The context of grammar/convention instruction does not become increasingly sophisticated over the course of the year as the same instructional routine and instructional activities are repeated throughout the units.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet expectations for foundational skills development. The materials, questions, and tasks provide instruction in phonics, word recognition, vocabulary, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression Students are guided to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading. The materials also provide students frequent opportunities to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, as well as to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials, questions, and tasks addressing grade-level CCSS by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, vocabulary, morphology, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression.

Each week of each unit addresses foundational skills for phonics through instruction, application, and assessment. Whole group phonics/fluency instruction is provided as part of every weekly lesson.

  • One 20-minute mini-lesson is taught each week. Each mini-lesson targets two primary skills. For example, in Unit 1, week 1 short vowels are taught, although these are below Grade 5 level foundational skills.
  • Each mini-lesson also includes a focus on reading multi-syllabic words and on a particular fluency skill, such as reading rate or accuracy.

Differentiation of phonics and fluency instruction is supported in the small group instruction lessons. Students are provided multiple opportunities to practice the strategies for learning foundational skills during these teacher-led lessons and when completing the Your Turn practice pages that correspond to the foundational reading skills lessons.

Phonics is also addressed through the spelling. Phonics through spelling in Unit 1 and Unit 2 are review phonics from prior grade levels, such as in Unit 1, Week 1, short vowels are taught. In Unit 2, Week 2, plurals are taught. By Unit 4, prefixes such as un- and re- are taught in the spelling.

  • Some of the skills are reinforced in the weekly spelling list, but none of the skills are applied in reading instruction, writing instruction, weekly/unit assessments, or culminating tasks.

Other routines for phonics and spelling are described in the “Instructional Routine Handbook” on pages R18 and R50. Phonics and spelling are assessed with dictated sentences the students must write and through phonics passages in which students read words with the phonics spelling patterns presented for the week.

Aside from the Phonics/Fluency lessons, fluency is also addressed through partner reading, choral reading, echo reading, and timed reading. Progress monitoring of fluency and recommendations and lessons for interventions are provided in the curriculum.

Vocabulary is taught in each unit through lessons called Build Vocabulary. These include a 5-day plan for students to learn categories of words such as synonyms, idioms, metaphors, suffixes, and root words.

  • Day 1: “Connect to Words” in which students are asked a series of questions that can only be answered with an understanding of the vocabulary word.
  • Day 2: “Expand Vocabulary” in which students are taken through a series of activities that generate different forms of the word such as adding or deleting suffixes or inflectional endings.
  • Day 3: “Reinforce the Words” in which students complete sentence stems with words related to the weekly vocabulary.
  • Day 4: “Connect to Writing” in which students write sentences in their notebooks using the vocabulary words.
  • Day 5: “Word Squares” in which students create word squares for each vocabulary words (Frayer model- define, illustrate, example, non-example).

Morphology is taught through “Build Vocabulary” and in some Vocabulary Strategy lessons.

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, students learn eight vocabulary words and study the morphological changes that occur when adding, changing, or removing inflectional endings. Students learn that a root is a basic part of a word that gives the word its meaning. The teacher models breaking down democracy into dem- and -cracy. Students work in pairs to figure out the meaning of biography, astronomy, and phone while reading the companion text, “Fantasy Becomes Fact.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students learn prefixes and suffixes. The teacher is directed to let students know a prefix is added to the beginning of words, while suffixes are added to the ends of words. Students learn un-, in-, and non- for prefixes. Students learn -ly, -er, and -or. As students read the companion text, “Frederick Douglass: Freedom’s Voice,” they are to determine the meaning of unexpected, hesitantly, and Liberator.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, students learn that a root word is the basic word part that gives the word its main meaning. The teacher models how to determine the meaning of invasive by pointing out invade is in invasive. Vas and vad come from a Latin word meaning “to go.” With a partner, students determine the meaning of nonnative and avian.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for materials, questions, and tasks guiding students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading.

Materials provide explicit instruction of new vocabulary along with multiple routine activities for students to work with new and unfamiliar words and figurative language. The Instructional Routine Handbook also describes routines for teaching new vocabulary words beginning on page R40. The materials do include activities for making meaning from unfamiliar words read in context during close reading of text sets each week.

  • In Unit 1, Week 3 page T153I, “Homographs, such as posts on page 55, are words that have the same spelling but different meanings. Used as a noun, posts means ‘pieces of wood fixed firmly in the ground.’ It can also mean ‘military bases.’ Used as a verb, to post mean ‘to mail or publish.’ You can use context clues to help you figure out the meaning of homographs. What does posts mean as it is used on page 55?”
  • In Unit 2, Week 3 page T159E, “Use context clues and word parts to help you determine the meaning of though and wouldst.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 1 page T25K, “Cause-and-effect clues can help you find a word’s meaning. What cause-and-effect clue helps you find the meaning of blurted on page 193?”
  • In Unit 4, Week 1 page T25K, “What is the meaning of the word hurled on page 272? Use the antonym grabbed and other context clues to help you figure out the definition.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 2 page T89K, “Point out that the author uses musical terms that give the story a more authentic feel. Explain the meaning of each musical term. Point to the recorder in the illustration on page 374. Say: 'Show me how you would play a recorder.'”
  • In Unit 6, Week 2 page T89C, “Point out the word convoluted on page 452. What context clues help you figure out what convoluted means? What is the meaning of convoluted?”

Opportunities for students to demonstrate mastery of the application of word analysis skills to grade level text occur during weekly assessments. The materials include two weekly assessments, and both are referred to as the "Weekly Assessment." There is also a selection test for each week.

  • In the Unit Assessment, there are vocabulary questions where students are required to identify the meaning of a vocabulary term.
    • Unit 1, “The precaution I had taken of fully charging it had done no good. The prefix pre- means “before.” What does the word precaution mean?”
  • In Weekly Assessment, there are vocabulary questions where students are required to use context clues to define a vocabulary term.
    • Unit 3, Week 2, “They became adept at protecting and herding sheep and other animals whereas their ancestors would have made a meal of them. This ability made dogs very useful. What does the word adept mean in the sentence?"
  • In the Selection Test, the first eight questions ask students to identify definitions for each of the week's vocabulary words with no context provided.
    • “What does the word inquisitive mean?” (Unit 4, Week 2)

Each week, “Vocabulary: Words in Context” and “Vocabulary Strategy” are introduced prior to reading texts.

