Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Reading Wonders Grade 1 partially meet expectations of alignment. The Grade 1 instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 1. Texts are worthy of students' time and attention. Text selections are appropriately rigorous but only partially support students building their ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills but limited opportunities for opinion writing. The materials support students' literacy development with foundational skills. The instructional materials for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations of Gateway 2. There is some support for building students' knowledge and academic vocabulary, but consistent guidance and focus in these areas does not appear over the course of the year. The materials provide some planning for academic vocabulary and writing development although the teacher may need to engage in additional planning to ensure the schedule can accommodate the intended lesson sequences.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
55
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
24
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The Grade 1 instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 1. Texts are worthy of students' time and attention. Text selections are appropriately rigorous but only partially support students building their ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills but limited opportunities for opinion writing. The materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
18/20

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading.

The teacher reads aloud a Literature Big Book for each week of the first three units. These big books include a paired read in the back of the book. All of these big books are of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading. These anchor texts are examined multiple times for multiple purposes and are used to expand topics and essential questions, build vocabulary, and prompt writing. These big books are all engaging and include a mix of informational texts and literature. A Literature Anthology replaces the Literature Big Books for Units 4- 6. These stories are equally as engaging.

Quality literature texts in the materials build academic vocabulary and facilitate access to future texts. Quality informational texts in the materials are engaging and provide students with opportunities to gain and broaden their knowledge base and personal perspective on a variety of topics at various levels of depth/meaning.

Examples of quality Grade 1 texts include but are not limited to:

  • A Second is a Hiccup by Hazel Hutchins is an informational picture book which describes the abstract concept of time in child-friendly terms. The text includes appealing watercolor illustrations as well as rhyme.
  • Mystery Vine by Catherine Falwell describes gardening to young readers. The text includes collages of full color art illustrations and descriptions of the ripening process.
  • Interrupting Chicken by David Ezra Stein is a humorous picture book that students will relate to. The text uses dialogue that will hold the attention of young readers.
  • Vulture View by April Pulley Sayre includes dynamic collages and rhyming text that delineates a day in the life of a turkey vulture. The poetic text uses questions that will engage children.
  • Hi! Fly Guy by Tedd Arnold is a humorous tale that is structured into three chapters and illustrated with engaging cartoon art.
  • Fun with Maps is an informational text that teaches about maps. There are clear illustrations that are used to enhance student understanding as well as domain specific vocabulary.
  • The Big Yucca Plant by Magaly Morales includes illustrations that are vibrant and bright and help students understand new and unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • How Bat Got it’s Wings by Gerald McDermott. The engaging folktale and bright, colorful illustrations of animals will engage Grade 1 students.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Read Aloud Texts, Literature Big Books and Paired Selections include a balanced mix of literary and informational texts. Genres represented in the materials include, but are not limited to, fantasy, realistic fiction, poetry, Informational Texts, expository text, folktales, biographies, legend and narrative Informational Texts.

Example of texts representing the balance of text types and genres include the following Literary Texts:

  • Unit 1, This School Year Will Be the Best by Kay Winters (Realistic Fiction)
  • Unit 2, “The Three Little Pigs” Read Aloud (Folktale)
  • Unit 3, On My Way to School by Wong Herbert Yee (Fantasy)
  • Unit 4, “How Bat Got Its Wings” by Gerald McDermott (Folktale)
  • Unit 5, Now What’s That Sound? (Realistic Fiction)
  • Unit 6, “Abuelita’s Lap” by Pat Mora (Poetry)

Example of texts representing the balance of text types and genres include the following Informational Texts:

  • Unit 1, Friends by Nina Crews (Informational Text)
  • Unit 2, The Best Spot (Informational Text)
  • Unit 3, Mystery Vine, Read Aloud (Informational Text)
  • Unit 4, Vulture Views by April Pulley Sayre (Informational Text)
  • Unit 5, “Saving Mountain Gorillas” Time for Kids (Informational Text)
  • Unit 6, March On! (Informational Text)

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The texts read aloud for Grade 1 meet the indicator for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for this grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task(s). The text presented for students in this series if of quality that will develop independent readers over the course of the school year. Anthology texts increase in complexity over the course of the school year, as do accompanying student tasks.

Texts that are of the appropriate complexity include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students read a fantasy in the Literature Anthology, Go Pip (pgs. 26-39), by Tomeck Bogacki. This text measures qualitatively as 30 Lexile.The organization is clear and sequential. The language is easy to understand. The sentences are simple and will be easy for students to understand. Students will write about and engage in finding text evidence and describing details (p. T114)
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, students are read the Big Book: Cool Dog, School Dog. This text measures qualitatively as 450 Lexile. This text has complex sentence structure and connection of ideas. The untraditional sentences and hyphenated adjectives in the text may cause some children who have difficulty understanding the texts. Students will need to synthesize information from the text and illustrations in order to fully understand what is happening in the story. Students respond to the text and listen to the teacher model retelling and fluency. Students are guided to use text evidence as they respond to the following question, “How does the author use illustrations to help tell the events of the story?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students will read a folktale in the Literature Anthology, The Gingerbread Man (pp. 50-65,), by Wiley Blevins. This text measures qualitatively as 320 Lexile.The organization of this text is clear and easy to predict. The illustrations are supportive of the story. The sentence structure and vocabulary are fairly simple. Students will write about and engage in finding and using text evidence to understand how the author uses text, craft, and structure to develop a deeper understanding of the story (p.T159A) Scaffolding is also used to assist teachers to support readers’ needs.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, students will read a nonfiction selection in the Literature Anthology, Building Bridges. This text measures qualitatively as 550 Lexile.This expository text structure is a straightforward definition structure. The captions with the photographs are helpful. Students will use text evidence to understand how the author presents information on different types of bridges (pp. T320-321) Scaffolding is also suggested to support learners needs.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, students read the Literature Anthology, Rain School. This text measures qualitatively as 440 Lexile. This story takes place in the African country of Chad. Children may be unfamiliar with the way of life in Chad. Students are guided to understand that the story takes place in a part of the country of Chad where they do not have construction workers with tools and big machines to build buildings. Students are directed to review the details in the text and illustrations that tell you about how the people are building the school.Teachers are directed to help students understand schooling in Chad by discussing the questions, “What are ways being a student in Chad is different from being a student in the United States? How is it the same?” Students fill in a graphic organizer to determine author’s purpose.The quantitative measures for this series’ was big books dropped off in Lexile levels halfway through the series. The interactive read alouds provide discussion opportunities for students, but are listed as on grade level. For example, in “The Cat’s Bell’, students are instructed to, “turn to a partner and talk about other words that could have been used instead of rumbled,” and “Why is putting the bell on Max considered such a risk?”

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet this indicator for supporting students’ ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. While the texts, both anchor and supporting, fall within the grade-level band, and appear to provide students access to increasingly rigorous texts over the course of the school year the task demands do not increase in complexity throughout the school year. Because of this, students may not be assured access to to the higher-level texts that are present at the end of the school year.

This series of texts contain a variety of complexity levels in each anthology unit. The first Anthology begins with Nate and Sam at School by Pat Cummings. It is a very simplistic text that focuses 2-5 word sentences that can be navigated by newer readers. By midyear students are reading in the Anthology Unit 3, Week 3, students read The Gingerbread Man by Wiley Blevins, a folktale paired with poetry. By the end of the year in Anthology Unit 4, students are reading more complex text with tier 2 and 3 vocabulary used in the text. For example in Unit 6 week 5 students read Happy Birthday USA, an informational text, that provides students with rich text and explains the founding of our nation.

Students also use the reading and writing workshop texts that increase in complexity over the course of a school year. In Unit 1, students read simple text that focus on a specific skill, for example “Jack Can”, a realistic fiction story with simplistic lines that includes tier one vocabulary.

In First Grade the year starts off with big books, such as This School Year Will Be the Best! (Unit 1, Week 1), comprehension activities students complete with books at the beginning of the year focus on a lot of teacher modeling. By the end of the school year students have moved on from big books to Interactive Read Alouds, such as Unit 6, Week 3, the story “Paul Bunyon and the Popcorn Blizzard”. Rather than a retell that focuses heavily on teacher modeling, teachers are now instructed to “prompt children to retell “Paul Bunyon and the Popcorn Blizzard.”

