Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

MyPerspectives English Language Arts Grade 10 materials fully meet the expectations of alignment. The materials provide students cohesive support and practice as they grow their skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. The materials include texts that reflect the appropriate demand and rigor required by the standards for the grade band.

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Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
32
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
32
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
34
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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-
Gateway One Details

The materials for Grade 10 meet the expectations for Gateway 1. The materials include texts that are high quality and engaging, and provide students opportunities to work with texts at the appropriate level of rigor and complexity. Questions and tasks students work with are consistently linked to texts and provide ongoing practice in grade level reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
16/16
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Criterion Rating Details

Texts include a wide variety of subjects, themes, text types, and complexity levels appropriate for Grade 10 students. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading. Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of high quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade.

NOTE: Indicator 1b is non-scored and provides information about text types and genres in the program.

Indicator 1a

Anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality, worthy of especially careful reading, and consider a range of student interests.

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria as the vast majority of anchor texts are widely read works that have been in the public eye for a length of time. The texts vary from seminal works to enduring classics that are worthy of especially careful reading. Additionally, the scope of texts—considering both theme and format—address a range of student interests. All of the anchor texts have been previously published and represent various cultures and histories. A few of the more modern anchor texts are of reputable publications. The qualities of the text, whether classic or modern, provide opportunity to study the careful and intentional use of language, impact on audience, purpose in the wider world, and development of ideas such that they are both timely and timeless.

Examples of publishable and worthy texts that meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

  • "Fall of the House of Usher” (short story) by Edgar Allan Poe
  • “House Taken Over” (short story) by Julio Cortazar
  • Excerpt from How to Tell If You Are Reading a Gothic Novel - In Pictures (informational graphic) by Adam Frost and Zhenia Vasiliev
  • Excerpt from The “Four Freedoms” Speech (speech) by Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • “Inaugural Address” (speech) by John F. Kennedy
  • “Inaugural Address” (video) by John F. Kennedy
  • The Tempest, Acts I - V (drama) by William Shakespeare
  • En El Jardin de los Espejos Quebrados, Caliban Catches a Glimpse of His Reflection” (poetry) by Virgil Suárez
  • “Literature and Culture: Oedipus the King” (historical context - Ancient Greece)
  • Oedipus Rex, Parts I and II (drama) by Sophocles

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
*Indicator 1b is non-scored (in grades 9-12) and provides information about text types and genres in the program.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by standards at each grade level. Source materials across the units include fiction and nonfiction literature, a broad variety of informational texts, digital resources such as audio recordings, and some visual stimulus. Assignments include writing in all of the modes indicated by the Common Core State Standards and media such as digital as well as traditional writing. Throughout the six units of study, students are exposed to a variety of texts that assist students with answering the unit’s Essential Question. This challenges the traditional use of text in specific grades and allows students to be exposed to a variety of subjects and themes. Genres include memoirs, blog posts, essays, short stories, novel excerpts, news articles, poems, and drama. Also, the publisher lists “Suggested Unit-Aligned Trade Books” which can be used as supplemental material.

Examples of the distribution of text types to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

Unit 1

  • “The Fall of the House of Usher” (short story) by Edgar Allan Poe
  • “Why Do Some Brains Enjoy Fear?” (interview) by Allegra Ringo
  • “Stone Age Man’s Terrors Still Stalk Modern Nightmares” (newspaper article) by Robin McKie
  • Suggested Unit-Aligned Trade Book: The Invisible Man, by H.G. Wells

Unit 2

  • “The Doll’s House’ (short story) by Katherine Mansfield
  • “Revenge of the Geeks” (argument) by Alexandria Robbins
  • “Fleeing to Dismal Swamp, Slaves and Outcasts Found Freedom” (radio broadcast) by Sandy Hausman
  • Suggested Unit-Aligned Trade Book: The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien

Unit 3

  • “Inaugural Address” (video) by John F Kennedy
  • “Caged Bird” (poem) by Maya Angelou
  • “The Censors” (short story) by Luisa Valenzuela, translated by David Unger
  • Suggested Unit-Aligned Trade Book: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs

Unit 4

  • “Civil Peace” (short story) by Chinua Achebe
  • “The Gold Series: a History of Gold (informational graphic) by Visual Capitalist
  • Suggested Unit-Aligned Trade Book: The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Unit 5

  • The Tempest, Acts I - V (drama) by William Shakespeare
  • “Let South Africa Show the World How to Forgive” (speech) by Desmond Tutu
  • Suggested Unit-Aligned Trade Book: The Count of Monte Cristo, by Alexandre Dumas

Unit 6

  • “The Neglected Senses” from For the Benefit of Those Who See by Rosemary Mahoney
  • “Experience: I First Saw My Wife 10 Years after We Married” (oral history) by Shander Herian
  • Suggested Unit-Aligned Trade Book: Blindness, by Jose Saramago

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level (according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis).
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

Many units employ a tiered level of text presentation, ranging from high, middle, and low Lexile measures. Texts are accompanied by a qualitative analysis based on knowledge demands, structure, language, and levels of meaning/purpose. Most texts are selected according to the connection of complexity and instructional purpose and tasks associated with Whole- or Small-group learning and Independent Learning. For example, though it may seem that students read texts at a high Lexile level at the beginning of the year, the complexities of texts generally align to the instructional purpose. More complex texts are used for whole-group instruction and less complex texts are for small-group or independent learning tasks. Materials offer support for text complexity through sections such as “Making Meaning” and vocabulary acquisition. All texts are accompanied by Performance Tasks that consist of essay writing or speaking and listening tasks aligned to the purpose of the text.

Examples of the appropriate level of text complexity that meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

Unit 2: “The Metamorphosis”

  • During Whole-class Learning, students read “The Metamorphosis,” a short story by Franz Kafka, which acts as the anchor text for the unit. Quantitatively, the Lexile level is 1310, with a word count of 21,912. Materials support students to make meaning and personal connections through the Essential Question (EQ) and the sections created to push students to comprehension: “Making Meaning,” “Language Development,” and “Effective Expression.” The short story is paired with a BBC film that aids in comprehension by providing video and audio. The EQ (Do people need to belong?) proves a strong relation with the associated task via qualitative analysis: “In this story, Gregor’s inability to belong in his altered state ruins his life. It also seriously hurts his family, who must care for him.” This analysis provided in the instructor’s text directly relates the EQ to the associated student task, while providing a strongly backed, qualitative analysis.

Unit 4: “The Golden Touch”

  • Students read the short story, “The Golden Touch” by Nathaniel Hawthorne in small groups. Because the Lexile measure for this story is 1130 and the text is 5,862 words, the text is quite accessible for small groups' learning based on quantitative measures. Qualitatively speaking, the instructor’s edition states that based on “Knowledge Demands” that “[T]he selection is a retelling of the myth of King Midas. The character’s situation and feelings are clearly explained.”

Unit 5: “The Sun Parlor”

  • Quantitatively, the reflective essay, “The Sun Parlor” falls on the lower end of the recommended Lexile range. However, students are required to complete this text within the construct of Independent Learning; considering students are required to read this text independent of assistance, students are to complete a “First Read,” and then “Close Read the Text.” So while the Lexile measure may be slightly lower and less challenging, qualitatively, students are presented with challenging concepts based on the Essential Question, “What motivates us to forgive?” The materials describe the tasks as an “adult reflection on mistaken values; students need to be open to the fact that people change over time.”

Unit 6: Excerpt from From Blindness

  • During Independent Learning, students read the novel excerpt from Blindness by José Saramago. As an outlier this text is well above the recommended Lexile range with a Lexile level 1600 and a text length of 5,502 words. Materials discuss the qualitative features that support student understanding of the text complexity: “The structure of the narrative is fairly clear and straightforward, with no exceptions to the chronology.” The text very strongly relates to the Essential Question: “What does it mean to see?” The man’s blindness occurs unexpectedly in a public place. His condition becomes more mysterious as the reader learns that there is no apparent physical cause. The reader is left to wonder if the blindness is a psychological condition or some unknown disease.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)

Within the grade 10 textbook, materials support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year, and series of texts are at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band. Within all units in the textbook, students are supported in their increasing literacy demands by engaging in reading and writing tasks in whole and small groups as well as independently during which they typically have a choice of texts. Students read, write, and discuss for a purpose, which is generally supported by the unit Essential Question, selected texts, Performance Tasks, and Performance-based Assessments. Within each unit, texts vary across a wide range of text complexities, based on quantitative and qualitative measures. To increase students’ literacy skills, the earlier texts tend to be at a higher complexity measure; but these are utilized in whole-group instruction with less complex tasks. By the end of the year, more texts fall at the lower end of the recommended Lexile range; however, students engage in these texts in Small-group and Independent Learning with the expectation that they carry more individual responsibility for reading and writing tasks.

