Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Reading Wonders Grade 4 partially meet expectations of alignment. The materials meet the expectations of Gateway 1. Texts students encounter over the course of the year are of high quality and interest, providing appropriately rigorous questions and tasks to engage students in each grade. The materials organize most speaking and listening activities to support the teacher’s implementation of practice with academic vocabulary and text-focused discussion. Writing tasks and activities attend to the balance and types intended by the standards, often connecting back to associated texts. The materials for Grade 4 partially meet the expectations of Gateway 2. There is some support for building students’ knowledge and academic vocabulary, but consistent guidance and focus in these areas does not appear over the course of the school year. The materials provide some planning for academic vocabulary and writing development, although the teacher may need to engage in additional planning to ensure the schedule can accommodate the intended lesson sequences.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
39
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
24
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The Grade 4 instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 1. Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention. Texts are of quality and are rigorous and meet the text complexity criteria for Grade 4. The materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Grammar and conventions instruction is embedded to facilitate students’ application of language skills but is taught mainly out of context. The materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
18/20
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 meet the expectations of texts being high quality, rigorous, and worthy of multiple close reads. Text selections are appropriately rigorous, but only partially support students’ building their reading skills over the course of the school year. The program has a balance of genres and text types included to provide students opportunities to read broadly and deeply as they build their literacy skills. Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 ELA meet expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading. Anchor texts are found in the student edition of the Literature Anthology as the main texts for each week. Many texts are of publishable quality and address several topics of interest which are engaging for Grade 4 students while expanding big ideas and broadening students’ knowledge base and personal perspectives. Anchor texts include a variety of interesting topics that include, but are not limited to historical fiction, folktales, fantasy, and expository texts.

Numerous texts are published, original, and award-winning works from a variety of text types and genres. These anchor texts contain rich language which is engaging. Some examples of quality anchor texts are:

  • Unit 1, A Crash Course in Forces and Motion with Max Axiom, Super Scientist, by Emily Sohn - This graphic novel is of high interest for students. This adventurous text contains brightly colored illustrations.
  • Unit 2, The Buffalo are Back, by Jean Craighead George - This picture book contains illustrations with fine details and realistic coloring. The engaging book about Yellowstone’s ecosystem helps students build knowledge about a biological problem.
  • Unit 3, Delivering Justice: W.W. Law and the Fight for Civil Rights, by Jim Haskins - This text contains bold-colored illustrations and depict thoughtful, historical images of the journey for equal rights.
  • Unit 3, Abe’s Honest Words: The Life of Abraham Lincoln, by Doreen Rappaport, This well-crafted text tells the story of Abraham Lincoln’s life and stretches students’ thinking about history through the use of Lincoln’s quotes and words weaved throughout the text.
  • Unit 4, LaRue for Mayor, by Mark Teague - This high-interest picture book contains a captivating main character. The structure of the text is well-crafted with black and white flashbacks.
  • Unit 5, Mama, I'll Give You the World, by Roni Schotter - This text contains creative, figurative language, which hooks the reader and assists students in visualizing the characters and setting.
  • Unit 5, A Drop of Water, by Gordon Morrison - This informational book displays vivid pictures of water, which support the text and help students understand water. Students are able to grow their knowledge about the scientific properties of water.
  • Unit 6, “My People,” by Langston Hughes - This poem uses repetition in a unique way to show students to think of beauty. While it is short, it is a deep and engaging poem.

Some anchor texts, though high quality, include only an excerpt of the original text such as A Cricket in Time Square and Valley of the Moon, which may impede students’ full understanding of the text. While Unit 6 contains two excerpts and two less engaging texts, Energy Island and The Big Picture of Economics, Week 5 does contain quality poems such as “The Drum” and “Birdfoot’s Grampa.”

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Texts which all students access include a balanced mix of literature and informational text. Text genres represented include, but are not limited to, expository texts, narrative nonfiction, articles, biographies, folktales, historical fiction, poetry, realistic fiction, drama, and fantasies.

Anchor text selections include 15 literary texts and 15 informational texts.

  • Literature examples include The Princess and the Pizza, by Mary Jane Auch, Aguinaldo, by Lulu Delacre, The Moon Over Star, by Dianna Hutts Aston, and Apples to Oregon, by Deborah Hopkinson.
  • Informational examples include Earthquakes, by Sneed B. Collard III, Spiders, by Nic Bishop, Why Does the Moon Change Shape? by Melissa Stewart, and The Big Picture of Economics, by David A. Adler.

Paired text selections include 14 literature texts and 16 informational texts.

  • Literature examples include The Box-Zip Project, The Moonlight Concert Mystery, How It Came To Be, and The Incredible Shrinking Potion.*
  • Informational examples include Tornado, Energy in the Ecosystem, A New Birth of Freedom, and One Nation, Many Cultures.

Weekly differentiated texts and complex extended texts are also a mix of text types and genres.

*Texts listed without an identified author usually indicate that they were written by the authors of the series.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectation that texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task. The majority of texts are at the appropriate quantitative level. Texts that are above or below grade level quantitative bands have qualitative features and/or tasks that bring it to the appropriate level for students to access the text.

Examples of texts that are of the appropriate complexity are:

Unit 1, Week 1: The Princess and the Pizza

  • Quantitative: Lexile 780; TextEvaluator 36
  • Qualitative: This text has a clear, sequential structure. Sentence structure is complex with many sentences containing clauses. A key figurative language phrase in the story must be emphasized ("for Pete’s sake") in order for students to understand the ending of the story. Numerous hints to other fairy tales are made, which makes the text more complex for students who lack that prior knowledge.
  • Reader and Task: In order to grasp references and humor in this story, students need to review fairy tale features. This review is done in the Interactive Read Aloud (page T12). Throughout the story, students take notes in a graphic organizer, which contains character, setting, beginning, middle, and end. The teacher models a think-aloud about making predictions. During the whole group reading, students answer questions about sequence and author’s craft. Students use the sequence graphic organizer to summarize the important events in the text. Students also write about how the author shows that winning the contest changes Paulina’s life.

Unit 2, Week 4: Spiders

  • Quantitative: Lexile 820; TextEvaluator 27
  • Qualitative: This text has a clear, sequential structure based on main ideas and details. It contains content-specific vocabulary pertaining to the biology and anatomy of spiders. Sentence structure is conversational using second person point-of-view and third person point-of-view.
  • Reader and Task: During “Introduce the Concept” (pages T202-T203), students watch a video about animal survival to gain background knowledge about animal adaptations. Since this text is organized by main ideas and details, students take notes in a graphic organizer as they read. During the whole group reading, the teacher models a think-aloud about summarizing the learned information. During the whole group reading, students answer questions about details, text features, and author’s craft. Students use the sequence graphic organizer to summarize how spiders have adapted in order to survive. Students write about how text features help one to understand the author’s point-of-view about spiders.

Unit 3, Week 1: The Cricket in Times Square

  • Quantitative: Lexile 780; TextEvaluator 40
  • Qualitative: This excerpt of a chapter book contains an abundance of back-and-forth dialogue. There are chapter headings letting readers know the character point-of-view. The setting requires background knowledge about New York City and Times Square.
  • Reader and Task: To access this text, teachers are directed to tell students about Times Square and provide pictures of Times Square for students to build background knowledge. Students take notes in a graphic organizer about point-of-view. During the reading of the text, students mainly answer questions about point-of-view, although they answer questions about the illustrations, making inferences, and making predictions. The teacher does a think-aloud about visualizing. At the end of the text, students use their notes to summarize the important events in the story. Students also write about the use of dialogue: “How does George Selden use dialogue to show how Chester and Tucker’s friendship develops throughout the story? Use these sentence frames to help organize your text evidence. George Selden uses Chester and...Tucker’s first meeting to....”

Unit 4, Week 1: See How They Run

  • Quantitative: Lexile 870; TextEvaluator 42
  • Qualitative: The text is organized with headings. The headings are a play-on-words, such as “There’s No Place Like Rome,” which makes predicting about the sections more complex. The vocabulary is subject-specific with words such as Athens, Julius Caesar, dictator, and senate. The purpose of the text is identifiable and connects to the Essential Question. The subject matter relies on a moderate level of discipline-specific knowledge.
  • Reader and Task: Prior to reading the text, background knowledge is built through vocabulary with words such as: democracy, amendments, commitment, compromise, legislation, and privilege. A lesson on how to read narrative nonfiction is also taught prior to reading the text. Students complete a graphic organizer for cause and effect as they read the text. Students identify the key details and summarize the text based on the cause and effect organizer. Students also respond to: “What is Susan E. Goodman’s viewpoint about democracy and our right to vote? Use these sentence frames to help organize your text evidence. Susan E. Goodman tells how the Founding Fathers…; She describes how democracy…; This helps me understand that she….”

Unit 5, Week 2: Apples to Oregon

  • Quantitative: Lexile 840; TextEvaluator 43
  • Qualitative: The organization of the text is chronological. The illustrations enhance the reader’s understanding of the genre. There is complex figurative language such as “...pull up roots...” and “It was wider than Texas, thicker than Momma’s muskrat stew, and muddier than a cowboy’s toenails.” There are complex and long sentences. The topic of pioneer life requires some discipline-specific content knowledge. There are some references students may not understand such as Johnny Appleseed, Chimney Rock, and Independence Rock.
  • Reader and Task: To help students access some of the challenges in the qualitative analysis, the “Connect to Content” directions in the teacher edition tells the teacher about the famous pioneer landmarks. To help students access the unfamiliar phrases or references such as “redder than the poison apple the old witch gave to Snow White,” the teacher is to explain the reference or how to use context clues to figure out what is happening. During the story, students complete a cause and effect graphic organizer. Students answer questions about cause and effect, literacy elements, and author’s craft. At the end of the text, students use their graphic organizer to summarize the important details of the story and describe the journey for the main character and her family. Students also write about following question: “How does the author show that the family’s trip to Oregon was successful? Use these sentence frames to organize your text evidence: The author tells me about Delicious and her family by using....Through descriptive details, I learned....The illustrations help me understand….”

Unit 6, Week 1: The Game of Silence

  • Quantitative: Lexile 900; TextEvaluator 51
  • Qualitative: The structure of this text is sequential. The language is complex with one-word sentences and sentences with clauses or dashes. There is subject-specific language around Ojibwe words. The theme of the text is implicit and is building throughout this section of the excerpt. The subject matter is complex and relies on moderate levels of content-specific knowledge about Native American history.
  • Reader and Task: The “Access Complex Text (ACT)” directions in the Teacher Edition provide multiple opportunities for scaffolding that addresses some of the challenges mentioned in the qualitative analysis. Students need prior knowledge about Ojiwbe people in 1850. Furthermore, ACT provides suggestions about accessing specific vocabulary, connecting the ideas, and sentence structure. Students complete a graphic organizer for documenting ideas about the theme. During the reading of the text, students answer questions about the text features, such as the glossary at the beginning of the excerpt. Students discuss with a partner generating their own questions, and they discuss the denotations and connotations of two vocabulary terms. The teacher provides think-alouds about rereading for details. At the end of the text, students use their theme graphic organizer to summarize the text. Students also write about the author’s use of sensory language by answering the following question: “How do you know that family is important to the story’s message? Use these sentence frames to organize text evidence. The author uses words and phrases to help me visualize…; This is important to the story’s message because…; It helps me understand….”

