Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Reading Wonders Grade 2 partially meet expectations of alignment. The Grade 2 instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 1. Texts are worthy of students' time and attention. Text selections are appropriately rigorous but only partially support students building their ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills but limited opportunities for opinion writing. The materials support students' literacy development with foundational skills. The instructional materials for Grade 2 partially meet the expectations of Gateway 2. There is some support for building students' knowledge and academic vocabulary, but consistent guidance and focus in these areas does not appear over the course of the year. The materials provide some planning for academic vocabulary and writing development although the teacher may need to engage in additional planning to ensure the schedule can accommodate the intended lesson sequences.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
56
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
24
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The Grade 2 instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 1. Texts are worthy of students' time and attention. Text selections are appropriately rigorous but only partially support students building their ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. The materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
18/20

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading.

For Grade 2, a Literature Anthology completely replaces the big books used in Kindergarten and Grade 1. All of the stories in the anthology are of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading. These anchor texts are examined multiple times for multiple purposes and are used to expand topics and essential questions, build vocabulary, and prompt writing.

Quality literature texts in the materials build academic vocabulary and facilitate access to future texts. Quality informational texts in the materials are engaging and provide students with opportunities to gain and broaden their knowledge base and personal perspective on a variety of topics at various levels of depth/meaning.

Examples of quality Grade 2 texts include but are not limited to:

  • Help! A Story of Friendship by Holly Keller is a simplified fable that uses engaging characters to share a lesson of friendship with students. The characters are relatable, and the story is familiar.
  • Not Norman by Kelly Bennett is a fictional story that is relatable for students. The use of dialogue and a multidimensional main character make this high quality text inviting to students.
  • Families Working Together (Time for Kids Expository Article) is an informational text that describes families. The text includes rich language and engaging photographs.
  • Volcanoes by Sandra Markle is written by an award winning author. The text includes detailed illustrations and domain rich vocabulary.
  • How the Beetle Got Her Colors (folktale) is written by award-winning author Joseph Bruchac. This text is written in a play format and immerses students in dialogue. There is also information on each of the animals featured in the folktale that will be of interest to students.
  • April Rain Song by Langston Hughes is a quality poem that includes imagery and descriptive adjectives that will engage the reader.
  • Wolf, Wolf by John Rocco has the familiar fable retold with the setting being Japan. Students are introduced to aspects of Japanese cultures in the humorous retelling of the fable from the point of view of the wolf.
  • Narrative Nonfiction: Biblioburro - A True Story of Columbia includes multiple shifts in unfamiliar settings and cultural vocabulary.
  • Brave Bessie by Eric Velasquez is a historical biography about the first African American woman to get her pilot's licence. The text includes complex vocabulary as well as engaging illustrations that help the reader to understand the text.
  • The Golden Flower: A Taino Myth from Puerto Rico by Nina Jaffe features a myth about a young boy who plants a variety of seeds that grow into a rainforest and a giant pumpkin with a magical surprise inside. The engaging story and bright, colorful illustrations will captivate Grade 2 students.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Read Aloud Texts, Literature Anthology, and Paired Selections include a balanced mix of literary and informational texts. Genres represented in the materials include, but are not limited to, poetry, fantasy, fables, folktales, myths, and biography.

Example of texts representing the balance of text types and genres include the following Literary Texts:

  • Unit 1, “My Puppy” by Aileen Fisher (Poetry)
  • Unit 2, Sled Dogs Run by Jonathan London(Realistic Fiction)
  • Unit 3, “Dear Primo: A Letter to My Cousin” by Duncan Tonatiuh (Realistic Fiction)
  • Unit 4, “April Rain Song” by Langston Hughes (Poetry)
  • Unit 5, “The Legend of Kate Shelley” (Legend)
  • Unit 6, “The Golden Flower: A Taino Myth from Puerto Rico by Nina Jaffe (Myth)

Example of texts representing the balance of text types and genres include the following Informational Texts:

  • Unit 1, Big Red Lollipop by Rukhsana Khan (Informational Text)
  • Unit 2, “At Home in the River” (Informational Text)
  • Unit 3, Many Ways to enjoy Music, Time for Kids (Informational Text)
  • Unit 4, Rain Forests by Nancy Smiler Levinson (Informational Text)
  • Unit 5, “Earth’s Resources” (Informational Text)
  • Unit 6, Money Madness by David A. Adler (Informational Text)

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the indicator for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for this grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task(s). The majority of Grade 2 reading materials are of appropriate complexity.

Texts that are of the appropriate complexity include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students read the fable, Wolf!, Wolf! by John Rocco (pgs. 136-157). This text measures qualitatively as 580 Lexile.This fable includes some domain-specific vocabulary. This story is set in China, and the author included words that are Chinese. Additionally, the story is told from the wolf’s point-of-view. Students will engage in learning tasks that require them to find text evidence in order to understand how the author uses text, craft and structure to develop a deeper meaning of the story (p. T95). Students will also write a short response to the text.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4 , students read Baby Bears by Bobbie Kalman.This text measures qualitatively as 590. Lexile. This text may be more complex due to lack of prior knowledge and vocabulary. Some facts may be brand-new to students. Students will need to be provided background or clarification of facts as needed. Teachers are also to provide definitions of specific words as needed. This text uses text features such as headings, photos, and captions. Teachers are directed to make sure students understand these text features to better comprehend the text. Students read and discuss to find the main topic and key details of the text.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, students read a realistic fiction, Dear Primo- A Letter to My Cousin by Duncan Tonatiuh (pgs. 336-363). This text measures qualitatively as 610 Lexile.This text includes letters that cousins write to each other. It also includes Spanish words. Additionally, one cousin lives in Mexico and one in America. This text asks students to use the skill compare and contrast to gain meaning and understanding of the text, along with following the plot of the story. Students complete a graphic organizer as they read detailing the plot line of both characters (p. T225G).
  • In Unit 6, Week 3 , students read Astronaut Handbook by Meghan Mccarthy. This text measures qualitatively as 790 Lexile. Students may be unfamiliar with the purpose of a handbook. The teacher explains that a handbook is a kind of reference book with facts and helpful information about a topic. Students may have difficulty with sentence structure and concept words. The topic, mountain climbers, is unfamiliar to students. Students are encouraged to take notes, reread, and ask questions when necessary.
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, students read poetry, “Books to the Ceiling” by Arnold Lobel, “I’ve got this Covered” by Lauire Purdie Salas, and “Eating While Reading” by Gary Soto. These texts measure qualitatively as 570-580 Lexiles. These poems include some sensory language that could be complex. There are a few instances of figurative language. In this unit, students are asked to describe how words supply rhythm in a poem. Students use a graphic organizer to describe the point of view of the characters found in each poem to assist in finding the poem's meaning (p. T405C).

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet this indicator for supporting students’ ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. While the texts, both anchor and supporting, fall within the grade-level band, and appear to provide students access to increasingly rigorous texts over the course of the school year the task demands do not increase in complexity throughout the school year. Because of this, students may not be assured access to to the higher-level texts that are present at the end of the school year.

This series of texts contain a variety of complexity levels in each anthology unit. The first Anthology begins with texts such as, in Unit 1, Week 3, Not Norman: A Goldfish Story by Kelly Bennett. This is a simplistic text yet attainable levels for a beginning second grade student. Then in Unit 3, Week , students read Wild Weather by Seymour Simon. This unit contains a variety of genre that scaffold instruction to reach every student. These units focus on expository text, fiction and folktales. Finally in Unit 6, Week 3, students read texts like the Astronaut Handbook by Megan McCarthy. This is an expository text that incorporates factual information about space. In the end of the text student are asked to formulate the author’s purpose

At the beginning of the year students are reading texts such as Little Flap Learns to Fly (Lexile 390), midway through the school year students are reading harder texts such as Magnets Work (Lexile 560) and by the end of the school year students are reading texts such as The Life of a Dollar Bill (Lexile 660) The rigor of comprehension activities also increases throughout the school year and the series provides scaffolds for comprehension activities within each week. For example, in Unit 1, Week 5, Day 3 students are instructed to, “write about Families Working Together and then on Days 4 and 5 students take their comprehension a step further and are instructed to “Write to compare Families Working Together with “Why We Work.’”

In Grade 2, the interactive read alouds are on grade-level texts that do not meet the requirements of complex text for Grade 2. This indicator states, “Read aloud texts are usually more challenging for the children to read than that of their independent reading texts.” Therefore, the read alouds may not be supporting the increase of children’s literacy skills throughout the year.

