Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Reading Wonders Grade 3 partially meet expectations of alignment. The materials meet the expectations of Gateway 1. Texts students encounter over the course of the year are of high quality and interest, providing appropriately rigorous questions and tasks to engage students in each grade. The materials organize most speaking and listening activities to support the teacher’s implementation of practice with academic vocabulary and text-focused discussion. Writing tasks and activities attend to the balance and types intended by the standards, often connecting back to associated texts. The materials support students' literacy development with foundational skills. Grammar instruction and attention to assuring students have access to increasingly rigorous texts over the course of the school year. The materials for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations of Gateway 2. There is some support for building students’ knowledge and academic vocabulary, but consistent guidance and focus in these areas does not appear over the course of the school year. The materials provide some planning for academic vocabulary and writing development, although the teacher may need to engage in additional planning to ensure the schedule can accommodate the intended lesson sequences.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
39
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
24
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The Grade 3 instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 1. Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention. Texts are of quality and are rigorous and meet the text complexity criteria for Grade 3. The materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Grammar and conventions instruction is embedded to facilitate students’ application of language skills but is taught mainly out of context. The materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
18/20
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 3 meet the expectations of texts being high quality, rigorous, and worthy of multiple close reads. Text selections are appropriately rigorous but only partially support students’ building their reading skills over the course of the school year. The program has a balance of genres and text types included to provide students opportunities to read broadly and deeply as they build their literacy skills. Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading. Anchor texts are found in the student edition of the Literature Anthology as the main texts for each week. Many texts are of publishable quality and address several topics of interest which are engaging for Grade 3 students. Anchor texts include a variety of interesting topics that include, but are not limited to, biographies of interesting people, books about historical events, fables, folktales, and historical fiction.

Some examples of quality texts included as anchor texts are:

  • Unit 1, A Mountain of History, Time for Kids Magazine - This high-interest text includes vibrant photographs and allows students to access historical information with an engaging article.
  • Unit 2, Whooping Cranes in Danger, by Susan E. Goodman - This expository text contains an engaging topic with clear photos and detailed captions.
  • Unit 2, The Castle on Hester Street, by Linda Heller - This award-winning historical fiction text contains intricate illustrations and relatable characters who are also Grade 3 students.
  • Unit 3, Finding Lincoln, by Ann Malaspina - This award-winning text brings to light important historical social issues. Students are shown history through the perspective of someone close to their age.
  • Unit 4, The Real Story of Stone Soup, by Yin Chang Compestine - This award-winning folktale expands students’ knowledge base of cultures and multiple perspectives.
  • Unit 5, Bravo, Tavo! by Brian Meunier - This award-winning realistic fiction text includes an unfamiliar setting and an unfamiliar culture and language. This is combined with a familiar topic (sports) that transfers to any culture or setting.
  • Unit 6, Alligators and Crocodiles, by Gail Gibbons - This text weaves together detailed illustrations with interesting informational content.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Texts which all students access include a balanced mix of literature and informational text. Text genres represented include, but are not limited to, informational texts, narrative nonfiction, biographies, folktales, historical fiction, poetry, realistic fiction, drama, myths, and fantasies.

Anchor text selections include 15 literary texts and 15 informational texts.

  • Literature examples include Wolf! by Becky Bloom, The Real Story of Stone Soup, by Ying Chang Compestine, and King Midas and the Golden Touch, by Margaret H. Lippert.
  • Informational examples include Earth, by Jeffrey Zuehlke, Amazing Wildlife of the Mojave, by Laurence Pringle, and Hot Air Balloons, by Dana Meachen Rau.

Paired text selections include 14 literature texts and 16 informational texts.

  • Literature examples include Coyote and the Jar of Stars, Windy Gale and the Great Hurricane, and Carlos’s Gift.
  • Informational examples include A Great American Teacher, Healthful Food Choices, and Trash into Art.

Weekly differentiated texts and complex extended texts are also a mix of text types and genres.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectation that texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task. The majority of texts are at the appropriate quantitative level. Texts that are above or below grade level quantitative bands have qualitative features and/or tasks that bring it to the appropriate level for students to access the text.

Examples of texts that are of the appropriate complexity include the following:

Unit 1, Week 2: Yoon and the Jade Bracelet

  • Quantitative: Lexile 480; TextEvaluator 20
  • Qualitative: The level of complexity is appropriate for the grade level. It has clear organization of text structure and easy-to-follow sentence structures. Though there are a few somewhat archaic terms ("school yard" and "she sent for her"), they do not impede understanding, and multiple levels of meaning (the tiger in the story and the older girl at school) are explained for the reader.
  • Reader and Task: Throughout the text, students take notes focusing on character, setting, plot, and sequence. During whole group reading, students work with partners to define words with context clues, generate questions, and analyze illustrations. Also during whole group reading, the teacher asks students to practice visualization, analyze author's craft, and make inferences. The story centers around relatable topics: being the new kid at school, learning to make friends, learning about one's culture, and wanting to please parents. At the end of the text, students are prompted to summarize using their notes, write about the main character's development, and reflect on the importance of traditions.

Unit 2, Week 2:The Castle on Hester Street

  • Quantitative: Lexile 730; TextEvaluator 33
  • Qualitative: Qualitatively, this text has a high level of complexity, but with appropriate scaffolding, it is appropriate for the grade level. The text structure may be difficult for some students to follow, as the perspective and dialogue alternate between the grandfather and the grandmother. Additionally, the knowledge demands are high, as the experiences portrayed are uncommon to most Grade 3 readers. Students will need background knowledge of the past challenges of Jewish citizens in Russia and the historical process of immigration in the United States. Vocabulary sometimes includes terms that may be unfamiliar such as "matzoh," "boarders," and "Sabbath." Illustrations are engaging and assist with understanding the text.
  • Reader and Task: The "Access Complex Text" directions in the TE provide instruction for scaffolding that addresses all of the challenges mentioned in the qualitative analysis. During whole group reading, students take notes on story details that relate to the theme. Students talk with partners to analyze illustrations and discuss predictions. Also during whole group reading, the teacher asks students to analyze the author's use of dialogue, identify similes, interpret illustrations, analyze character development, make predictions, generate questions, and think about the theme. At the end of the story, students are prompted to summarize using their notes, write about the grandparents' differing perspectives, and consider reasons for immigration.

Unit 3, Week 2: Finding Lincoln

  • Quantitative: Lexile 660; TextEvaluator 35
  • Qualitative: This text is moderately complex, and combined with the Lexile level within the Grade 2-3 complexity band, it is appropriate for Grade 3 readers. With clear organization, language, and sentence structures, students may need some background knowledge of American history, including the Civil War and segregation. These are addressed in the “Access Complex Text” TE notes during the close read. The story’s theme is clear but not explicit, so students are required to infer.
  • Reader and Task: Throughout the story, students take notes on causes and effects, visualize events in the story, examine illustrations, make inferences, and interpret idioms and word choices. After reading the story, students are asked to summarize important events and analyze character traits and one character’s effect on the other.

Unit 4, Week 1: The Real Story of Stone Soup

  • Quantitative: Lexile 570; TextEvaluator 26
  • Qualitative: This text has a moderate level of complexity. The text structure is clear and chronological, and the narrator's humor makes the text engaging for the reader. While most sentences are moderately complex, some include structures with a higher level of complexity. Vocabulary is mostly contemporary and familiar, but students may struggle with pronouncing character names such as Kuai or expressions such as "Ai yo!" and "Cai, cai, cai." Students may need prior knowledge of Chinese culture, landscape, and plant life (rivers, banana leaves, bamboo, chop sticks, and sesame oil). Illustrations are necessary for full comprehension.
  • Reader and Task: Throughout the story, students take notes on the narrator's point of view. During whole group reading, students work with partners to generate questions and analyze illustrations. Also during whole group reading, the teacher asks students to define words based on their roots, consider the author's writing strategies, make inferences, define folktales, and consider point of view. At the end of the text, students summarize main events using their notes, write about the author's use of dialogue, and make connections to healthful eating choices.

Unit 5, Week 1: Clever Jack Takes the Cake

  • Quantitative: Lexile 600; TextEvaluator 37
  • Qualitative: This text has a moderate level of complexity. The text structure is chronological and clear, and sentence structures vary from simple to compound and complex. The vocabulary is mostly conventional, with a few background knowledge requirements to understand terms such as "spinning wheel," "threadbare quilt," "pitted ax," "gypsy," and "concertina." The theme is implicit and may be somewhat challenging for students to interpret independently.
  • Reader and Task: Throughout the story, students take notes on the main character's point of view. During whole group reading, students work with partners to summarize certain events in the story. Also during whole group reading, the teacher asks students to summarize events, consider the author's writing strategies, interpret figurative language, make inferences, analyze illustrations, and determine cause and effect. At the end of the story, students use their notes to summarize, write about the author's use of text and illustrations, and connect to the idea of giving thoughtful gifts.

Unit 6, Week 2: Nora's Ark

  • Quantitative: Lexile 740; TextEvaluator 35
  • Qualitative: Text structure is chronological and easy to follow. Sentence structures vary, and the language is mostly explicit, with exceptions including dialect ("I reckon") and a French phrase. Multiple levels of meaning are explained for the reader, but some prior knowledge is required for readers to make the most meaning from the text, including knowledge of the biblical story of Noah's Ark, the importance of higher ground during a flood, and an understanding of rural communities in the early 1900s. Multiple characters introduced in the story may cause students to struggle.
  • Reader and Task: The "Access Complex Text" directions in the TE provide instruction for scaffolding that address some of the challenges mentioned in the qualitative analysis. Throughout the story, students take notes on details that lead them to the theme of the text. During whole group reading, students work with partners to discuss predictions and generate questions. Also during whole group reading, teachers ask students to consider the author's writing strategies, generate predictions, interpret idioms, make inferences, analyze illustrations, and determine cause and effect. At the end of the text, students use their notes to summarize, write about the story's message, and consider the importance of weather.

Two texts are near the end of the quantitative grade bands but are appropriate when qualitative measures and reader and task are considered:

  • Unit 1, Week 4: All Aboard! Elijah McCoy’s Steam Engine, by Monica Kulling: This text is at the lower end of the quantitative grade band at Lexile 430. The text is suited to the tasks, which helps to bolster it to an appropriate level. The text structure is chronological, and there are few challenging vocabulary terms included. The theme is simple with one point of view — that of the main character. This text is found at the beginning of the school year which allows students to access grade level text to build to grade-level independent reading proficiency.
  • Unit 6, Week 4: Alligators and Crocodiles, by Gail Gibbons: The quantitative level of this text is above Grade 3 quantitative band at Lexile 870. The structure of the text, including text in the illustrations, is more complex than is appropriate for Grade 3. Since the tasks focus on the structure and organization of the text, the tasks asked of the reader are also overly complex for Grade 3. However, this text occurs late in the year when students should be better equipped to handle more complex texts.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 3 partially meet the expectation of supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. While the anchor texts, paired texts, and leveled readers typically fall within the grade band and increase across the school year, the task demands do not increase in complexity throughout the school year.