Examples that materials support students’ increasing literacy skills across the year to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to the following examples:

Unit 1: Inside the Nightmare

Whole-group Learning text: “Fall of the House of Usher” by Edgar Allan Poe

  • Lexile: 1410
  • Length: 7,162
  • Qualitative Analysis:
    • Knowledge Demands: 4/5
    • Structure: 2/5
    • Language Conventionality and Clarity: 4/5
    • Levels of Meaning and Purpose: 4/5
  • Performance Task: "Use your knowledge of these texts and your own experience or observations to write an explanatory essay that answers this question: How and when does imagination overcome reason?"

Independent Learning text: Sleep Paralysis

  • Lexile: 1090
  • Word count: 449
  • Qualitative Analysis:
    • Knowledge Demands: 3/5
    • Structure: 3/5
    • Language Conventionality and Clarity: 2/5
    • Levels of Meaning and Purpose: 2/5
  • Text Questions:
    • Connect: What information about a symptom of sleep paralysis might link causes of stories of alien abduction in recent years?
    • Hypothesize: Why do you think people in “ages past” had stories of being harassed by demons rather than reporting that they had been abducted by aliens?
    • Compare and Contrast: In what way does the author say Lori Ball’s condition is similar to and different from other people’s sleep paralysis?

Unit Performance-based Assessment:

  • Write an explanatory essay on the following topic: In what ways does transformation play a role in stories meant to scare us?

Unit 6: Blindness and Sight

Whole-class Learning text: Oedipus the King Part 1 by Sophocles

  • Lexile: NP
  • Word count: 7,288
  • Qualitative Analysis
    • Knowledge Demands: 4/5
    • Structure: 3/5
    • Language Conventionality and Clarity: 3/5
    • Levels of Meaning and Purpose: 4/5
  • Performance Task: "Using information you have gathered through reading and your own life experiences, consider the differences between how people see themselves and how they are perceived by others. Wire a nonfiction narrative about a time when one person’s self-perception was unclear or incomplete, but someone saw him or her clearly. Tell a true story that suggests an answer to the following question: Can we see ourselves as clearly as others see us?"

Independent Learning Text: from Blindness by Jose Saramago

  • Lexile: 1600
  • Word count: 5,502
  • Qualitative Analysis
    • Knowledge Demands: 2/5
    • Structure: 2/5
    • Language Conventionality and Clarity: 4/5
    • Levels of Meaning and Purpose: 3/5
  • Text Questions
    • Analyze Cause and Effect: What effect does the lack of quotation marks to delineate dialogue have on the reader?
    • Assess: Why do you think the author chose to write the story in this manner?
    • Interpret: When the man is waiting for his wife in the lobby, what does he do over and over? Why does he feel the need to do this?
    • Connect: After the man is returned from home, he ends up falling asleep and into a dream. At the end of the story he dreams again. What is the significance of these dreams?
    • Speculate: What do you think might have happened to the man to cause him to suddenly go blind? Explain.

Unit 6 Performance-based Assessment

  • Write a nonfiction narrative in which you tell a true story related to the following question: Is there a difference between seeing and knowing.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

In the teacher edition, a planning section is provided for the anchor texts and series of connected texts. The planning sections include a summary of the text, insight into why the text was chosen, connection to Essential Question, connection to Performance Tasks, an outline of lesson resources, and a Text Complexity Rubric. The Text Complexity Rubric includes quantitative measures and qualitative measures. Quantitative measures include Lexile score and word count. Qualitative measures are scored and discussed by category: knowledge demands, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and levels of meaning/purpose.

The following is an example of a text complexity analysis and rationale like those that accompany all the texts in the materials:

Unit 1: PLANNING: “Fall of the House of Usher” by Edgar Allan Poe

  • Insight: Reading “The Fall of the House of Usher” will expose students to some of the classic elements of the Gothic tale: dreary weather, a depressing and oppressive setting, a mysterious illness, and a doppelganger. These elements work together to create a nightmarish confusion.
  • Instructional Standards: RL.10, RL.5, RL.1, L.1, L.1.b, L.5, L.5.b
  • Quantitative Measures:
    • Lexile: 1410
    • Text Length: 7,162 words
  • Qualitative Measures:
    • Knowledge Demands (4 out of 5): Life experience demands: Explores complex, sophisticated themes of mental illness and death that are not clearly explained and may be difficult for many readers
    • Structure (2 out of 5): First person narrator, told mainly in straightforward fashion.
    • Language Conventionality and Clarity (4 out of 5): Long and ornate sentence structure. Many above-level vocabulary words. Contains figurative language and complex descriptions.
    • Levels of Meaning/Purpose (4 out of 5): Multiple levels of meaning and symbolism may be difficult to grasp. Concepts and meanings are not clearly explained.

Indicator 1f

Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade-level reading proficiency.

The materials for Grade 10 include anchor and supporting texts that provide students with multiple opportunities to engage with a wide range and volume of readings in achieving grade-level reading proficiency. The six units of study are thematically designed with multiple texts that assist students with answering the unit’s essential question. Across the year, students are exposed to texts in a variety of print and digital media. Each unit begins with anchor texts as the focus of Whole-class Learning, followed by selected texts for Small-group Learning, and Independent Learning choices of text. Volume of reading is achieved through the variety of texts genres and lengths presented and the pace at which students are expected to complete each unit. The cumulative total of texts assigned varies by unit but offers a voluminous amount of reading.

Examples of the range and volume of reading that meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

Unit 1: Inside the Nightmare

Anchor texts:

  • “Fall of the House of Usher” (short story) by Edgar Allan Poe
  • “House Taken Over” (short story) by Julio Cortazar
  • Excerpt from How to Tell If You Are Reading a Gothic Novel - In Pictures (informational graphic) by Adam Frost and Zhenia Vasiliev

Supporting Texts:

  • “Where is Here?” (short story) by Joyce Carol Oates
  • Section from The Dream Collector (photo gallery) by Arthur Tress
  • “Why Do Some Brains Enjoy Fear?” (Interview) by Allegra Ringo

Unit 3: Extending Freedom’s Reach

Anchor texts:

  • Excerpt from "The Four Freedoms” (speech) by Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • “Inaugural Address” (speech) by John F. Kennedy
  • “Inaugural Address” (video) by John F. Kennedy

Supporting Texts:

  • Speech at the United Nations (speech) by Malala Yousafzai
  • Diane Sawyer Interview with Malala Yousafzai (interview) by ABC News
  • “Caged Bird” (poem) by Maya Angelou

Unit 5: Virtue and Vengeance

Anchor texts:

  • The Tempest, Acts I - V (drama) by William Shakespeare
  • En El Jardin de los Espejos Quebrados, Caliban Catches a Glimpse of His Reflection” (poetry) by Virgil Suárez

Supporting Texts:

  • “They are hostile nations” (poetry) by Margaret Atwood
  • “Let South Africa Show the World How to Forgive” (speech) by Desmond Tutu

Unit 6: Blindness and Sight

Anchor texts:

  • “Literature and Culture: Oedipus the King” (historical context - Ancient Greece)
  • Oedipus Rex, Parts I and II (drama) by Sophocles

Supporting Texts:

  • “View from the Empire State Building” (letter) by Helen Keller
  • “The Country of the Blind” (short story) by H.G. Wells
  • “The Neglected Senses” from For the Benefit of Those Who See (memoir) by Rosemary Mahoney

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage with complex texts to build content knowledge, strong writing skills, and to engage in meaningful dialogue that supports the acquisition and mastery of academic vocabulary. The text-based questions and tasks set forth in the materials support students as they engage in a wide variety of writing experiences, including targeted instruction of grammar and conventions/language skills.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text; this may include work with mentor texts as well).

The materials provide a consistent format for students to engage with text-dependent questions and/or tasks. Questions, tasks, and assignments are evident in each of the unit’s three sections: Whole-class Learning, Small-group Learning, and Independent Learning. Within the units, each module begins with a First Read guide which provides general text-dependent questions. The module also includes Comprehension Checks, Close Reads, and Analyze sections that provide text-specific questions. Each unit is designed in this manner to provide a scaffold-approach to text-dependent and text-specific questioning. Students are required to provide support from the text in most of the work they complete within the unit.

Examples of questions, tasks, and assignments that meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, the Performance Writing Task focus asks student to compose an explanatory essay that answers the question, “How and when does imagination overcome reason?” This addresses the Essential Question, “What is the allure of fear?” The instructions move students to further “support [their] ideas with references to the selections in Whole-class Learning, as well an an anecdote--or brief narrative--from [their] own experience.”
  • In Unit 2, after reading “The Metamorphosis,” students are introduced to Modernism. To further analyze the short story, students are asked the following questions:
    • “In what way is the story of “The Metamorphosis” fantastical?”
    • “In what ways could Kafka’s story be said to be ambiguous?”
    • “Is Gregor Samsa alienated? Explain.”
    • “In what sense could the story be said to be like a dream?”
  • In Unit 6, after reading Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, Part II, students analyze the drama by using the text to answer the following questions: “What facts does Oedipus gain by questioning the old shepherd? Why might this scene be the climax, or point of highest tension, in the tragedy? Explain.” The directions require that they “[c]ite textual evidence to support your answers."