  • For “Vocabulary: Words in Context”, the week's vocabulary words and definitions are introduced through a 10-minute mini-lesson using the Reading/Writing Workshop text prior to the shared read and the close read. The text provides an example of the word used in an isolated sentence, along with a representative picture and a question for partners to discuss. The week's vocabulary words are highlighted in the shared read and the close read; however, there is no instruction for teachers to revisit the words or their meanings in context.
  • For "Vocabulary Strategy," the week's vocabulary strategy is introduced through a 10-minute mini-lesson using the Reading/Writing Workshop text. Students are instructed to practice applying the skill with one or two words in the shared read (in the Reading/Writing Workshop text).

The Teacher Edition usually provides one opportunity for teachers to direct students in applying the vocabulary strategy skill during the close read.

  • Close Read - "Build Vocabulary"
    • Throughout the close read (in the Literature Anthology), "Build Vocabulary" words are called out in the margins of the Teacher Edition. These words are not related to the "Words in Context" or the "Vocabulary Strategy." Instructions are not provided with the words, but definitions are.
  • Close Read - "Access Complex Text: Specific Vocabulary"
    • At one or two points during the close read, a vocabulary word or word part is called out in the Teacher Edition for teachers to discuss with students.
  • "Build More Vocabulary" - Each day, an additional vocabulary skill is introduced or reviewed. These skills include, but are not limited to, homographs, homophones, academic vocabulary, context clues, related words, prefixes, and suffixes.
  • With the exception of the "Context Clues" activities, most practice activities involve students creating isolated sentences with the words, discussing examples, creating charts, and composing/decomposing words with word parts.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for providing students frequent opportunities to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, as well as to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Fluency routines are described in the Instructional Routine Handbook on page R36A. Routines included are partner reading, choral reading, echo reading, and timed reading. For example:

  • "Phonics/Fluency" - At the end of a 20-minute phonics lesson, the "Fluency" box directs teachers to model a fluency skill (expression, accuracy, or rate). Students then practice with echo reading, choral reading, or partner reading.
  • Small Group - At each reading level, after completing the leveled reader, the teacher models reading one page, then students practice (together as a group, with a partner).
  • Reader's Theater - At the end of each Unit, during week 6, students practice their parts for Reader's Theater every day.
  • Reading Workstation cards include a fluency card and reader's theater card to be used in workstations for week 6.

Weekly sets of lessons focus on one aspect of fluency as listed below along with some sample activities. Most of this fluency instruction occurs in differentiated small group instruction. Each unit focuses specific fluency skills such as expression, rate, phrasing, accuracy, and intonation. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4 and Unit 2, Week 3, the teacher models reading with expression and appropriate phrasing. Students chorally read the same passage the teacher modeled. Students can also practice fluency using the Your Turn Practice Book passages.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, the teacher models reading with appropriate rate and accuracy. Students choral read the same passage as the teacher modeled. The teacher listens for rate and accuracy.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, the teacher models reading with intonation. Students read in partners alternating paragraphs and using intonation like the teacher modeled.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, the teacher models reading with expression. Students take turns partner-reading paragraphs while practicing reading with expression.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, the teacher models reading with accuracy. Students take turns reading page 353. As one student reads, the partner follows along, checking for accuracy. Students review skipped or mispronounced words.
  • In Unit 6, Weeks 4 and 5, the teacher models reading with expression and appropriate phrasing. In Week 5, the teacher models how to read with expression and appropriate phrasing while reading a poem. With a partner, students take turns reading the poem using expression and appropriate phrasing.

Opportunities to demonstrate oral fluency are provided through the Your Turn practice book.

  • Each week, two out of ten activities focus on fluency and comprehension. Students read a passage aloud with a partner and answer comprehension questions. Partners track each other’s words correct per minute on the first read and second read.
  • Lexile levels for the reading passages are not provided in the student handbook or the teacher's annotated version. Without Lexile levels, the data for words per minute cannot be compared as students progress through the school year.

Students have the opportunity to practice fluency with poetry by reading and rereading poetry selections. Students read “A Simple Plan,” “Stage Fright,” “Catching Quiet,” and “Foul Shot” in Unit 2. In Unit 4, students practice reading fluency with poetry by reading and rereading “How I Hold the Summer?,” “Catching a Fly,” When I Dance,” “Words as Free as Confetti,” “Dreams,” and “A Story of How a Wall Stands.” In Unit 6, students read “To Travel,” “Wild Blossoms,” “You are my Music,” “You and I,” and “Time to Talk.”

Fluency assessments are included in the instructional materials. A beginning of the year diagnostic assessment is provided to determine students’ needs in foundational reading skills. The series includes blackline masters for fluency benchmarking and ongoing fluency assessment.

  • Thirty assessments are provided for the entire school year.
  • In the introductory section of the handbook, teachers are instructed to use at least two selections every two to three weeks for most students.
  • In each unit, the first passage is set at a Lexile level below the grade-level band, the next two are within the grade-level band, and the last two are at the high end or beyond the grade-level band.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations of the Gateway 2. Although texts are organized around themes, they do not build vocabulary or knowledge across weeks. Also, the number of words a student is introduced to in a five day setting, along with the time spent on vocabulary activities/tasks, may not allow students the time to develop a deep understanding of the words before moving on to a new week and set of words. Students write to address multiple topics over both short and extended time frames. However, students will not be able to adequately refine and reflect on their writings before moving on to a new topic; therefore, materials do not fully support increasing students’ writing skills and ability. Students will work on a series of short and long research projects throughout the year. There is not sufficient time built in to complete these projects and no guidance for teachers on how or when the projects and tasks would be completed. Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

24/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet expectations for texts being organized around a topic/topics to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. Each unit of study is organized around a theme. Each week of the unit is then organized around either a topic or a theme that addresses an essential question related to the unit’s theme. Unit themes are broad and do not necessarily build vocabulary and knowledge across weeks which would allow students to access future texts within a unit.