Anchor and supporting texts increase in complexity based on quantitative and qualitative components over the school year. Each week students build knowledge and read about a different topic or concept.

  • Unit 1 begins at the middle part of the Lexile band with Wolf! at 650 with qualitative complexity in the purpose, genre, sentence structure, and connection to ideas. The tasks associated with Wolf! are for students to identify key ideas and details about traditions and to take notes during the first read and summarize. In the reread, the task is to analyze the text, craft, and structure and use the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor and paired-text.
  • Unit 2 contains The Castle on Hester Street with a Lexile of 730 and qualitative complexity in prior knowledge, specific vocabulary, sentence structure, connection to ideas, and purpose. The tasks associated with The Castle on Hester Street are for students to identify key ideas and details about immigration and to take notes during the first read and summarize. In the reread, the task is to analyze the text, craft, and structure and use the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor and paired text: “Was it fair for immigrants to be tested and questioned so much at Ellis Island? Use text evidence from two sources to support your answer.”
  • Unit 3 contains Finding Lincoln with a Lexile of 660 and qualitative complexity in prior knowledge, specific vocabulary, connection to ideas, organization, sentence structure, genre, and purpose. The tasks associated with Finding Lincoln are for students to identify key ideas and details about leadership and to take notes during the first read and summarize. In the reread, the task is to analyze the text, craft, and structure and use the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor and paired-text.
  • Unit 4 contains Amazing Wildlife on the Mojave with a Lexile of 720 and qualitative complexity in purpose, prior knowledge, genre, specific vocabulary, and connection to ideas. The tasks associated with Amazing Wildlife on the Mojave are for students to identify key ideas and details about adaptations and to take notes during the first read and summarize. In the reread, the task is to analyze the text, craft, and structure and use the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor and paired-text: “How does an animal’s environment affect the way it lives? Use text evidence from two sources to support your answer.”
  • Unit 5 contains three anchor texts with Lexiles in the 700s. Elizabeth Leads the Way: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Right to Vote has a Lexile of 700 and qualitative complexity in connection to ideas, sentence structure, prior knowledge, specific vocabulary, purpose, organization, and genre. The tasks associated with Elizabeth Leads the Way: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Right to Vote are for students to identify key ideas and details about good citizenship and to take notes during the first read and summarize. In the reread, the task is to analyze the text, craft, and structure and use the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor and paired text.
  • Unit 6 contains Alligators and Crocodiles with a Lexile of 870 and qualitative complexity in purpose, genre, specific vocabulary, sentence structure, and connection to ideas. The tasks associated with Alligators and Crocodiles are for students to identify key ideas and details about animals and to take notes during the first read and summarize. In the reread, the task is to analyze the text, craft, and structure and use the Close Reading Companion. In the integration task, students integrate knowledge and ideas and make connections. Students also write to two sources based on the anchor and paired-text.

Teacher materials include direction for differentiation to increase students’ literacy skills through the ACT (Access Complex Text) directions and the Research Base Alignment resource book. The directions guide teachers through scaffolded activities such as rereading and paraphrasing, student generated questions, citing text evidence, evaluating the strength of evidence cited, writing about texts, teacher modeling, use of text-dependent questions, graphic organizers, think-alouds, student collaboration, and note-taking. Although scaffolded activities are provided throughout the materials, every text gets the same amount of time spent on reading it and analyzing it. More complex texts do not necessarily get more time to be analyzed since there are fixed routines in place every week for close reading and rereading.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectation that anchor texts and the series of texts connected to them being accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

The teacher edition Differentiate to Accelerate Chart explains the text complexity attributes of each whole class text, the Lexile and TextEvaluator levels of the texts, and the places within the lesson that will help the teacher determine if the text is appropriate in terms of reader and task.

The following example is from Unit 4, Week 2, page T72:

"The Impossible Pet Show" - 600L, TE 3

  • Qualitative: What Makes the Text Complex?
    • Specific Vocabulary- Figurative Language, page T81
    • Connection of Ideas- Infer, page T83
  • See Scaffolded Instruction in Teacher’s Edition, pages T81 and T83.
  • Reader and Task: The Introduce the Concept lesson on pages T74–T75 will help determine the reader’s knowledge and engagement in the weekly concept. See pages T80–T89 and T102–T103 for questions and tasks for this text.

The Talented Clementine - 660L TE 36

  • Qualitative: What Makes the Text Complex?
    • Organization Problems, page T89Q
    • Connection of Ideas - Make Inferences, pages T89C, T89G, T89O, T89W; Theme page T89Y
  • Sentence Structure, pages T89I, T89M
  • Prior Knowledge
  • New Terms, page T89K
  • Genre Realistic Fiction, pages T89A – T89B, T89E, T89U
  • Specific Vocabulary - Context Clues, page T89V
  • See Scaffolded Instruction in Teacher Edition, pages T89A–T89Z.
  • Reader and Task: The Introduce the Concept lesson on pages T74–T75 will help determine the reader’s knowledge and engagement in the weekly concept. See pages T89A–T89Z and T102– T103 for questions and tasks for this text.

The Teacher Edition also contains the Instructional Path at the beginning of each week. This path lists all texts read, why students are reading each text, the educational focus, and how the texts connect to one another during the week.

Unit 6, Week 2 Instructional Path T68-T69

  1. Talk About Weather: Guide students in collaborative conversations. Discuss the essential question: How can weather affect us? Develop academic language. Listen to “Joshua’s Odd Neighbor” and discuss the story.
  2. Read “The Big Blizzard”: Model close reading with a short complex text. Read “The Big Blizzard” to learn how a blizzard affects the Hernandez family in New York City, citing text evidence to answer text-dependent questions. Reread “The Big Blizzard” to analyze text, craft, and structure, citing text evidence.
  3. Write About “The Big Blizzard”: Model writing to a source. Analyze a short response student model. Use text evidence from close reading to write to a source.
  4. Read and Write About Nora’s Ark: Practice and apply close reading of the anchor text. Read Noah’s Ark to learn about a farm family that survives a storm and a terrible flood. Then use text evidence to understand how the author uses text, craft, and structure to develop a deeper understanding of the story. Write a short response about Nora’s Ark.
  5. Independent Partner Work: Gradual release of support to independent work. Text-dependent questions, scaffolded partner work, talk with a partner, cite text evidence, complete a sentence frame, guided text annotation.
  6. Integrate Knowledge and Ideas: Connect Text--Discuss how each of the texts answers the question: How can weather affect us? Text to Fine Art Compare how the theme in the texts read is illustrated in the 19th century painting. Conduct a Short Research Project. Write a summary about the effects of extreme weather.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 3 meet expectations that materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading. There are supports to build students’ comprehension of grade level texts in oral and silent reading.

Texts available daily to students include close reading texts, the literature anthology, paired texts, differentiated texts, interactive work text, differentiated texts, and extended complex texts.

Weekly routines include opportunities for students to practice choral reading, partner reading, repeated reading, timed reading, echo reading, oral reading modeling, and independent reading of a variety of texts.

For example, in Unit 2, Week 1, students participate in an interactive read aloud introducing the following essential question: “Why is working together a good way to solve a problem?” This leads to students participating in a shared reading and rereading of “Anansi Learns a Lesson” then a close reading and rereading from the Literature Anthology of Roadrunner’s Dance. Students also read a paired text, “Deltona Is Going Batty,” and then a small group reading where students are working with a differentiated text and are either being read to, echo reading, or reading with the support of a partner. Extended complex texts are also available for students to read. Students are given a purpose for reading with each reread and complete graphic organizers or answer questions to support comprehension.

In Unit 5, Week 3, students participate in an interactive read aloud introducing the following essential question: “How do teams work together?” A shared reading and rereading of “Rescue Dogs Save the Day” is followed by a close reading and rereading from the Literature Anthology of Wildfires. Students read a paired text of “Windy Gale and the Great Hurricane” and participate in small group reading where students are working with a differentiated text and are either being read to, echo reading, or reading with the support of a partner. Extended complex texts are also available to read. Students are given a purpose for reading with each reread and complete graphic organizers or answer questions to support comprehension.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Grade 3 meet the expectations that students will have opportunities for rich, rigorous discussions and writing tasks that are evidence-based. Questions and tasks associated with the texts focus students’ attention back to the texts and are organized to build their speaking and listening skills. Grammar and conventions instruction is embedded to facilitate students’ application of language skills but is taught mainly out of context. Each unit includes opportunities for on-demand and process writing, and the materials include culminating tasks at the end of each unit.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for text-dependent questions, tasks, and assignments requiring students to engage directly with the text and to draw on textual evidence to support what is explicit as well as make valid inferences.

During each whole-group selection, students are asked to answer a variety of literal, inferential, and evaluative questions. During whole-group reading of primary texts, students are asked to re-read to find answers to text-dependent questions. Question sets are included with each page of text. Many teacher-directed tasks support students in making connections between the text and illustrations. Questions and activities engage students in text-dependent writing and speaking opportunities.