Teacher materials include direction for differentiation to increase students’ literacy skills through the ACT (Access Complex Text) directions and the Research Base Alignment resource book. The directions guide teachers through scaffolded activities such as rereading and paraphrasing, student-generated questions, citing text evidence, evaluating the strength of evidence cited, writing about texts, teacher modeling, use of text-dependent questions, graphic organizers, think-alouds, student collaboration, and note-taking. Although scaffolded activities are provided throughout the materials, every text gets the same amount of time spent on reading it and analyzing it. More complex texts may not get more instructional time focused on understanding it and analyzing it since there are fixed routines in place every week for close reading and rereading.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation that anchor texts and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level. For each unit, the Teacher’s Manual includes a text complexity analysis including quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task information. This text complexity information is included for the Literature Big Books, the Reading/Writing Workshop stories, and the leveled readers.

The materials are clear about the level of text complexity and what students will gain from using these texts. For example, in Unit 3, Week 3, teachers are provided with the literature big book Interrupting Chicken which has a Lexile Score of 360. Teachers are provided with qualitative information that indicates that students will be working on organizing and connecting ideas as well as reader and task information which provides teachers with a more detailed description and specific page numbers for teaching the lesson/skill for the week.

The Teacher’s Edition also contains the Instructional Path at the beginning of each week. This path lists all texts read, why students are reading the text, the educational focus, and how the texts connect to one another during the week. There is also a Research Base Alignment in the online resources. Additionally, a page is provided at the beginning of each week’s materials for teachers entitled “Differentiate to Accelerate.” Teachers are instructed on this page, “If the text complexity of a particular section is too difficult for children, then see the references noted in the chart below for scaffolded instruction to help children Access Complex Text.”

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet the expectations for materials providing opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading, and there are supports to build students’ proficiency of grade level texts. Resources are provided to offer students texts to engage in a range and volume of reading. There are leveled texts, literature big books, and reading/writing workshop books, as well as book suggestions for extending complex texts.

Before each unit on the Differentiate to Accelerate Teacher pages, there is information for teachers titled “Monitor and Differentiate.” This information guides teachers towards lessons they can use to reteach, develop, extend and review material for students. This page also contains additional information for English Language Learners.

Text examples that show specific evidence for range and volume of reading from the Grade 1 materials include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students read At a Pond (190L) in the Literature Anthology. The text is also paired with a poem, “Way Down Deep.” The topic is modeled from the Literature Big Book Babies in the Bayou. Students are also engaged in reading “The Best Spot” (160L). The leveled readers range from 170L to 370L. Students practice literacy skills of retelling and citing text evidence. Students integrate new knowledge and reading with partners to gain gradual release to independent work by answering text-dependent questions and using text to text ideas to integrate knowledge and ideas. Teachers use the weekly Data Dashboard to progress monitor students for grouping decisions.
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, students read a fiction story in the Literature Anthology, Lissy’s Friends (460L). The paired text is “Making Paper Shapes” (510L). A realistic fiction story, “A Spring Birthday” (380L), is modeled for students. Students also engage in reading the interactive nonfiction Read Aloud Cards, “Let’s Dance.” The leveled readers range from 290L to 440L. Students practice literacy skills of understanding the theme or the central message of the text. Students are tasked with integrating new knowledge and ideas while making text to text and text to photography connections. Students engage in independent partner work to answer text-dependent questions in the Close Reading Companion in order to support the transition to gradual release to independent work. Teachers use the weekly Data Dashboard to progress monitor students for reading growth and grouping.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Grade 1 meet the expectations that students will have opportunities for rich, rigorous discussions and writing tasks that are evidence based. Questions and tasks associated with the texts focus students’ attention back to the texts and are organized to build their speaking and listening skills, and the materials include culminating tasks at the end of each unit. Grammar and conventions instruction is embedded to facilitate students’ application of language skills. Each unit includes opportunities for on-demand and process writing but provide limited opportunities for opinion writing.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations of most questions, tasks, and assignments being text-based and requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). Questions support students’ literacy growth over the course of the year.

Questions and tasks are connected to texts are text-based. These questions and tasks support students in drawing on textual evidence to support their learning of explicit information and inferences in a text or text set. Text-based questions and tasks require readers to produce evidence from texts to support opinions or statements when writing and speaking. These questions support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year.

The teacher materials reviewed provide support for planning and implementation of text-based writing and speaking activities through the Integrate Ideas Section for each week. Materials provide support for planning and implementation. For example, in Unit 3, Week 3, Day 3 of the close reading of The Gingerbread Man teachers are to teach cause and effect using the text: “A cause is what makes a character do something. An effect is what the character does. What did Gram do? (She made a man out of gingerbread.) Why did she do that? (She wanted a grandson.) Let’s add the cause and effect to our chart.”

In Unit 2, Week 1, students read, “Good Job, Ben!”. Text-based questions and tasks include, “Who is doing a job? What job does the woman have? How does she help people? What are the men doing? Why are they getting wet? What jobs do the people on these Pages have? How does Miss Glen help Ben?” Students also engage with the text, The Red Hat. Text-based questions and tasks include, “Who is the main character? Where is she? What event has happened? How do the illustrations help you know what Jen's new job is? Where is she sleeping when the fire bell rings? What do you think will happen? Where is Jen now? What is happening there? What does Jen do? How did the illustrations help you know Jen's job is important? What sentence does the author repeat on these pages? What does this help you know about Jen's job? Where is Jen? Where is Jen now? What event happens? Why does the author show Jen doing a different thing on each page? Why do you think the text says, thank you Jen after Jen gets Rex? Where did Nguyen take the photos? How did the photos help him draw the pictures?”

In Unit 5, Week 5, students read Building Bridges. Text-based questions and tasks include, “How does the author use captions to help us understand the main idea? What is the effect when triangle tubes are used to support a truss Bridge? What have the details in the selection been about? What is a key detail on pages 266 to 267? What is this selection mostly about? Why does the author ask and answer questions in the text? Why did the author include three photographs of the Rolling Bridge instead of just one?” Students also engage with the text, Small Joy. Text-based questions and tasks include, “Is this a good caption for the photo? What key details tell you what tiny houses are like? What other information could the author include in the caption? Why does the author use photographs instead of illustrations? Why is Small Joy a good title for this selection?”

The Close Reading companion also provides more text-based questions for students to work with. For example, after reading The Gingerbread Man students are asked text based questions such as, “ Why do you think the author repeats words in the story? What is different when the Gingerbread Man meets the fox? What happens when the Gingerbread Man meets the duck? What happens when he meets the fox? How do the illustrations help you understand what is happening?”

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation for materials culminating tasks that support series of text dependent questions and activities. Students are provided with a Unit Big Idea and a weekly Essential Questions. Students discuss questions, make connections, and create a graphic organizer to be used at the end of the unit. Similar processes are included at the end of most units to build students' ability to engage with the texts.

Each week an Essential Question is addressed throughout the texts and tasks. This Essential Question is revisited at the end of each text with Integrate Ideas activities. At the end of the week, students Integrate Ideas through Text Connections, Research and Inquiry, and Speaking and Listening activities. Students revisit the Essential Question and create a graphic organizer using notes from the weekly read. For Example in Unit 1, Week 4 students complete integrate ideas activities to connect to the week’s texts:

  • Connect to the Essential Question: Write the essential question on the board: What do friends do together? Read the essential question aloud. Tell children that they will think about all of the selections they have read and what they have learned about friendship and things children do together. Say: We have read many selections on this topic. We will compare the information from this week’s Leveled Readers and Toss! Kick! Hop!, Reading/Writing Workshop pages 74–83. Evaluate Text Evidence Guide children to review the selections and their completed graphic organizers. Have children work with partners to compare information from all the week’s reads. Children can record notes using a Foldable®. Guide them to record information from the selections that helps them answer the Essential Question.
  • Research and Inquiry: “Have children create a checklist and review their posters:
    • Does their poster focus on a single sport or game?
    • Does the poster have all the information that they wanted it to include?
    • Does the image give details and information about the sport or game?
    • Did they write complete sentences to describe the topic?
    • Have they taken notes about what they will say when they present their poster to the class?
    • Guide partners to practice sharing their posters with each other. Children should practice speaking and presenting their information clearly. Guide children to present their work. Prompt children to ask questions to clarify when something is unclear: What do you like best about this sport or game? Do the details on the poster help explain the sport? What did you learn that you didn’t know before? Have children use the Presentation Checklist online.”
  • Text to Fine Art: “Read aloud with children the Integrate activity on page 28 of the Close Reading Companion. Have partners share reactions to the painting. Then guide them to discuss how it is similar to the selections they read earlier in the week. Have partners collaborate to complete the Integrate page by following the prompts. Present Ideas and Synthesize Information When children finish their discussions, ask for a volunteer from each pair to share the information from their Foldable® and their Integrate pages. After each pair has presented their ideas, ask: How does learning about what different children do help you answer the Essential Question, What do friends do together? Lead a class discussion asking students to use the information from their charts to answer the Essential Question.”
  • Speaking and Listening: “As children work with partners in their Close Reading Companion or on their posters, make sure that they actively participate in the conversation and, when necessary, remind them to use these speaking and listening strategies: Speaking Strategies: Wait their turn to speak and to comment on the topic under discussion. Ask questions and give others a chance to think after they ask their questions. Use gestures and point to their posters or other visuals to communicate ideas and information. Listening Strategies: Listen quietly without interrupting as others speak. Listen to the words and pay attention to visual displays the speaker uses. Write down any questions they want to ask while listening to others.”

At the end of the Unit, during Week 6, students Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea. Students use their weekly graphic organizers and notes to participate in a collaborative conversation about the Unit Big Idea. Students present their ideas and the class creates a list. For example in Unit 3, Week 6 students Wrap Up the Unit by addressing the Big Idea: What can happen over time? Students make text connections that connect to the big idea:

  • Text to Text: “Write the Unit Big Idea on the board, ‘What can happen over time?’ Remind children that they have been reading selections about how people, animals, and other things can change over time. Divide the class into small groups. Tell children that each group will compare what they learned about what how things change over time to answer the Big Idea question. Model how to compare this information by using examples from the Leveled Readers and what they have read in this unit’s selections.”
  • Collaborative Conversations: “Have children review their class notes, writing assignments, and completed graphic organizers before they begin their discussions. Ask children to compare information from the unit’s selections and presentations. Have children work together to take notes. Explain that each group will use an Accordion Foldable® to record their ideas. Model how to use an Accordion Foldable® to record comparisons of texts. Guide children to focus their conversations on what they learned about how things can change over time.”
  • Present Ideas and Synthesize Information: “When children finish their discussions ask for volunteers from each group to share their ideas aloud. After each group has presented, ask: What have we learned about how different things can change over time? Lead a class discussion and list children’s ideas on the board.”
  • Building Knowledge: “Have children continue to build knowledge about the Unit Big Idea. Display classroom or library sources and have children search for articles, books, and other resources related to the Big Idea. After each group has presented their ideas, ask: What can happen over time? Lead a class discussion asking children to use information from their charts to answer the question.”

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Vocabulary routines are provided on Day 1 of each unit, and visual vocabulary cards are provided. A discussion follows the teacher introduction of the words. The vocabulary words are used during the discussion. Students then are instructed to complete the Talk About It activity from the Reading/Writing Workshop book with a partner. A “Collaborative Conversation” chart is included, with different strategies students can focus on each week.

Also on Day 1, students are instructed to retell the story. Students are prompted to retell with a partner using key ideas and details. During this activity, students cite text evidence. Additionally, a grammar rule is taught, and students have time to work in partners to talk and practice the rule. This routine occurs on Days 2, 3, and 4 as well.

The Speaking and Listening Standards addressed are referenced. Oral vocabulary is reviewed on Day 2, and on Day 3 new words are introduced using the same Define/Example/Ask routine. On Day 3, all the words are reviewed.

On every Day 4, students collaborate with partners to peer review and edit each other's’ writing.Students also engage in discussions with partners to complete research projects and culminating projects. Examples of discussion activities are:

  • Speaking and Listening: “Engage in collaborative conversation about weather. Retell and discuss Rain School. Present information on how the weather can affect us.”
  • Language Development Conventions: “Use special pronouns Vocabulary Acquisition. Develop oral vocabulary predict cycle creative frigid scorching. Acquire and use academic vocabulary country gathers. Use context clues to understand similes.”
  • Collaborative Conversation: “Take Turns Talking: As children engage in partner, small-group, and whole-group discussions, encourage them to: take turns talking and not speak over others, raise their hand if they want to speak, and to ask others to share their ideas and opinions.”
In Grade 1, texts are supported with questions and prompts that promote evidence-based discussions. The speaking/questioning prompts are accompanied by a yearlong approach to developing skills over the course of the school year. Materials provide multiple opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions across the whole year’s scope of instructional materials. Support for evidence-based discussions encourages modeling and a focus on using academic vocabulary and syntax. Teacher materials support implementation of these standards to grow students’ skills.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for supporting students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

In the majority of the lessons, there are opportunities for speaking and listening, whole group discussions, small group discussions, and partner discussions, that correlate to the Common Core Standard S.L.1.1 of engaging effectively in a range of collaborative discussions. The curriculum includes Collaborative Conversations supports, graphic organizers, Access Complex Text information, Conference Routines, and modeled Think alouds. Students are prompted to refer to the text with each task and modeled think alouds include text evidence.

Instructional time is dedicated to student’s practicing and applying speaking and listening skills daily and often. In First Grade, speaking and listening instruction is applied frequently over the course of the school year and daily. It includes facilitation, monitoring, and instructional supports for teachers. Students have multiple opportunities over the school year to demonstrate what they are reading through Make Connections or Respond to Text (or read aloud) and researching through varied speaking and listening opportunities within the Integrate Ideas on Day 4 and Day 5.

Students are expected to integrate ideas through Day 4 and Day 5 using speaking and listening skills weekly. Through the use of Make Connections and Respond to Text in each week, students talk about things learned and listen to others speak. Speaking and Listening skills are also directly addressed during the Close Read Companion task. For example, in Unit 6, Week 1 teachers are directed to monitor students as they work with partners in their Close Reading Companion or on their posters to make sure that they are actively participating in the conversation, and when necessary, remind children to use these speaking and listening strategies. A list of speaking and listening strategies is provided:

  • Speaking Strategies:Have conversations about their work with both peers and adults. Work together with diverse partners in small and large groups. Give directions about what steps need to be done to make the idea happen.
  • Listening Strategies: Restate directions about what steps need to be done to make the idea happen, to make sure the directions are understood. Ask questions to get additional information or to clarify something that they might not have understood the first time. Pay attention when having a conversation with someone and look at the person who is speaking.

During Research and Inquiry each week, students complete weekly projects. Each week students are asked to work in pairs or small groups to find out more about the weekly reading topic. Students use what they learn from their reading and discussions as well as other sources to find additional information. There is an option to set up a Shared Research Board to post illustrations and other information that students gather as they do their research.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet the expectations for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Each week students read and write about text in a mix of on-demand and process writing. On Days 1 and 2, students participate in both a shared and interactive evidence-based on-demand writing using the week’s texts. On Days 3, 4, and 5 students complete an independent process writing in which students analyze a student model, write, find textual evidence, apply a writing trait, revise, edit, and publish a writing. Digital resources are provided each week for additional practice.