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/ text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent and text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding.

The materials for Grade 10 contain text-dependent questions and tasks that build to a culminating task integrating a combination of writing skills with speaking and listening skills. Each unit is thematically organized to answer an Essential Questions throughout the distribution of texts and assignments in Whole-class Learning, Small-group Learning, and Independent Learning.

The text-dependent and text-specific questions are incorporated in activities that culminate in a Performance-based Writing Assessment, backward mapped from all unit activities. These culminating writing tasks are different genres of writing such as argument essay, informative essay, explanatory essay, and nonfiction narrative. Examples of culminating tasks include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, the Performance Writing Task focus asks students to compose an explanatory essay that answers, “How and when does imagination overcome reason?” This addresses the Essential Question, “What is the allure of fear?” The instructions move students to further “support [their] ideas with references to the selections in Whole-class Learning, as well as an anecdote--or brief narrative--from [their] own experience.”
  • In Unit 5, the Performance-based Assessment is to write an argument essay and informal speech in which students answer the question, “Can justice and forgiveness go hand in hand?” To prepare for this Performance-based Assessment students do the following:
    • Whole-class Learning: Students read William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” and then go through the writing process, highlighting elements of an argument and the peer review process, to write their own argument Performance Task that explores and defends the topic of virtue and vengeance.
    • Small-group Learning: Students join with their groups to review the unit’s readings (about nations and individuals who have struggled with forgiveness) as the foundation for creating and planning a talk show segment that addresses the question, “Does forgiveness first require an apology?”
    • Independent Learning: Students review their Evidence Log to see if they have enough evidence to write an argument answering the question, “Can justice and forgiveness go hand in hand? If not, they have to make a plan to do more research, talk to classmates, reread a selection, and/or ask an expert.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The materials for Grade 10 provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. Each unit is organized to answer an Essential Question (EQ) as each text is read and dissected. All speaking and listening assignments are performance-based for language development and require students to directly reference the text so that all students participate in accountable academic talk. Within each of the learning modules, Whole-class Learning, Small-group Learning, and Independent Learning, students are given materials with assignments and tasks to expand skills in academic vocabulary and syntax. During their reading, students see key words highlighted and defined. In ensuing sections, students demonstrate a variety of strategies for learning and using academic vocabulary. Many individual tasks and lessons encourage and prompt peer-to-peer discussions. There are instructions for teachers that include questions to lead whole class discussions.

Examples of opportunities and protocols include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, during whole-class instruction, students are required to analyze the performance of Part II of the play Oedipus; before discussion, students are to collect references and details as evidence via a Notes Collection Rubric. Students then construct critiques regarding the performance and then share and discuss: “Exchange critiques with a partner and discuss similarities and differences in your points of view. Then, consider how well you each met the criteria for the assignment.” The materials within this section provide opportunities for heavily-influenced, evidence-based discussions in a peer-to-peer setting during whole-class instruction.
  • In Unit 4, students read the “The Necklace” as one of the anchor texts. Under Language Development, students are given concept vocabulary which are highlighted in the short story. Students must respond to two questions that require them to look at the syntax within the piece: “How does the concept vocabulary sharpen the reader’s understanding of Mathilde Loisel’s character?” and “What other words in the selection connect to this concept?”
  • Unit 5, Let South Africa Show the World How to Forgive: As with grade 9, students are provided vocabulary words highlighted and defined in the text. They are then presented with brief explanations of prefix and suffix strategies and directed to explain how these strategies helped them make meaning of the words selected.
  • In Unit 6, Blindness and Sight, students practice small-group learning strategies. The materials outline the strategies and actions that are suggested for working in groups. These protocols support students as they have evidence-based discussions. For example, students are asked to come to class “prepared for group work,” “make eye contact to signal” their listening, “use text evidence,” “build off ideas from others,” and “invite others who have not yet spoken to join.” These prompts provide students with the directions necessary to initiate and sustain evidence-based discussions.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence as each unit is designed with several intentional, clearly labeled and supported speaking and listening activities, prompts, and presentations. In each unit, the Small-group Learning texts and tasks provide relevant follow-up questions and supports that direct students to speak with and listen to their peers. The Small-group Learning sections also provide a speaking- and listening-focused Performance Task. Additionally, speaking and listening is supported through Performance-based Assessments within each unit.

Examples of student opportunities for speaking and listening include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Outsiders and Outcasts, during the “Speaking and Listening Focus” of the Small-group Learning Performance Task, students follow this process:
    • Deliver a Multimedia Presentation: Students are provided with supports to deliver a multimedia presentation as a group. Students will be producing a presentation that includes text, graphics, and sound.
    • Plan With Your Group: Students are encouraged to “look for evidence in all readings to support their positions.” Additionally, students are prompted to “brainstorm what types of imagery best illustrate the idea of being different or being the same.”
    • Rehearse With Your Group: Student are prompted to “revisit the content of the presentation” to edit, if necessary. Also, the teacher is prompted to “remind students of the danger of speaking too fast when giving a presentation.”
    • Present and Evaluate: Teachers are provided with reflection questions that will support students as they listen to their peers and evaluate their presentations.
  • In Unit 4, The Thrill of the Chase, directions for group discussion include, “Be an active listener. As members of your group share key passages and explain their choices, give them your full attention. Ask questions, such as “Could you say more about that?” or “What sentence or paragraph in the text led you to that conclusion?”
  • In Unit 5, students plan a Talk Show in which they answer the question “Does forgiveness first require an apology?” This Small-group Learning task requires that each student take a role as a member of the talk show.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing as there is a variety of opportunities for on-demand and process writing throughout each unit in a variety of styles, formats, and lengths. Each unit contains several Performance Tasks that can be found at the end of each learning module (Whole-class Learning, Small-group Learning, and Independent Learning). The materials provide short and long on-demand writing assignments that prepare students for process writing projects.

Brief, on-demand writing assignments occur in relation to a single text or pair of texts and often lead to synthesis across assignments. Examples of on-demand assignments include evidence logs for information collection and journal logs for student reflection. Process writing in this series requires analysis and response to multiple texts and often occurs at the end of a unit as the Performance Task. Process writing assignments also support a presentation of the materials within the written assignment.

Examples of on-demand and process writing that meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, students review previously conceived notions based on evidence from the texts and compare to their opinions. Students then write a formal argumentative essay, which stands as the Performance-based Assessment. The essay response question is: “Should people in life-or-death situations be held accountable for their actions?”
  • In Unit 3, students read “The Metamorphosis.” The following assignment requires that the students use their reading to complete a writing task: "In a movie pitch, a writer tries to convince a movie studio to make a particular film. Write a pitch in which you argue that 'The Metamorphosis' should be made into a major Hollywood film."
  • In Unit 4, the Small-group Learning Task asks students to read The Thrill of the Chase. Following the reading, students write a paragraph to explain the steps to take to find Forrest Fenn’s treasure. Students are directed to use sentence variety when writing after analyzing sentence variety in the text; it is used as a mentor text in this context.
  • In Unit 4, during the Independent Learning section, students write an informative essay explaining how to decide what we want vs what we need and what can result from an imbalance between want and need. Students are directed to use evidence from sources across the unit and from the on-demand assignments leading to this culminating task.
  • In Unit 6, the Independent Learning activity asks students to review their Evidence Log to recheck their answer to the following question: “Is there a difference between seeing and knowing?” After independently reading an excerpt from the novel Blindness, students are asked if what they read added or changed what they thought about seeing and knowing. This short, focused writing task serves as prewriting for their Performance-based Assessment where students will write a nonfiction narrative that retells a true story answering the same question from their Evidence Log.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different types/modes/genres of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards which may include “blended” styles.

The materials for Grade 10 provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards as each unit focuses on a different writing style and provides lesson-by-lesson support for teachers and students as they build towards a Performance-based Assessment. Within each unit, all writing tasks are directly related to the text and/or essential questions for the units. In addition to low-stakes, informal writing opportunities, students are provided with writing tasks through the Performance-based Assessments that are varied throughout the units and reflect the distribution required by the standards. Students engage in writing explanatory, nonfiction narrative, informative, and argumentative pieces across all units as demonstrated in the evidence below.

Examples of different writing types addressed to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, students write an explanatory essay on the following: “In what ways does transformation play a role in stories meant to scare us?”
  • In Unit 2, students write an argumentative essay in which they defend a claim about the universal reality of being an outsider.
  • In Unit 4, students write an informative essay in which they examine a topic and convey concepts, information, and ideas as related to a particular question.
  • In Unit 5, students write an analysis for two poems: “They Are Hostile Nations,” by Margaret Atwood, and “Under a Certain LIttle Star,” by Wislawa Szymborska.
  • In Unit 6, students address the prompt, “Write a nonfiction narrative in which you tell a true story related to the following question: Is there a difference between seeing and knowing?”