Examples of text-dependent questions found throughout the units:

  • “Which words help you visualize the wolf’s actions?” (Unit 1 TE, page T27F)
  • “How is the story with the dogs connected to the text of pages 152-153?” (Unit 2 TE, page T159G)
  • “Why is Jane running very fast? What clues in the text help you identify cause and effect?” (Unit 3 TE, page 84)
  • “What is a habitat? Look for a definition and a restatement of the word in the text.” (Unit 4 TE, page T168)
  • “Which word does the author want to emphasize in the last sentence on page 435? Why does the author want to stress this word?” (Unit 5 TE, page T217C)
  • “What is the meaning of offering on page 4? What gives you a clue?” (Unit 6 TE, page T52)

Examples of text-dependent tasks and assignments found throughout the units:

  • “Have students review the first paragraph to find examples of nonliteral language.” (Unit 1 TE, page T17)
  • “Have students work in pairs. Have them use the details in the graphic organizer to write about author's point of view…” (Unit 2 TE, page T220)
  • “Ask pairs to talk about Inchworm’s unique features and how they help solve the problem. Have students use the text and illustrations to find examples of unique features.” (Unit 3 TE, page T19)
  • “With a partner, write notes about how the stories compare.” (Unit 4 TE, page T89X)
  • “Reread ‘Dolores Goes to School.’ Think of a question. You might ask: How did Dolores try to help the children in her class? Reread the section to find the answer.” (Unit 5 TE, page T210)
  • “Have students use text evidence to compare a historical fiction story to a fable.” (Unit 6 TE, page T105)

The Close Reading Companion, the Student Literature Anthology, and Reading/Writing Workshop include text-dependent questions, writing prompts, and discussion prompts that require students to engage in the text directly. The Respond to the Text questions at the end of the main literature anthology selections include summarization, writing, and making connection questions. The "make connection" questions ask students to provide evidence from the texts in the unit to answer the questions. Write to Source Lessons included in each weekly lesson routine include writing tasks that require students to provide evidence from the Literature Anthology texts in their writing. The Practice Book also provides questions/tasks that are tied directly to text unless the practice is a very specific skill (such as decoding).

Teacher modeling for text-dependent tasks is provided throughout instruction.

There are also “Text to Self” questions that are not text-dependent but relate to the theme of the text being read such as “Discuss how you and your friends help each other” (Unit 1, TE page T19) and “Discuss whether you would like to take part in a pet show and why.” (Unit 4, TE page 81).

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectation for containing sequences of text dependent questions and activities that building to a culminating task integrating skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination). Students are provided with a Unit Big Idea and a weekly Essential Question. Students discuss the questions, make connections, and create a graphic organizer to be used at the end of the unit. Similar processes are included at the end of most units to build students' ability to engage with the texts.

Each week, an Essential Question is addressed throughout the texts and tasks. This Essential Question is revisited at the end of each text with a Make Connections Question. At the end of the week, students Integrate Ideas through Text Connections to revisit the Essential Question and create a graphic organizer using notes from the weekly read. At the end of the Unit, students Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea. Students use their weekly graphic organizers and notes to participate in a collaborative conversation about the Unit Big Idea. Students present their ideas and create a top five most important list as a class and are encouraged to continue building knowledge through research and discussions.

Unit 2 Big Idea:

  • What does it take to solve a problem?

Unit 2, Week 4 Essential Question:

  • How can people help animals survive?

Questions at the end of the week's texts:

  • Describe the steps that Olivia and Carter took to help the Kemp’s ridley sea turtles.
  • How are scientists helping the whooping cranes survive?
  • How does the Save the Manatee Club help manatees survive?

End of Week Integrate Ideas: Text Connections:

  • Students create an accordion foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information they have learned about how people can help animals survive.

End of Unit: Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea:

  • The teacher writes “How can people help animals survive?” on the board. In small groups, students will compare the information they have learned throughout the unit in order to answer the Big Idea question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things, students vote to narrow down the list to the top five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea.

Unit 4 Big Idea:

  • What are different ways to meet challenges?

Unit 4, Week 3 Essential Question:

  • How do animals adapt to challenges in their habitat?

Questions/tasks at the end of the week’s texts:

  • How have the gray wolf and the red fox adapted to living in North America?

End of Week Integrate Ideas:Text Connections:

  • Students create a three-tab foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information they have learned about how animals adapt to challenges in their environment.

End of Unit: Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea:

  • The teacher writes “What are different ways to meet challenges?” on the board. In small groups, students will compare the information they have learned during the course of the unit in order to answer the Big Idea question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things, students vote to narrow down the list to the top five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet expectations for frequently providing opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax (small group and whole class). Each week, unfamiliar words are introduced and taught through a variety of activities and strategies that include discussions, writing, word morphology, and a define/example/ask routine. Each page identifies academic language that can be found in the text on that page.

Protocols and routines are presented in “Start Smart” pages at the beginning of Unit 1. Teachers are instructed to teach these procedures and routines to students in the first days of the school year. These procedures and routines will be used throughout the school year.

  • “Build Background” (pages S5-S6 and pages S19-S20): Introduces the concept of the weekly Essential Question. Protocol is introduced for using concept words related to the big idea, academic language, and domain-specific words in partner discussions.
  • “Collaborative Conversations:” Teachers are instructed to have students watch a video outlining procedures for partner and small group conversations, then share discussion guidelines revolving around turn-taking, careful listening, adding new ideas, preparing for discussions, asking and answering questions, taking on discussion roles, and being open to all ideas.
  • “Comprehension: Theme” (pages S11-S12): Teachers are guided to teach students how to answer a question by paraphrasing part of the text.
  • “Genre: Literature” (pages S13-S14): Teachers are guided to teach students about close reading to analyze and evaluate what they read and using direct quotes to cite text evidence.
  • “Comprehension: Author’s Point of View” (pages S23-S24): Teachers are guided to teach students about citing text evidence when making an inference.
  • “Genre: Informational Text” (pages S25-S26): Teachers are guided to teach students about using facts, details, graphs, charts, and diagrams as text evidence.

During weekly lessons, multiple collaborative opportunities are presented daily, with modeling and explicit directions provided to facilitate evidence-based discussions with a focus on academic vocabulary and syntax.

  • Academic language is highlighted in the margins of the teacher edition, providing ease of reference and use.
  • Routines and procedures are provided as periodic reminders for collaborative conversations and peer conferences.
  • The vocabulary routine attends to speaking and listening skills associated with evidence-based discussions, academic vocabulary, and syntax. Students utilize a wide variety of graphic organizers and sentence frames throughout the school year.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students make connections and discuss how voting gives people the power to choose. Students are asked to cite text evidence and given the sentence frames: "I read that voting…," "One way voting gives people power is..."
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, students make connections and discuss how the Wright brothers helped people fly. Students are asked to cite text evidence and are given the sentence frames: "I read that the Wright brothers…," "Their invention..."

Lessons include frequent opportunities for the teacher to frame and guide discussion during Collaborative Conversations.

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, students are advised to add new ideas to their conversations. The teacher edition states, “As students engage in partner, small-group, and whole-class discussions, encourage them to add new ideas to their conversations. Remind students to stay on topic, connect their own ideas to things their peers have said, and look for ways to connect their personal experiences or prior knowledge to the conversations.“
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, students are advised to be open to all ideas. The teacher edition states, “As students engage in partner, small group, and whole-class discussions, encourage them to share and listen openly in their conversations. Remind students that all ideas, questions, or comments are important and should be heard, not to be afraid to ask a question if something is unclear, to respect the opinions of others, and not to be afraid to offer opinions, even if they are different from others’ viewpoints.“

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet expectations for supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

Protocols and routines for speaking and listening are presented in “Start Smart” pages at the beginning of Unit 1. Teachers are instructed to teach these procedures and routines to students in the first days of the school year. These procedures and routines will be used throughout the school year.

Multiple collaboration opportunities are provided throughout the week such as Text Connections, Research and Inquiry, End-of-Unit Routine, Integrate Ideas– Inquiry Space, and Research and Inquiry, Wrap Up the Unit– Text Connections, and Publishing Celebrations.

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, students reread the section “Olivia and Carter to the Rescue!” to find the main ideas and key details in the text about how oil spills harm animals. Students are to refer directly to the text.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students work with a partner to discuss Arachne’s boasting and the trouble it causes. Students cite evidence from the text and use sentence frames for discussion.

Students are provided speaking and listening opportunities about the target vocabulary in the reading/writing workshop throughout the year. In the Smart Start instructions to teachers in Unit 1, there are specific instructions about listening comprehension such as to take turns talking, listen carefully, add new ideas, use text evidence, prepare for discussions, ask and answer questions, take on discussion roles, and be open to all ideas.

There are also speaking and listening checklists in the online teacher resources and in the description of assessments in Week 6 of each unit that instruct students as they engage in partner, small group, and whole class discussions.

There are varied weekly projects (i.e., fable story map, culture, web, community travel brochure, action plan, and landmark informative report) in which students work in pairs or small groups. Then, students work in small groups to present a project through a culminating unit project.

Listening comprehension lessons are included in each weekly Interactive read aloud. Students are prompted to think about the genre and the strategy prior to listening to the read aloud by the teacher.

A presentation checklist is provided in the materials for students to evaluate student presentations.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet expectations for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Writing projects, tasks, and presentations align to standards and allow students to learn, practice, develop, and apply writing skills across the course of the school year. Writing projects, tasks, and presentations are associated with texts of various genres, topics, or themes. Writing tasks are embedded throughout lessons and provide students opportunities for short and extended writings. For example, students write to sources, answer text-dependent questions, take notes, complete graphic organizers, and complete research projects and presentations. Students write informative, opinion, and narrative pieces focusing on topics such as ideas, voice, word choice, organization, and sentence fluency. Students are provided opportunities to work through the various stages of the writing process during which they revise their writings and conference with their peers and teacher. Anchor papers are found in the Assessment Handbook.

Each unit includes on-demand writing prompts.

  • Respond to the Text: Students immediately respond to a text that has been read. For example, in Unit 5, Week 2, students write to respond to the prompt, “How does the author help you understand how Tavo’s problems are connected to his father’s problems?” Students are provided with sentence frames to organize their text evidence.
  • Write to Sources: This is a 5-day routine of evidence-based writing that repeats each week. For example, in Unit 1, Week 4, students write to respond to the prompt, “Describe what an invention is, using details from ‘Mary Anderson’s Great Invention’.”
  • After Reading the Differentiated Texts: This is often a small group writing prompt. For example, in Unit 2, Week 3, students reading the Approaching Level text are prompted to work with a partner to write a short paragraph explaining why the author thinks debates are important, using evidence from the text to support their answers.
  • Research and Inquiry and Inquiry Space: Writing including evidence from researched texts. For example, in Unit 3, Week 4, students write and outline to begin a draft about taking a stance on overfishing. Students can collaborate digitally working with teams online through the online portal.

A text to media integrated lesson is available at the end of weekly lesson. Students use digital technology to post responses online. In the Unit 1 teacher edition on page T303, students are encouraged to use "technology such as computers, videos, digital images, music or other multimedia elements to produce and publish . . . ."

Each unit includes two different series of genre writing process lessons that take place over three weeks: Students are provided with an expert model in the first week of the phase; pre-write in second week; draft, proofread, edit, publish, and evaluate during the third week. Students can complete one or both of the lessons over the course of the six week unit.