In Unit 1, Week 5 the essential question is, “How does your body move?”. During Reading Writing Workshop, students engage with the texts, “Move and Grin!”. Students also read the Literature Anthology Move It! and the Paired Read “Using Diagrams”. During the week students address both on-demand and process writing prompts including but not limited to:

  • Shared Writing: Analyze the Prompt: “Tell children you work together to write a response to a question. Read the prompt aloud. How do the kids and animals move? Say: To respond to this prompt, we need to look at the text and photographs in ‘Move and Grin!’”
  • Find Text Evidence: “Explain that you reread the text and take notes to help answer the question. Read aloud pages 96 to 97. Say: On page 96, the text tells me that Scott’s frog can hop and jump. I see the frog doing a big jump in the photograph. On page 97, the text tells me that Scott can hop and jump, too. The photograph shows the boy doing a big jump. The text and photographs tell me that a frog and a boy can move in the same ways. We can use details like these to help us respond to the prompt. Let’s write them in our notes.”
  • Write to a Prompt: “Reread the prompt to children. How do the kids and the animals move? Say: We can use our notes to remember information to use for our writing. Let’s use our first note to write a sentence about how Scott and his frog move: Scott and his frog can hop and jump. Write the sentence. When I read a note, think of a sentence we can write using the information we recorded. Track the print as you reread the notes. Guide children to dictate complete sentences for you to record. Read the final response as you track the print. If needed, write these sentence frames and model how to complete one using the notes: Fran and her dog can . Stan and his horse can. Skip can and his crab can, too.”
  • Independent Writing: “Have children turn to page 93 in the Literature Anthology. Read the prompt: Use the words first, next, then, and last to describe the steps needed to make one of the motions in Move It! Say: First, you choose a motion that one of the children does. Then, you explain how the child makes that motion. You use the words first, next, then, and last to put the motions in order. The next step in responding to the prompt is to find text evidence and make inferences.”
    • Find Text Evidence: Say, “To respond to the prompt, we look for clues in the text and photographs to help us make inferences. Say: Look at page 86. What is the child in the photo doing? (handstand) Did the author choose a picture that shows us the first step or the last step of the handstand? (last) How do we know? (child is upside down; child has hands on the ground) Now let’s think about what else we know about doing handstands. What other steps do you need to do when you do a handstand? What is the first step? (guide children to consider the steps needed to make a handstand) Have children take notes as they look for evidence to respond to the prompt.”
    • Write to the Prompt: “Guide children as they begin their writing.”
      • Prewrite Have children review their notes and plan their writing. Guide them to put the steps of the motion in order by thinking about which step comes first, next, then, and last.
      • Draft: Have children write a response to the prompt. Remind them to use evidence from the text and what they know to make inferences. As children write their drafts, have them focus on the week’s skills: Order of Events. Put the steps needed to make one of the motions in order of first, next, then, and last.
      • Trait: Organization Clues Use evidence from the text or photos. Trait: Ideas Statements Place a period at the end of each statement.
      • Grammar: If needed, write sentence frames and model how to complete one: First, Next, and then, Last,

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. The writing prompts are balanced between informative and narrative, however there are not enough opportunities for students to engage in opinion writing prompts.

Process writing prompts include opportunities for students to address different types of writing:

  • Unit 1 - four informative writings and one narrative writing
  • Unit 2 - three informative writings, one narrative writing, and one opinion writing
  • Unit 3 - three narrative writings and two opinion writings
  • Unit 4 - three informative writings, one narrative writing, and one opinion writing
  • Unit 5 - two opinion writings, one informative writing, and one narrative writing
  • Unit 6 - two narrative writings, two informative writings, and one opinion writing

On demand prompts and quick writes include opportunities for students to address different types of writing:

  • In Unit 1, students write, “What will Cliff and Slim do when they reach the top of the hill? Write a new story in which Cliff brings home a different pet. Write a story about what happens when you take a make-believe pet to school.”
  • In Unit 5, students write, “ Why is Small Joy a good title for this selection?”
  • In Unit 6, students write, “What are some different kind of helpers? Write about a group of helpers in your community. Rosina has a special community that works together. How do the people in your community work together to help you?”

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and clear information appropriate for grade level. The materials include weekly opportunities for students to respond to one or two texts in a variety of writing modes including informative, opinion, and narrative analysis.

Frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing occur in each week of instruction. For example, in Unit 6, Week 3, the essential question is, “How can weather affect us?” Students write multiple times for multiple purposes to address this question’s topic. Examples of writing opportunities include, but are not limited to:

  • Writing Write to Sources- Students draw evidence from fiction text, write informative text and conduct short research on the weather.
  • Write About Wrapped in Ice- The teacher models writing to a source. Students analyze a short response student model. Students use text evidence from close reading to write to a source.
  • Shared Writing- Students write about Wrapped in Ice.
  • Interactive Writing- Students analyze a student model, write about Wrapped in Ice and find text evidence.
  • Independent Writing- Students write about Rain School. Teachers are directed to provide scaffolded instruction to meet student needs. Students prewrite, draft, revise, edit, and write a final draft. Students then present, evaluate, and publish their writings.
  • Shared Writing- Students write about the Reading/Writing Workshop text.
    • First, students analyze the prompt. The Teacher’s Edition states, “Tell children that today the class will work together to write a response to a prompt. Read the prompt aloud. What happened in Wrapped In Ice? Say: To respond to this prompt, we need to look at the text and illustrations in Wrapped In Ice.”
    • Next students, find text evidence. The Teacher’s Edition states, “Explain that you will reread the text and take notes to help respond to the prompt. Read aloud pages 264–265. Say: The text and the illustrations tell me what happened in the story. For example, Kim heard a strange sound. She looked outside and saw everything coated in ice. In the illustration, I see that the tree branches and roads are covered in ice. Kim asked her mom about the ice storm. These are details that will help us answer the question. Let’s write them down in our notes.”

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of the context. Across the year, students are taught nouns, all types of verbs, adjectives,different types of pronouns, prepositions, different types of sentences, and proper nouns. Additionally, there are many lessons on conventions: commas in a series, capitalization of plays and book titles, commas in dates, capitalization and punctuation, apostrophes, and abbreviations. Grammar lessons also increase in difficulty over the course of the school year as the skills become more advanced. At the beginning of the year students are working on more basic skills such as sentences and statements while at the end of the year students are working on indefinite pronouns and adverbs.

Teacher supports are explicit:

Unit 5, Week 2: Adjectives

  1. Model: Tell children that an adjective is a word that describes a noun. Explain that adjectives tell number, color, size or shape. They also tell how things look, sound, feel, smell or taste….
  2. Guided Practice/Practice – Display the sentences below and read the aloud. Have partners work together to identify the adjectives.
  3. Talk About it – Have partners work together to orally generate sentences that tell about the size and shape of objects on their desks.
  4. Link to Writing – Say: Let’s look back at our writing and see if we used adjectives to describe nouns. Did we use them correctly? Review the Shared Writing for the correct use of adjectives.

Unit 6, Week 3: Grammar Special Pronouns

  • Explain/Model
    • Explain that some pronouns do not refer to a specific person, place, thing, or number. Explain that anyone means “any person” and everyone means “all people.” Display the following sentences: Does anyone know what time it is? Everyone thought the joke was funny. Explain that anything means “no special thing,” everything means “all things,” and nothing means “no thing.” You can have anything you want for lunch. There is nothing in the mailbox
  • Guided Practice/Practice
    • Display the paragraph below and read it aloud. Have children identify the pronouns. Does anyone know what is in the box? Everyone thinks the box is filled with peanuts. “I do not think there is anything to eat in that box,” said Nate. The children looked in. Nothing was in the box! (anyone, everyone, I, anything, nothing)
  • Talk About It
    • Have partners orally generate sentences using anyone, everyone, anything, everything, and nothing.
  • Link to Writing Say:
    • Let’s look back at our writing and see if we used any special pronouns. Did we use them correctly? If special pronouns are not in the Shared Writing, work with children to add them and reread the response together.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
22/22
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet expectations for foundational skills development. The materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic and phonological awareness, and phonics that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials address the acquisition of print concepts explicitly and frequently provide opportunities for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills. Ongoing and frequent assessment of student mastery is provided as well as lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations of this indicator. Materials include explicit instruction for and regular practice of letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression.

Start Smart

During the three weeks of Start Smart, the first unit of the year, there are phonemic awareness and phonics lessons, which review Kindergarten standards. Week 1, Day 1 includes instruction in identifying phonemes and relearning the phonics of /m/ m and /s/ s. The teacher uses The Alphabet Poster and students sing the “Alphabet Song.” In Week 2, Day 5, students practice identifying rhyming words such as not and lot. For phonics instruction, students are retaught /b/ b and /l/ l.