Teacher materials include direction for differentiation to increase students’ literacy skills through the ACT (Access Complex Text) directions and the Research Base Alignment resource book. The directions guide teachers through scaffolded activities such as rereading and paraphrasing, student-generated questions, citing text evidence, evaluating the strength of evidence cited, writing about texts, teacher modeling, use of text-dependent questions, graphic organizers, think-alouds, student collaboration, and note-taking. Although scaffolded activities are provided throughout the materials, every text gets the same amount of time spent on reading it and analyzing it. More complex texts may not get more instructional time focused on understanding it and analyzing it since there are fixed routines in place every week for close reading and rereading.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectation that anchor texts and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level. For each unit, the Teacher’s Edition includes a text complexity analysis including quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task information. This text complexity information is included for the Reading/Writing Workshop stories, the Literature Anthology, and for the leveled readers. Additionally, for all of these texts, an Educational Testing Services (ETS) Text Evaluator score is also provided. This tool evaluates eight dimensions of text complexity and accounts for differences in genres.

The materials are clear about the level of text complexity and what students will gain from using these texts. For example, in Unit 6, Week 1, teachers are provided with a selection from the Literature Anthology entitled The Golden Flower: A Taino Myth from Puerto Rico which has a Lexile Score of 590. Teachers are provided with qualitative information that indicates that students will be working on genre and vocabulary as well as reader and task information which provides teachers with a more detailed description and specific page numbers for teaching the lesson/skill for the week.

The Teacher’s Edition also contains the Instructional Path at the beginning of each week. This path lists all texts read, why students are reading the text, the educational focus, and how the texts connect to one another during the week. There is also a Research Base Alignment in the online resources. Additionally, a page is provided at the beginning of each week’s materials for teachers entitled “Differentiate to Accelerate.” Teachers are instructed on this page, “If the text complexity of a particular section is too difficult for children, then see the references noted in the chart below for scaffolded instruction to help children Access Complex Text.”

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 2 meet the expectations for materials providing opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading, and there are supports to build students’ proficiency of grade level texts. Resources are provided to offer students texts to engage in a range and volume of reading. There are leveled texts, literature big books, and reading/writing workshop books, as well as book suggestions for extending complex texts.

Before each unit on the Differentiate to Accelerate Teacher pages, there is information for teachers titled “Monitor and Differentiate.” This information guides teachers towards lessons they can use to reteach, develop, extend, and review material for students. This page also contains additional information for English Language Learners.

Text examples that show specific evidence for range and volume of reading from the Grade 2 materials include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, students read a fiction story in the Literature Anthology, “Not Norman” (450L). This text is paired with a poem, “My Puppy.” Students engage in a close reading and modeling of the text “Finding Cal” (410L). The Leveled Readers range from 350L to 510L and include a variety of genres. Students engage with the reading of the Interactive Read Aloud cards “My Partner and Friend.” Students practice close reading of complex texts by practicing literacy skills of using information from illustrations and text to demonstrate understanding. Students practice with independent partner work in order to gain gradual release to becoming independent readers. Teachers use weekly progress monitoring on the Data Dashboard to check student growth.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students read an Expository Text, “Wild Weather” (670L), in the Literature Anthology. This is paired with an Expository Text “Can You Predict the Weather?” (610L). The Leveled Readers range from 370L to 630L all on the topic of weather exploration. Students are tasked with finding the main topic and purpose of the text. Students are also engaged in a modeled close reading of “Tornado” and an Interactive read aloud, “Clouds All Around.” After listening to these texts students make text connections that extend their comprehension. Students practice with independent partner work to gain gradual release to independent work. Students answer text-dependent questions and make text to text connections. Teachers use weekly progress monitoring on the Data Dashboard to check student growth.
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, students read several poems in the Literature Anthology Books such as “To The Ceiling,” “I’ve Got This Covered,” and “Eating While Reading.” These poems are paired with two more poems, “Clay Play” and “Crayons.” The Leveled Readers range from 70L to 640L. Students engage in a modeled close reading of three poems “A Box of Crayons,” “What Story is This?” and “The Ticket.” Students are tasked with answering questions to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. Students practice with independent partner work to gain gradual release to independent work. Students answer text-dependent questions and make text to text connections. Teachers use weekly progress monitoring on the Data Dashboard to check student growth.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Grade 2 meet the expectations that students will have opportunities for rich, rigorous discussions and writing tasks that are evidence based. Questions and tasks associated with the texts focus students’ attention back to the texts and are organized to build their speaking and listening skills, and the materials include culminating tasks at the end of each unit. Grammar and conventions instruction is embedded to facilitate students’ application of language skills. Each unit includes opportunities for on-demand and process writing.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations of most questions, tasks, and assignments being text-based and requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). Questions support students’ literacy growth over the course of the year.

Questions and tasks are connected to texts are text-based. These questions and tasks support students in drawing on textual evidence to support their learning of explicit information and inferences in a text or text set. Text-based questions and tasks require readers to produce evidence from texts to support opinions or statements when writing and speaking. These questions support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year.

The teacher materials reviewed provide support for planning and implementation of text-based writing and speaking activities through the Integrate Ideas Section for each week. Materials provide support for planning and implementation. For example, in Unit 6, Week 4, students are asked to summarize a section of the text. To provide support for implementation the Teacher Edition states, “Have children work with a partner to reread and summarize pages 450 and 451. Guide them to read the subheadings as they determine the most important ideas on each page and then tell those ideas in their own words.”

In Unit 4, Week 3, students read Dear Primo: A Letter to my Cousin. Text-based questions and tasks include, “ Where does Carlitos live? Where does Charlie live? How are these places different? What does the language used to describe where they live show you about the cousins? What is the subway like? What does the simile help you understand about the subway? What word does the author use to describe Charlie scoring a basket? How does the author show the excitement when Carlitos scores a goal? How did the illustrations show how the cousins lives are similar? What else can I visualize by using the illustration on the page? What details on page 354 help you visualize what the fiestas are like? What picture do they help you create in your mind? How is this celebration different from the one in Mexico?” Students also engage with the text, Games around the World. Text-based questions and tasks include, “What additional information does the map on page 366 tell you? How many players are needed to play Oware? What does the game board look like? What do the players do? Why is Games Around the World a good title for this selection? How does the author organize the selection? How do the circles around the countries on the map and around the photos help you understand the information in the selection?”

In Unit 6, Week 2, students read the text, My Light. Text-based questions and tasks include, “Using those clues, what does the word golden mean? What does she want us to know? What word does the author repeat on page 517? Why does the author use the words whish and whoosh on page 518? What causes the wind? What does the author explain about plants? Which words help you figure out what buried means? Why does the author repeat the words my light again? What information does the author explain on page 526? How did the illustrations help you understand how different light bulbs work? How does the Sun's light illuminate your town? What is the author's purpose for writing this selection? How is the author's use of my light a strong ending to the selection? Why is she interested in science?” Students also engage with the text, The Power of Water. Text-based questions and tasks include, “Page 532 tell that water never disappears. Why is that? What does it explain? How could you summarize energy from water? Why is the power of water a good title for this selection?”

The Close Reading Companion provides additional text-based questions and activities for students to complete. These pages included basic questions as well as higher level questions that called on students to infer deeper meaning from the text. These pages include questions such as,“How does the author help you make inferences about wildfires?” and “How does the Earth change because of wildfires and volcanic eruptions?”

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectation for materials culminating tasks that support series of text dependent questions and activities. Students are provided with a Unit Big Idea and a weekly Essential Questions. Students discuss questions, make connections, and create a graphic organizer to be used at the end of the unit. Similar processes are included at the end of most units to build students' ability to engage with the texts.