The following are examples of the writing lessons:

Unit 3: Opinion Writing

  • Opinion Letter: Week 1, expert model; Week 2, prewrite; Week 3, draft, revise, proofread/edit and publish, evaluate.
  • Evaluate book review: Week 4, expert model; Week 5, prewrite; Week 6, draft, revise, proofread/edit and publish, evaluate.

Unit 4: Narrative Writing

  • Fictional Narrative: Week 1, expert model; Week 2, prewrite; Week 3, draft, revise, proofread/edit and publish.
  • Evaluate Poetry: Week 4, expert model; Week 5, prewrite; Week 6, draft, revise, proofread/edit and publish, evaluate.

Unit 6: Informative Writing

  • Feature Article: Week 1, expert model; Week 2, prewrite; Week 3, draft, revise, proofread/edit and publish.
  • Research Report: Week 4, expert model; Week 5, prewrite; Week 6, draft, revise, proofread/edit and publish, evaluate.

Writer’s Workspace includes graphic organizers, tools, templates, model writing and organizers, scoring rubrics, writing traits mini-lessons, and editing checklists for informative, opinion and narrative writing.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. The writing prompts are balanced between informative and narrative.

Process writing prompts include opportunities for students to address different types of writing:

  • Unit 1 - Narrative Text - Friendly Letters and Personal Narrative
  • Unit 2 - Informative Text - Explanatory Essay and How-To Text
  • Unit 3 - Opinion Writing - Book Review and Opinion Essay
  • Unit 4 - Narrative Text/Poetry - Fictional Narrative and Poetry
  • Unit 5 - Informative Text - Expository Letter and Research Report
  • Unit 6 - Opinion Writing - Book Review and Opinion Essay

On demand prompts and quick writes include opportunities for students to address different types of writing:

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, students write a poem or limerick that tells about an invention and includes a simile.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students write to answer the prompt, “What do the photographs and the captions add to the text? Use details from the text.”
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students write about readiing. The teacher models for students how to use notes from the graphic organizer to write a summary of the theme of “Athena and Arachne.”

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectation for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. The materials include weekly opportunities for students to respond to one or two texts in a variety of writing modes including informative, opinion, and narrative analysis.

Examples of opportunities for evidence-based writing are:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, students use text evidence to understand how the author presents information about his community.
  • In Unit 2, the Week 1 reading/writing workshop on page 113 says, “Think about Anansi’s Character traits. Then write another event to add to the end of the story. Tell what Anansi would do next.”
  • In Unit 5, students use text evidence to understand how the author presents information to show that wildfires are not all bad.
  • In Unit 1, Week 4, students answer, “What qualities did Elijah McCoy and Thomas Edison share as inventors? Use text evidence from two sources to support your answer.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students use text evidence to understand how the author uses text, craft, and structure to develop a deeper understanding of the story.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, the reading/writing workshop on page 415 has students answer “Who is a better friend, Diana or Arachne? Use reasons from the text to support your claim.”

The Write to Sources' weekly lesson objectives have students write in response to the texts of the week. Students write to the reading/writing workshop text by writing in response to a prompt. Most prompts require text evidence to answer. Some prompts do not require text evidence.

  • Day 1: Writing Fluency – Students respond to a text-dependent question.
  • Day 2: Write to Reading/Writing Workshop Text – An evidence-based expert model is provided and discussed, and students analyze their prompt, take notes with evidence, then write.
  • Day 3: Write to Literature Anthology Text – The teacher guides students in analyzing the prompt and identifying and collecting evidence. Students write, and then the teacher conferences with students (guidance is provided for conferencing).
  • Days 4 and 5: Write to Two Sources – The teacher guides students in identifying and collecting evidence. Students write, and then students conference with peers. Guiding questions are provided for peer conferences.
  • Throughout the week, the teacher edition and supplemental online materials provide instructional supports for analyzing models, analyzing prompts, collecting evidence, using graphic organizers, structuring responses, and conferencing.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Most grammar lessons are taught out of context and do not connect to the weekly theme, essential question, or texts read. Although explicit instruction is present each week, the activities and contexts used each week do not increase in sophistication of contexts. Grammar, spelling, and writing are three separate lessons that inconsistently connect with the context of the weekly texts.

Grammar and convention are explicitly taught each week. This instruction is a part of every weekly lesson.

Weekly Grammar Instruction:

  • Each week, a specific grammar skill is identified for instruction.
  • Each day begins with a "Daily Language Activity," which is a sentence with errors for the students to correct.
  • On Day 1, the weekly skill is introduced in a 5-10 minute lesson, followed by a partner activity to reinforce the concept.
  • On Day 2, the weekly skill is reviewed in a 5-10 minute lesson, followed by a partner activity to reinforce the concept.
  • On Day 3, the weekly skill is not addressed. A lesson is included that focuses on a mechanics and usage skill, followed by a partner activity to reinforce the concept.
  • On Day 4, the lesson focuses on proofreading. Students work with a partner to complete the activity.
  • On Day 5, students are assessed on the weekly skill through a reproducible with isolated sentences and/or words.
  • Grammar practice reproducible pages are provided for students who need additional support.

Grammar routines are described in the “Instructional Routine Handbook” on page R67. Grammar instruction is separate from writing instruction. Once a week students are provided an opportunity to edit for errors related to the grammar instruction for that week. This weekly opportunity occurs on Day 2 of the “Write to Sources” activity for each unit and week. The embedded instruction is imbalanced as compared to the explicit stand-alone instruction, and does not provide sufficient in-context instruction. Materials consistently build students' skills in applying conventions and other aspects of language within their own writing.

  • For instance, Unit 1, Week 4, page T229 instructs teachers to, “Have students use Grammar Handbook page 475 in the Reading/Writing Workshop to check for errors in predicates.”

Spelling lists are designed to practice language standards and foundational skills such as Final e. The students learn these skills by word sorts. For example, students learn to add suffixes to base words in Unit 5. Throughout the year, students use spelling patterns and generalizations. An example is found in in Unit 2, Week 5, when students practice digraphs and open syllables.

The Unit and Benchmark Assessments evaluate grammar, mechanics, and usage in context. The context of grammar/convention instruction does not become increasingly sophisticated over the course of the year as the same instructional routine and instructional activities are repeated throughout the units.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
6/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 3 meet expectations for foundational skills development. The materials, questions, and tasks provide instruction in phonics, word recognition, vocabulary, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression that guides students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between the acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning from reading. The materials also provide students frequent opportunities to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, as well as to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for materials, questions, and tasks addressing grade-level CCSS by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, vocabulary, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression.

Each week of each unit addresses foundational skills for phonics through instruction, application, and assessment. Whole group phonics/fluency instruction is provided as part of every weekly lesson.

  • One 20-minute mini-lesson is taught each week. Each mini-lesson targets two primary skills. For example, Unit 5, Week 3 targets closed syllables and roots in related words.
  • Each mini-lesson also includes a focus on reading multi-syllabic words and on a particular fluency skill such as reading rate or accuracy.

Differentiation of phonics and fluency instruction is supported in the small group instruction lessons. Students are provided multiple opportunities to practice the strategies for learning foundational skills during these teacher-led lessons and when completing the Your Turn practice pages that correspond to the foundational reading skills lessons.

Phonics is also addressed through the spelling. Phonics through spelling in Unit 1 and Unit 2 reviews phonics from prior grade levels, such as in Unit 1, Week 1, when short vowels a and i and word families are taught. In Unit 2, Week 1, long i and long o are taught. In Unit 3, Week 4, prefixes (pre-, dis-, mis-) are incorporated into spelling.

  • Some of the skills are reinforced in the weekly spelling list, but none of the skills are applied in reading instruction, writing instruction, weekly/unit assessments, or culminating tasks.

Other routines for phonics and spelling are described in the “Instructional Routine Handbook” on pages R17 and R50. Phonics and spelling are assessed with dictated sentences that the students must write and through phonics passages in which students read words with the phonics spelling patterns presented for the week.

Aside from the Phonics/Fluency lessons, fluency is also addressed through partner reading, choral reading, echo reading, and timed reading. Progress monitoring of fluency and recommendations and lessons for interventions are provided in the curriculum.

Vocabulary is taught in each Unit through lessons called Build Vocabulary. These include a 5-day plan for students to learn categories of words such as synonyms, idioms, metaphors, suffixes, and root words.

  • Day 1: “Connect to Words” in which students are asked a series of questions that can only be answered with an understanding of the vocabulary word.
  • Day 2: “Expand Vocabulary” in which students are taken through a series of activities that generate different forms of the word such as adding or deleting suffixes or inflectional endings.
  • Day 3: “Reinforce the Words” in which students complete sentence stems with words related to the weekly vocabulary.
  • Day 4: “Connect to Writing” in which students write sentences in their notebooks using the vocabulary words.
  • Day 5: “Word Squares” in which students create word squares for each vocabulary words (Frayer model- define, illustrate, example, non-example).

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet expectations for materials, questions, and tasks guiding students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading.

Materials provide explicit instruction of new vocabulary along with multiple routine activities for students to work with new and unfamiliar words and figurative language. The “Instructional Routine Handbook” also describes routines for teaching new vocabulary words, beginning on page R40. The materials do include activities for making meaning from unfamiliar words read in context during close reading of text sets each week.

  • In Unit 1 page T27N, “If you didn’t know what racket means on page 22, how could you figure it out?”
  • In Unit 2 page T250, “Remind students that they can often figure out the meaning of an unknown word by looking at the word’s suffix.”
  • In Unit 3 page T27N, “What meaning does Martina use when she says, ‘I’ve had enough of creeps for one day’?”
  • In Unit 4 page T153F, “What clues in the surrounding sentence can help you determine the meaning of the word absorb?”
  • In Unit 5 page T89I, “What context clue can help you determine the meaning of channel? Help students state the definition of channel.”
  • In Unit 6 page T153G-H, “Help students locate context clues for mission specialist, payload, and climate.”

Opportunities for students to demonstrate mastery of the application of word analysis skills to grade-level text occur during weekly assessments. The materials include two weekly assessments, which are referred to as the "Weekly Assessment." There is also a selection test for each week.

  • In Weekly Assessment A, two of the questions are vocabulary questions where students are required to use context clues to define a vocabulary word.
  • In Weekly Assessment B, approximately 4-5 questions ask students to define words from the text using that week's vocabulary strategy.
  • In the Selection Test, the first eight questions ask students to identify definitions for each of the week's vocabulary words with no context provided.

Each week, “Vocabulary: Words in Context” and “Vocabulary Strategy” are introduced prior to reading texts.