A sample week of phonemic awareness and phonics in Grade 1 contains:

  • In Unit 6 Week 1
    • Day 1 – Phonemic Awareness – Phoneme identity
    • Phonics – Introduce/Blend Variant Vowel /u/ (oo, u, u_e, ew, ue, ui and ou)
    • Day 2 – Phonemic Awareness – Phoneme segmentation and Phonics – Review variant vowel u (blend and build as well)
    • Day 3 – Phonological Awareness – Identify and generate rhymes and Phonics – Blend with Variant Vowel /u/
    • Day 4 – Phonological Awareness – Syllable deletion, Phonics/Structural Analysis – Build words with variant vowel /u/, Suffixes –ful, -less
    • Day 5 – Phonemic Awareness – Phoneme segmentation and substitution, Phonics/structural analysis – Blend and Build words with variant vowel /u/, and Suffixes –ful, -less

Small group phonics lessons are also provided at the end of each week for students who were approaching grade level, on grade level, and beyond grade level.

Phonological/Phonemic Awareness topics covered in Grade 1 include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, students work on identify rhyme, phoneme isolation, blending segmentation.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, students work on phoneme isolation, categorization, blending, segmentation
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, students work on phoneme segmentation, blending, deletion
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students work on phoneme categorization, substitution, blending, addition

Phonics lessons provide students with opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students learn the inflected ending of -ing
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, students learn long a with a_e
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students learn long o with o, oa, ow, oe
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students learn r-controlled vowel ar
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, students learn diphthongs oi and oy

The instructional materials contain phoneme awareness and phonics which progresses in difficulty over the course of the school year. At the beginning of the year students work on short vowels and ending blends while at the end of the school year, students work on more challenging variant vowel sounds.

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

Students are taught print concepts starting in Unit 1. Print concepts from Kindergarten are reviewed. Grade 1 print concepts lessons include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, during Interactive Writing, the teacher guides students forming complete sentences: Track the print as you reread the notes. Then guide children informing complete sentences as you share the pen with them, using capital letters and periods.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, during Listening Comprehension, the teacher reminds students that sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a punctuation mark. The teacher also explains that some pages contain only part of a sentence, and that you must turn the page to read the end of the sentence.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, during Listening Comprehension, the teacher reminds students that some pages contain only part of a sentence and you must turn the page to read the end of the sentence. The teacher also mentions that The Last Train is a poem and each line begins with capital letter.

The materials have opportunities for students to learn text features. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, during Respond to the Text in Day 3, students learn about maps with Connect to Content: Using a Map. Students discuss what they have learned about maps and the teacher is to provide a collection of maps for students to study and then share with the class.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, during Extend the Concept, students learn about the captions. The teacher displays Teaching Poster 18 and reads the captions for the two top photographs and states: These captions give information about the two photographs. The first caption tells about tall buildings. The second tells us what people like to do in parks.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, during Extend the Concept, students learn about directions. The teacher displays Teaching Poster 15 and states: This set of directions tells you how to plant seeds. The child in the photographs is following these directions. The first thing you must do is pack dirt in a pot. The second step is to poke holes in the dirt. You can use your fingers to do this, like the child in the photograph.

In the instructional materials, there are opportunities to identify text structures.

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, during Comprehension in Day 2, students learn about the structure of informational text. The teacher reviews characteristics of informational nonfiction. Students then learn about Main Idea and Details as a text structure of nonfiction text. With the teacher, students find evidence in the text to figure out main idea and details.
  • During the Extend the Learning, the teacher may remind students about structures of text. For example, in Unit 5, Week 4, the teacher states: Remind children that they have been reading fiction about sounds and how they are made. Tell children they can also use informational selections to find facts and details about sounds.
  • In Unit 6 Week 4, on Day 2 – students analyze the genre realistic fiction. This lesson includes modeling and guided practice/practice for identifying elements in a story that are realistic fiction. On Day 4 students also analyze the text feature – directions. This lesson includes an explain, model and guided practice/practice portion as well. Students then use this skill in the next text selection – “Making Paper Shapes.”

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet the expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

The Grade 1 program works on several areas of fluency: accuracy, building fluency, expression, intonation, phrasing, rate, rereading for understanding of words, tracking print, volume and word automaticity. They also provide several ways to work on the fluency whether in connected text, reading aloud, partner reading, choral reading, modeling fluent reading, echo-reading, and sound/spelling.

In Unit 1 Week 3, fluency is addressed in the following ways:

  • Fluency • Appropriate phrasing Decodable Text • Apply foundational skills in connected text RF.1.2b, RF.1.2c, RF.1.2d, RF.1.3, RF.1.3b, RF.1.3g, L.1.1c
  • Model Fluency Phrasing Turn to page 27 of Cool Dog, School Dog. Point to the commas and the period on the page.
  • Focus on Fluency With partners, have children read A Pig for Cliff. Remind them that they can ask themselves questions to make sure they understand what they are reading.
  • Decodable Reader - Have children read “Cliff Has a Plan” (pages 25–30) to practice decoding words in connected text.
  • Build Fluency: Word Automaticity Have children read the following sentences together at the same pace. Repeat several times.
  • Quick Review Build Fluency: Sound-Spellings Display the Word-Building Cards: bl, cl, fl, gl, pl, I, a, ck, b, c, d, f, g,
  • Model Fluency Read the sentences one at a time.
  • Differentiated Texts Sound/Spellings Fluency Display the following Word-Building Cards: bl, cl, fl,
  • Fluency in Connected Text Have children review the Decodable Reader selections.

In Unit 6, Week 3 fluency is addressed in the following ways:

  • Fluency • Intonation Decodable Text • Apply foundational skills in connected text RF.1.3, RF.1.3e, RF.1.3g, RF.1.4a, RF.1.4b, RF.1.4c
  • Focus on Fluency With partners, have children read Wrapped in Ice. Remind them that they can ask themselves questions to understand what they are reading.
  • Build Fluency: Sound-Spellings Display the Word-Building Cards: wr,
  • Decodable Reader - Have children read “Miss Wright’s Job” (pages 57–60) and “Know About Snowstorms” (65–68) to practice decoding words.
  • Build Fluency: Word Automaticity Have children read the following sentences aloud together at the same pace.
  • Word Work/Fluency - Phoneme Segmentation, Phoneme Substitution,
  • Word Automaticity Help children practice word automaticity
  • Fluency Intonation Review what it means to read with expression when you read aloud and that when you come to a comma, you should pause briefly.
  • Differentiated Texts Sound/Spellings Fluency Display the following Word-Building Cards: bl, cl, fl,
  • Fluency in Connected Text Have children review the Decodable Reader selections.

The small differentiated reading groups also reference fluency. For students who are approaching grade level, fluency practice is in the lesson plan, and then also listed again for more practice afterward. Building fluency with phonics is also included. For students who are on level, fluency is part of the lesson plan, but not listed for more practice afterward.

In Smart Start, there is practice for decoding automaticity through Build Fluency: Sound Spellings. On Week 1, Day 2, student practice the sounds of a, m, s. On Week 1, Day 4, students practice the sounds of a, m, n, p, r, s, t. On Week 3, Day 1, students practice the sounds a, b, c, ck, d, e, f, h, i , k, l, m, n, p, r, s, t.

In Unit 1 and part of Unit 2, students practice decoding words with short vowels. For example, in Unit 2, Week 2, students relearn to decode the short u. In Unit 3, Week 1, students learn to decode words with long a: a_e. In Unit 5, Week 1, students are taught to decode r-controlled words with ar. As part of guided practice for all those lessons, students participate in guided practice by reading a list of words.

Irregularly spelled words and high frequency words are addressed. During High-Frequency Word lessons, students practice reading, spelling, and writing irregularly spelled and high-frequency words.

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Day 1, students learn: fun, make, they, too
    • The teacher displays High-Frequency Word Cards and uses the Read/Spell/Write routine to teach each word.
    • The teacher points out the irregularities in sound/spelling, such as the long a sounds spelled ey in the word they.
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Day 1, students learn: caught, flew, know, laugh, listen, were
    • After the Read/Spell/Write routine, students participate in guided practice.
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, Day 3, students learn: favorite, few, gone, surprise, wonder, young
    • Students participate in guided practice, which includes Visual Vocabulary Cards.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Each week students were provided with high-frequency words that they would be learning over the course of the week. These words were explicitly taught through whole group lessons that focused on teacher modeling and a read/spell/write routine. These words were also used in context throughout the week and appeared in the reading/writing workshop book and again in small group instruction. The instructional materials has practice of word recognition and analysis skills both in connected text but also in isolated text through practice books or in class work.