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for research-based and evidence-based writing to support analysis, argument, synthesis and/or evaluation of information, supports, claims.

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 include frequent opportunities for research-based and evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, arguments, synthesis and/or evaluation of information, supports, and claims. Each unit has multiple opportunities for students to practice research skills that allow them to synthesize and evaluate a wide range of materials in order to enhance the quality of their writing. In each unit, students are prompted to explore a topic to deepen their learning or answer a question to gather evidence all in preparation for a culminating assignment. Some texts are accompanied by tasks which require writing to sources. These may embed short research to enhance the evidence later used to support writing and presentations. In each writing assignment, students are directed to use information from a variety of sources, synthesizing information from reading, research, experience, and other texts.

Examples of research and evidence-based writing that meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, after reading On Seeing England for the First Time, students conduct research to learn about either the history of British rule in Antigua or the Brixon riots of April 1981. The culminating task for this unit asks students to write and present a scene in which characters based on unit texts respond to the question: “Which aspects of English society would you change? Which would you keep?” Students must synthesize information from text analysis as well as evidence from their own research.
  • In Unit 3, after reading an excerpt from Freedom of the Press Report 2015, students are asked to research more about the press in their Small-group Learning. The purpose of this work is to support the creation of an infographic presentation. Students are assigned to research the issue of freedom of the press in at least two countries.
  • In Unit 4, students synthesize information from a variety of sources including texts within the unit, their own personal experience, and the experiences of others shared in media to write an evidence-based essay about how and when imagination overcomes reason.
  • In Unit 5, after reading William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, students are asked to write a literary criticism of the drama. To achieve this, they are given smaller assignments that will lead to completion of an analysis of the entire work. One assignment reads as follows: “In this assignment, you will write a few paragraphs of literary criticism that analyze the ending of The Tempest. Consider one of these two issues in your analysis: Explain the effect on the play’s happy ending of Prospero giving up his powers or of Prospero forgiving Antonio while reminding him of his treachery.”
  • In Unit 6, after reading, Oedipus the King, Part I, students research the places named in the text. In Part II, students research various ways artists have portrayed Oedipus over the centuries.

Indicator 1n

Materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials including instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application context.

Within the Grade 10 textbook, most of the materials include instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application. All texts within Whole-class Learning and Small-group Learning have a section labeled “Language Development.” The subsections within Language and Development vary based on the selection and may include, but are not limited to: “Concept Vocabulary,” “Word Study,” “Word Network,” “Conventions and Style,” and “Author’s Style.” Under “Conventions and Style,” materials provide instruction and opportunities for application of grammar and conventions/language skills. The holistic approach to grammar and language instruction follows this pattern throughout the textbook.

Examples of instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 2: “Outsiders and Outcasts," Anchor Text: “The Metamorphosis” by Franz Kafka, translated by Ian Johnston (short story): The Teacher’s Edition notes that in the text “[t]he story uses complex language with archaic or unfamiliar syntax...many complex sentences with multiple clauses, figurative language, and above-level vocabulary.” To address this complexity, students engage in Whole-class Learning to read the text and complete four grammar and conventions/language practices: “Concept Vocabulary,” “Word Study,” “Word Network,” and “Conventions.” For example, in “Word Study,” students are practicing identifying, analyzing, and creating examples of connotation and denotation in the following tasks: “Name synonyms for three of the concept vocabulary words, and tell whether or not their connotations differ in degree of intensity.” and “For each of the three concept words you choose, write three sentences. In the first, use the concept word itself. In the second, use a synonym that has a lower degree of intensity. In the third, use a synonym that has a higher degree of intensity.”
  • Unit 5: “Virtue and Vengeance,” Anchor Text: The Tempest by William Shakespeare (play/drama): During Whole-class Reading over the course of five acts, students experience a number of grammar and conventions/language practices: “Concept Vocabulary,” “Word Study,” “Word Network,” “Conventions,” and “Author’s Style.” An example task asks students to focus specifically on “Author’s Style” and word choice that as tools for character development. Students complete the following: “Briefly describe the type of diction each character uses in these passages.” and “Write two brief passages about the same topic. In one passage, use diction that Caliban might use. In the other, use diction that Ariel might use.” (Student Edition page 115).

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The materials for Grade 10 fully meet the expectations of Gateway 2.

Criterion 2a - 2h

32/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students' knowledge and their ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend complex texts proficiently.

The materials for Grade 10 are organized around topics or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend texts proficiently. Each of the six units has an Essential Question that provides a theme for the unit. All of the readings, including Whole-class Learning, Small-group Learning, and Independent Learning, are centered on that topic to assist students with answering the Essential Question. Within the Whole-class Learning instruction, the anchor texts challenge students to think about the Essential Question. Supporting texts in the Small-group Learning and the Independent Learning sections provide information relative to the essential topic and anchor texts. Many of the texts represent multiple and sometimes conflicting perspectives about the essential topic, and include a variety of styles, genres, and media. The lessons in each of these learning modalities include activities that further student comprehension of progressively difficult text. Students’ knowledge based on the specific topic/lens is deepened after every text is analyzed, based on supporting questions. Assigned to keep an evidence log along with multiple graphic organizers, students can chart their growth as independent readers. Additionally, students display their knowledge in the completion of Performance Tasks or Performance-based Assessments that usually consist of speaking and listening skills or writing tasks.

Examples of organization of texts by topic to build student knowledge to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

Unit 2: Outsiders and Outcasts

  • Essential Question: Do people need to belong?
  • Whole-class Learning:
    • “The Metamorphosis” by Franz Kafka (translated by Ian Johnston)
    • “Franz Kafka and Metamorphosis” (media: video) BBC
  • Small-group:
    • “The Doll’s House” by Katherine Mansfield
    • “Sonnet, With Bird” by Sherman Alexie
    • “Elliptical” by Harryette Mullen
    • “Fences” by Pat Mora
    • “Revenge of the Geeks” by Alexandra Robbins
    • “Encountering the Other: The Challenge of the 21st Century” by Ryszard Kapuscski
  • Independent Learning
    • "The Orphan Boy and the Elk Dogs" as retold by Richard Ordoes and Alfonso Ortiz
    • “By Any Other Name” from Gifts of Passage by Santha Rama Rau
    • “Outsider’s Art is Aluted at Columbia, Then Lost Anew” by Vivian Yee

Unit 4: All That Glitters

  • Essential Question: What do our possessions reveal about us?
  • Whole-class Learning:
    • “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant
    • “Civil Peace” by Chinua Achebe
    • “Fit for a King: Treasures of Tutankhamun” (Photo Essay)
  • Small-group Learning:
    • “In La Rinconada, Peru, Searching for Beauty in Ugliness” by Marie Arana
    • “Avarice” by Yusef Komunyakaa
    • “The Good Life” by Tracy K. Smith
    • “Money” by Reginald Gibbons
    • “The Golden Touch” by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Independent Learning
    • “The Gold Series: A History of Gold” an informational graphic in Visual Capitalist
    • “Ads May Spur Unhappy Kids to Embrace Materialism” by Amy Norton
    • “My Possessions, Myself” by Russell W. Belk

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

The materials for Grade 10 primarily contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics. First-read materials direct students to notice, annotate, connect and respond. Close-read materials provide students with more annotation directions and tools, then direct them to question the text and draw conclusions. Students keep a digital notebook to collect their responses to the text. During Whole-class, Small-group, and Independent Learning, students engage in Making Meaning sections with each text which provides sequenced higher-order thinking questions and tasks for a range of purposes through various subsections. For example,

  • Comprehension Check provides questions and tasks concerning the key ideas and details of the text.
  • Jump Start: Close Read provides questions and tasks concerning the craft and structure of the text.
  • Analyze the Text: provides questions and tasks concerning the key ideas and details
  • Analyze Craft and Structure provides questions and tasks concerning the craft and structure of the text.
  • Language Development section provides sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks related specifically to language through the Concept Vocabulary, Word Study, Word Network, and Conventions subsections.

Examples of sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

Unit 2: Outsiders and Outcasts

Text: “The Metamorphosis” by Franz Kafka

Comprehension Check

  • How do the family’s activities change to accommodate Gregor’s new condition?
  • Confirm your understanding of the story by writing a summary.

Analyze the Text

  • Compare and Contrast: Describe how Gregor’s insect like body changes from the opening of the story to the ending.
  • Interpret: How do these physical changes reflect Gregor’s evolving emotional state?

Unit 4: All that Glitters

Text: “The Golden Touch” by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Comprehension Check

  • What type of person visits King Midas in his treasure room?
  • What wish does the stranger grant?
  • What happens to the king’s daughter when she hugs her father?
  • How does Midas help the stranger reverse the curse of the golden touch?

Analyze the Text

  • With your group, reread paragraph 2 of the text. What words or phrases would you use to describe King Midas, based on the details the author gives in this paragraph? Is the narrator’s attitude toward the king positive of negative? How do you know?