  • For “Vocabulary: Words in Context,” the week's vocabulary words and definitions are introduced through a 10-minute mini-lesson using the Reading/Writing Workshop text prior to the shared read and the close read. The text provides an example of the word used in an isolated sentence, along with a representative picture and a question for partners to discuss. The week's vocabulary words are highlighted in the shared read and the close read; however, there is no instruction for teachers to revisit the words or their meanings in context.
  • For "Vocabulary Strategy," the week's vocabulary strategy is introduced through a 10-minute mini-lesson using the Reading/Writing Workshop text. Students are instructed to practice applying the skill with one or two words in the shared read (in the Reading/Writing Workshop text).

The teacher edition usually provides one opportunity for teachers to direct students in applying the vocabulary strategy skill during the close read.

  • Close Read - "Build Vocabulary"
    • Throughout the close read (in the Literature Anthology), "Build Vocabulary" words are called out in the margins of the teacher edition. These words are not related to the "Words in Context" or the "Vocabulary Strategy." Instructions are not provided with the words, but definitions are.
  • Close Read - "Access Complex Text: Specific Vocabulary"
    • At one or two points during the close read, a vocabulary word or word part is called out in the teacher edition for teachers to discuss with students.
  • "Build More Vocabulary" - Each day, an additional vocabulary skill is introduced or reviewed. These skills include, but are not limited to, homographs, homophones, academic vocabulary, context clues, related words, prefixes, and suffixes.
  • With the exception of the "Context Clues" activities, most practice activities involve students creating isolated sentences with the words, discussing examples, creating charts, and composing/decomposing words with word parts

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet expectations for providing students frequent opportunities to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, as well as to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Fluency routines are described in the Instructional Routine Handbook on page R36A. Routines included are partner reading, choral reading, echo reading, and timed reading. For example:

  • "Phonics/Fluency" - At the end of a 20-minute phonics lesson, the "Fluency" box directs teachers to model a fluency skill (expression, accuracy, or rate). Students then practice with echo reading, choral reading, or partner reading.
  • Small Group - At each reading level, after completing the leveled reader, the teacher models reading one page, then students practice (together as a group, with a partner).
  • Reader's Theater - At the end of each Unit, every day during week 6, students practice their parts for Reader's Theater.

Weekly sets of lessons focus on one aspect of fluency as listed below, along with some sample activities. Most of this fluency instruction occurs in differentiated small group instruction. Each unit focuses on specific fluency skills such as expression, rate, phrasing, accuracy, and intonation. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4 and in Unit 3, week 1, the teacher models reading with expression. Students then practice inflecting their voices as they read a question.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3 and Unit 4, week 4, the teacher models reading with proper accuracy and phrasing. Students read with the teacher and then practice reading with a partner.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, the teacher models reading with proper rate. Students read with the teacher and then practice with a partner.
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, the teacher models reading with proper phrasing. Students read with the teacher and then practice with a teacher.

Opportunities to demonstrate oral fluency are provided through the Your Turn practice book.

  • Each week, two out of ten activities focus on fluency and comprehension. Students read a passage aloud with a partner and answer comprehension questions. Partners track each other’s words correct per minute on the first read and second read.
  • Lexile levels for the reading passages are not provided in the student handbook or the teacher's annotated version. Without Lexile levels, the data for words per minute cannot be compared as students progress through the school year.

Students have the opportunity to practice fluency with poetry by reading and rereading poetry selections. Students read “The Inventor Thinks Up Helicopters” and “Montgolfer Brothers’ Hot Air Balloon” in Unit 2, “The Winningest Women of the Iditarod Dog Sled Race” in Unit 4, and "Ollie’s Escape” and “The Gentleman Bookworm” in Unit 6.

Fluency assessments are included in the instructional materials. A beginning-of-the-year diagnostic assessment is provided to determine students’ needs in foundational reading skills. The series includes blackline masters for fluency benchmarking and ongoing fluency assessment.

  • Thirty assessments are provided for the entire school year.
  • In the introductory section of the handbook, teachers are instructed to use at least two selections every two to three weeks for most students.
  • In each unit, the first passage is set at a Lexile level below the grade-level band, the next two are within the grade-level band, and the last two are at the high end or beyond the grade-level band.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations of the Gateway 2. Although texts are organized around themes, they do not build vocabulary or knowledge across weeks. Also, the number of words a student is introduced to in a five-day setting, along with the time spent on vocabulary activities/tasks, may not allow students the time to develop a deep understanding of the words before moving on to a new week and set of words. Students write to address multiple topics over both short and extended time frames. However, students will not be able to adequately refine and reflect on their writings before moving on to a new topic; therefore, materials do not fully support increasing students’ writing skills and ability. Students will work on a series of short and long research projects throughout the year. There is not sufficient time built in to complete these projects and no guidance for teachers on how or when the projects and tasks would be completed. Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

24/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet expectations for texts being organized around a topic/topics to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. Each unit of study is organized around a theme. Each week of the Unit is organized around either a topic or a theme that addresses an essential question related to the Unit’s theme. Unit themes are broad and do not necessarily build vocabulary and knowledge across weeks which would allow students to access future texts within a Unit.

Each weekly topic/theme shares common vocabulary throughout the texts but does not consistently provide the opportunity to establish a base of knowledge across a wide range of subject matter in a one-week setting. Weekly topics/themes do not provide students the opportunity to refine and share their knowledge before continuing on to a new topic and set of texts.

Some topics/themes do promote some growth of knowledge, but sufficient time is not allotted for students to refine that knowledge to be able to access and comprehend future complex texts proficiently.

  • In Unit 1, the theme is Growing and Learning. In Week 5, the topic for the week is Landmarks. Texts within the week share common vocabulary. During the week students listen to, read, discuss, and write about the following texts:
    • “America’s Landmarks and Memorials”
      • Students summarize what landmarks tell us about history.
    • “A Natural Beauty”
      • Students learn what one national landmark teaches them, citing text evidence to answer text-dependent questions.
      • Students reread to analyze text, craft, and structure, citing text evidence.
    • Model Writing about Landmarks
      • Students read and analyze a short-response student writing model.
    • A Mountain of History
      • Students learn about Mount Rushmore National Memorial during the first read.
      • Students reread and use text evidence to understand how the author presents information about Mount Rushmore National Memorial.
    • “A Landmark Street”
      • Students compare this text to A Mountain of History
      • Students also read Differentiated Texts during small group: National Mall and “Gateway Arch.”
  • In Unit 3, the theme is One of a Kind. In Week 1, the theme is Be Unique. Texts within the week share common vocabulary. During the week students listen to, read, discuss, and write about the following texts:
    • “Bear, Beaver, and Bee”
      • Students discuss the text to find out what makes animals unique.
    • “The Inchworm’s Tale”
      • Students read to learn how one animal uses its special features to solve a problem, citing text evidence to answer text-dependent questions.
      • Students reread to analyze text, craft, and structure, citing text evidence.
      • Model Writing about “The Inchworm’s Tale”
      • Students read and analyze a short response student model writing.
    • Martina the Beautiful Cockroach
      • Students read the folktale to learn how Martina chooses among her unique admirers.
      • Students reread and use text evidence to understand how the author uses text, craft, and structure to develop a deeper understanding of the story and write a short response.
    • “Get a Backbone”
      • Students compare this text to weekly texts to find out information about how these animals are like other animals that they have read about.
      • Students also read Differentiated Texts during small group such as: Approaching Level:The Ballgame Between the Birds and the Animals and “All about Bats”; On Level: King of the Birds and “The Real Quetzal”; and Beyond Level: Sheep and Pig Set Up Housekeeping and “Sheep and Wolves.”

The teacher edition suggests that weekly texts are read, reread, discussed, and written about in a four-day timeline. On the fifth day, students will integrate ideas between texts and complete the weekly assessment.

Throughout lessons, the time allotted to each text for reading, rereading, discussion, and note taking is outlined, but support for teachers who need to flex or change the timeline is minimal. For example, in Unit 1, Week 1, teachers are to introduce the concept to build background knowledge, review vocabulary, and participate in a shared close read of “Bruno’s New Home.” Each of the following mini-lessons is allotted ten minutes.

  • In the Introduce the Concept ten-minute mini lesson, students discuss details of a photograph, have a collaborative discussion to answer three questions, are shown a model using the Concept Web to generate words and phrases related to stories with students’ contributions added, and continue to discuss as partners what they have learned in stories.
  • In the Vocabulary ten-minute mini-lesson, students are introduced to each vocabulary word using the vocabulary routine of define, example, and ask. There are seven vocabulary words. Students are then asked to work with a partner and look at each picture to discuss the definition of each word. Students then choose three words and write questions for their partner to answer.
  • In the Shared Read ten-minute mini-lesson, students read “Bruno’s New Home” so as to understand what they have learned about stories that can teach readers. Teachers are to model taking notes and to encourage students to think about any words they don’t understand and any questions they have. Teachers are to also model three separate discussions surrounding the text, and then students collaborate to make connections between the text and the essential question.

This time frame does not necessarily allow time for extended collaboration or discussion to build student knowledge to access future texts or grow the ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet expectations for materials containing sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Students are provided the opportunity to participate in the close reading of the three weekly texts and respond to questions and tasks. Instructions to the teacher support guiding to read, re-read, then closely consider texts. Close reading of three texts in one week requires significant periods of literacy instructional time; support for this work is outlined in the teacher implementation materials.

Close reading occurs on Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, and Day 4.

During Days 1 and 2, students participate in close reading of the companion text using the Close Reading Routine with the Reading/Writing Workshop.

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, students closely read the companion text “Mary Anderson’s Great Invention.” During the first reading, students listen to the teacher model how to ask and question key ideas and details and then find the text evidence. In the second read, students are asked to collaborate to find signal words (key ideas and details) for cause and effect language to place in a graphic organizer. For the Integrate part of the Close Reading Routine, students are asked to respond to the prompt: “What problem was Mary Anderson trying to solve with her invention? Explain using text evidence.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students closely read the companion text “Juanita and the Beanstalk.” During the first reading, students are asked text-dependent questions about key ideas and details, for instance, making trades such as: “Why does Juanita agree to trade Pepe for some beans?” For the second read, students are asked to summarize how Juanita found the giant's palace while talking with a partner. Students are asked a craft and structure question to discuss regarding Juanita’s point-of-view. For the Integrate part of the Close Reading Routine, students are asked to respond to the the prompt: “Add an event to the story. Write a dialogue between Juanita and Mama at the end of the story.”

During Days 3 and 4, students participate in close reading of the anchor text in the Literature Anthology.