Each weekly topic/theme shares common vocabulary throughout the texts but does not consistently provide the opportunity to establish a base of knowledge across a wide range of subject matter in a one-week setting. Weekly topics/themes do not provide students the opportunity to refine and share their knowledge before continuing on to a new topic and set of texts.

Some topics/themes do promote some growth of knowledge, but sufficient time is not allotted for students to refine that knowledge and be able to access and comprehend future complex texts proficiently.

  • In Unit 6, the theme is Joining Forces. In week 3, the topic for the week is Adaptations. Texts within the week share common vocabulary. During the week students listen to, read, discuss and write about the following texts:
    • “Bacteria: They’re Everywhere”
      • Students summarize how bacteria adapt in many ways.
    • “Mysterious Oceans”
      • Students learn about the adaptation of sea creatures to the deep ocean, citing text evidence to answer text-dependent questions.
      • Students reread to analyze text, craft, and structure, citing text evidence.
    • Model Writing about Adaptations
      • Students read and analyze a short response student model writing.
    • Survival at 40 Below
      • Students learn how some animals are adapted to the Arctic environment.
      • Students reread and use text evidence to understand how the author presents information about animals in the Arctic.
    • “Why the Evergreen Trees Never Lose Their Leaves”
      • Students compare this text to Survival at 40 Below.
    • Students also read differentiated texts during small group such as: Cave Creatures and “Why Bat Flies at Night.”

Other topics/themes are broad and the teacher may need extra support to help students comprehend future complex texts proficiently.

  • In Unit 3, the theme is Getting from Here to There. In Week 2, the theme is Being Resourceful. Texts within the week share common vocabulary. During the week students listen to, read, discuss, and write about the following texts:
    • “Lucia the Hummingbird”
      • Students discuss the text.
    • “Survivaland”
      • Students read to learn about how learning about nature can be useful, citing text evidence to answer text-dependent questions.
      • Students reread to analyze text, craft and structure, citing text evidence.
    • Model Writing about “Survivaland”
      • Students read and analyze a short response student writing model.
    • Weslandia
      • Students read to learn about how one boy uses what he learns about nature to create a new civilization.
      • Students reread and use text evidence to understand how the author uses text, craft, and structure to develop a deeper understanding of the story and write a short response.
    • “Plants with a Purpose”
      • Students compare and contrast this text and Weslandia to learn different uses for plants in the two texts.
      • Students also read Differentiated Texts during small group such as: Approaching Level: Over the Top, “Rain-Forest Treasures”; On Level: In Drama Valley, “Medicine from the Sea”; and Beyond Level: Welcome to the Wilds, “Kakapo: A Very Special Parrot."

According to suggestions in the Teacher Edition, weekly texts are read, reread, discussed, and written about in a four-day timeline. On the fifth day, students will integrate ideas between texts and complete the weekly assessment.

Throughout lessons, the time allotted to each text for reading, rereading, discussion, and note taking is outlined but support for teachers who need to flex or change the timeline is minimal. For example, in Unit 4, week 1, teachers are to introduce the concept to build background knowledge, introduce vocabulary, and participate in a shared close read of “How Mighty Kate Stopped the Train.” Each of the following mini-lessons is allotted for ten minutes during a shared read of the text.

  • In the Comprehension Strategy: Visualize ten-minute mini-lesson - Students discuss visualization, are modeled how visualization can help them understand the text, collaborate with a partner to tell how Kate saves her pappy’s horse and buggy, and identify other parts of the story they may want to visualize.
  • In the Comprehension Skill: Point of view ten-minute mini-lesson - Students discuss point of view, teacher models by reading aloud the first four paragraphs of the text and identifies important details about Kate and her tale. Teacher then models using the graphic organizer to describe the narrator’s point of view, and how to use notes from the organizer to summarize events in the story. Finally, students work in pairs to reread the rest of the story and use the graphic organizer to record details that help them describe the narrator’s point of view and summarize how the narrator’s point of view and descriptions of the characters and events influence the reader’s experience of “How Mighty Kate Stopped the Train.”
  • In the Genre: Tall Tale ten-minute mini-lesson. Students discuss the characteristics of a tall tale. The teacher models identifying the characteristics of a tall tale in “How Mighty Kate Stopped the Train.” Students discuss the terms hero and hyperbole. Students then work with a partner to find and list three details in the rest of the text that show that the story is a tall tale and share it with the class.
  • In the Vocabulary Strategy: Synonyms and Antonyms ten-minute mini-lesson. Students discuss the relationships between synonyms and antonyms. The teacher models using synonyms to better understand the meaning of the word boulder. Students then work in pairs to find a synonym or antonym in the same sentence or paragraph for a set of words and explain how each pair of words is related and how their relationship helps readers better understand their meanings.

This time frame does not necessarily allow time for extended collaboration or discussions to build student knowledge and access future texts or grow the ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet expectations for materials containing sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Students are provided the opportunity to participate in the close reading of the three weekly texts and respond to questions and tasks. Instructions to the teacher support with guidance to read, re-read, and closely consider texts. Close reading of three texts in one week requires significant periods of literacy instructional time; support for this work is outlined in the teacher implementation materials.

Close reading occurs on Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, and Day 4.

During Days 1 and 2, students participate in close reading of the companion text using the Close Reading Routine with the Reading/Writing Workshop.

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, students closely read the text, “The Magical Lost Brocade.” During the first read, students identify key ideas and details about making a plan of action. Students take notes, summarize, and answer text-dependent questions such as: “What do these details reveal about the characters?" and "What problem is described at the beginning of the story?” During the second read, student analyze the theme and genre. Students are directed to look at the headings and answer questions such as: “What is Ping’s quest? What magical characters and situations does the folktale contain?”
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students closely read the companion text, “Shipped Out.” During the first reading, students are asked key ideas and details about contributing to a cause. Students answer text-dependent questions such as: “What information supports the idea that different people can contribute to a cause?” For the second read, students focus on summarizing and understanding theme and genre. Students practice summarizing paragraphs, discuss character clues that lead to figuring out the theme, and students try to find a flashback in the story.