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts. This structure begins with an essential question for each unit. Each text is accompanied by Whole-class, Small-group, and Independent Learning sections. Each of these learning constructs contain text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that guide students in building knowledge and integrating ideas across both individual and multiple texts. These sequences of text dependent questions prepare students to complete the Performance Tasks, Unit Reflections, and Performance-Based Assessments that require students to specifically integrate knowledge across multiple texts.

Examples of coherently sequenced text dependent questions that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

Unit 1: Inside the Nightmare

Essential Question: What is the allure of fear?

  • Analyze the Text: After reading “Fall of the House of Usher,” students are assigned to respond to the questions below and cite textual evidence to support their answer:
    • Interpret: Which descriptive details of the interior of the house suggest that the narrator has entered a realm that is very different from the ordinary world?
    • Making Inferences: In what ways is the appearance of the interior of the house related to Usher’s appearance and the condition of his mind?
  • Performance Task: Writing Focus: Use your knowledge of these texts and your own experiences and observations to write an explanatory essay that answers this question: How and when does imagination overcome reason?

Unit 3: Extending Freedom’s Reach

Essential Question: What is the relationship between power and freedom?

  • Comparing Text to Media: In this part of the lesson, you will view Diane Sawyer’s video, "Malala Yousafzai." As you watch the interview, think back to Yousafzai’s United Nation speech. Consider ways in which the two texts connect with one another.
  • Performance Task: Speaking and Listening Focus: You have read many selections and viewed an interview that deals with issues of power and freedom. Work with your group to develop, refine, and deliver a multimedia presentation that answers this question: When, if ever are limits on freedom necessary?

Unit 6: Blindness and Sight

Essential Question: What does it mean to see?

  • Analyze the Text: After reading Oedipus, the King, students complete multiple text-dependent questions such as: Compare and Contrast: At the end of Part I, In what different ways are Oedipus and Teiresias both blind? In what ways can both see?
  • Performance Task: Writing Focus: Write a nonfiction narrative when one person’s self-perception was unclear or incomplete, but someone else saw him or her very clearly. Tell a true story that suggests an answer to the following question: Can we see ourselves as clearly as others see us?

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, and listening).

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrated their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills, including a combination of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Each unit is focused on a topic that is driven by an essential question. Each unit is divided into three learning modalities: Whole-class Learning, Small-group Learning, and Independent Learning. Students engage with multiple texts and tasks during each learning modality. As they progress through the unit, students have the opportunity to practice reading, writing, speaking, and listening independently; but the performance tasks for each modality generally require a combination of these skills as students compose synthesis essays, share their own work, hold structures discussions, and perform peer reviews. The Performance-based Assessments for each unit also require that students integrate multiple skills and give oral presentations of their work.

Examples of integrated skills in questions and tasks to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

Unit 1: Inside the Nightmare

Essential Question: What is the allure of fear?

  • Performance Task: After reading “The Fall of the House of Usher” and “House Taken Over,” students complete use the texts and their own experience to write an explanatory essay on the following question: How and when does imagination overcome reason?
    • Peer review: Exchange papers with a classmate. Use the checklist to evaluate your classmate’s argument and provide supportive feedback.
  • Performance-based Assessment: Write an explanatory essay on the following topic: In what way does transformation play a role in the stories meant to scare us? Use evidence from at least three of the selections you read and researched in this unit to support your perspective. Include a narrative dimension in the form of an anecdote, a brief story from your own experience or that of someone you know.

Unit 3: Extending Freedom’s Reach

Essential Question: What is the relationship between power and freedom?

  • Performance Task: Use the knowledge you have gained from reading Roosevelt’s “Four Freedoms” speech and from reading and listening to Kennedy’s inaugural address to write about the power of the individual. Write a brief informative essay in which you focus on answering this question: What can one person do to defend the human rights of all people?
  • Performance-based Assessment: Students complete a final draft of an informative essay that answers, “What does it mean to be free?” Then they use it as foundation for a five- to ten-minute multimedia presentation.

Unit 6: Blindness and Sight

Essential Question: What does it mean to see?

  • Performance Task: Use the information you have gathered through reading and your own life experiences to consider the differences between how people see themselves and how they are perceived by others. Write a nonfiction narrative about a time when one person’s self-perception was unclear or incomplete but someone else saw him or her clearly. Tell a true story that suggests an answer to the following question: Can we see ourselves as clearly as others see us?
  • Performance-based Assessment: Write a nonfiction narrative in which you tell a true story related to the following question: Is there a difference between seeing and knowing? In your narrative present both clearly-delineated characters - the people who are involved in the action of the story - and settings.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/ language in context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials include a consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic and figurative language in context.

The materials for Grade 10 include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Most materials include a consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary and figurative language in context. Each text within the Whole-group and Small-group Learning sections include a “Language Development” section with: “Concept Vocabulary,” “Word Study,” “Word Network,” “Conventions and Style,” “Text Features,” etc. All units follow the same expectation that students are interacting and building academic vocabulary per individual text. To complete the Performance-based Assessment at the end of the unit, students demonstrate “Academic Vocabulary” by incorporating their culminating “Word Network” per individual unit. Students are regularly interacting with words and building relationships with the language of the multiple texts as each unit is modeled exactly the same. By the time students have completed all units, students will have mastered formative language in context for individual texts and across texts multiple times. Additionally, the materials include text-specific evidence logs and selection tests that support and assess students as they interact with academic and figurative language in context.

Examples of building key academic vocabulary words in and across texts to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

Unit 4: All that Glitters

Text: “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant, translated by Andrew MacAndrew

Language Development

  • Concept Vocabulary:
    • Vocabulary: refinement, suppleness, exquisite, gallantries, resplendent, homage
    • How does the concept vocabulary sharpen the reader’s understanding of Mathilde Loisel’s character?
    • What other words in the selection connect to this concept?
    • Use each concept word in a sentence in which sensory details reveal the word’s meaning.
  • Word Study
    • Write the meanings of these words formed from the root -splend-: splendor, splendid, splendiferous. Consult a print or online dictionary if needed.
    • Use each of these three words in a sentence. Include context clues that reveal shades of meaning among the words.
  • Word Network
    • Add words related to materialism from the text to your Word Network.
  • Writing to Sources
    • Adopt the perspective of Mathilde Loisel, and write a diary entry in which you explain how your life changed after the party. Include several of the concept vocabulary words in your diary entry.
  • Evidence Log
    • Before moving on to a new selection, go to your evidence log and record what you learned from “The Necklace.”
  • Performance Task
    • Think about how the characters or real people featured in the section and decide what is valuable to them. Consider different reasons that objects either have or lack value. Then write an informative essay in which you answer these questions: What makes something valuable? What makes something a treasure?

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and practice which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria as they provide a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks. In each unit, writing instruction and tasks are aligned to specific texts. The texts are often used as models for future writing tasks so that students are writing with mentor texts in mind. Writing instruction takes a scaffolded approach to process writing providing students with the opportunity to practice and prepare before writing for performance-tasks or performance-based assessments. This instruction across the six units includes development of various grade-level- appropriate modes of writing to explore and reflect learning relative to the essential question in each unit. The cohesiveness of the writing instruction is also aligned to language standards which support development of increasingly complex writing skills. Text sets in each unit of study provide model/mentor texts such that students can analyze author’s craft demonstrating the language goal relative to writing instruction prior to attempting to demonstrate achievement in a writing task. Across the year, students keep a digital notebook which provides a snapshot of coherence as well as a record of growth across the various tasks.

Examples of a cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

Unit 2: Outsiders and Outcasts

  • Performance Task
    • Use the following outline to plan your response to “The Doll’s House.” Find quotations and other details from the story to support your ideas, and write the sources (page or paragraph numbers) for those supporting details.
  • Performance-based Assessment:
    • Write an argumentative essay in which to state and defend a claim about the following question: Is the experience about being an outsider universal? Use credible evidence from at least three of the selections you read and researched in this unit to support your claim.

Unit 4: All that Glitters

  • Writing to Sources:
    • Choose a character from one of your favorite books or short stories. Compose a diary entry written by that character. In your diary entry, include a description of an event that happens in the book or short story, and write the character’s thoughts and feelings about the experience. Remember to write from the character’s point of view.
  • Performance Task:
    • Think about how the characters or real people featured in this section and decide what is valuable to them. Consider different reasons that objects either have or lack value. Then, write an informative essay in which you answer these questions: What makes something valuable? What makes something a treasure?