Each week an Essential Question is addressed throughout the texts and tasks. This Essential Question is revisited at the end of each text with Integrate Ideas activities. At the end of the week, students Integrate Ideas through Text Connections, Research and Inquiry, and Speaking and Listening activities. Students revisit the Essential Question and create a graphic organizer using notes from the weekly read. For Example in Unit 1, Week 5 students complete integrate ideas activities to connect to the week’s texts:

  • Connect to the Essential Question: “Write the Essential Question on the board, ‘What happens when families work together?’ Read the Essential Question aloud. Tell children that they will think about all of the information that they have learned about families. Say: We have read many selections on this topic. We will compare the information from this week’s Leveled Readers and “Families Work!,” Reading/Writing Workshop, pages 86–89. Evaluate Text Evidence Guide children to review the selections and their completed graphic organizers. Have children work with partners to compare information from all the week’s reads. Children can record notes using a Foldable®. Guide them to record information from the selections that helps them to answer the Essential Question.”
  • Research and Inquiry: “Make a Job Description Sheet: Have children create a checklist and review their job description sheets:
    • Did they interview an adult family member or friend to learn about a specific job?
    • Does the job description sheet describe and explain what this person does at their job?
    • Have they included pictures or photographs of this person doing their job?
    • Have they taken notes for their presentation to explain how this person’s job helps the community?
    • Guide groups to practice sharing their job description sheets with each other. Children should practice speaking and presenting their information clearly. Prompt children to ask question to clarify when something is unclear: What type of job does this person do? Where do they work? What type of goods or services do they provide for the community? Have children use the Presentation Checklist online.”
  • Text to Photography: “ Read aloud with children the Integrate activity on page 33 of the Close Reading Companion. Guide partners to discuss how the photograph of the family washing the car is similar to “Families Work.” Have partners collaborate to complete the Integrate page by comparing the photograph to the week’s selections. Present Ideas and Synthesize Information When children finish their discussions, ask for a volunteer from each group to share the information from their Foldable® and their Integrate pages. After each group has presented their ideas, ask: How does learning about a specific job in your community answer the Essential Question: What happens when families work together? Lead a class discussion asking children to use the information from their charts to answer the Essential Question.”
  • Speaking and Listening: “As children are working with partners in their Close Reading Companion, or on their charts make sure that children are actively participating in the conversation, and when necessary, remind them to use these strategies: Speaking Strategies: Have children talk with adults in their family about their job. Have them ask specific questions about the type of work the adult does and the goods or service they provide for the community. Ask children to stay on topic and use descriptive details as they explain the specific job they researched. After they have finished presenting, encourage children to ask others to share their ideas, opinions, and questions about the job they described. Listening Strategies:Remind children to follow the agreed-upon rules for discussion by always looking at and listening to the speaker. Children should ask questions to gain additional information.”

At the end of the Unit, during Week 6, students Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea. Students use their weekly graphic organizers and notes to participate in a collaborative conversation about the Unit Big Idea. Students present their ideas and the class creates a list. For example in Unit 4, Week 6 students Wrap Up the Unit by addressing the Big Idea: What animals do you know about? What are they like? Students make text connections that connect to the big idea:

  • Text to Text: “Write the Unit Big Idea on the board: What animals do you know about? What are they like? Remind children that they have been reading selections all about different types of animals through the course of the unit. Divide the class into small groups. Tell children that each group will compare what they learned about animals in order to answer the Big Idea question. Model how to compare this information by using examples from the Leveled Readers and what they have read in this unit’s selections.”
  • Collaborative Conversations: “Have children review their class notes, writing assignments, and completed graphic organizers before they begin their discussions. Ask children to compare information from all the unit’s selections and presentations. Have children work together to take notes. Explain that each group will use an Accordion Foldable® to record their ideas. Model how to use an Accordion Foldable® to record comparisons of texts. Guide children to focus their conversations on what they learned about what different animals are like.”
  • Present Ideas and Synthesize Information: “When children finish their discussions; ask for a volunteer from each group to read their notes aloud. After each group has presented their ideas, ask: What interesting things have we learned about animals and what they are like? Lead a class discussion and list children’s ideas on the board.”
  • Building Knowledge: “Have children continue to build knowledge about the Unit Big Idea. Display classroom or library sources and have children search for articles, books, and other resources related to the Big Idea. After each group has presented their ideas, ask: What do we know about animals? What are they like? Lead a class discussion asking students to use information from their charts to answer the question.”

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

On Day 1, the essential question is discussed as a way of building background knowledge. Students discuss the question in partners or small groups, using a concept web to generate words and phrases. A “Collaborative Conversation” chart is also included, with different strategies students can focus on each week.

Oral vocabulary routines are provided on Day 1 of each unit. Five words are presented. Students are then prompted to use the words as they discuss the essential question. The Speaking and Listening Standards are referenced.

Later on Day 1, eight more vocabulary words are introduced under the mini lesson title of “Words in Context.” There are visual vocabulary cards for this part of the lesson, and a Define/ Example/ Ask routine is provided for each word on the back of the card. Students then work with a partner to look at the pictures and discuss the words. These vocabulary words are reviewed on Days 2, 3, and 4.

Students then read the Reading/ Writing Workshop story. The eight vocabulary words are highlighted. The words are discussed when they are encountered while reading the text.

After the story is read, students go back to the story and use sentence frames to answer questions using text-evidence.

On Day 1, students write work with partners. Additionally, a grammar rule is taught, and students have time to work in partners to talk and practice the rule on Day 2.

After reading the Literature Anthology story on Day 3, students get together to answer the essential question and cite text evidence.Students also participate in discussions with partners to complete research projects and culminating projects. Examples of discussion activities are:

  • Speaking and Listening: “Engage in collaborative conversation about weather. Retell and discuss Rain School. Present information on how the weather can affect us.”
  • Oral Vocabulary Words: “Tell children that you will share some words that they can use as they discuss the weather and its effects. Use the Define/Example/Ask routine to introduce the oral vocabulary words cycle and predict.”
  • Oral Vocabulary Routine: “Define: A cycle is a series of events that repeats in the same order. Example: A butterfly begins its life cycle as a caterpillar. Ask: What is the cycle of weather over a year? Define: When you predict, you use clues to guess what will happen in the future. Example: When Ken reads a story, he predicts what will happen next. Ask: What do you predict will happen when you go home today?”
  • Academic Language: “weather, affect, tall tale, visualize, events, characters, text, illustrations, events, order, pronoun, visualize, realistic fiction, cause and effect, idea, concluding statement, evidence, pronoun, theme, message, comma, pause”
  • Reading/Writing Workshop: Talk About It: “Weather Together: Guide children to discuss the weather in the photo. How does the weather affect the people in this photograph? How does the weather affect the cars? What other effects could it have? Use Teaching Poster 40 and prompt children to complete the Word Web by sharing words to describe how the weather affects everyone in the photograph. Have children look at page 257 of their Reading/Writing Workshop and do the Talk About It activity with a partner.”
  • Collaborative Conversations: “Take Turns Talking: As children engage in partner, small-group, and whole-group discussions, encourage them to: take turns talking and not speak over others, raise their hand if they want to speak. ask others to share their ideas and opinions.”

Materials provide multiple opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions across the whole year’s scope of instructional materials. Teacher modeling occurs often, with guided practice following. Support for evidence-based discussions encourages modeling and a focus on using academic vocabulary and syntax. Teacher materials support implementation of these standards to grow students’ skills.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations for supporting students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

In the majority of the lessons, there are opportunities for speaking and listening, whole group discussions, small group discussions, and partner discussions, that correlate to the Common Core Standard S.L.2.1 of engaging effectively in a range of collaborative discussions. The curriculum includes Collaborative Conversations supports, graphic organizers, Access Complex Text information, Conference Routines, and modeled Think alouds. Students are prompted to refer to the text with each task and modeled think alouds include text evidence.

Instructional time is dedicated to student’s practicing and applying speaking and listening skills daily. In Second Grade, speaking and listening instruction is applied frequently over the course of the school year and includes facilitation, monitoring, and instructional supports for teachers. Students have multiple opportunities over the school year to demonstrate what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching through varied speaking and listening opportunities especially on Day 4 and 5 with regards to research.

Students are expected to integrate ideas through Day 4 and Day 5 using speaking and listening skills weekly. Through the use of Make Connections and Respond to Text in each week, students talk about things learned and listen to others speak. Speaking and Listening skills are also directly addressed during the Close Read Companion task. For example, in Unit 6, Week 4 teachers are directed to monitor students as they work with partners in their Close Reading Companion or on their posters to make sure that they are actively participating in the conversation, and when necessary, remind children to use these speaking and listening strategies. A list of speaking and listening strategies is provided:

  • Speaking Strategies: As they discuss money and its circulation, remind children to support their thoughts and ideas by using evidence from their research using complete sentences. Ask children to describe the circulation of money outlined on their flow charts with appropriate facts and relevant details.
  • Listening Strategies: Remind children to follow the agreed-upon rules for discussion by always looking at and listening to the speaker. Ask children to listen to each other’s contributions and then add their own details and examples to the discussion. Tell children to ask questions to clarify anything they did not understand.

During Research and Inquiry each week, students complete weekly projects. Each week students are asked to work in pairs or small groups to find out more about the weekly reading topic. Students use what they learn from their reading and discussions as well as other sources to find additional information. There is an option to set up a Shared Research Board to post illustrations and other information that students gather as they do their research.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 2 meet the expectations for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Each week students read and write about text in a mix of on-demand and process writing. On Days 1 and 2, students participate in both a shared and interactive evidence-based on-demand writing using the week’s texts. On Days 3, 4, and 5 students complete an independent process writing in which students analyze a student model, write, find textual evidence, apply a writing trait, revise, edit, and publish a writing. Digital resources are provided each week for additional practice.