During Days 3 and 4, students participate in close reading of the anchor text in the Literature Anthology.

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, student closely read the anchor text, Second Day, First Impressions. During the first reading, students are asked to identify the structure of the text by answering the following questions: “Who is the main character? What is the setting? What problem does Luisa have?” During the second read, students are asked to analyze author’s craft. For example, students answer: “What is the meaning of the idioms sea of strangers, butterflies in her stomach, and made a beeline?” and “How does Hailin’s dialogue reveal what he thinks of himself?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students closely read Ida B. During the first reading, students identify and analyze the structure of the text by comparing and contrasting: “What was Ida B’s home like before her mother got cancer? How are Ida’s feelings about reading out loud different at home and at school?“ During the second read, students analyze author’s craft when asked the following questions: “How does the author help you understand Ida’s reaction to reading in class?” and “What human characteristics does the author give to happiness?”
  • For the reread of Survival at 40 Below on Day 4 in Unit 6, Week 3, students use the Close Reading Companion to answer questions by collaborating and filling in graphic organizers to write responses to author’s craft questions such as:
    • “How does the author feel about the wood frog’s adaptations to the cold?”
    • “Why does the author describe the arctic fox as an acrobat?”
  • For Unit 5, Week 3, students closely read Global Warming. This 13-page text is content heavy for students to closely read in two days. Teachers are directed to build vocabulary in the first read with words such as contribute, generate, and disposable. During the first read, students are asked questions about key ideas and details based on comparison and contrast such as:
    • “How is Earth’s atmosphere similar to a greenhouse?”
    • “Prior to today, what has the atmosphere been like for thousands of years?”

Students also participate in another close reading on Day 4 with paired texts. Students are expected to participate in two close reading lessons on Day 4.

  • In Unit 5, Week 5, students read “Busy, Beneficial Bees.” The teacher has students follow the Close Reading Routine. During the first read, students respond to the following prompts about text structure of cause and effect:
    • “How do honeybees help agriculture?”
    • “How is this text different from the previous articles on honeybees?”
  • For the reread of the paired text, “Busy, Beneficial Bees,” students respond to this author’s craft question: “How does the author’s use of headings help you understand his point of view about pesticides?”
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, students read “Choose Your Strategy: A Guide to Getting Along.” During the first read, the teacher asks students to respond to the following author’s craft question”
    • “How does the author organize the “Talk It Out” section?
  • For the reread of the paired text, students respond to the following craft and structure questions:
    • “How does the author’s use of sensory language help the reader understand the text?”
    • “What is the author’s purpose for writing this selection?”

In the Integrate sections of many weeks, students have the opportunity to connect all the texts they have read. For example:

  • In Unit 4, Week 3 of Integrate, students are provided the opportunity to think about the week’s Essential Question in association with all the week’s readings. Students respond to “What can people do to bring about a positive change?” People compare information they have read about taking action. Students take notes in their accordion foldable.

Because students follow the same routine for close reading with each companion text, each anchor text, and each paired-text in every week, students analyze each text in the same manner for key ideas and details, craft and structure, and language. The Close Reading Routine structures the analysis of each text the same way, building routines to support students' focus on the texts themselves.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet expectations for materials containing a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that ask students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. The units are organized by themes and have a broad range of topics that do not always connect or build knowledge and ideas. Each week has a new topic/theme connected to the unit theme, but that does not necessarily build knowledge or ideas.

Although there are multiple questions and tasks that direct students to analyze integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts, the time allotted to these questions and tasks is not sufficient for students to analyze the information. Each unit contains five weekly text sets with questions and tasks for each set. Each text set centers around a theme or topic with questions and tasks that ask students to refer back to the text to find and support answers to questions and to complete tasks. Questions and tasks require connected knowledge, and students are asked to connect ideas between multiple texts. Rubrics for each week and for each unit guide teachers in what to look for to support student learning. The amount of class time allotted to each text and question set may not be sufficient to provide the time needed for students to analyze texts and gain knowledge and ideas, and teachers may need to use outside resources to plan accordingly.

Unit 2, Week 2, examples of questions and tasks include but are not limited to:

  • Compare Texts: As students read and reread “The Princess and the Pea,” encourage them to take notes and think about the Essential Question: What can you do to get the information you need? Tell students to think about how the queen got the information she needed and compare it to what they learned in Where the Mountain Meets the Moon.
  • First Read Strategy: Summarize. Does the advisor believe that the princess is a real princess? How do you know? Why does he think this way?
  • Make Connections: How are the Old Queen’s actions different from the way another fairy tale character gets information? How does a plan help each character?
  • Read/Summarize/Guide: Students summarize the selection.
  • Reread/Analyze the Text: After students read and summarize, have them reread to develop a deeper understanding of the text by annotating and answering questions on pages 41-43 of the Close Reading Companion.
  • Integrate: Text to Poetry. Remind students to discuss information from all of this week’s reads. Tell them to include Oliver Herford's poem, “The Hippopotamus,” as part of their discuss. Students answer, “How does the poem connect to what you read this week?”
  • Access Complex Text: Connection of Ideas. Help students understand the weight of the king’s decision to give Minili the paper containing the “borrowed line.”
    • What negative things about his family’s past behavior does the king realize? (He realizes that holding onto the torn page shows proof of his ancestor’s rudeness, anger and greed.)
    • How do the king's thoughts about his family's past influence his decision to give the paper to Minili? (The king reasons that you only lose what you cling to, so if he chooses to release the paper and not cling to it, he can give it to Minli without losing it.)