Unit 6: Blindness and Sight

  • Performance Task
    • Using information you have gathered through reading and your own life experiences, consider the differences between how people see themselves and how they are perceived by others. Write a nonfiction narrative about a time when one person’s self-perception was unclear or incomplete. Tell a true story that suggest an answer to the following question: Can we see ourselves as clearly as others see us?
  • Performance-based Assessment
    • Write a nonfiction narrative in which you tell a true story related to the following question: Is there a difference between seeing and knowing? In your narrative present both clearly delineated characters - the people who are involved in the action of the story - and settings.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

For the Grade 10 textbook, most materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials. Each unit includes a research goal that students will conduct research projects of various lengths to explore a topic and clarify meaning. Most of these research projects are brief, and students are given an option to explore topics of their own choosing. An included resource toolkit includes a section on research which addresses topics like narrowing a topic, consulting sources, and avoiding plagiarism. While the research directions in the student text are always the same, the teacher edition offers varied suggestions for specific topics in case some students don’t develop one of their own. This instructional approach provides student an opportunity to practice their research skills through mini-inquiry projects. Many questions can be answered by consulting a single source beyond the assigned sources and sharing either the process of finding information or synthesizing with other students.

Examples of focused, shared research and writing projects to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

Unit 1: Inside the Nightmare

  • Text: “House Taken Over” by Julio Cortazar
    • Research to Clarify: If students struggle to come up with a detail to research, suggest that they focus on the following topics: Buenos Aires, the architecture, or the currency (money used in the country).
    • Research to Explore: Research the origin of the story. Discover information about the home in Buenos Aires Province that inspired it.

Unit 3: Extending Freedom’s Reach

  • Text: “The Censors” by Luisa Valenzuela, translated by David Unger
    • Research Challenge: Encourage interested students to learn more about current or past censorships in one or two other countries. During the research, have students consider the following questions: How is censorship enforced? What kinds of materials are censored? How does censorship affect the daily life of that country? How have citizens responded to the censorship? Students can write a one-page, magazine-style article to present their findings.

Unit 5: Virtue and Vengeance

  • Text: Act III of The Tempest by William Shakespeare
    • Research to Clarify: Choose at least one unfamiliar detail from the text. Briefly research that detail. In what way does the information you learned shed light on an aspect of the play?
    • Research to Explore: Choose something from the text that interests you and formulate your research question. Write your question here.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Each of the six units within Grade 10 is organized into Whole-class Learning, Small-group Learning, and Independent learning segments. In the Independent Learning section, students are given a list of works to select from as their personal reading. The section begins with Independent Learning Strategies that require students to be accountable for their work. The section states, “Throughout your life, in school, in your community, and in your career, you will need to rely on yourself to learn and work on your own.” Highlighting the purpose behind independent reading while providing guidelines for accountability (create a schedule, practice what you learned, and take notes) allows regular engagement for independent learning in each chapter. There is a student video for them to watch and learn more about what they must do during their Independent Learning days, which are typically Days 27 and 28 of each unit pacing plan.

Accountability for independent reading includes a selection test for each independent title which consists of selected response items addressing comprehension, vocabulary, and analysis. There are clear directions and consistent expectations for recording entries in the student’s digital notebook to connect and extend analysis of the text as well. Students are also consistently expected to share what they learned independently with their group/class.

Another opportunity to increase volume of reading and support or encourage independent reading is with the information for teachers to use trade books in each unit. Titles in each unit provide opportunities for teachers to swap titles within a unit, supplement with additional reading, or direct students for further reading on their own. While the possibility of independent reading in the form of reading and completing a task outside of a group does exist in each unit, accountability within each unit does not require a volume of independent reading.

Below is an example from a single unit of how students regularly engage in a volume of independent reading to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

Unit 1: Inside the Nightmare

  • Teaching with Trade Books
    • The Invisible Man by H. G. Wells
    • Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
    • Dracula by Bram Stoker
  • Independent Learning Selections
    • “How Maurice Sendak’s Wild things Moved Children’s Books Toward Realism” by Gloria Goodale
    • “Sleep Paralysis: a Waking Nightmare”
    • “The Feather Pillow” by Horacio Quiroga, translated by Margaret Sayers Peden
    • “Stone Age Man’s Terrors Still Stalk Modern Nightmares” by Robin McKie

Unit 1: Sample Independent Reading Tasks

  • Text: “The Feather Pillow”
    • First Read: Students complete the First Read Guide (graphic organizer). They complete the following information:
      • Notice: Who the is story about, what happens, when and where it happens, and why those involved react the way they do.
      • Annotate: Mark vocabulary and key passages you want to revisit
      • Connect: Connect ideas within the selection to what you already know and what you already have read.
      • Respond: Complete the Comprehension Check and by write a brief summary of the selection.
    • Comprehension Check Questions
      • At the beginning of the story, what have Alicia and Jordan recently done?
      • Initially, why is it not surprising that Alicia begins to lose weight?
      • What happens when Jordan helps Alicia go into the garden?
      • What causes the servant to call for Jordan when she comes in to strip Alicia’s bed?
      • To confirm your understanding, write a summary of “The Feather Pillow.”
    • Share Your Independent Learning: Students are asked to share their learning with their classmates.
      • Prepare to Share: What is the allure of fear? Reflect on the text you explored independently and write notes about its connection to the unit. In your notes, consider why this text belongs in the unit.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The materials in My Perspectives: English Language Arts - Grade 10 are well-designed and employ effective lesson structure and pacing so that students can master the content by the end of the course. Alignment to the standards is clearly outlined for each unit. The materials

offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing, standards-aligned data about student progress to inform placement, remediation and enrichment needs, and achievement, including rubrics and student self-assessments. Strategies and supports for students who need differentiated instruction are included (above and below grade level). Additionally, the materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers, “platform neutral,” follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. The materials can be easily customized for local use.



Criterion 3a - 3e

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8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials, My Perspectives: English Language Arts - Grade 10, are well-designed and employ effective lesson structure and pacing so that students can master the content by the end of the course. The student resources include clear directions, a predictable and intentional layout for each unit, and many high- and low-tech review and practice resources. Students and teachers are supported with clear directions and appropriate, well-designed graphics. Alignment to the standards is clearly outlined for each unit.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed (i.e., allows for ease of readability and are effectively organized for planning) and take into account effective lesson structure (e.g., introduction and lesson objectives, teacher modelling, student practice, closure) and short-term and long-term pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 10 are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Each unit is organized into the following sections: Unit Introduction, Whole-class Learning, Small-group Learning, Independent Learning, Performance-based Assessment, and Unit Reflection. Teachers and students are also directed to additional materials such as digital resources, including media selections, modeling videos, and audio recordings.

The curriculum is composed of six, six-week units. Each unit follows the same sequence of instruction focused on the unit essential question.

  • Unit Introduction – 1 day
  • Whole-class Learning – 12 days followed by 2 days for performance task
  • Small-group Learning – 9 days followed by 2 days for performance task
  • Independent Learning – 2 days followed by 2 days for performance based assessment

Each section begins with an overview followed by the lesson plan for the text. Each lesson plan includes:

  • Summary of text
  • Insight into the text itself
  • Connection to the essential question
  • Connection to the performance task
  • Lesson resources including:
    • Instructional standards for the lesson
    • Student resources found online
    • Teacher resources found online in the Interactive Teacher’s Edition
    • Selection resources
    • Reteach/Practice resources
  • Assessment
  • Text Complexity Rubric
  • Support for ELLs, struggling learners, and gifted
  • Teaching and Learning Cycle: Decide and Plan → Teach → Analyze → Revise and Identify Needs → Decide and Plan

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

For Grade 10, the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding. The pacing is such that students can master the content by the end of the course. The pacing guide appears in the TE on the first page of each unit, on the Whole-class Learning overview page, on the Small-group Learning overview page, and on the Independent Learning overview page of each unit.

With 6 units, the curriculum could be covered in a 36 week academic year. Teachers may choose to deliver whole-class learning, assign students to groups for small-group learning, or assign the independent learning lessons to individual students.

Support for block scheduling of the course content for individual lessons in each unit is available. For example, each day in the pacing plan represents a 40-50 minute class period. Teachers are advised to combine days to reflect their class schedule and they are given guidance on revising the pacing for differentiation (integrating lesson components and resources as necessary for students).

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The student resources for Grade 10 include ample review and practice resources, clear directions and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids. Materials include: evidence log; word network; learning strategies for whole-class, small-group and independent learning; genre-specific first and close read guides; text-dependent questions; App for scanning multi-media; model text for writing; support charts; concept vocabulary; essay rubrics; organization chart for small-group work; choice in many assignments; selection audio; presentation rubrics; and sentence stems.

Student directions are clearly written, and units and assignments follow the same predictable sequence, making it easy for students to complete activities. By beginning the Unit with a Launch Text written in the type of writing students will be practicing throughout the unit, and by having students address the essential question in response to the Launch Text throughout the unit and again in the culminating performance assessment, students continue to interact with the theme through reading, writing, and speaking.

The First-Read Guide is divided into quadrants titled: Notice, Annotate, Connect, and Respond.

  • Notice new information or ideas you learn about the topic as you first read this text.
  • Annotate by marking vocabulary and key passages you want to revisit.
  • Connect ideas within the selection to other knowledge and the selections you have read.
  • Respond by writing a brief summary of the selection.