Two texts are significantly below the quantitative stretch grade band, but the texts are appropriate when qualitative measures and reader and task are considered:

  • Unit 1, Week 4: A Crash Course in Forces and Motion with Max Axiom, Super Scientist, by Emily Sohn: This text is below the stretch grade band with a 630 Lexile. The qualitative features of this text help bolster this to an appropriate level. The text is a graphic novel. It has speech bubbles, which are not necessarily in order from left to right. The vocabulary is subject-specific to physical science. There are references to scientific topics such as friction in space and Isaac Newton. These references are supported with separate text boxes containing definitions.
  • Unit 3, Week 2: Aguinaldo, by Lulu Delacre: This text is below the stretch grade band with a 650, but the Text Evaluator places the text above the grade level with a 54. The qualitative features of this text are complex. It contains difficult vocabulary such as coquettishly and caressed. Some Spanish terms such as besito de coco are not directly defined when the word is used. The theme of the story is revealed over the entirety of the text.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 partially meet the expectation of supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. While the anchor texts, paired-texts, and leveled readers typically fall within the grade band and increase across the school year, the task demands do not necessarily increase in complexity throughout the school year.

Anchor and supporting texts increase in complexity based on quantitative and qualitative components over the school year. Each week students build knowledge and read about a different topic or concept.

  • Unit 1 texts start in the beginning of the Lexile stretch band with The Princess and the Pizza at 780 with qualitative complexity in purpose, specific vocabulary, prior knowledge, sentence structure, organization, and connection of ideas. The tasks associated with The Princess and the Pizza are for students to identify the sequence of the story by taking notes during the first and second readings of the story. Students summarize the story in the end. In the reread, the task is to analyze the author’s craft and purpose while using the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to a poem by Robert Louis Stevenson and “Tomás and His Sons.” Students also write to two sources based on the anchor text and paired text: “Explain that students will write a narrative that includes details from both The Princess and the Pizza and “Tomás and His Sons.” Provide students with the following prompt: “Describe what happens when Tomás visits Princess Paulina’s Pizza Palace to sell some grapes. Use details from both stories.
  • Unit 2 contains The Secret Message with a Lexile of 820 and qualitative complexity in specific vocabulary, genre, prior knowledge, and connection of ideas. The tasks associated with the text are for students to take note of clues which hint to the theme. Students take notes and summarize. In the reread, the task is to analyze the author’s craft of the characters while using the Close Reading Companion. In the Integration Task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to the world. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor text and paired text: “Write a letter from the Persian Merchant to Gordi Goat in which the merchant explains that he was too busy to save the goat.”
  • Unit 3 contains Abe’s Honest Words: The Life of Abraham Lincoln, with a Lexile of 780 and qualitative complexity in prior knowledge, vocabulary, organization, sentence structure, and connection of ideas. The tasks associated with Abe’s Honest Words are for students to use details to figure out the author’s point-of-view. Students take notes in a graphic organizer and then summarize. In the reread, the task is to analyze the author’s craft and use of Lincoln’s quotes while using the Close Reading Companion. In the Integration Task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to the world. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor text and paired-text: “How did Lincoln’s words lead to change?” The paired text with this text has a Lexile of 1240, which is significantly above the grade band, that will make access for all students more challenging. Since the materials allot the same time each week to each companion text, anchor text, and paired-text, no extra time is available to spend on this high Lexile text.
  • Unit 4 contains LaRue for Mayor, with a Lexile of 890 and qualitative complexity in purpose, vocabulary, sentence structure, genre, and connection of ideas. The tasks associated with LaRue for Mayor are for students to use details to determine point-of-view. Students summarize the story. In the reread, students analyze the author’s use of Ike’s letters and the newspaper to reveal more information about the characters while using the Close Reading Companion. In the Integration Task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to the world. Students also Write to Two Sources based on the anchor text and paired text.
  • Unit 5 contains A Drop of Water, with a Lexile of 870 and qualitative complexity in purpose, organization, vocabulary, sentence structure, genre, and connection of ideas. The tasks associated with A Drop of Water are for students to identify sequences of water properties and take notes in a graphic organizer, so they can summarize at the conclusion of the text. In the reread, the task is to analyze the author’s craft while using the Close Reading Companion. In the Integration Task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to the world. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor text and paired-text.
  • Unit 6 contains The Big Picture of Economics, with a Lexile of 970 and qualitative complexity in genre, vocabulary, purpose, and connection of ideas. The tasks associated with this text are for students to identify main idea and details about economic concepts. Students take notes in a graphic organizer and write a summary. In the reread, the task is to analyze the author’s craft and purpose with the use of text features and illustrations while using the Close Reading Companion. In the Integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections to the world about money. Students also write to two Sources based on the anchor text and paired-text.

Teacher materials include direction for differentiation to increase students’ literacy skills through the ACT (Access Complex Text) directions and the Research Base Alignment resource book. The directions guide teachers through scaffolded activities such as rereading and paraphrasing, student-generated questions, citing text evidence, evaluating the strength of evidence cited, writing about texts, teacher modeling, use of text-dependent questions, graphic organizers, think-alouds, student collaboration, and note-taking. Although scaffolded activities are provided throughout the materials, every text gets the same amount of time spent on reading and analyzing it. More complex texts may not get more instructional time focused on understanding and analyzing it since there are fixed routines in place every week for close reading and rereading.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the expectation that anchor texts and the series of texts connected to them being accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

The Teacher Edition's Differentiate to Accelerate chart explains the text complexity attributes of each whole class text, the Lexile and TextEvaluator levels of the texts, and the places within the lesson that will help the teacher determine if the text is appropriate in terms of reader and task.

The following example is from Unit 6, Week 3, page T136:

"The Great Energy Debate" - 910L, page TE 54

  • Qualitative: What Makes the Text Complex?
    • Organization
    • Information, page T145
    • Genre Narrative
    • Nonfiction, page T151
  • See Scaffolded Instruction in Teacher Edition, pages T145 and T151.
  • Reader and Task: The Introduce the Concept lesson on pages T138–T139 will help determine the reader’s knowledge and engagement in the weekly concept. See pages T144–T153 and T166–T167 for questions and tasks for this text.

Energy Island - 800L, page TE 33:

  • Qualitative: What Makes the Text Complex?
    • Genre Illustrations, page T153A; Text Features, page T153G; Myth, page T153U
    • Prior Knowledge Geography, page T153C
    • Connection of Ideas Information, page T153E; Opinions, pages T153M, T153Q
    • Sentence Structure, page T153I
    • Specific Vocabulary Unfamiliar Words, pages T153K, T153W
    • Purpose Understand, page T153O
  • See Scaffolded Instruction in Teacher Edition, pages T153A–T153X.
  • Reader and Task: The Introduce the Concept lesson on pages T138–T139 will help determine the reader’s knowledge and engagement in the weekly concept. See pages T168–T169, T176–T177, T180–T181, T186–T187, and T166–T167 for questions and tasks for this text.

The Teacher Edition also contains the Instructional Path at the beginning of each week. This path lists all texts read, why students are reading each text, the educational focus, and how the texts connect to one another during the week.

Unit 6, week 4 Instructional Path, pages T196-T197:

  1. Talk About Money Matters: Guide students in collaborative conversations. Discuss the essential question: What has been the role of money over time? Develop academic language and domain-specific vocabulary on money matters. Listen to “All about Money” to summarize the history of money and how it has changed.
  2. Read “The History of Money”: Model close reading with a short, complex text. Learn how money has changed throughout the history of the world, citing text evidence to answer text-dependent questions. Reread “The Big Blizzard” to analyze text, craft, and structure, citing text evidence.
  3. Write About Money Matters: Model writing to a source. Analyze a short response student model. Use text evidence from close reading to write to a source.
  4. Read and Write About Money Matters: Practice and apply close reading of the anchor text. Read The Big Picture of Economics to learn about how the economy works. Reread The Big Picture of Economics to understand how the author presents information about how the economy affects everyday life. Write a short response about The Big Picture of Economics.
  5. Independent Partner Work: Gradual release of support to independent work. Text-dependent questions, scaffolded partner work, talk with a partner, cite text evidence, complete a sentence frame, and guided text annotation.
  6. Integrate Knowledge and Ideas: Connect Texts, Text-to-Text: Discuss how each of the texts answers the question: What has been the role of money over time? Text-to-Poetry: Compare how the role of money in the texts read with the poem “Sing a Song of Sixpence.” Conduct a Short Research Project: Research world currencies.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 meet expectations that materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading. There are supports to build students’ comprehension of grade level texts in oral and silent reading.

Texts available daily to students include close reading texts, the literature anthology, paired texts, differentiated texts, interactive Worktext, and extended complex texts.

Weekly routines include opportunities for students to practice choral reading, partner reading, repeated reading, timed reading, echo reading, oral reading modeling, and independent reading of a variety of texts.

For example, in Unit 3, Week 2, students participate in an interactive read-aloud introducing the following essential question: “In what ways can you help your community?” This leads to students participating in a shared reading and rereading of “Remembering Hurricane Katrina” then a close reading and rereading from the Literature Anthology of Aguinaldo. Students also read a paired text, “Partaking in Public Service,” and then participate in a small group reading where students are working with a differentiated text and are either being read to, echo reading, or reading with the support of a partner. Extended complex texts are also available for students to read. Students are given a purpose for reading with each reread and complete graphic organizers or answer questions to support comprehension.

In Unit 6, Week 3, students participate in an interactive read-aloud introducing the following essential question: “How have our energy resources changed over the years?” A shared reading and rereading of “Energy Solutions” is followed by a close reading and rereading from the Literature Anthology of Energy Island. Students read a paired text: “Of Fire and Water” and participate in a small group reading where students are working with a differentiated text and are either being read to, echo reading, or reading with the support of a partner. Extended complex texts are also available to read. Students are given a purpose for reading with each reread and complete graphic organizers or answer questions to support comprehension.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Grade 4 meet the expectations that students will have opportunities for rich, rigorous discussions and writing tasks that are evidence based. Questions and tasks associated with the texts focus students’ attention back to the texts and are organized to build their speaking and listening skills. Grammar and conventions instruction is embedded to facilitate students’ application of language skills but is taught mainly out of context. Each unit includes opportunities for on-demand and process writing, and the materials include culminating tasks at the end of each unit.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for text-dependent questions, tasks, and assignments requiring students to engage directly with the text and to draw on textual evidence to support what is explicit as well as make valid inferences.