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, students closely read All Aboard! Elijah McCoy’s Steam Engine. This 15-page text is a long close read for students. Teachers are directed to build vocabulary in the first read such as grimy, knockoffs, and marvel. During the first read, students are asked questions about language and key ideas and details such as:
    • What metaphor do you see in this paragraph?
    • What was the effect of Elijah McCoy’s oil cup on the railroads?
  • For the reread on day 4 in Unit 1, Week 4, students use the Close Reading Companion to answer questions by collaborating and completing graphic organizers with responses to craft and structure questions such as:
    • How does the way the author repeats words and phrases help you understand Jack’s character?
    • How does the author use language to help you visualize what the bear is doing?
  • For the Integrate component in Unit 1, Week 4, students are asked to make text-to-world connections about inventions people use everyday and how those inventions help people. Students are asked to connect a song, “Inventive Minds,” with a Blast Back assignment and the text to answer: “How does the Blast connect to what you read this week? To the song 'Inventive Minds'?"
  • For Unit 5, Week 1, students closely read Clever Jack Takes the Cake. This 17-page text is a long text for students to closely read. Teachers are directed to build vocabulary in the first read such as jig, fortress, and tiara. During the first read, students are asked questions about key ideas and details such as:
    • How is the invitation connected to the text on page 367? What mistake does Jack make in this section?
  • For the reread on day 4 in Unit 1, Week 4, students use the Close Reading Companion to answer questions by collaborating and filling in graphic organizers to write responses to craft and structure questions such as:
    • How does the author help you understand how hard it was for Elijah’s parents to send him to school in Scotland?
    • How does the author hint that Elijah will work to change things for the grease monkey?
  • For the Integrate component in Unit 1, Week 4, students are asked to make text-to-world connections about gift giving. Students are then asked to read a poem by Louisa May Alcott in order to connect to what they have read over the week.

Students also participate in another close reading on day 4 using paired texts. Students are expected to participate in two close reading lessons on day 4, keeping the focus on those routines as they examine the texts.

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, students read “Lighting the World.” The teacher has students follow the Close Reading Routine. During the first read, students respond to the following key ideas and details questions:
    • Why did early designs of light bulbs fail?
    • What is “Bright Idea” mostly about?
  • For the reread of the paired text, students respond to this craft and structure question: How does the author help you understand how inventors work?
  • For the Integrate part of “Lighting the World,” students are directed to make text-to-text connections between All Aboard! and other texts they have read.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students read “When Corn was Cash.” During the first read, the teacher asks students to respond to the following key idea and details prompts:
    • Summarize what the text says about why people barter and how Native Americans used the barter system.
    • Why did the colonists need to barter for crops? Why didn’t they grow their own crops?
  • For the reread of the paired text, students respond to the following craft and structure questions:
    • Why does the author use headings in the text?
    • How does the author show how the colonists used bartering to survive?
  • For the Integrate part of “When Corn was Cash,” students are directed to make text-to-text connections with Clever Jack Take the Cake.

Because students follow the same routine for close reading every week with each companion text, each anchor text, and each paired-text, students analyze each text in the same manner for key ideas and details, craft and structure, and language. The Close Reading Routine structures the analysis of each text the same way, building routines to support students' focus on the texts themselves.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet expectations for materials containing a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that ask students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. The units are organized by themes and have a broad range of topics that do not always connect or build knowledge and ideas. Each week has a new topic/theme connected to the unit theme, but that does not necessarily build knowledge or ideas.

Although there are multiple questions and tasks that direct students to analyze integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts, the time allotted for these questions and tasks is not sufficient for students to analyze the information. Each unit contains five weekly text sets with questions and tasks created for each set. Each text set centers around a theme or topic with questions and tasks that ask students to refer back to the text to find and support answers to questions and to complete tasks. Questions and tasks require connected knowledge, asking students to connect ideas between multiple texts. Rubrics for each week and each unit guide teachers in what to look for to support student learning. The amount of class time allotted to each text and question set may not be sufficient to provide the time needed for students to analyze texts and gain knowledge and ideas, so teachers may need to use outside resources to plan accordingly.

In Unit 1, Week 3, examples of questions and tasks include but are not limited to:

  • Compare Texts: As students read and reread “Sharing Polkas and Pitas,” encourage them to take notes and think about the Essential Question: "How do people from different cultures contribute to a community? Tell students to think about how this text compares with Gary the Dreamer."
  • First Read Strategy: ask and answer questions - "How do the Seblini brothers share their culture?" (They own a bakery where they bake and sell Middle Eastern foods. People gather there.)
  • Reread Close Reading Companion, page 20, Author’s Craft: Organization - "How does the author use words and phrases to help you visualize how people share their cultures? Cite examples from the text to support your opinion." (The author says the Polish dancers “whirl” and wear “colorful costumes.” Details about Middle Eastern food help me picture how the Seblini brothers share their culture.)
  • Read/Summarize/Guide: Students summarize the selection.
  • Reread/Analyze the Text: After students read and summarize, have them reread to develop a deeper understanding of the text by annotating and answering questions on pages 18–20 of the Close Reading Companion.
  • Integrate/Make Connections: Essential Question answer - They share traditional dances and music. Evidence: The Polonia Ensemble is described on pages 72 and 73. Text-to-Text Answer: Both texts share music. Dance and food are also shared in this text.
  • Discuss how Polish signs and songs are an example of how cultures share language traditions with the community (page 72).
  • Access Complex Text: Organization - Tell students that the author describes how people in different cities share their culture. Although the cultures are not directly compared, students should think about ways they are alike and different.
    • How are the Polish people of Chicago and the Middle Eastern people of Detroit alike? (They want to share their culture. They bring their culture to the community.)
    • How is the way they share their culture different? (The Polish people share their music and dance. The Middle Eastern people share their food.

In Unit 6, Week 5, examples of questions and tasks include but are not limited to:

  • Compare Texts: As students read and reread “The Gentleman Bookworm,” encourage them to take notes and think about the Essential Question: What makes you laugh? Tell students to compare this poem with “Ollie’s Escape.”
  • First Read Strategy: Reread - What did the guest worm do after the host worm gave his toast? (waved her napkin, curled up in a ball, and swallowed poems)
  • Reread Close Reading Companion, page 196 Author’s Craft: Illustration: How does the poet use the illustration to support the details in the poem? (It shows the worms eating books in a formal setting.)
  • Reread Close Reading Companion, page 197 Author’s Craft: Personification - How does the author use personification to show what the bookworms are doing? (The worms eat with a fork and spoon and speak French. They give toasts and use napkins.)
  • Read/Summarize/Guide: Students summarize the selection.
  • Reread/Analyze the Text: After students read and summarize, have them reread to develop a deeper understanding of the text by annotating and answering questions on pages 196–197 of the Close Reading Companion.
  • Integrate/Make Connections: Essential Question answer: It is fun to compare how the bookworms in the poem like books with how people like books. It is also funny that the poet chose poems as the main course for their dinner. Evidence: The host “ate his words with a fork and a spoon.” Before the guest ate her poems, the host suggested she “chew them slowly. One line at a time!”
  • Access Complex Text: Specific Vocabulary - Students may need help understanding the wordplay in the poem. Bookworms are worms that eat books. Who else do we call bookworms? (People who enjoy books). The bookworm tells his guests to chew the poems slowly, one line at a time. What might this mean about how poems should be read? (They should be read slowly, line by line.) Make sure students understand that the titles in italics are well-known children’s books.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet expectations for questions and tasks supporting students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g., combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening). Students read, discuss, and listen when addressing the Unit's big idea and the weekly Essential Question Text Connection Questions. Students do not have to write at length about the question; instead, they create graphic organizers to aid in class discussion. The weekly discussions and graphic organizer creating would lead to students being able to complete the Unit Wrap Up. The Big Idea questions are frequently broader than the focused knowledge building that may be happening in the lessons.

  • The Unit 5 Big Idea is "What are ways people can take action?" This topic is broad.
  • The Unit 5, Week 1 Essential Question is "How do we get what we need?" This question is broad and will not build knowledge of a topic.
  • The questions at the end of the week's texts are repetitive and do not require students to broaden their knowledge of a topic. Questions at the end of the week’s texts include the following:
    • How does Juanita get what she needs?
    • How does Jack get what he needs to bake the Princess’s cake?
    • How do people get what they need by bartering?
  • In the End of Week Integrate Ideas/Text Connections section, students create an accordion foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information they have learned about how people get what they need. This task asks students to compare the texts, using the foldable. There are few directions to support this task to promote deeper thinking or building knowledge.
  • In the End of Unit Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea section, the teacher writes “What are ways people can take action?” on the board. In small groups students will compare the information they have learned during the course of the unit in order to answer the Big Idea question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things, students vote to narrow down the list to the top five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea. This is a Listing What You Have Learned Task. Students share out answers, vote on a top five, and then move on to a new unit. This task repeats itself in all six units.
  • The Unit 6 Big Idea is "How do we decide what’s important?" This topic is broad.
  • The Unit 6, Week 4 Essential Question is "How can learning about animals help you respect them?" This question is broad and will not build knowledge of a topic.
  • The questions at the end of the week's texts are repetitive and do not require students to broaden their knowledge of a topic. Questions at the end of the week’s texts include the following:
    • How can people learn to respect butterflies?
    • Why did learning about alligators and crocodiles teach you to respect them?
    • Explain why Old Croc learns to respect monkeys.
  • In the End of Week Integrate Idea: Text Connections section, students create a three tab foldable to record comparisons about the week’s texts. Students are to compare the information about how learning about animals can help people protect them. This task asks students to compare the texts using a foldable. There are few directions to support this task to promote deeper thinking or building knowledge.
  • In the End of Unit Wrap Up the Unit: Big Idea section, the teacher writes “How do we decide what’s important?” on the board. In small groups students will compare the information they have learned during the course of the unit in order to answer the Big Idea question. Students use an accordion foldable to record comparisons of texts. Students present their ideas and list ideas on the board. If there are more than five things, students vote to narrow down the list to the five most important things. Students are encouraged to continue building knowledge about the Unit Big Idea. This is a Listing What You Have Learned Task. Students share out answers, vote on a top five, and then move on the a new unit. This task repeats itself in all six units.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the criteria for including a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. The number of words a student is introduced to in a five-day setting, along with the time spent on vocabulary activities/tasks, may be amended to meet site-specific needs. Direction is given in the Teacher’s Edition for teachers to review vocabulary in future lessons or how words build knowledge to access future grade-level texts. The teacher edition states, “The words are always reviewed the next week in Build Vocabulary. In addition, you should do a periodic cumulative review of vocabulary words about twice per unit.”