The Close-Read Guide is divided into three sections:

  • Close read the text – Revisit sections of the text you marked during your first read. Read these sections closely and annotate what you notice. Ask yourself questions about the text. What can you conclude? Write down your ideas.
  • Analyze the text – Think about the author’s choices of patterns, structure, techniques, and ideas included in the text. Select one and record your thoughts about what this choice conveys.
  • Quick Write – Pick a paragraph from the text that grabbed your interest. Explain the power of this passage.

Ample review and practice resources are available:

  • Evaluating Your Draft checklist:
    • Purpose and Organization
      • Provides an introduction that establishes a clear context and introduces the characters.
      • Presents a clear chronological sequence of events that are linked by a variety of transitions.
      • Provides a conclusion that follows from the events and experiences in the narrative.
    • Evidence and Elaboration
      • Effectively uses narrative techniques such as dialogue, pacing, and description.
      • Uses descriptive details, sensory language, and precise words and phrases.
      • Establishes the writer’s voice through word choice, sentence structure, and tone.
    • Conventions
      • Attends to the norms and conventions of the discipline.

Directions and explanations are clear and reference materials are correctly labeled:

  • Peer Review - Exchange papers with a classmate. Use the checklist to evaluate your classmate’s nonfiction narrative and provide supportive feedback.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 10 include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. Alignment to the standards is found repeatedly throughout the series.

On pages T48-T59 of the Teacher Edition (TE), the Standards Correlation indicates, by standard, the name of the text or assignment and page number on which it appears. In Lesson Resources prior to each text in the TE, the standards appear in the chart broken down by Reading, Language, Writing, and Speaking and Listening.

In the Student Edition (SE), the standards are found on pp. xx-xxix and noted in the margins throughout each text selection, with the activities and questions following the text, with the performance tasks, and with the culminating Performance-based Assessment.

There is alignment between questions, tasks and assessment items. Examples like the one below can be found throughout the textbook:

  • Question
    • What was the author’s dream at age 12?
  • Task
    • Using this chart, cite three of the author’s influences and explain how each influence affected the central idea of the text. Share your responses with your group.
  • Assessment Item
    • You have read about imaginary characters and settings. Work with your group to develop, plan, and perform a fictional narrative for your class in which you address this question: What might Alice and the Jabberwock discuss if they had met and had a conversation?

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
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Indicator Rating Details

The visual design for Grade 10 (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The visual design is engaging. The colors chosen are not distracting. Also, color coding is used appropriately to allow teachers and students to locate sections of the textbook.

The layout of the text is consistent throughout, with each unit following the same format. Color-coded sections within each unit make them easy to locate quickly. For example, in the TE all lesson sections labeled “Teaching” appear with a green background color, while sections labeled for “Teaching Performance Tasks" appear with an orange background color.

Charts and graphics are easily recognizable from one unit to the next and are free from distraction. Texts are flanked by wide margins to allow for first- and close-reading notes. The font, size, margins, and spacing are consistent and readable.

Selections and their accompanying questions and tasks appear consistently throughout the text, making it easy for students to recognize and follow the order in which the materials are presented.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials, My Perspectives: English Language Arts - Grade 10, are well-organized to support teachers in their instruction and in refreshing/acquisition of their own learning of more advanced literacy skills. Clear alignments to the standards are listed throughout the teacher materials. The materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies that are incorporated throughout. Teachers are supported within each text selection to choose and employ research-based strategies to meet the needs of their students. Suggestions for communicating with students and their families to support student learning goals are also located throughout the units.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials include a Teacher’s Edition with ample and useful annotation and suggestions on how to present the content in the Student Edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The series includes an overview for each of the six units that includes a pacing plan with suggested days for Unit Introduction, Whole-class Learning, Small-group Learning, and Independent Learning. After each type of learning there are performance tasks that lead to the Performance-based Assessment at the end of each unit. To further assist teachers, there is a connection to standards, other lessons, trade books, skills, and vocabulary. The units include notes for cross-curricular perspectives and differentiation of instruction.

Throughout the unit, teacher guidance is provided in the margins on every page. For example, during Close Read the narrative guides teachers through this process by reminding students of what to look for, Annotate gives modeling language, Question models questioning and has the teacher talk through what they are wondering following the narrative, and finally, Conclude is where the teacher makes a conclusion based on the modeled think aloud.

Pearson Realize has online resources supplementing the Teacher Edition (TE) and Student Edition (SE). Digital Perspectives in the TE shows what digital resources are available for each lesson, such as audio, video, document, annotation highlights, EL highlights, and online assessments. Students have an online Evidence Log that is used to record evidence from all selections in a unit to aid in writing the culminating task of the Performance-based Assessment.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials contain a Teacher’s Edition with full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The series begins with “Getting Started with My Perspectives” that offers a program overview, teacher “how-to” information, teacher resources with scope and sequence, student resources, ELD support, and author background information.

Each unit in this series includes labels (Unit Introduction with Goals, Pacing Plan, Current Perspectives, Home Connections, and Unit Reflection) that give teachers an explanation of how to teach the texts and skills. The Personalize for Learning offers English Language Support, as well as Challenges for advanced students. This and other resources are available as a link within the online teacher edition. Additionally, the teacher’s edition allows for a direct link to the student’s edition within the unit for activities and assignments.

Pages are also color-coded: Whole-class Learning is lime green, Performance Tasks and Performance-based Assessments are color-coded in orange, Small-group Learning is turquoise, and Independent Learning is blue. The teacher is given instruction on what to say for each point of the lesson. Both Whole-class Learning and Small-group Learning have Learning Strategies to guide teachers with an outline to execute instruction.

Each selection in the Whole-class Learning and the Small-group Learning contains a “Planning” section that offers teachers the following:

  • Summary
  • Insight
  • Connection to Essential Question
  • Connection to Performance Tasks
  • Lesson Resources with standards listed
  • Student Resources
  • Teacher Resources
  • Reteach/Practice Suggestions
  • Assessment

Background and Author information is given for each section as a means to provide teachers with needed guidance through each reading selection. Within the teacher’s edition most selections have an audio-adapted version and a written version of the text.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials contain a Teacher’s Edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

Teachers are provided with a Pacing Plan for each unit that includes the Unit Introduction, Whole-Class Learning, Small-Group Learning, Independent Learning, Performance-Based Assessment, and Unit Reflection. Within each section, there is a recommended number of days allocated for each reading selection and activities, including Performance Tasks and Performance-Based Assessment. This gives a great overview of the unit and what to expect, for ease in planning.

Standards are given for each section as a means to provide teachers with needed guidance through each reading selection.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

At the beginning of the Teacher’s Edition, there is a section entitled, “Getting Started with My Perspectives.” In "What is My Perspectives" the publisher explains, “My Perspectives is a print and digitally blended program that promotes students’ ownership of the learning through goal setting, student choice and reflection. Students encounter authors’ perspectives as they read literature from across time periods and cultures. They engage in meaningful activities that inspire thoughtful conversations, discussions, and debates. ”

Pages are also color-coded: Whole-class Learning is lime green, Performance Tasks and Performance-based Assessments are color coded in orange, Small-group Learning is turquoise, and Independent Learning is blue. The teacher is given instruction on what to say for each point of the lesson. Both Whole-class Learning and Small-group Learning have Learning Strategies to guide teachers with an outline to execute instruction.

There is also a Planning section before each text selection showing the Lesson Resources, both student and teacher resources organized by Making Meaning, Language Development, and Effective Expression. Next, is a Personalize For Learning: Reading Support that gives the Text Complexity rubric for that reading selection and a Decide and Plan section which gives teachers additional information for English Language Support, Strategic Support, and Challenge support as well as a Read and Respond teaching scaffold. Decide and Plan also includes CCSS Instructional Standards for the selection with a catching-up suggestion and a looking-forward selection for the various standards covered in Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

There a section called “Home Connection” that instructs teachers to send home a letter explaining to parents what students will be learning and how they will be assessed. This can be downloaded in English and Spanish from the digital teacher’s edition.

Prior to each unit, students are given an outline page that lists the Essential Question with all the readings from in the Whole-class Learning, Small-group Learning, and Independent Learning. Additionally, the Performance Tasks that follow the three types of learning are listed for students to view. Finally, the Performance-based Assessment is listed with the prompt so students are made aware of what will be expected of them before they start the unit of study.

At the beginning of each unit, there are “Unit Goals” in the Student Edition. The goals are as follows: Reading Goals, Writing and Research Goals, Language Goals, and Speaking and Listening Goals. Students are asked to “Rate how well you meet these goals right now.” Introductory directions say, “These goals will help you succeed on the Unit Performance-based Assessment.” Later in the unit, students are given the opportunity to revisit their rankings as they reflect on individual growth.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials in My Perspectives: English Language Arts - Grade 10 offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing, standards-aligned data about student progress to inform placement, remediation and enrichment needs, and achievement. Rubrics are included for the Performance-based Assessments that accompany each unit. There is also an opportunity for students to complete a self-assessment, rating themselves on how they meet the unit goals.