During each whole-group selection, students are asked to answer a variety of literal, inferential, and evaluative questions. During whole-group reading of primary texts, students are asked to re-read to find answers to text-dependent questions. Question sets are included with each page of text. Many teacher-directed tasks support students in making connections between the text and illustrations. Questions and activities engage students in text-dependent writing and speaking opportunities.

Examples of text-dependent questions found throughout the units:

  • “How is the explanation of friction in the story related to the sidebar about friction?” (Unit 1 TE page T217I)
  • “How does what the characters say and do at the beginning of the fable help you figure out how the story will end?” (Unit 2 TE page T25Q)
  • “According to Lincoln, how did brave men consecrate the grounds?” (Unit 3 TE page 217W)
  • “Reread the poem. What words and phrases express the mood and feeling of the narrator?” (Unit 4 TE page T281C)
  • “According to the text, what has Luisa been doing over the past few weeks?” (Unit 5 TE page T25G)
  • “Why does the author start the story with italicized text?” (Unit 6 TE page T89C)

Examples of text-dependent tasks and assignments found throughout the units:

  • “After students read and summarize, have them reread to develop a deeper understanding of the text by annotating and answering questions on pages 31–32 of the Close Reading Companion.” (Unit 1 TE page T281F)
  • “Tell students to apply the strategy in a Think Aloud by summarizing to understand the main idea of the text.” (Unit 2 TE page T217J)
  • “Choose one of the primary source quotes on pages 7–9 and tell a partner how it helps you understand Nellie Bly.” (Unit 3 TE page T245)
  • “Tell students they will use the events and details from their Point of View chart to summarize.” (Unit 4 TE page T153R)
  • “Encourage students to discuss with a partner how inventions can solve problems. Ask them to cite text evidence. Use these sentence frames to focus discussion: I read that Kevlar . . . . This is an example of how . . . .” (Unit 5 TE page T145)
  • “Read page 397 together. As you read, model how to take notes. 'I will think about the Essential Question as I read and note main events and details.'” (Unit 6 TE page T80)

The Close Reading Companion, the Student Literature Anthology, and Reading/Writing Workshop include text dependent questions, writing prompts, and discussion prompts that require students to engage in the text directly. The Respond to the Text questions at the end of the main literature anthology selections include summarization, writing, and making connection questions. The "make connection" questions ask students to provide evidence from the texts in the unit in their answers. Write to Source Lessons included in each weekly lesson routine include writing tasks that require students to provide evidence from the Literature Anthology texts in their writing. The Practice Book also provides questions/tasks that are tied directly to text, unless the practice is a very specific skill (such as decoding).

Teacher modeling for text-dependent tasks is provided throughout instruction.

There are also “Text to Self” questions that are not text-dependent but relate to the theme of the text being read, such as “Tell about a time when a friend helped you think of a good idea.” (Unit 1, Week 1, TE page T17) and “If you could move somewhere new, where would you go? Why?” (Unit 5, Week 2, TE page 81).

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation for containing sequences of text dependent questions and activities that building to a culminating task integrating skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination). Students are provided with a Unit Big Idea and a weekly Essential Question. Students discuss the questions, make connections, and create a graphic organizer to be used at the end of the unit. Similar processes are included at the end of most units to build students' ability to engage with the texts over the course of the school year.

Each week, an Essential Question is addressed throughout the texts and tasks. This Essential Question is revisited at the end of each text with a Make Connections Question. At the end of the week, students integrate ideas through text connections to revisit the Essential Question and create a graphic organizer using notes from the weekly read. At the end of the unit, students Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea. Students use their weekly graphic organizers and notes to participate in a collaborative conversation about the Unit Big Idea. Students present their ideas and create a top five most important list as a class and are encouraged to continue building knowledge through research and discussions.

Unit 3

Big Idea:

  • How can you show your community spirit?

Unit 3, Week 3 Essential Question:

  • How can one person make a difference?

Questions at the end of the week’s texts:

  • How did Judy Bonds make a difference?
  • How did Westley Wallace Law become a leader in his community?
  • How did the events of the Civil Rights era influence Nora Davis Day’s life?

End of Week: Integrate Ideas/Text Connections:

  • Students create a three tab foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information they have learned about how one person can make a difference.

End of Unit/Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea:

  • The teacher writes “How can you show your community spirit?” on the board. In small groups, students will compare the information they have learned throughout the unit in order to answer the Big Idea question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things, students vote to narrow down the list to the top five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea.


Unit 5

Big Idea:

  • What helps you understand the world around you?

Unit 5, Week 4 Essential Question:

  • How can words lead to change?

Questions/tasks at the end of the week’s texts:

  • Talk about how Elizabeth Cady Stanton helped women gain the right to vote.
  • Why did Lincoln’s words leave such a lasting impression on people?
  • What purpose did “The Gettysburg Address” serve for people saddened by the terrible cost of war?

End of Week Integrate Ideas/Text Connections:

  • Students create a layered book foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information they have learned about how words can lead to change.

End of Unit/Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea:

  • The teacher writes “What helps you understand the world around you?” on the board. In small groups, students will compare the information they have learned during the course of the unit in order to answer the Big Idea question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things, students vote to narrow down the list to the top five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for frequently providing opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax (small group and whole class). Each week, unfamiliar words are introduced and taught through a variety of activities and strategies that include discussions, writing, word morphology, and a define/example/ask routine. Each page identifies academic language that can be found in the text on that page.

Protocols and routines are presented in “Start Smart” pages at the beginning of Unit 1. Teachers are instructed to teach these procedures and routines to students in the first days of the school year. These procedures and routines will be used throughout the school year.

  • “Build Background” (pages S5-S6 and pages S19-S20) introduces the concept of the weekly Essential Question. Protocol is introduced for using concept words related to the big idea, academic language, and domain-specific words in partner discussions.
  • “Collaborative Conversations”: Teachers are instructed to have students watch a video outlining procedures for partner and small group conversations, then share discussion guidelines revolving around turn-taking, careful listening, adding new ideas, preparing for discussions, asking and answering questions, taking on discussion roles, and being open to all ideas.
  • “Comprehension: Theme” (pages S11-S12): Teachers are guided to teach students how to answer a question by paraphrasing part of the text.
  • “Genre: Literature” (pages S13-S14): Teachers are guided to teach students about close reading to analyze and evaluate what they read and using direct quotes to cite text evidence.
  • “Comprehension: Author’s Point of View” (pages S23-S24): Teachers are guided to teach students about citing text evidence when making an inference.
  • “Genre: Informational Text” (pages S25-S26): Teachers are guided to teach students about using facts, details, graphs, charts, and diagrams as text evidence.

During weekly lessons, multiple collaborative opportunities are presented daily, with modeling and explicit directions provided to facilitate evidence-based discussions focusing on academic vocabulary and syntax.

  • Academic language is highlighted in the margins of the Teacher Edition, providing ease of reference and use.
  • Routines and procedures are provided as periodic reminders for collaborative conversations and peer conferences.
  • The vocabulary routine attends to speaking and listening skills associated with evidence-based discussions, academic vocabulary, and syntax. Students use a wide variety of graphic organizers and sentence frames throughout the school year.
  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students make connections and discuss how Sarah Weeks uses dialogue in Experts, Incorporated and tell how she helps you to understand how Rodney feels as he struggles and then comes up with his idea. Students are asked to cite text evidence and given the sentence frames: "Sarah Weeks uses dialogues to show that Rodney and his friends.… This helps me understand...."
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, during an Imagery and Personification mini-lesson, the teacher is directed to “Model identifying examples of imagery and personification in the poem, ‘Climbing Blue Hill’ on page 439.”

Lessons include frequent opportunities for the teacher to frame and guide discussion during Collaborative Conversations.

  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students are advised to add new ideas to their conversations. During the Build Background mini-lesson the Teacher Edition states, “Add New Ideas as students engage in partner, small-group, and whole-class discussions; encourage them to add new ideas to their conversations. Remind students to stay on topic, connect their own ideas to things their peers have said, and look for ways to connect their personal experiences or prior knowledge to the conversations.“
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students are advised to be open to all ideas. During the Build Background mini-lesson the Teacher Edition states, “As students engage in partner, small group, and whole-class discussions, encourage them to share and listen openly in their conversations. Remind students to wait for a person to finish before they speak. They should not speak over others, quietly raise their hand to let others know they would like a turn to speak, and ask others in the group to share their opinions so that all students have a chance to share.“

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet expectations for supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

Protocols and routines for speaking and listening are presented in “Start Smart” pages at the beginning of Unit 1. Teachers are instructed to teach these procedures and routines to students in the first days of the school year. These procedures and routines will be used throughout the school year.

Multiple collaboration opportunities are provided throughout the week, such as Text Connections, Research and Inquiry, End-of-Unit Routine, Integrate Ideas – Inquiry Space and Research and Inquiry, Wrap Up the Unit – Text Connections, and Publishing Celebrations.

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students reread the section “The Ant and the Grasshopper” and answer the question, “Talk about how Ant and Grasshopper act like real people.” in a collaborative group.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students work with a partner to discuss how the invention of the telephone affected the town of Centerburg. Students cite evidence from the text and use sentence frames for discussion.

Students are provided speaking and listening opportunities about the target vocabulary in the Reading/Writing Workshop throughout the year. In the Smart Start instructions to teachers in Unit 1, there are specific instructions about listening comprehension such as to take turns talking, listen carefully, add new ideas, use text evidence, prepare for discussions, ask and answer questions, take on discussion roles, and be open to all ideas.

There are also speaking and listening checklists in the online teacher resources and in the description of assessments in week 6 of each unit that instruct students as they engage in partner, small group, and whole class discussions.

There are varied weekly projects (i.e., interview a classmate, research the effects of human actions, make a poster, research a topic, research a famous business owner) in which students work in pairs or small groups. Then, students work in small groups to present a project through culminating unit project.

Listening comprehension lessons are included in each weekly Interactive Read Aloud. Students are prompted to think about the genre and the strategy prior to listening to the read aloud by the teacher.

A presentation checklist is provided in the materials for students to evaluate student presentations.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet expectations for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Writing projects, tasks, and presentations align to standards and allow students to learn, practice, develop, and apply writing skills across the course of the school year. Writing projects, tasks, and presentations are associated with texts of various genres, topics, or themes. Writing tasks are embedded throughout lessons and provide students opportunities for short and extended writings. For example, students write to sources, answer text-dependent questions, take notes, complete graphic organizers, and complete research projects and presentations. Students write informative, opinion, and narrative pieces focusing on topics such as ideas, voice, word choice, organization, and sentence fluency. Students are provided opportunities to work through the various stages of the writing process during which they revise their writings and conference with their peers and teacher. There are also anchor papers in the Assessment Handbook.

Each unit includes on-demand writing prompts.