In Unit 2, Week 1 the essential question is, “How do animals survive?”. During Reading Writing Workshop, students engage with the texts, “A Visit to the Desert”. Students also read the Literature Anthology Sled Dogs Run and the Paired Read “Cold Dog, Hot Fox”. During the week students address both on-demand and process writing prompts including but not limited to:

  • Build Writing Fluency: Quick write on ”A Visit to the Desert,”
    • Day 1 and Day 2 Write to a Source:Analyze a student model. Write about “A Visit to the Desert”. Apply Writing Trait: Ideas. Apply Grammar Skill: Singular & Plural Nouns.
    • Day 3 Write to a Source: Write about Sled Dogs Run independent practice. Provide scaffolded instruction to meet student needs.
    • Day 4 and Day 5 Write to Two Sources. Analyze a student model. Write to compare Sled Dogs Run with “Cold Dog, Hot Fox”.
  • Genre Writing: Informative Text How-To Text Expert Model: “Discuss features of informational writing. Discuss the expert model Prewrite. Discuss purpose and audience Plan the topic.”
  • Write to Sources: “Build Writing Fluency Write to a Prompt Provide children with the prompt: Add an event to the story. Have Grandma explain why she wanted Tim to come with her to the desert. Have children share possible reasons Grandma invited Tim to come. After children finish sharing ideas, have them write continuously for seven minutes in their Writer’s Notebook. If children stop writing, encourage them to continue. When children finish writing, have them work with a partner to compare their ideas for an event to add and explanation for Grandma’s invitation. Partners should make sure that they both understand the topic.”
  • Writing Process Genre Writing: Informational Text: How-to Text,First Week Focus: “Over the course of the week, focus on the following stages of the writing process: Expert Model Analyze with children the features of how-to text and discuss the Expert Model found online in Writer’s Workspace. Prewrite Discuss with children the purpose for writing how-to text and analyze their audience. Teach the Order Ideas Minilesson. Then have children choose their topics and plan their writing. Walk children through Model Graphic Organizer 23 found online in Writer’s Workspace. Then have them record their ideas for their how-to text on Graphic Organizer 24.”
  • Write to the Reading/Writing Workshop Text:Analyze the Prompt, “Read aloud the prompt on page 112 of the Reading/Writing Workshop. Say: What is the prompt asking? We need to explain why Grandma wanted Tim to visit her home in the desert. In order to add a new event to the story, let’s reread the selection to find supporting details that tell us about the characters and the setting. We can also look for descriptive details. As we reread we can take notes to answer the prompt. Analyze Text Evidence Say: Let’s take a look at how one student, Olivia, took notes to answer the prompt. She tells about the desert animals and the stars. Say: Why do you think Olivia put these details in her notes? (They help explain why Grandma wanted to show the desert to Tim.) Display Graphic Organizer 11 found online in Writer’s Workspace and guide the class through the rest of Olivia’s notes. Analyze the Student Model Explain how Olivia used text evidence from her notes to write a response to the prompt.”
  • Your Turn: Write About the Text Read, “Pretend you are Tim. Explain to your parents how your feelings changed during the trip. Discuss the prompt with children. Remind them that A Visit to the Desert is realistic fiction, a kind of narrative text. In continuing the story, their purpose is to entertain with a story that could happen in real life. Have children take notes as they think about the details from the story that they can use as they respond to the prompt. Remind them to include the following elements as they craft their response from their notes: Event, Descriptive Details, Details. Have children use Grammar Handbook page 477 in the Reading/Writing Workshop to edit for errors with nouns.”

Direction and instruction is also given to teachers on conducting student conferences about their writing. Conferencing Routines include, “STEP 1 Talk about the strengths of the writing, STEP 2 Focus on the target trait, and STEP 3 Make concrete suggestions for revisions. Peer Conferences provide questions to guide peers as they review a partner’s draft such as, “Which details describe the setting? Does the writer use complete sentences? and Where can descriptive details be added?” A Go Digital! Writer's Workspace provides tools for writers to use the writing process digitality.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade meet the expectations for providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. The writing prompts are balanced between informative, narrative, and opinion writing prompts.

Unit Genre Writing prompts include opportunities for students to address different types of writing:

  • Unit 1- Narrative: Friendly Letter, Personal Narrative
  • Unit 2- Informative/Explanatory: How-to Text,How-to Directions
  • Unit 3- Opinion: Opinion Letter, Book Review
  • Unit 4- Narrative: Fictional Narrative, Poem
  • Unit 5- Informative/Explanatory: Explanatory Writing, Compare/Contrast Writing
  • Unit 6-Informative/Explanatory: Summary, Research Report

Weekly Write to Sources prompts include opportunities for students to address different types of writing:

  • Unit 1 - three narrative writings, one opinion writing, and one informative writing
  • Unit 2 - three narrative writings, one opinion writing, and one informative writing
  • Unit 3 - three informative writings, one opinion writing, and one narrative writing
  • Unit 4 - three informative writings, one opinion writing, and one narrative writing
  • Unit 5 - two opinion writings, two informative writings, and one narrative writing
  • Unit 6 - two opinion writings, two informative writings, and one narrative writing

On demand prompts and quick writes include opportunities for students to address different types of writing:

  • In Unit 2, students answer, “In your opinion, is it easy or hard for an eagle to take care of an eaglet? Use text evidence to support your answer. Students compare the two texts “Baby Bears” and “From Caterpillar to Butterfly” and answer the prompt - Which selection is presented in a more clear and understandable manner?”
  • In Unit 5 students write a dialogue between Pablo and his mom that happens after the class wins the prize.
  • In Unit 6, students answer, “How does the author help you to understand that the world changed from the beginning to the end of the story?”

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectation for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and clear information appropriate for grade level. The materials include weekly opportunities for students to respond to one or two texts in a variety of writing modes including informative, opinion, and narrative analysis.

Frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing occur in each week of instruction. For example, in Unit 6, Week 4, the essential question is, “How can we use money?” Students write multiple times for multiple purposes to address this question’s topic. Examples of writing opportunities include, but are not limited to:

  • Write to Sources- Students draw evidence from expository texts,write informational texts, and conduct short research on money.
  • Write About Money- The teacher models writing to a source. Students analyze a short response student model. Students use text evidence from close reading to write to a source.
  • Write a short response about Money Madness.- Students write to two sources, citing text evidence from Money Madness and “King Midas and the Golden Touch.”
  • Conduct a Short Research Project- Students create a flowchart about money and its circulation.
  • Write to Two Sources- How do the authors of “Money Madness” and “King Midas and the Golden Touch” use sequence to organize the text?
    • First students analyze the prompt. The Teacher’s Edition states, “Explain that today children will use facts and details from both “Money Madness” and “King Midas and the Golden Touch” in the Literature Anthology to write a response to a prompt. Provide children with the following prompt: How do the authors of “Money Madness” and “King Midas and the Golden Touch” use sequence to organize the text? Use evidence from both texts to support your answer.”
    • Then students analyze text evidence. The Teacher’s Edition states, “Display Graphic Organizer 58 found online in Writer’s Workspace. Say: Let’s see how one student took notes to answer the prompt. Here are Farah’s notes. Read through the text evidence for each selection and have children discuss how each author used sequence to organize the text. Provide the following prompt to children: How do the authors of “Money Madness” and “King Midas and the Golden Touch” use illustrations to support the text? Use evidence from both texts to support your answer.”
    • Finally students find text evidence. The Teacher’s Edition states, “Have children take notes. Help them find text evidence and give guidance where needed. If necessary, review with children how to use their own words to describe the illustrations and text in each selection. Remind them to write down the page number and source of the information.”

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet expectations for explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of the context. Across the year, students are taught nouns, verbs, adjectives, pronouns, prepositions, sentence rearranging, and proper nouns. Additionally, there are many lessons on conventions: commas in a series, capitalization of plays and book titles, commas in dates, capitalizing book titles, apostrophes, and abbreviations, to name some of them. Readings/texts support the acquisition and practice of language standards.

Teacher supports are explict::

Unit 2, Week 2, Day 1 Singular and Plural Nouns:

  1. Explain/Model – Explain that some nouns name one person, place, or thing. These are singular nouns. Some nouns name more than one person, place, or thing or a group of things. These nouns are called plural nouns. Tell children that you can usually make a noun plural by adding –s.
  2. Guided Practice – Display the sentences below and read them aloud. Have children identify the nouns and tell if they are singular or plural.
  3. Practice – Display the sentence below and read it aloud. Have partners rewrite the sentence, changing the singular noun to a plural noun and the plural noun to a singular noun. Have them discuss the change in meaning of the sentence.
  4. Talk About It – Find nouns – Display the following nouns: lizard, lions, rabbits, snake, pet, animals, frogs, turtle. Have partners record the nouns in a two-column chart labeled “singular nouns” and “plural nouns” and take turns using the nouns in sentences.