During Start Smart, the beginning three-week unit, ten sight words are taught and reviewed each week.

The words are introduced and practiced in isolation, using the Read/Spell/Write routine. Sometimes students practice writing in the air. Kindergarten words are practiced as well. These words are practiced in context in the third week.

In Unit 1, Week 1, four high-frequency words are taught, and students have opportunities to read the high-frequency words in connected text.

  • Day 1: The teacher models reading the four new sight words A read/spell/write routine is used to teach the words. Students practice reading sentences containing the new words.
  • Day 2: The four words are practiced and added to a word bank. Students review the words they learned during Start Smart.
  • Day 3: Students review the four words again using some visual vocabulary cards. They chorally read sentences containing the words. They review current and previous words in the word bank.
  • Day 4: Students practice the four words again, and use them orally in sentences.
  • Day 5: Students again review the words. Students write sentences with each word.

In the differentiated guided reading groups, the sight words are reviewed again. The words are reviewed after the approaching level and on level lessons.

Much of the phonics instruction is practiced in connected text. In Unit 5, Week 2, students are working on r-controlled vowels.

  • Day 1: A sound-spelling card is shown, and the letter/sound connections are made. Students blend letters into words, and then practice reading words and sentences.
  • Day 3: Students review the r-controlled vowels again. Students blend words. Students practice decoding words and a few sentences.
  • Day 4: Students review and blend words again. Students write dictated words with partners. Students read Decodable Readers.
  • Day 5: Students read words and also practice reading them quickly. They don’t read/practice the words in context.

In the differentiated guided reading groups, the sounds are reviewed again, and decodable readers are read again in the approaching and on level groups.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet expectations for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills. Teachers are provided with a wealth of assessment resources online and in assessment books.

Assessment books are included with the instructional materials: a Placement and Diagnostic Assessment book, a Unit Assessments book, and a Running Record/Benchmark Assessments book.

Grade 1 students are assessed with a placement test during the third week of the school year. Everything needed is included in the Placement and Diagnostic Assessment book. Grade 1 students are to be assessed on either a comprehension test, or phonemic awareness subtests and a letter naming fluency assessment. If students score 80% or higher on the phonemic awareness subtests, and score at or above the appropriate benchmark for letter naming fluency, or 80% correct or higher on the comprehension test, then teachers are instructed to begin lessons with students with the Wonders On Level materials. Similar instructions are given on how to place students in the Wonders Approaching Level materials (pp. 6-7).

There are many other assessments included in the Placement and Diagnostic Assessment book. There is a chart on page 13 outlining a general testing schedule. For example, it is suggested that Grade 1 students be assessed on phonological and phonemic awareness subtests, sight word assessments, and a phonics survey at the beginning, middle, and end of the year. Other assessments are to be considered for the middle and end of the year. Since many states use a screener such as DIBELS or the TPRI, alignment information is provided (pp. 16-27). The phonemic awareness assessments, the letter naming fluency assessment, and some of the other assessments appear to be publisher-written. The phonics assessment is called The Quick Phonics Survey and is written by Jan Hasbrouck.

In the Teacher Edition, each week there is a Monitor and Differentiate box. These boxes provided teachers with instructions for a quick check to see if students understand the concept. For example in Unit 1, Week 2, teachers are instructed “Can children apply the strategy visualize?” Based on this question teachers are provided with additional pages they can reference to further support students.

Additionally, in the Teacher Edition, each week there is a page that includes progress monitoring information and a chart with guidelines to help teachers know how to use assessment results. In the back of the Teacher Edition, teachers are also provided with a chart on how to use assessment results.

Examples of informal assessments include:

  • Quick Checks: Wonders provides many opportunities for you to observe students independently practice a strategy or skill taught in whole group instruction. • The Quick Check reminds you to observe your students and see if any of them are having difficulty with a skill they have just learned. • You can use this information to decide if this is a skill you need to address in small group instruction.
  • Assignments: Every assignment or activity allows you to assess reading behaviors. Assignments do not need to be formally graded, but they should be treated as a potential source of information about what students know, what they still need to learn, and what their misconceptions or difficulties are. • Review assignments, noting both strengths and weaknesses, and present the student with oral or written feedback.
  • Classroom Observations: You have opportunities to observe your students at work and at play, working alone, and interacting with other students. Be systematic with the way you do and record the observations.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations that materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills. The monitor and differentiate boxes, small group lessons, English Language Learner boxes and corrective feedback boxes provide teachers many opportunities to target the needs of students. Students are given repeated opportunities to practice foundational skills over the course of the week. Phonics skills that are targeted for the week recur again and again throughout weekly lessons. Teachers are constantly checking for students’ understanding of these skills and provide with additional supports to help all students achieve mastery. As evidenced below students were also given many opportunities over the course of the week to work on foundational skills.

For every unit, there are pages titled Differentiate to Accelerate. These pages include the quantitative, qualitative, and reader/task information, as well as an outline for where to find information on how to differentiate for English Language Learners, how to differentiate using the Quick Checks, and also how to differentiate using the leveled readers. (Unit 3, Week 1, T7)

On every Day 1, and throughout the week, there are many scaffolds for English Language Learners. While many of these have to do with comprehension and vocabulary, there are some that have to do with foundational skills. “Phonemic Awareness: Minimal Contrasts: Focus on articulation. Say /a/ and note your mouth position. Have children repeat.” (Unit 3, Week 1, T13)

Periodically, there is Corrective Feedback given. “Sound error: Model the sound that children have missed, then have them repeat the sound.” (Unit 3, Week 1, T13)

Each day, there is a Monitor and Differentiate box. The Quick Check is listed. Some of these have to do with comprehension, but some of them have to do with foundational skills. “Can children read and decode words with long a: a__e? Can children recognize and read high frequency words?” Then, directions are given for small group instruction. The information in this box that referenced foundational skills remained the same throughout the week. (Unit 3, Week 1, T15)

Differentiation is provided within the small differentiated reading groups. The students in Approaching grade level practice skills a lot more than the students in on grade level and beyond grade level groups. In Unit 3, Week 1:

  • Approaching: There are 4 short lessons for phonological awareness, 5 for phonics, including 1 for building fluency with phonics, 3 for reviewing and reteaching high frequency words, 2 for structural analysis, and 1 for rereading text for fluency. (14 lessons)
  • On: 1 lesson for phonics and 1 lesson for reteaching high frequency words. (2 lessons)
  • Beyond: The focus is not foundational skills during that week.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations of the Gateway 2. Texts are organized around topics to build knowledge. The materials do provide some teacher guidance for supporting students’ academic vocabulary, but lack a year long structure. Vocabulary words are not revisited during the year and do not build to students being about to read across texts. Students write to address multiple topics over both short and extended time frames, which supports increasing students’ writing skills and ability. Students will work on a series of short and long research projects throughout the year. The materials lack direction and support to teachers for completing shared research products. Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

24/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for texts being organized around a topic/topics to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend complex texts proficiently.

Each unit is built around a Big Idea with five weekly topics. In each unit, the anchor texts and supporting texts center around the weekly topics. The writing tasks revolve around the weekly topic.Each week ends with research and inquiry. Students research the topic and create a product.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, the topic is A Community in Nature.The Literature Big Book, Babies in the Bayou, is paired with a informational text called “At a Pond”. The Reading/Writing Workshop stories support the topic, as do the small leveled texts.Students draw evidence from the text and write informational stories (T174).Students research a habitat, create a collage, and present their work (T206).
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, the topic is Up in the Sky. The Literature Anthology story is called Kitten’s First Full Moon with a paired informational text called “The Moon” .The Reading/Writing Workshop stories support the topic, as do the small, leveled texts. Students respond to a prompt based on a text they read. Given that the text relates to the topic, the writing prompt does as well. “Fern thinks she sees a boat in the sky and wants to find out more about it.” (p. T96) Students create a poster with information about objects people see in the sky. (T128)

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for containing sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. In Grade 1, students ask and answer questions about key details in a text, retell stories, and demonstrate understanding of its central message, and describe characters, settings, and major events.