In Unit 6, Week 3, examples of questions and tasks include but are not limited to:

  • Compare texts: As students read and reread “Why Evergreen Trees Never Lose Their Leaves,” encourage them to take notes and think about the Essential Question: How are living things adapted to their environment? Tell students to think about how this text compares with what they learned about Arctic animals in Survival at 40 Below.
  • First Read Strategy: Genre Expository Text. What relationship is explained on these pages?
  • Read/Summarize/Guide: Students summarize the selection.
  • Reread/Analyze the Text: After students read and summarize, have them reread to develop a deeper understanding of the text by annotating and answering questions.
  • Make Connections: How is the bird’s adaptation in this story different from other animal adaptations you’ve read about?
  • Integrate: Text to Photography. How does the photograph connect to what you read this week?
  • Access Complex Text: Connection of Ideas. Remind students that they have read about each of the animals on page 482 earlier in the selection. Invite them to look back and recall what each animal has done to survive the winter.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet expectations for questions and tasks supporting students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g., combination of reading, writing, speaking, and listening). Students read, discuss and listen when addressing the Unit Big idea and the weekly Essential Question Text Connection Questions. Students do not have to write at length about the question. Instead they create graphic organizers to aid in class discussion. The weekly discussions and graphic organizer note-taking would lead to students being able to complete the Unit Wrap-Up. The Big Idea questions are frequently broader than the focused knowledge building that may be taking place in the lessons.

  • The Unit 1 Big Idea is "Where can an idea begin?" This question is broad and vague.
  • The Unit 1, Week 3 Essential Question is "How can experiencing nature change the way you think about it?" This question is broad.
  • The questions at the end of the week's texts are repetitive and do not require students to broaden their knowledge of a topic. The questions require little deeper thinking and could be answered without closely reading the texts. Questions at the end of the week’s texts include the following:
    • Talk about how Thoreau’s experiences at Walden Pond changed his view of nature.
    • Talk about how the camping trip changed the President's view of nature.
    • Talk about how Roosevelt's experience in England changed the way he thought about birds.
  • In the End of Week Integrate Ideas - Text Connections section, students create a four-door foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information they have learned about seeing things for yourself. This task asks students to compare the texts using a foldable. There are few directions to support this task to promote deeper thinking or building knowledge.
  • In the End of Unit Wrap Up the Unit - The Big Idea section, the teacher writes “Where can an idea begin?” It can begin on the board. In small groups students will compare the information they have learned during the course of the unit in order to answer the Big Idea question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things listed, students vote to narrow down the list to the top five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea. This task is a listing what you have learned task. Students share out answers, vote on a top five, and then move on the a new unit. This task repeats itself in all six units.
  • The Unit 6 Big Idea is "How are we all connected?" This question is broad and vague.
  • The Unit 6, Week 4 Essential Question is "What impact do our actions have on the world?" This question is broad.
  • The questions at the end of the week's texts may lead to the answering of the Big Idea and Essential Questions but do not build knowledge across texts. The texts are loosely connected, and students do not deeply study the texts to gain knowledge. Questions at the end of the week’s texts include the following:
    • What impact did the publication of Silent Spring have on the makers of pesticides such as DDT?
    • Talk about how the actions of the people of Kenya affected the land before and after Wangari’s movement.
    • How did the students’ actions have an impact on their community?
  • In the End of Week Integrate Ideas - Text Connections section, students create a four-door foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information they have learned about making a difference. This task asks students to compare the texts using a foldable. There are few directions to support this task to promote deeper thinking or building knowledge.
  • In the End of Unit Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea section, the teacher writes “How are we all connected?” on the board. In small groups students will compare the information they have learned during the course of the unit in order to answer the Big Idea question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things, students vote to narrow down the list to the top five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea. This task is a listing what you have learned task. Students share out answers, vote on a top five, and then move on the a new unit.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for including a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. The number of words a student is introduced to in a five-day setting, along with the time spent on vocabulary activities/tasks, may be amended to meet site-specific needs. Direction is given in the Teacher’s Edition for teachers to review vocabulary in future lessons or to teach how words build knowledge to access future grade-level texts. The teacher edition states, “The words are always reviewed the next week in Build Vocabulary. In addition, you should do a periodic cumulative review of vocabulary words about twice per unit.”

Vocabulary builds throughout the week and across texts within a one-week period. During the reading each week, students are introduced to Words to Know Vocabulary. These vocabulary words are introduced using the vocabulary routine and visual vocabulary cards. The vocabulary routine states to define the word, give an example of the word, and then ask a question using the word. Words are introduced within the context of a sentence. Words to Know Vocabulary are found within and throughout each text read during the week. Vocabulary strategy mini-lessons are included in weekly lessons. Vocabulary practice can be found in student practice books.

In the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook, a supplemental resource, teachers are guided through a 4-step routine that can be used year-long to introduce vocabulary. (pages R41-R42)

  • Step 1: Introduce: Tell students what the vocabulary routine will be.
  • Step 2: Model (I Do): Define/Example/Ask
  • Step 3: Guided Practice (We Do): Ask students to identify examples and non-examples of the word; guide students in creating word squares.
  • Step 4: Provide Independent Practice (You Do.): “Individual turns allow you an opportunity to assess each student’s skill level and provide additional practice for those students who need it. Near the end of each week, students should write sentences in their word study notebooks using the words.” (page R42)

In the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook, teachers are also provided with instructions on introducing Vocabulary in context: “As you Close Read the selection with students, take a moment to point out the Build Vocabulary words and their definitions...Unlike the Define/Example/ Ask Routine, the purpose of the Build Vocabulary words is to simply point out and define these rich vocabulary words to enrich and broaden students’ vocabulary and promote understanding of the text” (page R43). In this supplemental resource, the Define/Example/Ask routine is explained:

  • Define: “You will tell them the meaning of the word, using student-friendly language--words they already know.” (page R44)
  • Example: “You will give them an example of how the word is used, using their own common experiences.” (page R44)
  • Ask: “You will ask them a question that helps them connect the word to words they already know and use the word in speaking.” (page R44)

In the “Smart Start” of the Wonders Teacher’s Edition, year-long protocols and routines are presented at the beginning of Unit 1. The “Smart Start” pages guide teachers in introducing students to the following instructional routines that are addressed in weekly lessons:

Vocabulary Routine

  • The Define/Example/Ask routine is introduced to students

Building Vocabulary

  • Teachers are instructed in building word walls, selecting five to ten words per week from the texts.
  • Teachers are instructed to “try to include useful words that students might use in writing and speaking.”
  • A Periodic Vocabulary Review routine is outlined in the margin, stating that students will encounter the vocabulary words in multiple contexts. It does not mention in which contexts/activities/resources the students will repeatedly encounter these words. It does state, “The words are always reviewed the next week in Build Vocabulary. In addition, you should do a periodic cumulative review of vocabulary words about twice per unit.” Review instructions include:
    • 1. Review the words using the Word Lists Online PDF.
    • 2. Have students write sentences using the words. Then have partners discuss each other’s work.
    • 3. As needed, students can check the meanings or pronunciations of words using the Glossary on Literature Anthology, pages 552-568.