An example of instruction includes but is not limited to:

  • Grammar Adjectives That Compare
    • 1. Explain/Model
      • Remind children that an adjective is a word that describes a noun (a word that names a person, place, or thing) and that we can use adjectives to compare nouns. We add -er to the end of an adjective to compare two nouns.
      • Display the following sentences: Rose has a new camera. Rose’s camera is newer than Sam’s camera. Model identifying the adjective in the first sentence and the comparative form of the adjective in the second sentence.
      • Think Aloud In the first sentence, the word new is an adjective. It describes the noun camera. The second sentence compares Rose’s camera to Sam’s camera. Rose’s camera is newer. The adjective is newer. The -er ending shows that two nouns, Rose’s camera and Sam’s camera, are being compared.
      • Discuss how the adjective new was changed to newer by adding -er to the end of new.
    • 2. Guided Practice/Practice
      • Display the sentences and answer choices below and read them aloud. Ask children to choose the correct adjective in parentheses.
      • Prompt children by asking: Does the adjective compare two nouns, or does it describe just one noun? The water is (cold/colder) at the bottom of the ocean than at the surface. (colder) The ocean is (deep/deeper) than the lake. (deeper)
    • 3. Talk About It/Compare It
      • Provide children with three adjectives that can be used to describe teamwork or exploration, such as strong, tough, and deep. Then have partners add the -er ending to each adjective, and then use the adjective in a sentence that compares two people, places, or things.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
22/22
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 2 meet expectations for foundational skills development. The materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonics that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials address the acquisition of print concepts explicitly and frequently provide opportunities for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills. Ongoing and frequent assessment of student mastery is provided as well as lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations of this indicator. Materials include explicit instruction for and regular practice of phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression. Phonics instruction is part of students’ daily learning. Phonics instruction has modeling and guided practice/practice as part of the routine.

During the first weeks of the materials, there are 10 lessons in an introductory unit called Start Smart. Short vowels (a Kindergarten standard) are reviewed in the first four days. In Days 5 and 6, students relearn consonant blends. In Days 7 and 8, students are retaught long a and long i. In Days 9 and 10, long e is retaught.

Throughout lessons the teacher models and conducts guided practice. Phonics lesson are taught each day of the week. For example, in Unit 3, Week 2, the focus is long i, which is a Grade 1 standard:

  • Day 1: Phonics – Introduce long i: I, y, igh, ie and blend words with long i
  • Day 2 Review Long i: I, y, igh, ie (blend and build)
  • Day 3 Phonics: Blend words with long I – I, y, igh, ie and Structural Analysis – Open syllables
  • Day 4 Phonics: Build words with long I and Structural Analysis – open syllables
  • Day 5 Phonics: Blend and build words with long i

Phonics lessons provide students with opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students learn three prefixes: re-, un-, and dis-
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, students learn two suffixes: -ful, -les
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students learn the suffixes: -s, -ess
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students learn silent letters: wr, kn, gn, mb, sc
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students learn irregular plurals
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, students learn r-controlled vowel syllables
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, students learn vowel team syllables

Skills progress over the school year, especially since Kindergarten and Grade 1 phonics are reviewed through Unit 3. At the beginning of the year students worked on more basic long vowel spellings – Unit 1 Week 5 Long I – i_e, but by mid year as evidenced above were working on more challenging long vowel patterns.

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 2 meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

The materials have opportunities for students to learn text features. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, during Day 2 of Genre: Informational Text, the students are taught about the following text features: diagrams and labels.
    • Diagrams: Point out the diagram of the bald eagle. Explain that diagrams help give a picture of what something is, what features something has, or how something works.
    • Labels: Point out that there are five labels around the diagram of the eagle. Each of them points out and describes a different feature of the eagle.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, during Day 2 of Genre: Informational Text, the students are taught about the following text features: sidebars and subheads.
    • Sidebar: Point out the sidebar. Explain that a sidebar gives information that goes beyond the main text. Say: Read the title in the sidebar. How does it help you understand what information the sidebar gives?
    • Subhead: Point out the subhead “How Can You Stay Safe?”. Explain that a subhead tells what a section of text is about. Ask: What do you expect this section to be about?
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, during Day 2 of Genre: Informational Text, the students are taught about maps. Point out the map. Explain that a map is a flat picture of part of Earth. Ask: Why do you think the author includes a map of Alaska in this selection? Students learn about the map key.

In the instructional materials, there are opportunities to identify text structures.

  • In Unit 4, Week 2, during Day 2 of Genre: Informational Text, the students are taught about what expository text is. It gives facts about a topic such as a real person, a real event, a real place, or a real thing. Students are told about the structures expository texts contain. Text structures include sequential, cause and effect, and problem and solution. Students practice identifying expository text in the Practice book.
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, during the Literature Anthology, the students focus on the problem and solution of the story.

Some examples of analyzing text features and structures together include:

Unit 3, Week 1 – On Day 2 students learn all about the fiction genre and how they can identify texts that are fiction. Student practice with this skill is also provided in their On Level practice book. Students review the fiction genre with the Mr. Putter and Tabby story. Students also work with a partner to find dialogue in the story. On Day 4 of this week students learn about text features: diagrams in the selection Day to Night.

Unit 1, Week 4 – On Day 2 students learn all about the Genre Narrative Fiction – this lesson includes an explain, model and guided practice/practice portion. There is also an On Level practice book page on this skill as well. In the Reading/Writing Workshop book there is also a Text Features explanation on photo and captions. There is also a Your turn portion where students are instructed to “Find other photos with captions. Tell what you learn from them.”

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 2 meet the expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

The Grade 2 program works on several areas of fluency: accuracy, building fluency, expression, intonation, phrasing, rate, rereading for understanding of words, tracking print, volume and word automaticity. There are several ways to work on the fluency whether in connected text, reading aloud, partner reading, choral reading, modeling fluent reading, echo-reading, and sound/spelling.

The materials contain opportunities for Grade 2 students to gain oral reading fluency over the course of the year.

  • During the first two-week unit of the year, Start Smart, fluency is every few days.
    • Days 3 and 4: Teacher models, and then students read chorally.
    • Days 7 and 8: Teacher models, and then students read chorally.
    • Days 9 and 10: Teacher models, and then students reread in partners.
  • In Unit 1, Week 1, fluency practice is on days 3, 4, and 5.
    • Day 3: Teacher explains and models reading with expression, there is guided practice, and then it says students CAN practice. It’s not part of the lesson. (T46)
    • Day 4: Teacher reviews reading with expression. Students practice. (T53)
    • Day 5: Students practice reading words with short a and short i for automaticity. (T58)
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, fluency practice is on days 2, 3, 4, and 5.
    • Day 2: Build Fluency: Word Automaticity: “Have children chorally read words to build fluency.” (T26)
    • Days 3 and 4: There are lessons on intonation. The teacher explains this skill, models and then allows for guided practice. Teachers are also instructed at the bottom of the page that, “Children can practice fluency using the Practice Book passages.” (T44, T51)
    • Day 5: Students build fluency through use of the word building cards. (T57)

The small differentiated reading groups also reference fluency. For students who are approaching grade level and on grade level, fluency practice is in the lesson plan, and then also listed again for more practice afterward.

The lessons also grow in difficulty over the course of the school year. In Unit 2, Week 2 students have a fluency lesson on expression. In this lesson, the focus is on rate of reading and children are told, “When you read with expression, you can also show emotions by reading faster when a character is excited and slower when a character is sad. Good readers also raise the volume of their voice when they read an exclamation or a word that is emphasized.” This lesson was taken a step further in Unit 5, Week 2 when students have another lesson on expression and this time are told, “They should think about what kind of emotion is being expressed in the text, and then read in a way that shows that emotion. For instance, they might read more loudly to show anger or more quickly to show excitement. They can change their expression when reading dialogue to show the speaker's feelings and meaning,”

Irregularly spelled words and high frequency words are addressed. During High-Frequency Word lessons, students practice reading, spelling, and writing irregularly spelled and high-frequency words.