Vocabulary builds throughout the week and across texts within a one-week period. During reading each week, students are introduced to Words to Know vocabulary. These vocabulary words are introduced using the vocabulary routine and visual vocabulary cards. The vocabulary routine states to define the word, give an example of the word, and then ask a question using the word. Words are introduced within the context of a sentence. Words to Know vocabulary are found within and throughout each text read during the week. Vocabulary strategy mini-lessons are included in weekly lessons. Vocabulary practice can be found in student practice books.

In the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook, a supplemental resource, teachers are guided through a 4-step routine that can be used year-long to introduce vocabulary. (pages R41-R42)

  • Step 1: Introduce: Tell students what the vocabulary routine will be.
  • Step 2: Model (I Do): Define/Example/Ask
  • Step 3: Guided Practice (We Do): Ask students to identify examples and non-examples of the word; guide students in creating word squares (Frayer Model).
  • Step 4: Provide Independent Practice (You Do): “Individual turns allow you an opportunity to assess each student’s skill level and provide additional practice for those students who need it. Near the end of each week, students should write sentences in their word study notebooks using the words” (page R42).

In the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook, teachers are also provided with instructions on introducing vocabulary in context: “As you Close Read the selection with students, take a moment to point out the Build Vocabulary words and their definitions.... Unlike the Define/Example/ Ask Routine, the purpose of the Build Vocabulary words is to simply point out and define these rich vocabulary words to enrich and broaden students’ vocabulary and promote understanding of the text” (page R43). In this supplemental resource, the Define/Example/Ask routine is explained:

  • Define: “You will tell them the meaning of the word, using student-friendly language--words they already know” (page R44).
  • Example: “You will give them an example of how the word is used, using their own common experiences” (page R44).
  • Ask: “You will ask them a question that helps them connect the word to words they already know and use the word in speaking” (page R44).

In the “Smart Start” of the Wonders Teacher’s Edition, year-long protocols and routines are presented at the beginning of Unit 1. The “Smart Start” pages guide teachers in introducing students to the following instructional routines that are addressed in weekly lessons:

Vocabulary Routine

  • The Define/Example/Ask routine is introduced to students.

Building Vocabulary

  • Teachers are instructed in building word walls, selecting five to ten words per week from the texts.
  • Teachers are instructed to “try to include useful words that students might use in writing and speaking.”
  • A Periodic Vocabulary Review routine is outlined in the margin, stating that students will encounter the vocabulary words in multiple contexts. It does not mention in which contexts/activities/ resources the students will repeatedly encounter these words. It does state, “The words are always reviewed the next week in Build Vocabulary. In addition, you should do a periodic cumulative review of vocabulary words (about twice per unit).” Review instructions include:
    • Review the words using the Word Lists Online PDF.
    • Have students write sentences using the words; then have partners discuss each other’s work.
    • As needed, students can check the meanings or pronunciations of words using the Glossary on Literature Anthology pages 552-568.

Build Background

  • The concept of the weekly essential question is introduced.
  • Teachers are to introduce concept words related to the Big Idea and guide students to generate words related to the essential question. Explicit instructions/routines for this are not provided.
  • In the “Collaborative Conversations” box, teachers are instructed to have students watch a video outlining procedures for partner and small group conversations, then share discussion guidelines.
  • None of the discussion guidelines include procedures for ensuring inclusion of academic vocabulary in speaking activities.

Vocabulary Strategy

  • The week's vocabulary strategy is introduced through a 10-minute mini-lesson using the Reading/Writing Workshop text.
  • For example, in Unit 3, Week 2, the vocabulary strategy is figurative language, idioms: “Model identifying the idiom ‘collect her thoughts’ on page 199 of 'Jane’s Discovery.' Point out that collect means to gather to help students draw inferences in order to unlock the meaning of the idiom 'collect her thoughts.'" (page T92)
  • Students are instructed to practice applying the skill with one or two words in the shared read (in the Reading/Writing Workshop text). Example: “Have students work in pairs to find the nonliteral meanings of the idioms like 'clockwork' and 'getting the hang of it' on page 202 of ‘Jane’s Discovery.’ Encourage partners to use the surrounding text to determine the meanings of the idioms.” (page T92)
  • The teacher edition usually provides one or two opportunities for teachers to direct students in applying the vocabulary strategy skill during the close read. Example: “Mrs. Yates says that Lincoln dared to 'stand up' for what he believed in. What does the idiom stand up for mean?” (page T93E)

Close Read - Build Vocabulary

  • Throughout the close read (in the Literature Anthology), Build Vocabulary words are called out in the margins of the TE. These words are not related to the Words in Context or the Vocabulary Strategy. Instructions are not provided with the words, but definitions are.
  • For example, Build Vocabulary words in the close read for Unit 3, Week 2, include the following words: enormous, mumbled, polished, errand, budge, game.

Close Read - Access Complex Text: Specific Vocabulary

  • At one or two points during the close read, a vocabulary word, word part, or term is called out in the teacher edition for teachers to discuss with students.
  • For example, in Unit 3, Week 2, these include the following: essay, loud as a tin drum.

Close Read - Companion Text

  • In the companion text following the anchor text, vocabulary words are highlighted.

Build Vocabulary instruction is also included in the language arts lessons. During a Build Vocabulary lesson, students practice weekly vocabulary using strategies such as connect to words, expand vocabulary, reinforce the words, connect to writing, and word squares. Words in Build Vocabulary are also listed along with their definitions in the teacher edition for teachers to address while reading the weekly Literature Anthology.

Build Vocabulary

  • In a 5-day routine, students practice vocabulary words introduced that week. For example, in Unit 3, Week 2, Day 1 students answer questions about the following words: amazement, bravery, disappear, donated, leader, nervous, refused, and temporary (page T104).
  • Students practice the words through questions, sentences, changing inflectional endings, writing definitions, completing sentence stems, drawing representative pictures, creating word squares, and writing their own sentences.

Build More Vocabulary

  • Each week, additional vocabulary skills are introduced or reviewed. These skills include, but are not limited to homographs, homophones, shades of meaning, academic vocabulary, context clues, related words, prefixes, and suffixes.
  • With the exception of the "Context Clues" activities, most practice activities involve students creating sentences with the words, discussing examples, creating charts, and composing/ decomposing words with word parts.

Academic Words are in bold in the Teacher Edition notes and listed and labeled in a side box in the Teacher Edition. These words are used in student questioning and directions.

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet expectations for materials supporting students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Students write to address multiple topics over both short and extended time frames and are provided with mentor texts, conference questions, anchor papers, and rubrics to help them self-evaluate writing, as well as give teachers a clear picture to evaluate and give feedback. The required time the weekly lesson would take, along with the amount of writing students are responsible for, is unbalanced. Students may not be able to adequately refine and reflect on their writings before moving on to a new topic; therefore, materials do not fully support increasing students’ writing skills and ability.

Students participate in both on-demand and process writings throughout the year. Each week students Write to Sources and Work on a Genre Writing.

Write to Sources has students read and reread texts to take notes, cite text evidence to support their ideas and opinions, and write short analytical responses. After reading, students write to build writing fluency, analyze model responses, incorporate stronger evidence, and focus on a writing trait. Write to Sources provides students with student exemplars and analyzes writing prompts while modeling organizational tools such as graphic organizers.

  • In Unit 4, Week 5
    • Students read the prompt: “Write about ‘The Giant.’ Describe how the author wrote about him.”
    • Students read the reading/writing workshop text and prompt. Students analyze the prompt and reread to note literary elements.
    • Students then Analyze Text Evidence by looking at a model graphic organizer.
    • Students analyze the student model and discuss the use of figurative language, strong words, and repetition.
    • Students then write to answer the prompt and craft their responses using figurative language, strong words, and repetition.
    • Students check for errors in irregular verbs.
    • Students then analyze the prompt: "How do the poets use repetition to help you understand the message in their poems?" (“The Winningest Woman of the the Iditarod Dog Sled Race” and “ The Brave Ones”)
    • Students use both poems as sources to answer the prompt.
    • Students analyze text evidence and look at another student exemplar to discuss.
    • Students analyze the student model and then write to answer the prompt.

Write to Sources also hosts Teacher Conferences and Peer Conferences.

  • In teacher conferences teachers and students talk about the strength of the writings and focus on how the writer uses text evidence. The teacher makes concrete suggestions and suggests revisions. Focuses and sentence stems are given in the teacher edition to guide the suggested revisions. For example, Unit 6, Week 4 suggests that teachers focus on a sentence by stating, “Rewrite this sentence by adding an adverb that compares to explain ____." Teachers may also focus on a section by stating, “I want to know more about_____. Provide more supporting details.” Teachers may also focus on a revision strategy. The teacher can have a student underline a section and use a specific revision strategy, such as using transitions.
  • In the Peer Conference notes three questions are given to focus the conference conversation. For example in Unit 2, Week 2, the student conference notes tell the teacher, “Focus peer response on using precise nouns to support opinions. Provide these questions: 'Did your partner state a clear opinion? Do all of the reasons and evidence support your partner's opinion? What nouns can be replaced by more precise nouns?'”

Genre Writing takes place over a three week period. Each Unit has two Genre Writing Topics. These topics are not always tied to a unit text and do not always require text evidence. During the Genre Writing students analyze an expert model, prewrite, draft, revise, proofread and publish, and evaluate their writing, using a student rubric.

  • In Unit 5, students write an opinion essay in Weeks 1-3. No topic is explicitly given other than to write about something for which they have a strong opinion.
    • Students read and analyze a model student response and discuss the features of an opinion essay.
    • Students discuss and plan for the purpose and audience of their writing.
    • Students participate in a mini-lesson about organization of opinion essays and choose their topics.
    • Students then discuss the student model and participate in a mini-lesson about fact and opinion.
    • Students begin a draft of their writing, using their notes.
    • Students then study a revised student model and participate in a mini-lesson on strong openings.
    • Students revise their drafts.
    • Students discuss an edited student model and edit their own papers.
    • Students publish a final presentation of their opinion writings in print or digitally.
    • Students then use the student rubric to evaluate their own opinion essays and reflect on their progress as writers. Students are asked to consider areas where they feel they have shown improvement and to think about what areas need further improvement.
    • Students set writing goals and prepare for teacher and peer conferences.