In the Teacher’s Guide, each time a Literature Big Book story, a Reading/Writing Workshop story, or a Literature Anthology story is introduced, a Close Reading Routine chart is shown. This chart shows that while the story is first read, key ideas and details are to be identified, and during the reread, analyzing text, craft, and structure questions are asked. Within each unit there is a small chart called, “Skills Trace.” For Unit 1, this skills trace shows how key details are introduced, reviewed, and assessed. For Unit 2, this skills trace lets us know that character, setting, and events are introduced in Week 1, reviewed in Weeks 2 & 4, and when they are assessed.

In each unit throughout the program, students are asked to retell in response to the Literature Big Book, the Reading/Writing Workshop story, the Literature Anthology story, the interactive read aloud, and the leveled texts. Retelling cards are offered for support for the approaching level text and the on level text. Also in first grade, students are asked to identify words and phrases in stories and poems that suggest feelings, explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, to be able to identify who is telling the story.

For most texts, students are given opportunities to analyze phrases and authors’ word choices. Students are given opportunities to identify key ideas, details, analyze structure and craft in every unit. The tasks that are associated with language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure appear to be logical and increasing in complexity. Examples of coherently sequenced questions include but are not limited to:

Unit 2, Week 4

  • Main Topic and Key Details Author’s Craft: How do the text and photographs help you understand what the selection is about? (The text asks questions about animals that live at a pond. The photographs show baby ducks on the water and a pond. This helps me understand that the selection is about animals that live at a pond.) 2
  • Key Details: Remember, photographs in informational text can show key details that help you better understand the text. With a partner, look at the photographs on pages 52–53. What key details do you learn from these photographs?
  • Author’s Craft: Sentence Structure Why does the author ask questions, but not answer them? (so I will use clues from the photo and text to figure out the answers as I read)
  • Main Topic and Key Details: Turn to a partner and discuss what you have read on pages 56 and 57. Let’s add these important details to the Main Topic and Details chart. 8
  • Author’s Craft: Text Structure How does the information on these pages help you know who lives at a pond? (The text and photos help me know that a pond is a home to animals like turtles, fish, and bugs.)

Unit 6, Week 5

  • Text Structure: Reread pages 399–401. How is the information organized on these pages? (First, we learn what the holiday is about. Then, we learn how it began.)
  • Cause and Effect: Talk about what happened when the Declaration of Independence was first read. (“Music blared and bells rang.”) How is it similar to how we celebrate the Fourth of July? (We make noise on the Fourth of July, too. We play music, and shoot fireworks.)
  • Author’s Purpose: Teacher Think Aloud Facts tell me what the writer wants me to know. On pages 402–403, the author tells facts about the Declaration of Independence. What does it have to do with July 4?
  • Author’s Craft: Details Reread pages 402–403. Why does the author include dates in the text? (to help us understand that the Declaration of Independence was signed long ago and to help us see the order in which events took place)
  • Key Details: What was our nation like in 1776? (There were 13 colonies and about 2 million people.) What is our nation like today? (Today, there are 50 states and more than 312 million people.)
  • Text Feature: Map: What does the map on page 406 show? (the original 13 colonies) How is the map on page 407 different? (It shows all of the United States today, and it shows where the original 13 colonies fit into the whole nation.)

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that the materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Although there are a multiple questions and tasks that direct students to analyze integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts, the time allotted these questions and tasks is not sufficient for students to analyze the information. Each unit contains three weekly text sets with questions and tasks created for each set. Each text set centers around a theme or topic with questions and tasks that asks students to refer back to the text to find and support answers to questions and to complete tasks. Questions and tasks require connected knowledge and ask students to connect ideas between multiple texts. The amount of class time allotted to each text and question set may not be sufficient to provide the time needed for students to analyze texts and gain knowledge and ideas, and teachers may need to use outside resources to plan accordingly. An example of how text sets and questions that build knowledge and integrate ideas are provided, but not given enough instructional time includes but is not limited to:

Unit 5, Week 5

  • Students talk about celebrating America! Teachers guide children in collaborative conversations and discuss the essential question: Why do we celebrate holidays? Develop academic language. Students listen to “Celebrate the Flag” and reread to understand the importance of the American flag.
  • Students read Share the Harvest and Give Thanks to apply foundational skills in connected text. Teachers model close reading. Students revisit Share the Harvest and Give Thanks to learn about the harvest season, citing text evidence to answer text-dependent questions. They also read Share the Harvest and Give Thanks to analyze text, craft, and structure, citing text evidence.
  • Students write about celebrating the Harvest and are modeled writing to a source. Students analyze a short response student model and use text evidence from close reading to write to a source.
  • Students read and write about America. They practice and apply close reading of the anchor text, Happy Birthday, U.S.A.! to learn about the birth of America use text evidence to understand how the author presents information. Students then write to a source, citing text evidence to support their opinion of the most important part of the Fourth of July.
  • Students integrate knowledge and ideas to connect texts. They discuss how each of the texts answers the question: Why do we celebrate holidays? Students then read with “You’re a Grand Old Flag” to compare songs about America and then conduct a short research project that has them create a flag.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Culminating tasks and projects do occur across the year’s worth of instructional materials. The culminating tasks are partially related to the text-based questions or tasks produced during the week. On Day 5 of each week, students complete the Integrate Ideas activity and the Text Connections, Research and Inquiry, and Speaking and Listening tasks.

During Text Connections each week, students complete a foldable to compare information from the week’s readings. The directions ask students to compare texts without giving any further direction or guiding questions. The directions and foldable for connecting to the essential question do not vary or grow in rigor throughout the units or school year. This culminating activity does not demonstrate knowledge of a topic.

During Research and Inquiry students create a checklist to review their project for the week. This gives students a better understanding of the task and its requirements, but does not demonstrate knowledge of a topic. For example in Unit 6, Week 5, the Teacher’s Edition states, “Have children create a checklist and review their projects: Does their flag look like a Japanese Children’s Day flag? Do they wish to make any last minute changes to the flag?Have they correctly written sentences about what they learned in their research?Have they taken notes about what they would like to talk about when presenting their projects to the class? Guide partners to practice sharing their projects with each other. Children should practice speaking and presenting their information clearly. Guide children to share their work. Prompt children to ask questions to clarify when something is unclear: What did you learn about Japanese Children’s Day? What do you want your flag to look like? Why is Japanese Children’s Day important? Have children use the Presentation Checklist online.”

The Speaking and Listening activity remind students speaking and listening strategies while working with a partner to complete an activity in the Close Reading Companion. Students again compare how the Close Reading text is similar to the week’s texts. These directions are vague and do not support a student's ability to demonstrate knowledge of a topic. For example in Unit 4, Week 2, the Teacher’s Edition states, “Read aloud with children the Integrate activity on page 113 of the Close Reading Companion. Have partners share reactions to the photograph. Then guide them to discuss how it is similar to the selections they read earlier in the week. Have partners collaborate to complete the Integrate page by following the prompts.”

At the end of the Unit, during Week 6, students Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea. Students use their weekly graphic organizers and notes to participate in a collaborative conversation about the Unit Big Idea. Students present their ideas and the class creates a list. This task does not differ throughout the units. The Teacher Edition does not provide enough support to ensure that students demonstrate their knowledge of a topic.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. The materials do provide some teacher guidance for supporting students’ academic vocabulary, but lack a year long structure. Vocabulary words are not revisited during the year and do not build to students being about to read across texts.

In the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook, a supplemental resource, teachers are guided through a 4-step routine that can be used year-long to introduce vocabulary. (pages R41-R42)

  • Step 1: Introduce (tell students what the vocabulary routine will be)
  • Step 2: Model (I Do - Define/Example/Ask)
  • Step 3: Guided Practice (We Do - Ask students to identify examples and non-examples of the word; Guide students in creating word squares)
  • Step 4: Provide Independent Practice (You Do): “Individual turns allow you an opportunity to assess each student’s skill level and provide additional practice for those students who need it. Near the end of each week, students should write sentences in their word study notebooks using the words” (page R42).