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Day 1, students learn: all, any, goes, new, number, other, right, says, understands, work.
    • The teacher displays High-Frequency Word Cards and uses the Read/Spell/Write routine to teach each word.
    • The teacher points out the irregularities in sound/spelling, such as the /ur/ sound spelled or in work and the short u sound, /u/, spelled o in other.
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Day 1, students learn: talk, once, upon, among, touch, bought, never, knew, soon, sorry.
    • After the Read/Spell/Write routine, students participate in guided practice.
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, Day 3, students learn: complete, enough, anymore, river, against, terrible, sometimes, window, stranger, rough.
    • Students participate in guided practice, practice, and cumulative review.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Each week students were provided with high-frequency words that they would be learning over the course of the week. These words were explicitly taught through whole group lessons that focused on teacher modeling and a read/spell/write routine. These words were also used in context throughout the week and appeared in the reading/writing workshop book and again in small group instruction. The instructional materials contain practice of word recognition and analysis skills both in connected text, but also in isolated text through practice books or in class work.

During Start Smart, the beginning two-week unit, ten sight words are taught and reviewed each week. The words are introduced and practiced in isolation, using the Read/Spell/Write routine. Sometimes students practice writing in the air. Sometimes students practice filling the words in on a worksheet and then reading the sentences chorally.

In Unit 1, Week 1, ten high-frequency words are taught, and students have opportunities to read the high-frequency words in connected text.

  • Day 1: The teacher models reading the ten new sight words A read/spell/write routine is used to teach the words. Students practice reading sentences containing the new words.
  • Day 2: The ten words are practiced and added to a word bank. Students review the words they learned during Start Smart.
  • Day 4: Students practice the ten words again, and use them orally in sentences.

Much of the phonics instruction is practiced in connected text. In Unit 5, Week 2, students are working on the diphthongs oi and oy.

  • Day 1: A sound-spelling card is shown, and the letter/sound connections are made. Students blend letters into words, and then practice reading words and sentences.
  • Day 2: Students use the diphthong vowel cards to build words with other letter cards.
  • Day 3: Students review the diphthongs again. Students blend words. Students practice decoding words in context in Decodable Readers.
  • Day 4: Students review and blend words again. Students read Decodable Readers.
  • Day 5: Students read words and also practice reading them quickly.

In the differentiated guided reading groups, the sounds are reviewed again, and decodable readers are read again in the approaching and on level groups.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 2 meet expectations for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills. Teachers are provided with a wealth of assessment resources. In addition to Unit assessments, there are weekly, mid-unit and end of unit assessments. Fluency passages to use with students are also provided online as well. Benchmark assessments, running records and screening/placement/diagnostic assessments are also provided online.

Assessment books are included with the materials: a Placement and Diagnostic Assessment book, a Unit Assessments book, and a Running Record/Benchmark Assessments book.

Grade 2 students are to be given a placement test in the first few weeks of the school year. Everything needed is included in the Placement and Diagnostic Assessment book. Grade 2 students are to be assessed on either a comprehension test, or an oral reading fluency assessment. There are specific guidelines for placement based on the assessment scores. For example, if students score in the 50th percentile or higher on the oral reading fluency assessment and 80% correct or higher on the comprehension test, then teachers are instructed to begin lessons with students with the Wonders On Level materials. Similar instructions are given on how to place students in the Wonders Approaching Level materials (pp. 8-9).

The oral fluency assessments include information about each student’s fluency. Also included is prosody checklist.

There are many other assessments included in the Placement and Diagnostic Assessment book. There is a chart on page 13 outlining a general testing schedule. For example, it is suggested that Grade 2 students be assessed on phonemic awareness subtests, sight word assessments, a phonics survey, an informal reading inventory, a writing assessment, a vocabulary assessment, and the spelling inventory at the beginning, middle, and end of the year. Other assessments are to be considered for the middle and end of the year. Since many states use a screener such as DIBELS or the TPRI, alignment information is provided (pp. 16-27). The phonemic awareness assessments, the letter naming fluency assessment, and some of the other assessments appear to be publisher-written. The phonics assessment is called The Quick Phonics Survey, and is written by Jan Hasbrouck.

In the Teacher Edition, each week there is a Monitor and Differentiate box. These boxes provided teachers with instructions for a quick check to see if students understand the concept. An example of one of these is seen in Unit 2 Week 1 when teachers are instructed to check “Can children read and decode words with short o and long o? Can children recognize and read high-frequency words?” Teachers are then given pages to turn to for additional small group instruction based on whether or not students understood the concept.

Examples of informal assessments include:

  • Quick Checks: Wonders provides many opportunities for you to observe students independently practice a strategy or skill taught in whole group instruction. • The Quick Check reminds you to observe your students and see if any of them are having difficulty with a skill they have just learned. • You can use this information to decide if this is a skill you need to address in small group instruction.
  • Assignments: Every assignment or activity allows you to assess reading behaviors. Assignments do not need to be formally graded, but they should be treated as a potential source of information about what students know, what they still need to learn, and what their misconceptions or difficulties are. • Review assignments, noting both strengths and weaknesses, and present the student with oral or written feedback.
  • Classroom Observations: You have opportunities to observe your students at work and at play, working alone, and interacting with other students. Be systematic with the way you do and record the observations.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations that materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills. The monitor and differentiate boxes, small group lessons, English Language Learner boxes and corrective feedback boxes provide teachers many opportunities to target the needs of students. Students are given repeated opportunities to practice foundational skills over the course of the week. Phonics skills that are targeted for the week recur again and again throughout weekly lessons. Teachers can also constantly check for students’ understanding of these skills and were provided with additional supports to help all students achieve mastery. As evidenced below, students are provided many opportunities over the course of the week to work on foundational skills.

For every unit, there are pages titled Differentiate to Accelerate. These pages include the quantitative, qualitative, and reader/task information, as well as an outline for where to find information on how to differentiate for English Language Learners, how to differentiate using the Quick Checks, and also how to differentiate using the leveled readers. (Unit 5, Week 1, T7)

On every Day 1, and throughout the week, there are many scaffolds for English Language Learners. While many of these have to do with comprehension and vocabulary, there are some that have to do with foundational skills. “Phonemic Awareness:Minimal Contrasts: Focus on articulation. Say /ou/ and note your mouth position. Have children repeat.” (Unit 5, Week 1, T13)

Periodically, there is Corrective Feedback given. “Sound error: Model the sound that children have missed, then have them repeat the sound.” (Unit 5, Week 1, T13)

Each day, there is a Monitor and Differentiate box. The Quick Check is listed.Some of these have to do with comprehension, but some of them have to do with foundational skills. “Can children read and decode words with diphthongs ou and ow? Can children recognize and read high frequency words?” Then, directions are given for small group instruction. (Unit 5, Week 1, T15)

Differentiation is provided within the small differentiated reading groups. The students in Approaching grade level practice skills a lot more than the students in on grade level and beyond grade level groups. In Unit 5, Week 1:

  • Approaching: There are 3 short lessons for phonological awareness, 5 for phonics, including 1 for building fluency with phonics, 2 for reviewing and reteaching high frequency words, 2 for structural analysis, and 1 for rereading text for fluency. (13 lessons
  • On: 1 lesson for phonics. (1 lessons)
  • Beyond: There are no foundational skills lessons.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Grade 2 partially meet the expectations of the Gateway 2. Texts are organized around topics to build knowledge. The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for including a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Students write to address multiple topics over both short and extended time frames; however, students may not be able to adequately refine and reflect on their writings before moving on to a new topic; therefore, materials do not fully support increasing students’ writing skills and ability. Students will work on a series of short and long research projects throughout the year. The materials lack direction and support to teachers for completing shared research products. Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

24/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations for texts being organized around a topic/topics to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend complex texts proficiently.

Each unit is built around a Big Idea with five weekly topics. In each unit, the anchor texts and supporting texts center around the weekly topics. The writing tasks revolve around the weekly topic.Each week ends with research and inquiry. Students research the topic and create a product.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, the topic is Pets are Our Friends. The Literature Anthology story is called Not Norman, with a related poem called “My Puppy”. The Reading/Writing Workshop stories support the topic, as do the small, leveled texts. This topic is closely related to the Week 1 topic: Friends Help Friends, and the Week 4 topic: Animals Need Our Care.Students respond to a prompt based on a text they read. Given that the text relates to the topic, the writing prompt does as well. Students write about how the boy’s and the dog’s relationship changes. (p. T222) Students create a poster with information about an animal and why it would make a good pet. (p. T246).
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, the topic is Earth Changes. The anchor texts and supporting texts all incorporate the topic. Some titles include, Into the Sea, Volcanoes, and Earthquakes.Students draw evidence from expository texts and write informational texts (T126). Students research facts and details to describe a natural event that changes Earth and write summaries, including a photograph or drawing (T150).