  • Respond to the Text: Students immediately respond to a text that has been read. For example, in Unit 1, Week 5, students write to respond to the prompt, “How does the author make his or her point of view clear in this selection?”
  • Write to Sources: This is a 5-day routine of evidence-based writing that repeats each week. For example, in Unit 5, Week 4, students write to respond to the prompt, “Why does the author begin and end the selection with a drop of water?”
  • After Reading the Differentiated Texts: This is often a small group writing prompt. For example, in Unit 6, Week 4, students reading the on-level text are prompted to work with a partner to write a short paragraph about the steps Hector takes before he produces his first bike. Have them include details from the text.
  • Research and Inquiry and Inquiry Space: Writing includes evidence from researched texts. For example, in Unit 2, Week 4, students write and outline to begin a draft about a shark investigation they have been working on. Students can collaborate digitally working with teams online through the online portal.

A text to media integrated lesson is available at the end of each weekly lesson. Students use digital technology to post responses online. In Unit 1, Week 3, students are prompted to write and post discussion using the online forum.

Each unit includes two Genre Writing process writing lessons that include 3-week process writing lessons. Students are provided with an expert model in Week 1; prewrite in Week 2; draft the writing in Week 3; and proofread, edit, publish, and evaluate during Week 3. Students can complete one or both of the lessons.

The following are examples of the writing lessons:

Unit 1: Narrative Writing

  • Friendly Letter, pages T344–T349: Week 1 expert model, prewrite; week 2 draft, revise; week 3 proofread/edit and publish/evaluate.
  • Personal Narrative, pages T350–T355: Week 4 expert model, prewrite; week 5 draft, revise; week 6 proofread/edit and publish/evaluate.

Unit 3: Opinion Writing

  • Book Review: Week 1 expert model, prewrite; Week 2 draft, revise; Week 3 proofread/edit and publish/evaluate.
  • Opinion Essay: Week 4 expert model, prewrite; Week 5 draft, revise Week 6 proofread/edit and publish/evaluate.

Unit 5: Informational Writing

  • Expository Letter: Week 1 expert model, prewrite; Week 2 draft, revise; Week 3 proofread/edit and publish/evaluate.
  • Book Review, Week 4, expert model, prewrite; Week 5 draft, revise; Week 6 proofread/edit and publish/evaluate.

Writer’s Workspace includes graphic organizers, tools, templates, model writing and organizers, scoring rubrics, writing traits mini-lessons, and editing checklists for informative, opinion, and narrative writing.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. The writing prompts are balanced between informative and narrative.

Process writing prompts include opportunities for students to address different types of writing:

  • Unit 1 - Narrative Text - Friendly Letters and Personal Narrative
  • Unit 2 - Informative Text - Explanatory Essay and How-To Text
  • Unit 3 - Opinion Writing - Book Review and Opinion Essay
  • Unit 4 - Narrative Text/Poetry - Fictional Narrative and Poetry
  • Unit 5 - Informative Text - Expository Letter and Research Report
  • Unit 6 - Opinion Writing - Book Review and Opinion Essay

On demand prompts and quick writes include opportunities for students to address different types of writing:

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, students write a poem about an animal using a simile or metaphor.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students write to answer the prompt, “How does the author use the event of the moon landing to develop the relationship between Mae and Gramps?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students make text-to-text connections when answering the prompt, “Compare Nora Davis Day’s experiences with those of others who made a difference. Contrast how each selection presents information.”

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectation for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. The materials include weekly opportunities for students to respond to one or two texts in a variety of writing modes including informative, opinion, and narrative analysis.

Examples of opportunities for evidence-based writing are:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students write a paragraph that paraphrases the events in the text that lead to the solution. Teachers are directed to make sure students include a concluding sentence in their paragraphs.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, students use evidence from two texts when answering the prompt, “How do A Drop of Water and ‘The Incredible Shrinking Potion’ convince readers to look closely at something?”
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, students write a summary of “My Name is Ivy,” including the poem’s theme.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students write about how the author structures the events in the folktale. Students use sentence frames to organize evidence from the text.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students write about how the author uses the event of the moon landing to develop the relationship between Mae and her grandfather.

The Write to Sources weekly lesson objectives are to have students write in response to the texts of the week. Students write to the Reading/Writing Workshop text by writing in response to a prompt. Most prompts require a text evidence to answer. Some prompts do not require text evidence.

  • Day 1: Writing Fluency – Students respond to a text-dependent question.
  • Day 2: Write to Reading/Writing Workshop Text – An evidence-based expert model is provided and discussed, students analyze their prompt, take notes with evidence, then write.
  • Day 3: Write to Literature Anthology Text – The teacher guides students in analyzing the prompt, identifying and collecting evidence, students write, then the teacher conferences with students (guidance is provided for conferencing).
  • Days 4 and 5: Write to Two Sources – The teacher guides students in identifying and collecting evidence, students write, then the students conference with peers. Guiding questions are provided for peer conferences.
  • Throughout the week, the Teacher Edition and supplemental online materials provide instructional supports for analyzing models, analyzing prompts, collecting evidence, using graphic organizers, structuring responses, and conferencing.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Most grammar lessons are taught out of context and do not connect to the weekly theme, essential question, or texts read. Although explicit instruction is present each week, the activities and contexts used each week do not necessarily increase in sophistication of contexts. Grammar, spelling, and writing are three separate lessons that often do not connect nor are they taught within the context of the weekly texts.

Grammar and convention are explicitly taught each week. This instruction is a part of every weekly lesson.

Weekly Grammar Instruction:

  • Each week, a specific grammar skill is identified for instruction.
  • Each day begins with a "Daily Language Activity," which is a sentence containing errors for the students to correct.
  • On Day 1, the weekly skill is introduced in a 5-10 minute lesson, followed by a partner activity to reinforce the concept.
  • On Day 2, the weekly skill is reviewed in a 5-10 minute lesson, followed by a partner activity to reinforce the concept.
  • On Day 3, the weekly skill is not addressed. A lesson is included that focuses on a mechanics and usage skill, followed by a partner activity to reinforce the concept.
  • On Day 4, the lesson focuses on proofreading. Students work with a partner to complete the activity.
  • On Day 5, students are assessed on the weekly skill through a reproducible with isolated sentences and/or words.
  • Grammar Practice Reproducibles pages are provided for students who need additional support.

Grammar routines are described in the “Instructional Routine Handbook” on page R67. Grammar instruction is separate from writing instruction. Once a week students are provided an opportunity to edit for errors related to the grammar instruction for that week. This weekly opportunity occurs on Day 2 of the “Write to Sources” activities for each unit and week.

  • For instance, Unit 4, Week 3, page T157 instructs teachers to “Have students use Grammar Handbook page 464 in the Reading/Writing Workshop to check for errors in pronoun-verb agreement.”

Spelling lists are designed to practice language standards and foundational skills. The students learn these skills in a five-day routine that includes word sorts. For example, students learn to spell prefixes in Unit 6, Week 3. Throughout the year, students use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., students practice open syllables in Unit 5, Week 2).

The Unit and Benchmark Assessments evaluate grammar, mechanics, and usage in context. The context of grammar/convention instruction does not become increasingly sophisticated over the course of the year as the same instructional routine and instructional activities are repeated throughout the units.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
6/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 meet expectations for foundational skills development. The materials, questions, and tasks provide instruction in phonics, word recognition, vocabulary, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression and guide students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading. The materials also provide students frequent opportunities to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, as well as to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for materials, questions, and tasks addressing grade-level CCSS by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, vocabulary, morphology, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression.

Each week of each unit addresses foundational skills for phonics through instruction, application, and assessment. Whole group phonics and fluency instruction are provided as part of every weekly lesson.

  • One 20-minute mini-lesson is taught each week. Each mini lesson targets two primary skills. For example, in Unit 1, Week 2, long a and inflectional endings are taught, although these are below Grade 4 level foundational skills.
  • Each mini-lesson also includes a focus on reading multi-syllabic words and on a particular fluency skill, such as reading rate or accuracy.

Differentiation of phonics and fluency instruction is supported in the small group instruction lessons. Students are provided multiple opportunities to practice the strategies for learning foundational skills during these teacher-led lessons and when completing the Your Turn practice pages that correspond to foundational reading skills lessons.

Phonics is also addressed through the spelling. Phonics through spelling in Unit 1 and Unit 2 are review phonics from prior grade levels such as in Unit 1, Week 1, short vowels are taught. In Unit 2, Week 2, digraphs are taught. In Unit 3, Week 4, plurals and suffixes are taught.

  • Some of the skills are reinforced in the weekly spelling list, but none of the skills are applied in reading instruction, writing instruction, weekly/unit assessments, or culminating tasks.

Other routines for phonics and spelling are described in the “Instructional Routine Handbook,” pages R17 and R50. Phonics and spelling are assessed with dictated sentences students must write and through phonics passages in which students read words with the phonics spelling patterns presented for the week.

Aside from the Phonics/Fluency lessons, fluency is also addressed through partner reading, choral reading, echo reading, and timed reading. Progress monitoring of fluency and recommendations and lessons for interventions are provided in the curriculum.

Vocabulary is taught in each unit through lessons called, "Build Vocabulary." These include 5-day plans for students to learn categories of words such as synonyms, idioms, metaphors, suffixes, and root words.

  • Day 1: “Connect to Words,” in which students are asked a series of questions that can only be answered with an understanding of the vocabulary word.
  • Day 2: “Expand Vocabulary,” in which students are taken through a series of activities that generate different forms of the word such as adding or deleting suffixes or inflectional endings.
  • Day 3: “Reinforce the Words,” in which students complete sentence stems with words related to the weekly vocabulary.
  • Day 4: “Connect to Writing,” in which students write sentences using the vocabulary words in their notebooks.
  • Day 5: “Word Squares,” in which students create word squares for each vocabulary words (Frayer model-define, illustrate, example, non-example).

Morphology is taught through Build Vocabulary and Vocabulary Strategy.

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, students learn three common suffixes: -ly, -ive, and -ful. The teacher models using the suffix -ive using a word from the Companion Text. Students are tasked with identifying and defining suffixes in the following words: immediately, traditionally, and successful. Students can also practice those suffixes in Your Turn, page 47.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students learn the prefix en-. The teacher chunks out the word encircle in order to show students that en- means, “put into” or “cover with.” Therefore, encircle means, “to put in a circle.”
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, students learn -ity as part of the word individuality. The teacher separates individual and -ity and explains that -ity means, “having the quality of” or “a state of being.” Students discuss how adding -ity changes the meaning of the word individual. Students are directed to search the dictionary for other words ending with the suffix, -ity.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet expectations for materials, questions, and tasks guiding students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading.

Materials provide explicit instruction of new vocabulary along with multiple routine activities for students to work with new and unfamiliar words and figurative language. The “Instructional Routine Handbook” describes routines for teaching new vocabulary words, beginning on page R40. The materials do include activities for making meaning from unfamiliar words read in context during close reading of text sets each week.