Build Background

  • The concept of the weekly essential question is introduced.
  • Teachers are to introduce concept words related to the Big Idea and guide students to generate words related to the essential question. Explicit instructions/routines for this are not provided.
  • In the “Collaborative Conversations” box, teachers are instructed to have students watch a video outlining procedures for partner and small group conversations, then share discussion guidelines.
  • None of the discussion guidelines include procedures for ensuring inclusion of academic vocabulary in speaking activities.

Vocabulary Strategy

  • The week's vocabulary strategy is introduced through a 10-minute mini-lesson using the Reading/Writing Workshop text.
  • For example, in Unit 4, Week 2, the vocabulary strategy is adages and proverbs: Teachers are to explain that adages and proverbs are traditional sayings that have often been repeated.
  • Students are instructed to practice applying the skill with one or two words in the shared read (in the Reading/Writing Workshop text). Example from Unit 5, week 5: “Use the roots below to figure out the meanings of words from “New Arrivals Welcome” and “A Growing Problem.”
  • The Teacher Edition usually provides one or two opportunities for teachers to direct students in applying the vocabulary strategy skill during the close read. For example in Unit 3, Week 3: “The word microscope on page 219 has a prefix and a Greek root. The prefix micro- means ‘small.’ The root scope means ‘see or watch.’ Use this information, along with context clues, to figure out the meaning of microscope. ”

Close Read - Build Vocabulary

  • Throughout the close read (in the Literature Anthology), "Build Vocabulary" words are called out in the margins of the Teacher Edition. These words are not related to the "Words in Context" or the "Vocabulary Strategy." Instructions are not provided with the words, but definitions are.
  • For example, Build Vocabulary words in the close read for Unit 2, week 4, include the following words: consulted, solemnly, comb, empty, lifeless, saplings, casks, dismayed.

Close Read - Access Complex Text: Specific Vocabulary

  • At one or two points during the close read, a vocabulary word, word part, or term is called out in the Teacher Edition for teachers to discuss with students.
    • In Unit 2, Week 2, these words/terms include the following: pedigree, ancestors, and credentials

Close Read - Companion Text

  • In the companion text following the anchor text, vocabulary words are highlighted.

Build Vocabulary instruction is also included in the language arts lessons. During a Build Vocabulary lesson, students practice weekly vocabulary using strategies such as connect to words, expand vocabulary, reinforce the words, connect to writing, and word squares. Words in Build Vocabulary are also listed along with their definitions in the Teacher Edition for teachers to address while reading the weekly Literature Anthology.

Build Vocabulary

  • In a 5-day routine, students practice vocabulary words introduced that week. For example, in Unit 1, Week 3, Day 1, students answer questions about the following words: debris, emphasis, encounter, generations, indicated, naturalist, sheer, and spectacular.
  • Students practice the words through questions, sentences, changing inflectional endings, writing definitions, completing sentence stems, drawing representative pictures, creating word squares, and writing their own sentences.

Build More Vocabulary

  • Each week, additional vocabulary skills are introduced or reviewed. These skills include, but are not limited to homographs, homophones, shades of meaning, academic vocabulary, context clues, related words, prefixes, and suffixes.
  • With the exception of the "Context Clues" activities, most practice activities involve students creating sentences with the words, discussing examples, creating charts, and composing/decomposing words with word parts.

Academic words are also in bold in the Teacher Edition notes and listed and labeled in a side box. These words are used in student questioning and directions.

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet expectations for materials supporting students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Students write to address multiple topics over both short and extended time frames and are provided with mentor texts, conference questions, anchor papers, and rubrics to help students self-evaluate writing as well as giving a clear picture for teachers to evaluate and give feedback. The required time the weekly lesson would take with the amount of writing students are responsible for is unbalanced. Students may not be able to adequately refine and reflect on their writings before moving on to a new topic; therefore, materials do not fully support increasing students’ writing skills and ability.

Students participate in both on-demand and process writings throughout the year. Each week students Write to Sources and work on Genre Writing.

The Write to Sources process has students read and reread texts to take notes, cite text evidence to support their ideas and opinions, and write short analytical responses. After reading, students write to build writing fluency, analyze model responses, incorporate stronger evidence, and focus on a writing trait. Write to Sources provides students with student exemplars and analyzes writing prompts while modeling organizational tools such as graphic organizers.

  • In Unit 3, Week 4
    • Students read the prompt: “Write about how people responded to the oil spill.”
    • Students analyze the prompt and reread to note literary elements such as details the author includes about the topic and noting text evidence.
    • Students then Analyze Text Evidence by looking at model student notes.
    • Students analyze the student model and discuss focus on a topic, sentence structure, and a strong conclusion.
    • Students then write to answer the prompt and craft their responses focusing on a topic, sentence structure, and a strong conclusion.
    • Students check for errors in linking verbs.
    • Students then analyze the prompt: How do the authors help you understand how many people have been inspired by Winter’s story?
    • Students use poems as sources to answer the prompt.
    • Students analyze text evidence and look at another student exemplar to discuss.
    • Students analyze the student model and then write to answer the prompt.

Write to Sources also hosts Teacher Conferences and Peer Conferences.

  • In teacher conferences teachers and students talk about the strength of the writings and focus on how the writer uses text evidence, and the teacher makes concrete suggestions and suggests revisions. Focuses and sentence stems are given in the Teacher Edition to guide the suggested revisions. For example, Unit 5, Week 3 suggests that teachers focus on a sentence by stating, “Try adding more information to show cause and effect. Teachers may also focus on a section by stating, 'This section could be developed with facts or examples that explain your point. Add details to help me understand better.'” Teachers may also focus on a revision strategy. The teacher can have a student underline a section and use a specific revision strategy, such as sentence combining. "Try combining these connected ideas using a complex sentence."
  • In the Peer Conference notes three questions are given to focus the conference conversation. For example in Unit 1, Week 4, the student conference notes tell the teacher, “Focus peer response groups on sequence, precise language, and reasons and evidence. Provide these questions: Are events told in a logical order that make sense? Does the writing contain strong words using precise language? Did your partner include reasons and evidence from the text?”