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations for containing sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. In Grade 2, students are ask and answer questions such as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text, retell stories, including fables and folktales and determine their central message, and describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

In the Teacher’s Guide, each time a Reading/Writing Workshop story, or a Literature Anthology story is introduced, a Close Reading Routine chart is shown. This shows that while the story is first read, key ideas and details are to be identified, and during the reread, analyzing text, craft, and structure should take place.Within each unit, we see a small chart called, “Skills Trace.” For Unit 1, this skills trace shows how key details are introduced, reviewed, and assessed. For Unit 5, this skills trace lets us know when point of view is introduced, reviewed, assessed.

In each unit throughout the program, students are asked to retell in response to the Literature Big Book, the Reading/Writing Workshop story, the Literature Anthology story, the interactive read aloud, and the leveled texts. Retelling cards are offered for support for the approaching level text and the on level text. Second grade students, in particular, are asked to be able to recount fables and folktales. All of the texts ask students to analyze language, word choice, key ideas, details, structure, and craft. Students’ independence with these components (language, word choice, key ideas, details, structure, craft) does seem to increase. Examples of coherently sequenced questions include but are not limited to:

Unit 2, Week 4

  • Text Features: Headings and Captions How do the headings on pages 196 and 197 help to clarify the information in the text? (They give specific examples of details in the text, like what kinds of plants pandas eat and a specific place where bears live.)
  • Main Topic and Key Details What key detail did you learn about how bears and baby bears spend the winter? Let’s add it to our Main Topic and Key Details Chart.
  • Author’s Craft: Details and Facts Authors of nonfiction text try to give details and facts in a clear way. Look at the word den in the second sentence on page 199. The author introduces the word den by telling us that it is a home. Reread page 199. Work with a partner to find three more facts about dens.
  • Main Topic and Key Details Look back through the selection with a partner. Make sure you’ve added all the important key details about the main topic “Bears and Baby Bears” to your graphic organizer.
  • Author’s Craft: Photos and Diagrams Explain that an author of nonfiction text chooses photos and diagrams to show information and create interest for the reader. • Point out how the author used photos and text in the diagram to show and tell about each stage of the bear’s life cycle. (p. 200) • Ask children to find their favorite photograph. Have them tell why they think it is interesting and what they learned from it.

Unit 6, Week 3

  • Analyze Words/Phrases: Read and spell the words astronaut and satellites. Explain word meaning as needed. (T225A) On page 538, the author uses the clue word First to help us understand steps to become an astronaut. What is the first step? (T225B) To figure out the meaning of the word mentally, I can use what I know about Latin roots….(T225D)
  • Key Ideas/Details: The text tells about some of the things you must do to become an astronaut. What key details have we read so far? Let’s add the information to our Main Idea and Key Details chart. (T225C) Turn to a partner and discuss the key details you learned on these pages about becoming an astronaut. Let’s add the information to the chart (T225D)
  • Structure: Expository text often contains diagrams. A diagram is a picture with labeled parts. Look at the diagram on page 546 with a partner and discuss what it helps you understand. (T225F)
  • Craft: How does the author interact with the reader? (T225D) Idioms are phrases that have a meaning different than the actual words. Authors use idioms to express or describe something. What do you think the idiom “ride of your life” means? Why do you think the author uses this idiom here? (T225G) How does the author use humor to grab your attention? (T225H)

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the expectations that the materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Although there are a multiple questions and tasks that direct students to analyze integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts, the time allotted these questions and tasks is not sufficient for students to analyze the information. Each unit contains three weekly text sets with questions and tasks created for each set. Each text set centers around a theme or topic with questions and tasks that asks students to refer back to the text to find and support answers to questions and to complete tasks. Questions and tasks require connected knowledge and ask students to connect ideas between multiple texts. The amount of class time allotted to each text and question set may not be sufficient to provide the time needed for students to analyze texts and gain knowledge and ideas, and teachers may need to use outside resources to plan accordingly. An example of how text sets and questions that build knowledge and integrate ideas are provided, but not given enough instructional time includes but is not limited to:

Unit 5, Week 4

  • Students talk about protecting our Earth. Teachers guide students in collaborative conversations to discuss the essential question: How can we protect the Earth? And develop academic language. Students listen to “Clean Water” and discuss the story.
  • Students Read “The Art Project” and model close reading with a short complex text. Students learn about saving Earth’s resources, citing text evidence to answer text-dependent questions. Students then reread “The Art Project” to analyze text, craft, and structure, citing text evidence.
  • Students write About “The Art Project” while the teacher models writing to a source. Students analyze a short response student model and use text evidence from close reading to write to a source.
  • Students read and write About The Woodcutter’s Gift to practice and apply close reading of the anchor text. Students read The Woodcutter’s Gift about how a woodcutter puts a tree to good use and then reread to use text evidence to understand how the author uses text, craft, and structure to develop a deeper understanding of the story. Students write a short response about The Woodcutter’s Gift and integrate Information about protecting the Earth and its resources. Students write to two sources, citing text evidence from The Woodcutter’s Gift and “Earth’s Resources.”
  • Students complete independent partner work as a gradual release of support to independent work. Students answer text-dependent questions, scaffolded partner work, talk with a partner, cite text evidence, complete a sentence frame, and are guided in text annotation.
  • Students integrate knowledge and ideas to connect texts. Students discuss how each of the texts answers the question: How can we protect Earth? and compare information about Earth in texts read with a photograph of a house made of glass bottles. Finally students conduct a short research project. They create a chart that shows materials that can be recycled.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the expectations questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Culminating tasks and projects do occur across the year’s worth of instructional materials. The culminating tasks are partially related to the text-based questions or tasks produced during the week. On Day 5 of each week, students complete the Integrate Ideas activity and the Text Connections, Research and Inquiry, and Speaking and Listening tasks.

During Text Connections each week, students complete a foldable to compare information from the week’s readings. The directions ask students to compare texts without giving any further direction or guiding questions. The directions and foldable for connecting to the essential question do not vary or grow in rigor throughout the units or school year. This culminating activity does not demonstrate knowledge of a topic.

During Research and Inquiry students create a checklist to review their project for the week. This gives students a better understanding of the task and its requirements, but does not demonstrate knowledge of a topic. For example in Unit 6, Week 3, the Teacher’s Edition states, “Have children create a checklist and review their travel plans or proposals: Does their plan describe the location they plan to visit? Have they identified the purpose of the trip and the role of each team member? Did they add a map of the place they will visit? Have they taken notes about the trip’s goals? Guide groups to practice sharing their travel plans or proposals with each other. Children should practice speaking and presenting their information clearly. Prompt children to ask questions to clarify when something is unclear: Where will you travel? Why do you hope to see there? What will be your responsibility on this trip? Have children use the Presentation Checklist online.”

The Speaking and Listening activity remind students speaking and listening strategies while working with a partner to complete an activity in the Close Reading Companion. Students again compare how the Close Reading text is similar to the week’s texts. These directions are vague and do not support a student's ability to demonstrate knowledge of a topic. For example in Unit 1, Week 5, the Teacher’s Edition states, “Read aloud with children the Integrate activity on page 33 of the Close Reading Companion. Guide partners to discuss how the photograph of the family washing the car is similar to “Families Work.” Have partners collaborate to complete the Integrate page by comparing the photograph to the week’s selections.”

At the end of the Unit, during Week 6, students Wrap Up the Unit: The Big Idea. Students use their weekly graphic organizers and notes to participate in a collaborative conversation about the Unit Big Idea. Students present their ideas and the class creates a list. This task does not differ throughout the units. The Teacher Edition does not provide enough support to ensure that students demonstrate their knowledge of a topic.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for including a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. The number of words a student is introduced to in a five-day setting, along with the time spent on vocabulary activities/tasks, may be amended to meet site-specific needs. Direction is given in the Teacher’s Edition for teachers to review vocabulary in future lessons or how words build knowledge to access future grade-level texts. The teacher edition states, “The words are always reviewed the next week in Build Vocabulary. In addition, you should do a periodic cumulative review of vocabulary words about twice per unit.”

Vocabulary build throughout the week and across texts within a one-week period. During reading each week, students are introduced to Words to Know vocabulary. These vocabulary words are introduced using the vocabulary routine and visual vocabulary cards. The vocabulary routine states to define the word, give an example of the word, and then ask a question using the word. Words are introduced within the context of a sentence. Words to Know vocabulary are found within and throughout each text read during the week. Vocabulary strategy mini lessons are included in weekly lessons. Vocabulary practice can be found in student practice books.