  • In Unit 1, Week 3 page T153N, “What is the meaning of the word fault in the text? What is another meaning of the word fault?”
  • In Unit 2, Week 2 page T89K, “Look at the word desperate in the stage directions for Felipe. With your partner, name words or phrases that are antonyms for desperate. Why is Felipe desperate?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 1 page T25E, “Find the word sprang on page 183. What do you think it means? Use paragraph clues to check your meaning.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 4 page T217E, “Which context clues help you to determine the meaning of ‘dwarf planets’ in the first paragraph on page 341?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1 page T250, “An author can use the same word in different ways to express different ideas. The author uses the word world several times on pages 376 and 377. When the author says, ‘the World seems to sparkle,’ what ‘world’ is the author referring to? Reread the last sentence on page 377. When the author says ‘there is no more beautiful place in the world,’ how is the meaning of world here different than on page 376?”
  • In Unit 6, Week 2 page T89E, “Using context clues, what do you think the Spanish words mestizos and vaqueros mean? What do these words tell the reader about the region where the story is set?”

Opportunities for students to demonstrate mastery of the application of word analysis skills to grade level text occur during weekly assessments. The materials include two weekly assessments, and both are referred to as the "Weekly Assessment." There is also a selection test for each week.

  • In the Unit Assessment, there are vocabulary questions where students are required to identify multiple meanings of a vocabulary term.
    • Unit 1, “One week into her new job, the luck that brought her to Colorado seemed to change. Which word has almost the same meaning as luck as it is used in the sentence?”
  • In the Weekly Assessment, there are vocabulary questions where students are required to use context clues to define a vocabulary term.
    • Unit 3, week 2, “They came in search of possible work prospects, or chances for jobs in America. What are prospects?”
  • In the Selection Test, the first eight questions ask students to identify definitions for each of the week's vocabulary words with no context provided.
    • “What does the word attracted mean?” (Unit 2, week 1)

Each week, “Vocabulary: Words in Context” and “Vocabulary Strategy” are introduced prior to reading texts.

  • For “Vocabulary: Words in Context”, the week's vocabulary words and definitions are introduced through a 10-minute mini-lesson using the Reading/Writing Workshop text prior to the shared read and the close read. The text provides an example of the word used in an isolated sentence, along with a representative picture and a question for partners to discuss. The week's vocabulary words are highlighted in the shared read and the close read; however, there is no instruction for teachers to revisit the words or their meanings in context.
  • For "Vocabulary Strategy," the week's vocabulary strategy is introduced through a 10-minute mini-lesson using the Reading/Writing Workshop text. Students are instructed to practice applying the skill with one or two words from the shared read (the Reading/Writing Workshop text).

The Teacher Edition usually provides one opportunity for teachers to direct students in applying the vocabulary strategy skill during the close read.

  • Close Read - "Build Vocabulary"
    • Throughout the close read (in the Literature Anthology), "Build Vocabulary" words are called out in the margins of the Teacher Edition. These words are not related to the "Words in Context" or the "Vocabulary Strategy." Instructions are not provided for the words, but the word definitions are.
  • Close Read - "Access Complex Text: Specific Vocabulary"
    • At one or two points during the close read, a vocabulary word or word part is called out in the Teacher Edition for teachers to discuss with students.
  • "Build More Vocabulary" - Each day, an additional vocabulary skill is introduced or reviewed. These skills include, but are not limited to, homographs, homophones, academic vocabulary, context clues, related words, prefixes, and suffixes.
  • With the exception of the "Context Clues" activities, most practice activities involve students creating isolated sentences with the words, discussing examples, creating charts, and composing/decomposing words with word parts.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet expectations for providing students frequent opportunities to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, as well as to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Fluency routines are described in the Instructional Routine Handbook on page R36A. Routines include partner reading, choral reading, echo reading, and timed reading. For example:

  • "Phonics/Fluency" - At the end of a 20-minute phonics lesson, the "Fluency" box directs teachers to model a fluency skill (expression, accuracy, or rate). Students then practice fluency with echo reading, choral reading, or partner reading.
  • Small Group - At each reading level, after completing the leveled reader, the teacher models reading one page, then students practice (together as a group, with a partner).
  • Reader's Theater - At the end of each Unit, during week 6, students practice their parts for Reader's Theater every day.
  • Reading Workstation cards include a fluency card and reader's theater card to be used in workstations for week 6.

Weekly sets of lessons focus on one aspect of fluency as listed below, along with some sample activities. Most of this fluency instruction occurs in differentiated small group instruction. Each unit focuses specific fluency skills such as expression, rate, phrasing, accuracy, and intonation. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Weeks 4 and 5, the teacher models reading appropriate phrasing and rate. Students take turns reading with a partner. Each partner should follow along in the text and give feedback regarding phrasing and rate.
  • In Unit 1, Week 1 and Unit 2, week 2, the teacher models reading with intonation. Students read with a partner taking turns to read the passage with intonation to express the characters’ feelings.
  • In Unit 3, Week 5 and Unit 5, week 4, the teacher models reading with proper rate. The class is divided into two groups with the first group reading the first paragraph at a steady rate. The second group echo reads using the same steady rate.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, the teacher models reading with expression. Students take turns partner-reading paragraphs. The first time through reading students are asked to read without expression. The second time through reading students are to read with strong expression.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, the teacher models reading with proper rate and accuracy. The class is divided into small groups, and each group takes turns chorally reading the passage. Students are reminded to listen to each other and read at an accurate rate.
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, the teacher models reading with proper accuracy. Students take turns in pairs, reading with accuracy and confirming word meanings if necessary.

Opportunities to demonstrate oral fluency are provided through the Your Turn practice book.

  • Each week, two out of ten activities focus on fluency and comprehension. Students read a passage aloud with a partner and answer comprehension questions. Partners track each other’s words correct per minute on the first read and second read.
  • Lexile levels for the reading passages are not provided in the student handbook or the teacher's annotated version. Without Lexile levels, the data for words per minute cannot be compared as students progress through the school year.

Students have the opportunity to practice fluency with poetry by reading and rereading poetry selections. Students read “The Sandpiper” and “Fog” in Unit 2. In Unit 6, students practice reading fluency with poetry by reading and rereading: “Climbing Blue Hill,” “My Name is Ivy,” “Collage,” “The Drum,” “Birdfoot’s Grampa,” “From My Chinatown,” “Growing Up,” and “My People.”

Fluency assessments are included in the instructional materials. A beginning of the year diagnostic assessment is provided to determine students’ needs in foundational reading skills. The series includes blackline masters for fluency benchmarking and for ongoing fluency assessment.

  • Thirty assessments are provided for the entire school year.
  • In the introductory section of the handbook, teachers are instructed to use at least two selections every two to three weeks for most students.
  • In each unit, the first passage is set at a Lexile level below the grade level band, the next two are within the grade level band, and the last two are at the high end or beyond the grade level band.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 partially meet the expectations of Gateway 2. Although texts are organized around themes, they do not build vocabulary or knowledge across weeks. Also, the number of words a student is introduced to in a five-day setting, along with the time spent on vocabulary activities/tasks, may not allow students the time to develop a deep understanding of the words before moving on to a new week and set of words. Students write to address multiple topics over both short and extended time frames; however, students will not be able to adequately refine and reflect on their writings before moving on to a new topic. Therefore, materials do not fully support increasing students’ writing skills and ability. Students will work on a series of short and long research projects throughout the year. There is not sufficient time built in to complete these projects and no guidance for teachers on how or when the projects and tasks would be completed. Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

24/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet expectations for texts being organized around a topic/topics to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. Each unit of study is organized around a theme. Each week of the unit is then organized around either a topic or a theme that addresses an essential question related to the unit’s theme. Unit themes are broad and do not necessarily build vocabulary and knowledge across weeks which would allow students to access future texts within a unit.

Each weekly topic/theme shares common vocabulary throughout the texts but does not consistently provide the opportunity to establish a base of knowledge across a wide range of subject matter in a one-week setting. Weekly topics/themes do not provide students the opportunity to refine and share their knowledge before continuing on to a new topic and set of texts.Some topics/themes do promote growth of knowledge, but sufficient time is not allotted for students to refine that knowledge and be able to access and comprehend future complex texts proficiently.

In Unit 2, the theme is Think It Through. In Week 4, the topic for the week is Adaptations. Texts within the week share common vocabulary. During the week students listen to, read, discuss, and write about the following texts:

    • “Adaptations at Work"
      • Students summarize unique adaptations of some animals.
    • “Animal Adaptations”
      • Students learn how animals adapt to their surroundings, citing text evidence to answer text-dependent questions.
      • Students reread to analyze text, craft, and structure, citing text evidence.
    • Model Writing about Adaptations
      • Students read and analyze a short response student model writing.
    • Spiders
      • Students learn about the special characteristics that help animals survive.
      • Students reread and use text evidence to understand how the author discusses what it takes for an animal to survive.
    • Anansi and the Birds”
      • Students compare this text to Spiders.
      • Students also read Differentiated Texts during small group, such as: Extreme Animals and “Hare and the Water.”

Other topics/themes are broad and do not promote growth of knowledge. Sufficient time is not allotted for students to refine that knowledge and be able to access and comprehend future complex texts proficiently.

In Unit 3, the theme is Figure it Out. In Week 1, the theme is Making it Happen. Texts within the week share common vocabulary. During the week students listen to, read, discuss and write about the following text:

    • “A Special Birthday Hug"
      • Students discuss the text.
    • “Sadie’s Game”
      • Students read to learn about how two people show they care about each other, citing text evidence to answer text-dependent questions.
      • Students reread to analyze text, craft and structure, citing text evidence
      • Model Writing about “Sadie’s Game”Students read and analyze a short response student model writing.
    • Mama, I’ll Give You the World
      • Students read to learn about how Luisa plans something special for her mother.
      • Students reread and use text evidence to understand how the author uses text, craft, and structure to develop a deeper understanding of the story and write a short response.
    • “What if it Happened to You”
      • Students compare and contrast this text and Mama, I’ll Give You the World to find different ways that people show they care.
      • Students also read Differentiated Texts during small group such as: Approaching Level: Saving Stolen Treasure, “Miguel’s Amazing Shyness Cure”; On Level: The Perfect Present, “Fly Me to the Moon”; and Beyond Level: First Edition, “Magnolia Leaves.”

According to the suggestions in the Teacher Edition, weekly texts are read, reread, discussed,and written about in a four-day timeline. On the fifth day, students will integrate ideas between texts and complete the weekly assessment. Throughout the lessons, the time allotted to each text for reading, rereading, discussion, and note taking is outlined, but support for teachers who need to flex or change the timeline is minimal. For example, in Unit 1, Week 1, teachers are to introduce the concept to build background knowledge, introduce vocabulary, and participate in a shared close read of “The Princess and the Pea.” Each of the following mini-lessons is allotted ten minutes during a shared read of the text.

In the Introduce the Concept ten-minute mini-lesson, students discuss details of a photograph, have a collaborative discussion to answer three questions, are shown a model using the Concept Web to generate words and phrases related to how people come up with clever ideas (with students’ contributions added), and continue to discuss in partners about how people come up with clever ideas.