Genre Writing takes place over a three-week period. Each unit has two Genre Writing topics. These topics are not always tied to a unit text and do not always require text evidence. During the Genre Writing, students analyze an expert model, prewrite, draft, revise, proofread and publish, and evaluate their writing using a student rubric.

  • In Unit 4, students write a fictional narrative in Weeks 1-3. Students write about someone who is running for mayor of a town.
    • Students read and analyze a model student response and discuss the features of a fictional narrative.
    • Students discuss and plan for the purpose and audience of their writing.
    • Students participate in a mini-lesson about sequence.
    • Students work in a small group to brainstorm ideas and plan their writing using a story map organizer.
    • Students then review a revised student model and participate in mini-lessons on developing characters and strong conclusions.
    • Students revise their drafts.
    • Students discuss an edited student model and edit their own papers.
    • Students publish a final presentation of their fictional narrative writings in print or digitally.
    • Students then use the student rubric to evaluate their own fictional narrative essays and reflect on their progress as writers. Students are asked to consider areas where they feel they have shown improvement and to think about what areas need further improvement.
    • Students set writing goals and prepare for teacher and peer conferences.

To evaluate Genre Writings, teachers are directed to use the rubric and anchor papers provided to help evaluate student writing. Teachers are directed to review with individual students the writing goals they have set and discuss ways to achieve these goals.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 5 meet the criteria for including a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. Students will work on a series of short and long research projects throughout the year. In Units 1, 5, and 6, students will work on short Research and Inquiry projects each week. In Units 2, 3, and 4, students will work on three longer online Inquiry Space performance tasks. Teacher instructions in the Teacher Edition for Research and Inquiry and Inquiry Space are brief. Teachers will need to identify instructional time that works for their settings to implement this work, and there is some guidance in the teacher materials.

Research and Inquiry: Weekly Projects

  • These are week-long projects that take place during three out of the six units in the school year during Unit 1, Unit 5, and Unit 6.
  • Students conduct research and create short projects such as interviews, summaries, illustrations, poems, story maps, and brochures.
  • Speaking and listening skills are incorporated on Day 5, when students present their projects.
  • Teacher instructions in the Teacher Edition are brief and lack explicit direction for effectively guiding students through the research process with online and print materials.
    • Unit 1, Week 4: “Find Resources - Review how to locate and use reliable print and online resources. Students should verify all facts in multiple sources.”
    • Unit 5, Week 3: “Find Resources - Have partners search reliable print and digital sources for information about nature reserves and wildlife sanctuaries. Tell them to look for web sites that describe ways the reserve or sanctuary protects wildlife. Ask students to choose one reserve or sanctuary to focus on as they answer their research questions. Suggest that students use Research Process Checklist 3.

Unit 1 Eureka! I’ve Got It - Weekly Projects

  • Week 1 - Venn Diagram, T38
  • Week 2 - Time Line, T102
  • Week 3 - Promotional Map, T166
  • Week 4 - Shared Research Board, T230
  • Week 5 - Persuasive Speech, T294
  • Week 6 - Newspaper Article, Television Segment, Slide Show or Pamphlet, Debate, Persuasive Presentation

Unit 5 What’s Next - Weekly Projects

  • Week 1 - Cause and Effect Chart, T38
  • Week 2 - Presentation, T102
  • Week 3 - Website Entry or Podcast, T166
  • Week 4 - Summary, T230
  • Week 5 - Bibliography, T294
  • Week 6 - Choice of Multimedia Presentation, Formal Presentation, Slide Show, Mock Interview, or Persuasive Speech

Unit 6 Linked In - Weekly Projects

  • Week 1 - Class Web Site, T38
  • Week 2 - Oral Presentation, T102
  • Week 3 - Oral Presentation, T166
  • Week 4 - Research Display, T230
  • Week 5 - Interview Summary, T294
  • Week 6 - Choice of Oral Presentation, List of Guidelines, Slide Show, Rap or Jingle, or Mock Interview

Inquiry Space

Inquiry Space is a digitally-delivered program that provides students practice and instruction in integrating and applying reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills to build and share knowledge about a science or social studies topic. Inquiry Space performance tasks are found in Units 2, 3, and 4. Each six-week project is made up of six levels that step out the research, writing, and presenting process. Inquiry Space is not allotted time during the suggested lesson plans in either the core nor optional plans until week 6 of the Unit, so teachers will identify time(s) that work for use of this component.

  • Level 1: Analyze the Task - purpose and audience, keywords, research plan, design your presentation.
  • Level 2: Evaluate Sources - skim and scan, evaluate sources.
  • Level 3: Take Notes - taking notes from audio sources, taking notes from video sources, paraphrasing, research plan, taking notes from print sources.
  • Level 4: Write an Outline and Draft - organizing notes, outline to draft, student model outline, opinion statement, paraphrasing, writing rubric.
  • Level 5: Revise and Edit Your Draft - revised student model, edited student model, cite sources, proofreader marks, peer conferencing checklist, revise and edit checklist, writing rubric, peer conferencing video.
  • Level 6: Publish and Present - how to give a presentation, presentation checklist, listening checklist, presentation rubric, how to publish your work, design your presentation, record and edit audio.
  • For example, In Unit 4, students complete a Narrative Performance Task. The Teacher Edition states, “Each week students will complete one level of a six-week narrative performance task in a digital environment. Via a game-like interface, students are assigned a task and work independently to: plan and conduct research, synthesize information, communicate ideas in writing and presentation."
  • Resource Toolkit: At each level, a toolkit of resources is available to students. The point-of-use resources include a variety of animated tutorials, videos and slide presentations that students can view to help them at each level.
  • Projects integrate reading and writing skills throughout all six weeks. Projects incorporate speaking and listening skills in the fifth and sixth weeks as students peer conference and later present their projects.