To evaluate Genre Writings teachers are directed to use the rubric and anchor papers provided to help evaluate all student writing. Teachers are directed to review with individual students the writing goals they have set and discuss ways to achieve these goals.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 3 meet the criteria for including a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. Students will work on a series of short and long research projects throughout the year. In Units 1, 5, and 6, students will work on short Research and Inquiry projects each week. In Units 2, 3, and 4, students will work on three longer online Inquiry Space performance tasks. Teacher instructions in the teacher edition for Research and Inquiry and Inquiry Space are brief, to support Grade 3 students' development in the component skills of research work as outlined in the standards. Teachers can use the included guidance to identify when this work is implemented in varied schedules.

Research and Inquiry: Weekly Projects

  • These are week-long projects that take place during three out of the six units in the school year (during Unit 1, Unit 5, and Unit 6).
  • Students conduct research and create short projects such as interviews, summaries, illustrations, poems, story maps, and brochures.
  • Speaking and listening skills are incorporated on Day 5, when students present their projects.
  • Teacher instructions in the Teacher Edition are brief and lack explicit direction for effectively guiding students through the research process with online and print materials.
    • Unit 1, Week 1: “Find Resources - Have students use the online Unit 1, Week 1 fact sheet [from Research Roadmap] to identify a fable to research. Discuss the library or media center and make sure students know how to use the tools and resources there to find reliable print and online materials.” (TE page T40)
    • Unit 6 Week 5: “Find Resources - Students should refer to the online Fact Sheet [from Research Roadmap] about how to craft a limerick. Encourage them to research other examples of humorous poems to mimic. Have them list their source information.” (TE, page T294)

Unit 1 Growing and Learning - Weekly Projects

  • Week 1 Fable Story Map, page T40
  • Week 2 Culture Web, page T106
  • Week 3 Community and Travel Brochure, page T172
  • Week 4 Action Plan, page T238
  • Week 5 Landmark Informative Report, page T302
  • Week 6 Choice of: Oral Presentation, Travel Brochure, Community Timeline, Formal Letter, and Timeline of Historical Landmarks

Unit 5 Take Action - Weekly Projects

  • Week 1 - Create a List, page T38
  • Week 2 - Reusable Materials Collage, page T102
  • Week 3 - Team Member Paragraph, page T166
  • Week 4 - Visual Narrative, page T230
  • Week 5 - Energy Source Venn Diagram, page T294
  • Week 6 - Choice of: Early Culture Presentation, Reduce/Reuse/Recycle Plan, Emergency Response Team Report, Good Citizen Storyboard, and Energy Sources Pros and Cons Presentation

Unit 6 Think It Over - Weekly Projects

  • Week 1 - Interview a Classmate, page T38
  • Week 2 - Extreme Weather Summary, page T102
  • Week 3 - Setting Goals Interview, page T166
  • Week 4 - Create Illustrations, page T230
  • Week 5 - Write a Humorous Poem, page T294
  • Week 6 - Choice of: Quality They Value Essay, Weather Disaster News Story, Goal Setting Plan, Fantasy Story with Animal Character, and Health Slideshow

Inquiry Space

Inquiry Space is a digitally-delivered program that provides students with practice and instruction in integrating and applying reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills to build and share knowledge about a science or social studies topic. Inquiry Space performance tasks are found in Units 2, 3, and 4. Each six-week project is made up of six levels that step out the research, writing, and presenting process. There is included guidance for the teacher to identify when optional Inquiry Space work may occur.

  • Level 1: Analyze the Task - purpose and audience, keywords, research plan, design your presentation.
  • Level 2: Evaluate Sources - skim and scan, evaluate sources.
  • Level 3: Take Notes - taking notes from audio sources, taking notes from video sources, paraphrasing, research plan, taking notes from print sources.
  • Level 4: Write an Outline and Draft - organizing notes, outline to draft, student model outline, opinion statement, paraphrasing, writing rubric.
  • Level 5: Revise and Edit Your Draft - revised student model, edited student model, cite sources, proofreader marks, peer conferencing checklist, revise and edit checklist, writing rubric, peer conferencing video.
  • Level 6: Publish and Present - how to give a presentation, presentation checklist, listening checklist, presentation rubric, how to publish your work, design your presentation, record and edit audio.
  • For example, In Unit 4, students complete a Narrative Performance Task. The teacher’s edition states, “Each week students will complete one level of a six-week narrative performance task in a digital environment. Via a game-like interface, students are assigned a task and work independently to plan and conduct research, synthesize information, and communicate ideas in writing and presentation.
  • Resource Toolkit: At each level, a toolkit of resources is available to students. The point-of-use resources include a variety of animated tutorials, videos and slide presentations that students can view to help them at each level.
  • Projects integrate reading and writing skills throughout all six weeks. Projects incorporate speaking and listening skills in the fifth and sixth weeks as students peer conference and later present their projects.

The Inquiry Space projects require research skills over the six weeks of the Unit, supporting Grade 3 students as they work on the subcomponent skills that make up comprehensive research abilities in later grades.

  • Research skills are introduced through narrated, text-heavy slideshows and tutorials. Students are directed to apply skills by answering free response and yes-or-no questions/prompts in a step-by-step research process (analyze the task, evaluate sources, take notes, create a story map and write a draft, revise and edit your draft, publish and present). Students have the option to skip the instructional slideshows and tutorials.
  • During the “evaluate sources” step, they evaluate and select three out of four digital sources provided in Inquiry Space.
  • Various research skills are addressed as students take notes from multiple sources. However, each unit’s project follows a similar pattern of instruction with small changes according to the type of writing required.

Unit 2 Inquiry Space - Investigate: Floods - Informative

  • Week 1 Research Plan, pages T40-41
  • Week 2 Evaluate sources, pages T106-107
    Week 3 Take notes on sources, pages T172-173
  • Week 4 Outline and draft, pages T238-239
  • Week 5 Collaborative conversation, revise, edit, pages T302-303
  • Week 6 Publish and present, pages T338-339

Unit 3 Inquiry Space - Take a Stand: Overfishing - Opinion

  • Week 1 Research Plan, pages T40-41
  • Week 2 Evaluate sources, pages T106-107
  • Week 3 Take notes on sources, pages T172-173
  • Week 4 Outline and draft, pages T238-239
  • Week 5 Collaborative conversation, revise, edit, pages T302-303
  • Week 6 Publish and present, pages T338-339

Unit 4 Inquiry Space - Write About: Frogs - Narrative

  • Week 1 Research Plan, pages T38-39
  • Week 2 Evaluate sources, pages T102-103
  • Week 3 Take notes on sources, pages T166-167
  • Week 4 Outline and draft, pages T23-231
  • Week 5 Collaborative conversation, revise, edit, pages T294-295
  • Week 6 Publish and present, pages T330-331

Included in the materials are student and teacher checklists for Research and Inquiry, which are to guide the research process and the presentation. Speaking and listening skills are incorporated on Day 5 when students present their projects.

A “Research Roadmap” PDF is available for students, providing free-response questions to guide them through their project.

Reading Digitally

Reading Digitally occurs during week 6 of each unit. After reading the Time for Kids digital article, four options are provided for work around the article. Two options are about research: Research for Study and Independent Study.

  • In Unit 5, Week 6, students learn about paraphrasing and citing sources, during Research for Study.
  • In Unit 5, Week 6 in Independent Study, students brainstorm a research question. The teacher is to remind students about how to conduct an Internet search, and students are to create an informational presentation about earthquakes.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the criteria for materials providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Students are allotted 20 minutes of daily sustained silent reading time, as well as time during Small Group, when they do reading activities using Workstation Activity Cards. Suggested time frames for Daily Independent Reading by Grade are 30-40 Minutes for Grade 3 students. Directions are provided for an independent reading routine at the beginning of the Unit 1 “Start Smart” pages as well as each week in the differentiated Small Group directions. Students keep an independent reading log to track texts read.

Start Smart - “Independent Reading” (TE page S32)

  • The rationale for sustained silent reading is explained, and teachers are directed to set aside 15-30 minutes for this per day, depending on the grade level. It is specified that “Students can read independently during sustained silent reading time, as well as during Small Group when they do reading activities using their Workstation Activity Cards.”
  • Teachers are provided with directions on helping students select a book, as well as helping them “create a reading log, or response journal, where they record reactions and feelings about what they are reading.”

Differentiated Instruction Small Group - “Self-Selected Reading”

  • Teachers are provided with differentiated instructions for assisting students in selecting a book for sustained silent reading and providing them with guidance for independent, purposeful reading.
  • Although teachers are directed to have students fill out graphic organizers and answer specific questions during their sustained silent reading, no forms are provided for teachers to print out and give to the students to help facilitate independent, purposeful reading.
  • How to Choose a Good Independent Reading Book: "The books students choose to read can be easy, at their independent reading level (texts that are “just right”), or challenging--but of high interest. Students should be encouraged to choose a book at their independent reading level most of the time. Share the following guidelines with students to help them choose an appropriate independent reading book...."

Teachers are given suggestions on how to set up a classroom library and organize texts. Classroom library trade books provide options for independent reading. A unit bibliography also provides additional suggestions of titles related to the unit themes.

Students keep an Independent Reading Journal. As students read independently, they will be documenting what they think about what they read in their Independent Reading Journals. Students are encouraged to ask questions about what they are reading and to find answers. They are also directed to identify words they do not know and cannot figure out. They are shown that they can also notice when parts of what they read are confusing or they do not understand. Teachers are directed in ways to support and scaffold the way students can read, think about, and reread texts, such as using Thinking Codes when reading.

Teachers are directed to track Independent Reading goals and confer with students about their independent reading. It is suggested that teachers engage each student in a conversation about what they are reading and why they chose their specific text. Asking additional questions, as appropriate, can provide the teacher with valuable formative assessment information about a student’s reading development. These questions may include questions about the text’s genre, text features, referring back to specific “Think Codes” students have left in the text, general comprehension of text, and more focused questions on how the author presents information in a section of the text on which the student may have commented. Teachers are also instructed that they may take notes and make lists of strengths and weaknesses a student may have to keep track of student progress.

Resource pages R107-R108 show examples of conference forms and goal setting.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Wonders Grade 3 Close Read Companion 978-0-02-132941-0 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 3 Literature Anthology 978-0-02-134174-0 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 3 Unit 2 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-677208-7 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 3 Unit 1 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-677778-5 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 3 Unit 6 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-678341-0 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Reading/Writing Workshop Grade 3 978-0-07-678411-0 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 3 Unit 5 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-679023-4 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 3 Unit 3 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-679982-4 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017
Wonders Grade 3 Unit 4 CCSS Teacher's Edition 2017 978-0-07-680477-1 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill Education 2017

About Publishers Responses

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Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

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After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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