In the Vocabulary ten-minute mini-lesson, students are introduced to each vocabulary word using the vocabulary routine of define, example, and ask. There are seven vocabulary words. Students are then asked to work with a partner and look at each picture to discuss the definition of each word. Students then choose three words and write questions for their partners to answer.

This time frame does not necessarily allow time for extended collaboration or discussions to build student knowledge and access future texts or grow the ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet expectations for materials containing sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Students are provided the opportunity to participate in the close reading of the three texts weekly and respond to questions and tasks. Instructions to the teacher support with guidance to read, re-read, then closely consider texts. Close reading of three texts in one week requires significant periods of literacy instructional time; support for this work is outlined in the teacher implementation materials.

Close reading occurs on Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, and Day 4.

During Days 1 and 2, students participate in close reading of the companion text using the Close Reading Routine with the Reading/Writing Workshop.

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, students closely read the text, “A World of Change.” During the first read students identify key ideas and details about how people prepare for natural disasters. Students take notes, summarize, and answer text-dependent questions such as: "How are the natural changes that affect Earth different? What do they have in common?” During the second read, students analyze the text, craft, and structure to discuss the compare and contrast text structure and the expository text genre. Students are directed to look at the the headings and answer questions such as: “What do you think this section will be about?”
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, students closely read the companion text poems, “Sing to Me” and “The Climb.” During the first reading, students are asked key ideas and details about achievements and answer text-dependent questions such as: “Read the first two stanzas. What are some key ideas and details that you noted?” For the second read, students analyze the text, craft, and structure focusing on genre, theme, and poetry structure. Students answer questions such as: “What characteristics or qualities of the narrator are revealed in the poem?” and students work together to explain the effect of repetition in the poem.

During Days 3 and 4, students participate in close reading of the anchor text in the Literature Anthology.

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students closely read the anchor text, Experts Incorporated. During the first reading, students are asked to generate a question of their own and share the question with a partner. Students continue reading to find the answer. Also in the first reading, students evaluate the author’s craft when asked: “How does the author build tension in the story and show how it affects Rodney?” During the second read, students are asked to use details to draw inferences: “How do you know that Rodney is good at defending and describing his ideas to others?”
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students closely read See How They Run. During the first reading, students identify and analyze the main idea and details: “What do all the details on page 279 have in common?” and “Determine the main idea on page 279, and paraphrase it with a partner.” During the second read, students analyze author’s craft when asked the following questions: ”Reread page 273. Why does the author include the sections about Greek and Roman democracies?” and “How does the author structure the information on page 275?”
  • For the reread on Day 4 in Unit 5, Week 2, students use the Close Reading Companion to answer questions by collaborating and filling in graphic organizers to write responses to author’s craft questions such as: “How does the author help you understand the characters?” and “How does the author show what is important to Delicious and her family?”
  • For Unit 3, Week 3, students closely read Delivering Justice: W.W. Law and the Fight for Civil Rights. This 16-page text is content -heavy for students to closely read in two days. Teachers are directed to build vocabulary in the first read with words such as lured, register, and regardless. During the first read, students are asked questions about key ideas and details such as: “Why couldn’t Westley eat at the Levy’s lunch counter?” and “Why did people throw their charge cards into a pile during Westley’s meeting?”

Students participate in another close reading on Day 4. This is with the paired text. Students are expected to participate in two close reading lessons on Day 4, making this the core focus for the day:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students read “Energy in the Ecosystem.” The teacher has students follow the close reading routine. During the first read, students respond to the following key ideas and details prompts:
    • Use the key details in "The Living Woodlands" to identify the main idea of the section.
    • Reread page 151 and identify the key ideas. Then use the details to tell the main idea of the section,"Back to the Cycle."
    • For the reread of the paired text, “Energy in the Ecosystem,” students respond to this author’s craft question: “How does the author use repetition to organize information?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students read “Energy is Everywhere.” During the first read, the teacher asks students to respond to the following key idea and details prompts:
    • “What is the main idea of the first paragraph on page 424? What key details support this main idea?”
    • Summarize the selection.
    • For the reread of the paired text, students respond to the following craft and structure questions: “Why does the author think it is important to learn about energy?” and "Reread the instructions for making a circuit. How does the format help you understand the steps and materials?"

Many weeks, in the Integrate sections, students have the opportunity to connect all the texts they have read.

  • In Unit 3, Week 5 of Integrate, students are provided the opportunity to think about all the week’s readings and include the song, “Did you Feed My Cow,” as part of the discussion. Students respond to: “How does the song connect to what you read this week?”
  • In Unit 6, Week 4 of Integrate, students are provided the opportunity to think about all the week’s readings. The teacher is to guide students to see the connections between music and text. Students respond to: “How does the song connect to what you read this week?”

Because students follow the same routine for close reading with each companion text, each anchor text, and each paired-text in every week, students analyze each text in the same manner for key ideas and details, craft and structure, and language. The Close Reading Routine structures the analysis of each text the same way, building routines to support students' focus on the texts themselves.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet expectations for materials containing a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that ask students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. The units are organized by themes and have a broad range of topics that do not always connect or build knowledge and ideas. Each week has a new topic/theme connected to the unit theme that does not necessarily build knowledge or ideas.

Although there are multiple questions and tasks that direct students to analyze integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts, the time allotted for these questions and tasks is not sufficient for students to analyze the information. Each unit contains five weekly text sets with questions and tasks. Each text set centers around a theme or topic with questions and tasks that ask students to refer to the text to find and support answers to questions and to complete tasks. Questions and tasks require connected knowledge and ask students to connect ideas between multiple texts. Rubrics for each week and each unit guide teachers in what to look for to support student learning. The amount of class time allotted for each text and question set may not be sufficient to provide the time needed for students to analyze texts and gain knowledge and ideas, and teachers may need to use outside resources to plan accordingly.

In Unit 3, Week 2, examples of questions and tasks include but are not limited to:

  • Compare Texts: As students read and reread “Partaking in Public Service,” encourage them to take notes and think about the Essential Question: In what ways can you help your community? Tell students to think about how this text compares with Aguinaldo.
  • First Read Strategy - Make Predictions: Based on the title, the photographs, the graph and the text on page 213, what do you predict this text will be about?
  • Reread Integrate (Close Reading Companion, page 80): How is the way the artist shows community similar to the authors' ideas about community in Aguinaldo or “Partaking in Public Service?”
  • Read/Summarize/Guide: Students summarize the selection.
  • Reread/Analyze the Text : After students read and summarize, have them reread to develop a deeper understanding of the text by annotating and answering questions on pages 77-79 of the Close Reading Companion.
  • Integrate/Make Connections: The Essential Question is: "In what ways are these young people making a difference?" The young people are finding solutions to problems in their communities. Many of them are sharing their ideas so others can join them. The evidence given is on page 215; I read that Katie Stagliano grows produce and donates it to a soup kitchen. I also read that Evan Green organized a team of kids to collect donations to save the rainforest.
  • Text to Text Question: "Describe the role of public service. Use examples from the selections." Public service is a way for each of us to become engaged in our communities and to help make them better. The evidence given is: Marlia engaged in public service when she went to the nursing home and spent time with Elenita. The young people in “Partaking in Public Service” came up with their own ideas to solve problems in their communities.
  • Access Complex Text-Specific Vocabulary - Point out difficult vocabulary on pages 206-207. Tell students that authors will sometimes use specific, challenging adjectives so that the readers can easily visualize events and characters. Review the definitions of challenging vocabulary with students.
    • Elenita coquettishly fixes her hair. What context clues allow you to figure out the meaning of coquettishly? (She fixed her hair with a light touch.)
    • What does a manicured hand look like? (It is one with clean, well-polished nails.)

In Unit 6, Week 1, examples of questions and tasks include but are not limited to:

  • Compare Texts: As students read and reread “Native Americans: Yesterday and Today,” encourage them to take notes and think about the Essential Question, "How do traditions connect people?" Tell students to compare this text with The Game of Silence.
  • First Read Strategy: "What do Lewis and Clark need from Chief Cameahwait?" Reread “A Surprise Reunion” to find out. As you read, remember to use the reread strategy.
  • Reread Close Reading Companion, page 172, Integrate - How does the photographer express a similar point of view about traditions as the authors of "The Game of Silence" and “Native Americans: Yesterday and Today”?
  • Reread Close Reading Companion, page 166, Reread - Why does the author want you to understand how frustrating and challenging the game of silence is?
  • Read/Summarize/Guide: Students summarize the selection.
  • Reread/Analyze the Text: After students read and summarize, have them reread to develop a deeper understanding of the text by annotating and answering questions on pages 169-171 of the Close Reading Companion.
  • Integrate/Make Connections: Essential Question: How do Native Americans today honor their past? They honor their past with dances, gatherings, and stories. The evidence provided is on page 475, where I read that “powwows allow them to celebrate ancient traditions” and that sharing stories keeps the past alive.
  • Access Complex Text - Genre: Help students connect important information to illustrations and photographs in the texts. What does the illustration on page 474 depict? (the Trail of Tears) Locate the text that tells about the Trail of Tears. (“This led to the forced removal of the Cherokee from their homestead…”)

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet expectations for questions and tasks supporting students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g., combination of reading, writing, speaking, and listening). Students read, discuss, and listen when addressing the Unit Big idea and the weekly Essential Question and Text Connection Questions. Students do not have to write at length about the question. Instead, they create graphic organizers to aid in class discussion. The weekly discussions and graphic organizer note-taking would lead to students being able to complete the Unit Wrap-Up.

The Big Idea questions are frequently broader than focused knowledge-building that may be happening in the lessons.
  • The Unit 2 Big Idea is "What can animals teach us?" This question is broad and vague.
    • The Unit 2, Week 1 Essential Question is: "What are some messages in animal stories?" This question is broad and will not build knowledge of a topic.
    • The Questions at the end of the week’s texts do not allow students to broaden their knowledge of a topic: "Talk about the message in this story." "Tell how the merchant delivered a secret message even though he did not know it." and "What lesson does the goat learn in the fable?"
    • In the End of Week Integrate Ideas: Text Connections section - The task asks students to compare the texts, using a foldable. There are few directions to support this task to promote deeper thinking or building knowledge. Students create an accordion foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information they have learned about messages in animal stories.
    • In the End of Unit Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea section - The task is a listing of what you have learned. Students share out answers, vote on a top five, and then move on to a new unit. This task repeats itself in all six units. The teacher writes “What can animals teach us?" on the board. In small groups students will compare the information they have learned during the course of the unit in order to answer the Big Idea question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things, students vote to narrow down the list to the top five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea.
  • The Unit 4 Big Idea is "How do different writers treat the same?" The question is broad and vague.
    • The Unit 4, Week 2 Essential Question is: "Why do people run for office?" This question is broad and will not build knowledge of a topic.
    • The questions at the end of the week's texts may lead to the answering of the Big Idea and Essential Questions but do not build knowledge across texts. The texts are loosely connected, and students do not deeply study the texts to gain knowledge. Questions at the end of the week’s texts include the following:
      • Talk about why Miguel decides to run for class president.
      • Why does he run for mayor?
      • What can people achieve in local and state public offices?
    • The End of Week Integrate Ideas: Text Connections task asks students to compare the texts using a foldable. There are few directions to support this task to promote deeper thinking or building knowledge. Students create an accordion foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information they have learned about why people run for office.
    • The End of Unit Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea section task is a listing what you have learned task. Students share out answers, vote on a top five, and then move on to the a new unit. This is the sixth time students have done this same task with a different question. The teacher writes “How do different writers treat the same topic?” on the board. In small groups students will compare the information they have learned during the course of the unit in order to answer the Big Idea question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things, students vote to narrow down the list to the top five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for including a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. The number of words a student is introduced to in a five-day setting, along with the time spent on vocabulary activities/tasks, may be amended to meet site-specific needs. Direction is given in the Teacher’s Edition for teachers to review vocabulary in future lessons or to teach how words build knowledge to access future grade-level texts. The teacher edition states, “The words are always reviewed the next week in Build Vocabulary. In addition, you should do a periodic cumulative review of vocabulary words about twice per unit.”