The Inquiry Space projects require research skills over the six weeks of the unit.

  • Research skills are introduced through narrated, text-heavy slideshows and tutorials. Students are directed to apply skills by answering free response and yes or no questions/prompts in a step-by-step research process (analyze the task, evaluate sources, take notes, create a story map and write a draft, revise and edit your draft, publish and present). Students have the option to skip the instructional slideshows and tutorials.
  • During the “evaluate sources” step, they evaluate and select three out of four digital sources provided in Inquiry Space.
  • Various research skills are addressed as students take notes from multiple sources. However, each unit’s project follows a similar pattern of instruction, with small changes according to the type of writing required.

Unit 2 Inquiry Space - Investigate: Solar Energy - Informative

  • Week 1 - Research Plan, T38-39
  • Week 2 - Evaluate sources, T102-103
  • Week 3 - Take notes on sources, T166-167
  • Week 4 - Outline and draft, T230-231
  • Week 5 - Collaborative conversation, revise, edit, T294-295
  • Week 6 - Publish and present, T330-331

Unit 3 Inquiry Space - Take a Stand: Water Conservation - Opinion

  • Week 1 - Research Plan, T38-39
  • Week 2 - Evaluate sources, T102-103
  • Week 3 - Take notes on sources, T166-167
  • Week 4 - Outline and draft, T230-231
  • Week 5 - Collaborative conversation, revise, edit, T294-295
  • Week 6 - Publish and present, T330-331

Unit 4 Inquiry Space - Write About: Lewis and Clark - Narrative

  • Week 1 - Research Plan, T38-39
  • Week 2 - Evaluate sources, T102-103
  • Week 3 - Take notes on sources, T166-167
  • Week 4 - Outline and draft, T23-231
  • Week 5 - Collaborative conversation, revise, edit, T294-295
  • Week 6 - Publish and present, T330-331

Included in the materials are student and teacher checklists for Research and Inquiry, which are to guide the research process and the presentation. Speaking and listening skills are incorporated on Day 5, when students present their projects.

A “Research Roadmap” PDF is available for students, providing free-response questions to guide them through their project.

Reading Digitally:

Reading Digitally occurs during Week 6 of each unit. After reading the Time for Kids digital article, four options are provided for work around the article. Two options are about research, Research for Study and Independent Study.

  • In Unit 4, Week 6, Research Online states, “Using Multimedia Elements: Encourage students to suggest multimedia elements that would augment a presentation on water and drought. Point out that video clips of places experiencing drought or flooding might be helpful.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 6 in Independent Study, students are to brainstorm a research question: What else can people do to conserve water? The teacher is to remind students about how to conduct an Internet search, and students are to create an informational presentation about helping victims of natural disasters.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Students are allotted 20 minutes of daily sustained silent reading as well as time during Small Group when they do reading activities using their Workstation Activity Cards. Suggested Timeframes for Daily Independent Reading Grade are 10-20 Minutes for Grade 5 students. Directions are provided for an independent reading routine at the beginning of Unit 1 (in the “Start Smart” pages) and each week in the differentiated Small Group directions. Students keep an independent reading log to track texts read.

Start Smart - “Independent Reading”

  • The rationale for sustained silent reading is explained, and teachers are directed to set aside 15-30 minutes for this per day, depending on the grade level. It is specified that “Students can read independently during sustained silent reading time, as well as during Small Group when they do reading activities using their Workstation Activity Cards.”
  • Teachers are provided with directions on helping students select a book, as well as helping them “create a reading log or response journal, where they record reactions and feelings about what they are reading.”

Differentiated Instruction Small Group - “Self-Selected Reading”

  • Teachers are provided with differentiated instructions for assisting students in selecting a book for sustained silent reading and providing them with guidance for purposeful reading.
  • How to Choose a Good Independent Reading Book: The book students choose to read can be easy, at their independent reading level (texts that are “just right”), or challenging--but of high interest. Students should be encouraged to choose a book at their independent reading level most of the time. Share the following guidelines with students to help them choose an appropriate Independent Reading book.
  • For example in Unit 2, Week 2, students may self-select a text during small group. The Teacher Edition states, “Have students choose a fairy tale book for sustained silent reading. Remind students that they should actively engage with the story by making, confirming, and revising predictions as they read. They should think about events that occur in the beginning, middle, and end of the story which may be similar to or different from one another. Also students can compare and contrast events and their outcomes to better understand what happens in a story and how characters are affected.”

Teachers are given suggestions on how to set up a classroom library and organize texts. Classroom library trade books provide options for independent reading. A unit bibliography also provides additional suggestions of titles related to the unit themes.

Students keep an Independent Reading Journal. As students read their independent reading books, they will be documenting what they think about what they read in the Independent Reading Journal. Students are encouraged to ask questions about what they are reading and find answers. Students are also directed to identify words they do not know and cannot figure out. They are shown that they can also notice when parts of what they read are confusing or they do not understand. Teachers are directed in ways to support and scaffold ways students can read, think about, and reread texts such as using Thinking Codes when reading.

Teachers are directed to track Independent Reading goals and confer with students about their independent reading. It is suggested that teachers engage the student in a conversation about what they are reading and why they chose their specific text. Asking additional questions, as appropriate, can provide the teacher with valuable formative assessment information about a student’s reading development. These questions may include questions about: the text’s genre, text features, referring back to specific “Think Codes” students have left in the text, general comprehension of text, and more focused questions on how the author presents information in a section of the text the student may have commented on. Teachers are also instructed that they may take notes and lists strengths and weaknesses a student may have to keep track of student progress.

Resource pages R107-R108 show examples of conference forms and goal setting.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

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0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Wonders Grade 5 Close Read Companion 978-0-02-131025-8 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Reading Wonders Grade 5 Literature Anthology 978-0-02-141787-2 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 5 Unit 5 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-676558-4 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 5 Unit 6 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-676747-2 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Reading/Writing Workshop Grade 5 978-0-07-676789-2 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 5 Unit 2 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-676977-3 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 5 Unit 3 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-679064-7 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 5 Unit 4 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-679581-9 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 5 Unit 1 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-680481-8 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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