In the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook, a supplemental resource, teachers are guided through a 4-step routine that can be used year-long to introduce vocabulary. (pages R41-R42)

  • Step 1: Introduce (tell students what the vocabulary routine will be)
  • Step 2: Model (I Do - Define/Example/Ask)
  • Step 3: Guided Practice (We Do - Ask students to identify examples and non-examples of the word; Guide students in creating word squares)
  • Step 4: Provide Independent Practice (You Do): “Individual turns allow you an opportunity to assess each student’s skill level and provide additional practice for those students who need it. Near the end of each week, students should write sentences in their word study notebooks using the words” (page R42).

In the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook, teachers are also provided with instructions on introducing vocabulary in context: “As you Close Read the selection with students, take a moment to point out the Build Vocabulary words and their definitions...Unlike the Define/Example/Ask Routine, the purpose of the Build Vocabulary words is to simply point out and define these rich vocabulary words to enrich and broaden students’ vocabulary and promote understanding of the text” (page R43). In this supplemental resource, the Define/Example/Ask routine is explained:

  • Define: “You will tell them the meaning of the word using student-friendly language--words they already know” (page R44).
  • Example: “You will give them an example of how the word is used, using their own common experiences” (page R44)
  • Ask: “You will ask them a question that helps them connect the word to words they already know and use the word in speaking” (page R44).

Each week students students Build the Concept using Oral Language Vocabulary words, practice Words in Context using Visual Vocabulary Cards, Connect to the Concept using vocabulary words, Review Oral Vocabulary, Expand Vocabulary, practice Vocabulary Strategies, and Reinforce Vocabulary. The Words in Context words are highlighted in the Literature Anthology. For example in Unit 2, Week 1:

  • On Day 1, students work with the Oral vocabulary define/example/ask routine for the words capture, chorus, croak, reason and visitor. Next students study the words in context using the visual vocabulary cards and the define/example/ask routine.Students are taught the words adapt, climate, eager, freedom, fresh, sense, shadows, silence. Students are also exposed to these words in their reading/writing workshop book on pages 100-101. The Teacher Edition states, “This page also has a your turn section where students pick three words and write three questions for their partner to answer.” These vocabulary words also appear in context in the story,“A Visit in the Desert”.
  • On Day 2, students review the words capture, chorus, croak, reason and visitor. Students expand vocabulary by practice adding inflectional endings –s, -ed, -ing to the end of the weekly vocabulary words. Students also have another vocabulary strategy lesson on prefixes where they learn about the prefixes re-, un-, and dis-. Students follow the explain, model and guided practice routine for this lesson.
  • On Day 3, students review weekly oral vocabulary cards. Students then reinforce vocabulary by reviewing the current week’s vocabulary words, afterwards students complete a sentence activity using the previous and current week’s vocabulary words.
  • On Day 4, students review weekly vocabulary words. Students complete a vocabulary strategy lesson on phrasing. Students also have a vocabulary lesson on root words.
  • On Day 5, students review weekly visual vocabulary display cards.

Academic Language are also included in bold in the Teacher Edition notes and listed and labeled in a side box in the teacher edition. These words are used in student questioning and directions.

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet expectations for materials supporting students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Students write to address multiple topics over both short and extended time frames and are provided with mentor texts, conference questions, anchor papers, and rubrics to help students self evaluate writing as well as giving a clear picture for teachers to evaluate and give feedback. The required time the weekly lesson would take with the amount of writing students are responsible for is unbalanced. Students may not be able to adequately refine and reflect on their writings before moving on to a new topic; therefore, materials do not fully support increasing students’ writing skills and ability.

Students participate in both on-demand and process writings throughout the year. Each week students Write to Sources and Work on a Genre Writing. Examples of this includes, but is not limited to:

Unit 6

  • Write to Sources: As students read and reread each week for close reading of text, they take notes, cite text evidence to support their ideas and opinions, and write short analytical responses. After reading, students build writing fluency, analyze model responses, craft longer responses incorporating text evidence, and focus on writing traits. Each week, students first write to one source and then write to two sources.
  • Weekly writing traits addressed:
    • Week 1 Organization
    • Week 2 Word Choice
    • Week 3 Ideas
    • Week 4 Organization
    • Week 5 Word Choice
  • Writing Process: Focus on Informative/Explanatory Writing Over the course of the unit, children will develop one or two longer informative/explanatory texts. Children will work through the various stages of the writing process, allowing them time to continue revising their writing, conferencing with peers and teacher.
  • Genre writing addressed: Informative/Explanatory
    • Teachers can choose one or complete both 3-week writing process lessons over the course of the unit.
      • Summary Writing
        • Week 1 Expert Model, Prewrite
        • Week 2 Draft, Revise
        • Week 3 Proofread/Edit and Publish
      • Evaluate Research Report
        • Week 4 Expert Model, Prewrite
        • Week 5 Draft, Revise
        • Week 6 Proofread/Edit and Publish, Evaluate
    • To evaluate Genre Writings teachers are directed to use the rubric and anchor papers provided to help evaluate student writing. Teachers are directed to review with individual students the writing goals they have set and discuss ways to achieve these goals.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the expectations for including a progression of focused shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials. Students engage in a progression of short research projects to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

There is one research opportunity in each unit. Students are led through the research process across the school year and the research requirements for students do not change or increase in complexity. Also, supports for teachers in how to teach students to do research for projects are not explicitly provided and opportunities for teachers to instruct and support student research to build understanding of a topic are missed.

In Grade 2, on Day 4 there is a Research and Inquiry activity. The students create an artifact to show something they have learned during the past unit, such as making a poster, or a page in a class book. The three research steps in the Teacher Edition though, rarely vary from what is given in Unit 1, Week 1: Choose a Topic, Find Resources, and Keep Track of Ideas. The Find Resources step sometimes adds in that students can reference magazines or library books or that students may use an interview as a resource. Occasionally students are asked to Conduct Internet Research instead of Find Resources.

Every Week 6 a set of research steps are listed:

  • Set Research Goals
  • Identify Sources
  • Find and Record Information
  • Organize
  • Synthesize and Present

This list doesn’t change from Week 1 to the end of the year. This additional Week 6 research project opportunity also lacks direction. Often teachers are told to have students use reference materials or online resources, but are not given specific lists of what these would be. Also, the Week 6 projects can be unclear. For example, in Unit 3, Week 6 one of the projects that’s listed is, “Research teams will generate a question around the forces described in the project, and design an experiment that answers that question.” This project does not include enough information for students to complete successfully.


Although, most projects direct students to go back and look at the reading selections, students could complete the research project without reviewing the texts and without having to do any research.For example in Unit 5, Week 2 students write a script. The Teacher Edition states, “Tell children they will write a script that shows an example of how to get along with others. Explain the characteristics of the strip. As a class, brainstorm Possible research questions about different places people get along. Children can use what they read this week to help them. Each group will choose a question such as how do people get along on sports teams.” Teachers are not provided with adequate direction and support.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 2 meet expectations that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. Independent reading routines are listed in the Professional Development Instructional Routine Handbook. This handbook gives routines for choosing a book, how to build classroom and school libraries, independent reading journals, and teacher and student conferences. The handbook states that students in Kindergarten should read between 10-15 minutes a day independently.

Each week students complete Self-Selected Reading during small group time. For example in Unit 5, Week 2 students who are participating in the Approaching Level small group are given the instruction,“Have children pick a fictional story that they have read for sustained silent reading. Remind them that they should identify the character’s point of view about an event and to summarize the events at the beginning, middle and end of the story to help them better understand the plot.Students are also directed to read purposefully, “Have children record points of view on their point of view graphic organizer. After reading, children participate in a group discussion. Children should share the information they recorded on their point of view graphic organizer, tell if they agreed or disagreed with a character’s point of view, and share their summaries and how summarizing helped them better understand the story.” (T161)

Digital Resources such as the ConnectED Web site are available. There is a School to Home link on the student edition. Comprehension and vocabulary activities provided for the week. Students can access texts read in class and teachers can assign reading tasks for students to complete from home via the website. Students also have access to 390 leveled texts on this site that they could either read or have read to them.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Close Reading Companion Grade 2 978-0-02-130599-5 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Literature Anthology Grade 2 978-0-02-134098-9 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 2 Unit 3 978-0-07-676621-5 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 2 Unit 4 978-0-07-676804-2 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 2 Unit 6 978-0-07-677082-3 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Reading/Writing Workshop 978-0-07-678320-5 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 2 Unit 2 978-0-07-678664-0 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 2 Unit 5 978-0-07-679677-9 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017
Grade 2 Unit 1 978-0-07-680388-0 Copyright: 2017 McGraw-Hill 2017

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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