Vocabulary builds throughout the week and across texts within a one-week period. During the reading each week, students are introduced to Words to Know vocabulary. These vocabulary words are introduced using the vocabulary routine and visual vocabulary cards. The vocabulary routine states to define the word, give an example of the word, and then ask a question using the word. Words are introduced within the context of a sentence. Words to Know vocabulary are found within and throughout each text read during the week. Vocabulary strategy mini-lessons are included in weekly lessons. Vocabulary practice can be found in student practice books.

In the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook, a supplemental resource, teachers are guided through a 4-step routine that can be used year-long to introduce vocabulary. (pages R41-R42)

  • Step 1: Introduce: Tell students what the vocabulary routine will be.
  • Step 2: Model (I Do): Define/Example/Ask
  • Step 3: Guided Practice (We Do): Ask students to identify examples and non-examples of the word; guide students in creating word squares.
  • Step 4: Provide Independent Practice (You Do.): “Individual turns allow you an opportunity to assess each student’s skill level and provide additional practice for those students who need it. Near the end of each week, students should write sentences in their word study notebooks using the words.” (page R42)

In the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook, teachers are also provided with instructions on introducing vocabulary in context: “As you Close Read the selection with students, take a moment to point out the Build Vocabulary words and their definitions.... Unlike the Define/Example/ Ask Routine, the purpose of the Build Vocabulary words is to simply point out and define these rich vocabulary words to enrich and broaden students’ vocabulary and promote understanding of the text.” (page R43) In this supplemental resource, the Define/Example/Ask routine is explained:

  • Define: “You will tell them the meaning of the word, using student-friendly language--words they already know.” (page R44)
  • Example: “You will give them an example of how the word is used, using their own common experiences.” (page R44)
  • Ask: “You will ask them a question that helps them connect the word to words they already know and use the word in speaking.” (page R44)

In the “Smart Start” of the Wonders Teacher’s Edition, year-long protocols and routines are presented at the beginning of Unit 1. The “Smart Start” pages guide teachers in introducing students to the following instructional routines that are addressed in weekly lessons:

Vocabulary Routine

  • The Define/Example/Ask routine is introduced to students

Building Vocabulary

  • Teachers are instructed in building word walls, selecting five to ten words per week from the texts.
  • Teachers are instructed to “try to include useful words that students might use in writing and speaking.”
  • A Periodic Vocabulary Review routine is outlined in the margin, stating that students will encounter the vocabulary words in multiple contexts. It does not mention in which contexts/activities/resources the students will repeatedly encounter these words. It does state, “The words are always reviewed the next week in Build Vocabulary. In addition, you should do a periodic cumulative review of vocabulary words about twice per unit.” Review instructions include:
    • 1. Review the words using the Word Lists Online PDF.
    • 2. Have students write sentences using the words. Then have partners discuss each other’s work.
    • 3. As needed, students can check the meanings or pronunciations of words using the Glossary on Literature Anthology, pages 552-568.

Build Background

  • The concept of the weekly essential question is introduced.
  • Teachers are to introduce concept words related to the Big Idea and guide students to generate words related to the essential question. Explicit instructions/routines for this are not provided.
  • In the “Collaborative Conversations” box, teachers are instructed to have students watch a video outlining procedures for partner and small group conversations, then share discussion guidelines.
  • None of the discussion guidelines include procedures for ensuring inclusion of academic vocabulary in speaking activities.

Vocabulary Strategy

  • The week's vocabulary strategy is introduced through a 10-minute mini-lesson using the Reading/Writing Workshop text.
  • For example, in Unit 2, Week 2, the vocabulary strategy is context clues. Teachers are to remind students that they can often figure out the meaning of an unknown word by using context clues within the paragraph.
  • Students are instructed to practice applying the skill with one or two words in the shared read (in the Reading/Writing Workshop text). For example, in Unit 2, week 2, it says, “Have students work in pairs to figure out the meanings of tense, energetic, and sickly in ‘The Ant and the Grasshopper.’ Encourage partners to go back into the text and use antonyms as context clues to help them determine each word’s definition.” (page T88)
  • The Teacher Edition usually provides one or two opportunities for teachers to direct students in applying the vocabulary strategy skill during the close read. For example, in Unit 4, Week 2, it says, “Identify the context clues that help you understand the word amend.” (page T89W)

Close Read - Build Vocabulary

  • Throughout the close read (in the Literature Anthology), "Build Vocabulary" words are called out in the margins of the Teacher Edition. These words are not related to the "Words in Context" or the "Vocabulary Strategy." Instructions are not provided with the words, but definitions are.
  • For example, Build Vocabulary words in the close read for Unit 3, Week 4, include the following words: address, divided, haste, opposed, perish, proclamation, shattered, tension.

Close Read - Access Complex Text: Specific Vocabulary

  • At one or two points during the close read, a vocabulary word, word part, or term is called out in the Teacher Edition for teachers to discuss with students.
    • In Unit 4, Week 2, these words/terms include the following: perilous and scurrilous.

Close Read - Companion Text

  • In the companion text following the anchor text, vocabulary words are highlighted.

Build Vocabulary instruction is also included in the language arts lessons. During a Build Vocabulary lesson, students practice weekly vocabulary using strategies such as connect to words, expand vocabulary, reinforce the words, connect to writing, and word squares. Words in Build Vocabulary are also listed along with their definitions in the Teacher Edition for teachers to address while reading the weekly Literature Anthology.

Build Vocabulary

  • In a 5-day routine, students practice vocabulary words introduced that week. For example, in Unit 5, Week 3, Day 1, students answer questions about the following words: bouquet, emotions, encircle, express, fussy, portraits, sparkle, and whirl. (page T36)
  • Students practice the words through questions, sentences, changing inflectional endings, writing definitions, completing sentence stems, drawing representative pictures, creating word squares, and writing their own sentences.

Build More Vocabulary

  • Each week, additional vocabulary skills are introduced or reviewed. These skills include, but are not limited to homographs, homophones, shades of meaning, academic vocabulary, context clues, related words, prefixes, and suffixes.
  • With the exception of the "Context Clues" activities, most practice activities involve students creating sentences with the words, discussing examples, creating charts, and composing/decomposing words with word parts.

Academic words are also in bold in the Teacher Edition notes and listed and labeled in a side box in the Teacher Edition. These words are used in student questioning and directions.

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet expectations for materials supporting students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Students write to address multiple topics over both short and extended time frames and are provided with mentor texts, conference questions, anchor papers, and rubrics to help students self-evaluate writing as well as giving a clear picture for teachers to evaluate and give feedback. The required time the weekly lesson would take with the amount of writing students are responsible for is unbalanced. Students may not be able to adequately refine and reflect on their writings before moving on to a new topic; therefore, materials do not fully support increasing students’ writing skills and ability.

Students participate in both on-demand and process writings throughout the year. Each week students Write to Sources and work on Genre Writing.

The Write to Sources process has students read and reread texts to take notes, cite text evidence to support their ideas and opinions, and write short analytical responses. After reading, students write to build writing fluency, analyze model responses, incorporate stronger evidence, and focus on a writing trait. Write to Sources provides students with student exemplars and analyzes writing prompts while modeling organizational tools such as graphic organizers.

  • In Unit 2, Week 4
    • Students read the prompt: “Write about the four poems.”
    • Students read the Reading/Writing Workshop text and prompt. Students analyze the prompt and reread to note literary elements such as similes and metaphors.
    • Students then Analyze Text Evidence by looking at model student notes.
    • Students analyze the student model and discuss the use of figurative organization, and precise language.
    • Students then write to answer the prompt and craft their responses using figurative organization and precise language.
    • Students check for errors in combining sentences.
    • Students then analyze the prompt: Describe how the poets use their inspiration to convey their point of view about each animal or insect.
    • Students use poems as sources to answer the prompt.
    • Students analyze text evidence and look at another student exemplar to discuss.
    • Students analyze the student model and then write to answer the prompt.

Write to Sources also hosts Teacher Conferences and Peer Conferences.

  • In Teacher Conferences, teachers and students talk about the strength of the writings and focus on how the writer uses text evidence, and the teacher makes concrete suggestions and suggests revisions. Focuses and sentence stems are given in the Teacher Edition to guide the suggested revisions. For example, Unit 6, week 2 suggests that teachers focus on a sentence by stating, “Rewrite this sentence by adding descriptive details about ____." Teachers may also focus on a section by saying, “Stating your main idea clearly can strengthen this opening.” Teachers may also focus on a revision strategy. The teacher can have a student underline a section and use a specific revision strategy, such as rearranging. "This idea seems to be out of order. Try moving it so your points are ordered logically."
  • In the peer conference notes, three questions are given to focus the conference conversation. For example, in Unit 5, Week 4, the student conference notes tell the teacher, “Focus peer response on three writing traits of the week. Provide these questions: 'Are all the supporting details related to the topic? Is formal language used throughout? Are topic sentences included at the beginning of each paragraph?'”

Genre Writing takes place over a three-week period. Each unit has two Genre Writing topics. These topics are not always tied to a unit text and do not always require text evidence. During Genre Writing, students analyze an expert model, prewrite, draft, revise, proofread and publish, and evaluate their writing using a student rubric.

  • In Unit 4, students write a fictional narrative in weeks 1-3. Students write about someone who is running for mayor of a town.
    • Students read and analyze a model student response and discuss the features of a fictional narrative.
    • Students discuss and plan for the purpose and audience of their writing.
    • Students participate in a mini-lesson about organization of opinion essays and choose their topics.
    • Students then discuss the student model and participate in a mini-lesson about sequence.
    • Students work in a small group to brainstorm ideas and plan their writing using a story map organizer.
    • Students then review a revised student model and participate in mini-lessons on descriptive details and dialogue.
    • Students revise their drafts.
    • Students discuss an edited student model and edit their own papers.
    • Students publish a final presentation of their fictional narrative writings in print or digitally.
    • Students then use the student rubric to evaluate their own fictional narrative essays and reflect on their progress as writers. Students are asked to consider areas where they feel they have shown improvement and to think about what areas need further improvement.
    • Students set writing goals and prepare for teacher and peer conferences.