In the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook, teachers are also provided with instructions on introducing vocabulary in context: “As you Close Read the selection with students, take a moment to point out the Build Vocabulary words and their definitions...Unlike the Define/Example/Ask Routine, the purpose of the Build Vocabulary words is to simply point out and define these rich vocabulary words to enrich and broaden students’ vocabulary and promote understanding of the text” (page R43). In this supplemental resource, the Define/Example/Ask routine is explained:

  • Define: “You will tell them the meaning of the word using student-friendly language--words they already know” (page R44).
  • Example: “You will give them an example of how the word is used, using their own common experiences” (page R44)
  • Ask: “You will ask them a question that helps them connect the word to words they already know and use the word in speaking” (page R44).

In the “Smart Start” of the Wonders Teacher’s Edition, year-long protocols and routines are presented at the beginning of Unit 1. The “Smart Start” pages guide teachers in introducing students to the following instructional routines that are addressed in weekly lessons:

  • Build Background Oral Language: Words are explained/modeled and students participate in guided practice with sentence stems.
  • Build the Concept Oral Language: Words are introduced that connect to the essential question. Students create a word web.
  • Extend the Concept Oral Language: Words are introduced that connect to the essential question. Students create a word web. Category words are also introduced, modeled and practiced.
  • Integrate Ideas Oral Language: Words are introduced that connect to the essential question. Students create a word web.

During each week students are introduced to oral vocabulary using the define/example/ask routine. These vocabulary words are revisited throughout the week of instruction. For example in Unit 6, Week 3, students are introduced to the oral vocabulary words cycle and predict. The Teacher Edition states, “Tell children that you will share some words that they can use as they discuss the weather and its effects. Use the Define/Example/Ask routine to introduce the oral vocabulary words cycle and predict.” Students then participate in the Oral Vocabulary Routine:

  • Define: A cycle is a series of events that repeats in the same order.
  • Example: A butterfly begins its life cycle as a caterpillar.
  • Ask: What is the cycle of weather over a year?
  • Define: When you predict, you use clues to guess what will happen in the future.
  • Example: When Ken reads a story, he predicts what will happen next.
  • Ask: What do you predict will happen when you go home today?

Academic Language are also included in bold in the Teacher Edition notes and listed and labeled in a side box in the teacher edition. These words are used in student questioning and directions.

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for materials supporting students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.

Throughout the units students respond to writing prompts on a variety of texts. As students practice close reading by reading and rereading a text, they take notes and cite text evidence. After reading, children write briefly about what they recall about the text in order to build writing fluency. Through the scaffolded instruction in writing about text in Shared Writing, the teacher then guides the class to respond to a writing prompt, using sentence frames as needed. In Interactive Writing the children analyze a student model response that includes the weekly writing trait before they respond to a new prompt together. In Independent Writing, children write independently, applying their close reading skills and the trait to their own writing. An example of materials building students’ writing ability includes but is not limited to:

Unit 3, Week 4

  • On Days 1 and 2 students participate in a shared writing and interactive writing students are to, “Write about home life now and in the past”.They analyze a student model, write about the text “Life and Home”, find evidence, apply the writing trait to give reasons for an opinion, and apply the grammar skill of practicing the use of is and are.
  • On Days 3, 4, and 5 students complete an independent writing. Students write about the text Long Ago and Now, are provided scaffolded instruction, find text evidence, and apply the writing trait to give reasons for an opinion. Students prewrite, draft, revise, edit, create a final draft, and then present, evaluate, and publish their writing.

Unit 6, Week 5

  • On Days 1 and 2 students participate in a shared writing and interactive writing students are to write about the text Share the Harvest and Give Thanks. Students find text evidence, apply the writing trait of main idea and details and the grammar skill of adverbs that tell.
  • On Days 3, 4, and 5 students complete an independent writing. Students write about the text Happy Birthday, U.S.A! Students are provided scaffolded instruction, find text evidence, and apply the writing trait of main idea and details. Students prewrite, draft, revise, edit, create a final draft, and then present, evaluate, and publish their writing.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for including a progression of focused shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials. Students engage in a progression of short research projects to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

There is one research opportunity in each unit. Students are led through the research process across the school year and the research requirements for students do not change or increase in complexity. Also, supports for teachers in how to teach students to do research for projects are not explicitly provided and opportunities for teachers to instruct and support student research to build understanding of a topic are missed.

In Grade 1, on Day 4 there is a Research and Inquiry activity. The students create an artifact to show something they have learned during the past unit, such as making a poster, or a page in a class book. The three research steps in the Teacher Edition though, rarely vary from what is given in Unit 1, Week 1: (T44) Choose a Topic, Find Resources, and Keep Track of Ideas. The Find Resources step sometimes adds in that students can reference magazines or library books or that students may use an interview as a resource. Occasionally students are asked to Conduct Internet Research instead of Find Resources.

Every Week 6 a set of research steps are listed:

  • Set Research Goals
  • Identify Sources
  • Find and Record Information
  • Organize and Summarize
  • Compare and Present

This list doesn’t change from Week 1 to the end of the year. This additional Week 6 research project opportunity also lacks direction. For example, in Unit 4, Week 6 one of the projects is, “Research teams will study threats to an animal team they reported on in Week 2 and write a short story about how the animals work together to overcome a specific problem.” If a teacher has several groups of students working on this same project that creates a lot of work for the teacher to find Web sites and texts students can access to create this project. More instruction and guidance are needed to complete these projects.


Teachers are not provided with adequate direction and support for research projects. For example in Unit 6, Week 2 students make a newspaper. The Teacher Edition states, “ Do a Research project to write a newspaper article about someone who helps others. Children will work with a group to put the Articles together to make a newspaper. “ Each student writes an article and put it together to create the newspaper. The information provided to teachers is, “Review the steps in the research process. Guide children to think of the people who help them in their lives and choose one to write about. With children, review print and online newspapers. Encourage children to interview family and community members to get information. Have them use the research process checklist online. Have children record their ideas in a 4 tab foldable. Model recording details they can include in their article. Explain the characteristics of a newspaper. Have children write articles and create a newspaper. Prompt children to use the information from their interviews to write an article about a person who helps them. Guide them to include a drawing of the person they write about. Have groups put their articles together to form a newspaper. Encourage groups to read each other newspapers.”

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet expectations that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. Independent reading routines are listed in the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook. This handbook gives routines for choosing a book, how to build classroom and school libraries, independent reading journals, and teacher and student conferences. The handbook states that students in Kindergarten should read between 10-15 minutes a day independently.

Each week students complete Self-Selected Reading during small group time. For example in Unit 5, Week 2 students who are participating in the Approaching Level small group are given the instruction,“Have children pick a fantasy. Remind them to predict what might happen as they read the story, identify the causes and order of the events that make up the plot, and to note the parts of the text that show that it is a fantasy.” Students are also directed to read purposefully, “Have children record the events on a cause and effect chart. After reading,

guide children to participate in a group discussion about the story. Guide children to share their charts, tell how they could tell that the selection was a fantasy and whether they liked it, and to

share what predictions they made and whether they were correct.” (T139)

Digital Resources such as the ConnectED Web site are available. There is a School to Home link on the student edition. Comprehension and vocabulary activities provided for the week. Students can access texts read in class and teachers can assign reading tasks for students to complete from home via the website. Students also have access to 360 leveled texts on this site that they could either read or have read to them.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Literature Anthology Grade 1.2 978-0-00-139018-2 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Close Reading Companion Grade 1 978-0-02-130521-6 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Literature Anthology (Hardcover) 978-0-02-136908-9 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Literature Anthology Grade 1.1 978-0-02-138919-3 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Literature Anthology Grade 1.3 978-0-02-144526-4 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 1 Unit 2 978-0-07-676624-6 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Reading/Writing Workshop Grade 1.1 978-0-07-677063-2 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Reading/Writing Workshop (Harcover) 978-0-07-677113-4 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 1 Unit 4 978-0-07-677239-1 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 1 Unit 3 978-0-07-678662-6 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Reading/Writing Workshop Grade 1.3 978-0-07-679764-6 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 1 Unit 6 978-0-07-679834-6 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Reading/Writing Workshop Grade 1.2 978-0-07-680007-0 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 1 Unit 5 978-0-07-680030-8 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 1 Unit 1 978-0-07-680490-0 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

X