To evaluate Genre Writings teachers are directed to use the rubric and anchor papers provided to help evaluate student writing. Teachers are directed to review with individual students the writing goals they have set and discuss ways to achieve these goals.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 4 meet the criteria for including a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. Students will work on a series of short and long research projects throughout the year. In Units 1, 5, and 6, students will work on short research and inquiry projects each week. In Units 2, 3, and 4, students will work on three longer online inquiry space performance tasks. Teacher instructions in the teacher edition for Research and Inquiry and Inquiry Space are brief to support Grade 4 students' development in the component skills of research work as outlined in the standards. Teachers can use the included guidance to identify when this work is implemented in varied schedules.

Research and Inquiry: Weekly Projects

  • These are week-long projects that take place during three out of the six units in the school year during Unit 1, Unit 5, and Unit 6.
  • Students conduct research and create short projects such as interviews, summaries, illustrations, poems, story maps, and brochures.
  • Speaking and listening skills are incorporated on Day 5, when students present their projects.
  • Teacher instructions in the Teacher Edition are brief and lack explicit direction for effectively guiding students through the research process with online and print materials.
    • Unit 1, Week 2: “Find Resources - Review how to locate and use reliable print and online resources. Students should verify all facts in multiple sources.”
    • Unit 6, Week 4: “Find Resources - Invite students to research two or three other currencies from around the world, using primary and secondary sources. Encourage them to skim and scan the sources to find what they are looking for Remind them to create a bibliography of the sources they used.

Unit 1 Think It Through - Weekly Projects

  • Week 1: Interview a Classmate, T38
  • Week 2: Research the Effects of Human Actions, T102
  • Week 3: Make a Poster, T166
  • Week 4: Research a Topic, T230
  • Week 5: Research a Famous Business Owner, T294
  • Week 6: Choice of: Give a Presentation, Create a Multimedia Presentation, Create a Newscast, Do an Experiment, or Research a Business

Unit 5 Figure It Out - Weekly Projects

  • Week 1: Research an Aid Organization, T38
  • Week 2: Map the Oregon Trail, T102
  • Week 3: Research an Inventor, T166
  • Week 4: Research the Hubble Space Telescope, T230
  • Week 5: Research the Job of an Archaeologist, T294
  • Week 6: Choice of: Produce a Television Commercial, Write a Blog, Create an Encyclopedia Entry, Present a Slideshow, Conduct an Interview

Unit 6 Past, Present, and Future - Weekly Projects

  • Week 1: Research a Traditional Festival, T38
  • Week 2: Make a Fictional Journal Entry, T102
  • Week 3: Research Energy Sources, T166
  • Week 4: Research World Currencies, T230
  • Week 5: Conduct Peer Reviews, T294
  • Week 6: Choice of: Demonstrate a Festival Tradition, Record and Interview, Create a Multimedia Presentation, Make a Chart, or Present a Biography

Inquiry Space

Inquiry Space is a digitally-delivered program that provides students practice and instruction in integrating and applying reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills to build and share knowledge about a science or social studies topic. Inquiry Space performance tasks are found in Units 2, 3, and 4. Each six-week project is made up of six levels that step out the research, writing, and presenting process.

  • Level 1: Analyze the Task - purpose and audience, keywords, research plan, design your presentation
  • Level 2: Evaluate Sources - skim and scan, evaluate sources
  • Level 3: Take Notes - taking notes from audio sources, taking notes from video sources, paraphrasing, research plan, taking notes from print sources
  • Level 4: Write an Outline and Draft - organizing notes, outline to draft, student model outline, opinion statement, paraphrasing, writing rubric
  • Level 5: Revise and Edit Your Draft - revised student model, edited student model, cite sources, proofreader marks, peer conferencing checklist, revise and edit checklist, writing rubric, peer conferencing video
  • Level 6: Publish and Present - how to give a presentation, presentation checklist, listening checklist, presentation rubric, how to publish your work, design your presentation, record and edit audio
  • For example, In Unit 4, students complete a Narrative Performance Task. The Teacher Edition states, “Each week students will complete one level of a six-week narrative performance task in a digital environment. Via a game-like interface, students are assigned a task and work independently to: plan and conduct research, synthesize information, communicate ideas in writing and presentation.
  • Resource Toolkit: At each level, a toolkit of resources is available to students. The point-of-use resources include a variety of animated tutorials, videos and slide presentations that students can view to help them at each level.
  • Projects integrate reading and writing skills throughout all six weeks. Projects incorporate speaking and listening skills in the fifth and sixth weeks as students peer conference and later present their projects.

The Inquiry Space projects require research skills over the six weeks of the Unit. The teacher uses included guidance to support students' development of the component skills of research as they practice over the year.

  • Research skills are introduced through narrated, text-heavy slideshows and tutorials. Students are directed to apply skills by answering free response and yes or no questions/prompts in a step-by-step research process (analyze the task, evaluate sources, take notes, create a story map and write a draft, revise and edit your draft, publish and present). Students have the option to skip the instructional slideshows and tutorials.
  • During the “evaluate sources” step, they evaluate and select three out of four digital sources provided in Inquiry Space.
  • Various research skills are addressed as students take notes from multiple sources. However, each unit’s project follows a similar pattern of instruction, with small changes according to the type of writing required.

Unit 2 Inquiry Space - Investigate: Sharks - Informative

  • Week 1 Research plan, T38-39
  • Week 2 Evaluate sources, T102-103
  • Week 3 Take notes on sources, T166-167
  • Week 4 Outline and draft, T230-231
  • Week 5 Collaborative conversation, revise, edit, T294-295
  • Week 6 Publish and present, T330-331

Unit 3 Inquiry Space - Take a Stand: Protect the Environment - Opinion

  • Week 1 Research plan, T38-39
  • Week 2 Evaluate sources, T102-103
  • Week 3 Take notes on sources, T166-167
  • Week 4 Outline and draft, T230-231
  • Week 5 Collaborative conversation, revise, edit, T294-295
  • Week 6 Publish and present, T330-331

Unit 4 Inquiry Space - Write About: Bullying - Narrative

  • Week 1 Research Plan, T38-39
  • Week 2 Evaluate sources, T102-103
  • Week 3 Take notes on sources, T166-167
  • Week 4 Outline and draft, T23-231
  • Week 5 Collaborative conversation, revise, edit, T294-295
  • Week 6 Publish and present, T330-331

Included in the materials are student and teacher checklists for Research and Inquiry, which are to guide the research process and the presentation. Speaking and listening skills are incorporated on Day 5, when students present their projects.

A “Research Roadmap” PDF is available for students, providing free-response questions to guide them through their project, but the materials lack explicit instructions for effective research.

Reading Digitally:

Reading Digitally occurs during week 6 of each unit. After reading the Time for Kids digital article, four options are provided for work around the article. Two options are about research: Research for Study and Independent Study.

  • In Unit 5, Week 6, students are to be informed about image and multimedia searches during Research Online.
  • In Unit 5, Week 6 in Independent Study, students are to brainstorm a research question. The teacher is to remind students about how to conduct an Internet search and students are to create an informational presentation about helping victims of natural disasters.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Students are allotted twenty minutes of daily sustained silent reading as well as time during Small Group when they do reading activities using their Workstation Activity Cards. Suggested Timeframes for Daily Independent Reading Grade are 30-40 Minutes for Grade 4 students. Directions are provided for an independent reading routine at the beginning of the Unit 1 (in the “Start Smart” pages) and each week in the differentiated Small Group directions. Students keep an independent reading log to track texts read.

Start Smart - “Independent Reading”

  • The rationale for sustained silent reading is explained, and teachers are directed to set aside 15-30 minutes for this per day, depending on the grade level. It is specified that “students can read independently during sustained silent reading time, as well as during Small Group when they do reading activities using their Workstation Activity Cards.”
  • Teachers are provided with directions on helping students select a book, as well as helping them “create a reading log, or response journal, where they record reactions and feelings about what they are reading.”

Differentiated Instruction Small Group - “Self-Selected Reading”

  • Teachers are provided with differentiated instructions for assisting students in selecting a book for sustained silent reading and providing them with guidance for purposeful reading.
  • How to Choose a Good Independent Reading Book: The book students choose to read can be easy, at their independent reading level (texts that are “just right”), or challenging--but should definitely be of high interest. Students should be encouraged to choose a book at their independent reading level most of the time. Share the following guidelines with students to help them choose an appropriate Independent Reading book.
  • For example in Unit 1, week 2 students may self-select a text during small group. The Teacher Edition states, “Have students choose a realistic fiction book for sustained silent reading. Before they read, have students preview the book, reading the title and viewing the front and back cover. As students read, remind them to make predictions about the text. Encourage students to read different books in order to identify the problems and solutions that drive each book's plot. As students read, have them fill in story details on a Character, Plot, Setting: Problem and Solution Chart. They can use their chart to help them write a summary of the book. Ask students to share their reactions to the book with classmates.”

Teachers are given suggestions on how to set up a classroom library and organize texts. Classroom library trade books provide options for independent reading. A unit bibliography also provides additional suggestions of titles related to the unit themes.

Students keep an Independent Reading Journal. As students read their independent reading books, they will be documenting what they think about what they read in an Independent Reading Journal. Students are encouraged to ask questions about what they are reading and find answers. They are also directed to identify words they do not know and cannot figure out. They are shown that they can also notice when parts of what they read are confusing or they do not understand. Teachers are directed in ways to support and scaffold the way students can read, think about, and reread texts, such as using Thinking Codes when reading.

Teachers are directed to track Independent Reading goals and confer with students about their independent reading. It is suggested that teachers engage the student in a conversation about what they are reading and why they chose their specific text. Asking additional questions, as appropriate, can provide the teacher with valuable formative assessment information about a student’s reading development. These questions may include questions about: the text’s genre, text features, referring back to specific “Think Codes” students have left in the text, general comprehension of text, and more focused questions on how the author presents information in a section of the text the student may have commented on. Teachers are also instructed that they may take notes and lists strengths and weaknesses a student may have, to keep track of student progress.

Resource pages R107-R108 show examples of conference forms and goal setting.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

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0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Reading Wonders Grade 4 Literature Anthology 978-0-02-114247-7 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 4 Close Read Companion 978-0-02-130873-6 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Reading/Writing Workshop Grade 4 978-0-07-676799-1 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 4 Unit 4 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-677176-9 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 4 Unit 2 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-678456-1 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 4 Unit 1 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-679048-7 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 4 Unit 6 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-679870-4 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 4 Unit 3 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-680379-8 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 4 Unit 5 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-680538-9 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017

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ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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