Students are systematically held accountable for independent reading and are provided with a number of tools to support them and track their reading.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 10 regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. The series provides for year-long assessments in the form of a Beginning-of-Year Test on all standards taught in the academic year for planning standards focus, a Mid-Year Test for mastery of standards taught the first half of the year and providing opportunities to remediate, and an End-of-Year Test to determine mastery of standards, future class placement, and to capture final assessment data.

Unit-level Assessments include:

  • Selection activities formatively used to assess students’ grasp of critical concepts such as analyzing text, analyzing craft and structure, concept vocabulary, word study, and author’s style.
  • Notes in the Teacher Edition that offer suggestions for re-teaching.
  • Selection tests tracking student progress toward mastering standards taught with the selection.
  • Performance tasks including both a writing and a speaking and listening performance task preparing students for success on the end-of-unit Performance-based Assessment.
  • Unit tests requiring students to apply standards taught in the unit with new text, providing an opportunity for teachers to remediate.
  • Performance-based Assessments where students use their notes, knowledge, and skills learned to complete a project on their own.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Assessments for Grade 10 clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

In the Teacher Edition (TE), there is a Standards Correlation that notes by standard and title of the text or assignment and the page number on which it appears. In Lesson Resources prior to each text in the TE, the standards appear in the chart by activity and assessment, broken down by Reading, Language, Writing, and Speaking and Listening.

In the Student Edition (SE), standards are noted in the margin next to each text, activity, assessment and performance task.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Assessments for Grade 10 provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

When assessing taught standards, Mid-Year Tests and Unit Tests can be administered online, and remediation is assigned automatically. If not administered online, an interpretation guide can be used to assign remediation resources.

The writing portion of each Performance-based Assessment includes a genre-specific rubric in both the Teacher Edition and Student Edition. The second part of the Performance-based Assessment, speaking and listening, includes a rubric specific to the type of presentation. The wording in these rubrics is taken directly from the standards.

Formative assessment tips and suggestions are included with each activity. A section entitled "Personalize for Learning," located in the bottom margin of the TE throughout each unit, provides support for ELLs, Strategic Support, and Challenge.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 10 include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Prior to the introductory Launch Text, students complete a self-assessment, rating themselves on how they meet the unit goals.

The first activity students complete at the end of each text during Whole-group and Small-group Learning is a Comprehension Check, in which students respond to several open-ended questions following the first read of the text and then write a summary of the text. During Small-group Learning, students respond individually, then review and clarify details with group members.

Formative assessment tips and suggestions are included in the Teacher Edition (TE) in the margins with each of the activities students are to complete following a text. If students fail to cite evidence, teachers are instructed to remind them to support their ideas with specific information.

In the lesson plan for each text, found in the Interactive TE or Unit Resources, teachers are provided a list of resources to go with that text lesson. The list includes Reteach/Practice documents and Assessment for the text, if available.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 10 indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

  • All texts are read independently for the first and close reads.
  • Students are provided graphic organizers to record notes for both reads.
  • Students keep an evidence guide throughout the unit to collect evidence supporting their understanding of the unit essential question.
  • An Independent Learning Strategies video is included in the Teacher Edition (TE) that can be viewed with students prior to the two days of Independent Learning.
  • Students are to then complete the Independent Learning Strategy chart with the strategy and action plan they will follow. Strategies include: Create a schedule; Practice what you’ve learned; and Take Notes.
  • To help students choose the independent text, they are to:
    • Look Back – think about the selections they have already read and decide what more they want to know about the topic.
    • Look Ahead – preview the selection by reading the provided descriptions and decide which one is most appealing and interesting.
    • Look Inside – scan the text and make another selection if this text they chose doesn’t meet their needs.
  • Students complete the First-Read Guide and Close-Read Guide on the independent text.
  • There are text questions teachers can assign from the TE.
  • Students present to the class what they learned from the independent reading that helped them further understand the unit essential question.
  • A trade book alignment is included with each unit for suggestions for integrating longer works within the unit and lesson plans for each title are available.

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials in My Perspectives: English Language Arts - Grade 10 provide teachers with strategies to reach all learners, including those whose skills may be above or below grade level, or whose English proficiencies may provide additional challenges as they engage with the content. All students have extensive opportunities to read, write, speak, and listen to grade level text and meet or exceed grade level standards. Lessons provide Whole-class, Small-group, and Independent Learning opportunities throughout the school year.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 10 provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners, so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

Each unit begins with a Launch Text that is a lower Lexile, so that students can read independently and complete the assigned homework. There is also an audio summary for students to build additional background before reading.

There is a Personalize For Learning: Reading Support section that gives the Text Complexity rubric for that reading selection and a Decide and Plan section which gives teachers additional information for:

  • English Language Support with suggestions for Knowledge Demands and Language
  • Strategic Support with suggestions for Knowledge Demands and Language/Clarity
  • Challenge Support with suggestions for Text Analysis and Written Response

As part of supporting the standards throughout the unit’s teaching and learning cycle, under Decide and Plan is the standard being taught.

  • Next to the standard under Catching Up, selection scaffolds are provided before the lesson is assigned in the Student Edition (SE) to scaffold learning for students who are below grade level or students who need English Language Support.
  • The Looking Forward section provides activities to practice mastered skills in depth for those students exceeding grade level standards.

There are also notes in the Teacher Edition (TE) under the heading Personalize For Learning to provide extra support. There is a Vocabulary Development section that focuses on multiple-meaning words and gives examples for several meanings of a selected word.

Under Lesson Resources in the TE there are Reteach/Practice materials available online for students who may need extra teaching and practice with author’s craft, word study, conventions and writing/discussion. Each selection has the option to listen to the audio online as well as the Word Network graphic organizer and the Evidence Log.

Author’s Perspective gives teachers pertinent information to assist with providing differentiated instruction.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 10 regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade- level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

All students have extensive opportunities to read, write, speak, and listen to grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards. The students read the same grade-level texts throughout each unit, with the teacher modeling and scaffolding instruction during Whole-group Learning and facilitating during Small-group Learning. The students do have a choice of 4-6 selections during Independent Learning. These selections vary in genre and Lexile, but all are tied to the unit’s Essential Question and have a similar lesson plan and expectations.

There are supports built into the series to help make students who are not at grade level and students who speak a language other than English successful with the grade-level text and grade-level standards. For example, when introducing a unit, there is an Introduction Video as well as a Launch Text that is always a model of the type of writing students will be expected to write at the end of the unit. Audio Summaries are also available in both English and Spanish to help build background knowledge before reading.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 10 regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

All students have extensive opportunities to read, write, speak, and listen to grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards. The students read the same grade-level texts throughout each unit, with the teacher modeling and scaffolding instruction during Whole-group Learning and facilitating during Small-group Learning.

Under Personalize For Learning: Reading Support the Decide and Plan section gives teachers additional information for Challenge Support with suggestions for Text Analysis and Written Response.

Under Standards Support Through Teaching and Learning Cycle, the Looking Forward section provides activities to practice mastered skills in depth for those students exceeding grade-level standards. Within the Teacher’s Edition (TE), there is a chart that has the CCSS grade-level standard listed that includes a column called “Looking Forward.” This gives advanced opportunities for students who have mastered the standard to go deeper into the standard. For example:

  • In Reading CCSS RL.9-10.3 students analyze how particular elements of a story or a drama interact. To go deeper, those students “think of other plays and movies they have read or seen and discuss how stage directions are essential to a script.”

The Teacher’s Edition has tips for the teacher throughout the unit under the heading of Personalize For Learning, and one category is Challenge. Suggestions are located here to extend the learning for students who are exceeding grade-level standards. The format is similar for each unit and each grade level.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 10 provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Unit 2: Outsiders and Outcasts

Whole-class Learning: After reading The Metamorphosis, students draw images of their own interpretations of Gregor’s appearance based on the descriptions provided in the text. Students then share their sketches and reasons for including the details they are using in the drawings, exploring differences and similarities among the sketches.

Small-group Learning: Students create a multimedia presentation to present a position about whether difference is a weakness and sameness is a strength.

Independent Learning: After choosing a text from the selections offered as independent readings for this unit, students are asked to share what they have learned with classmates (pairing or small groups). The task is as follows: “Reflect on the text you explored independently and write notes about its connection to the unit. In your notes, consider why this text belongs in the unit.” Under “Learn From Your Classmates,” students are asked to “Share your ideas about the text you explored on your own. As you talk with others in your class, jot down a few ideas that you learned from them.”

Unit 5: Virtue and Vengeance

Whole-class Learning: While reading The Tempest, students make flashcards with the elements of a Shakespeare romance on one side and examples from The Tempest on the other side. Students practice with the flashcards, alone or with a partner.

Small-group Learning: After reading “Let South Africa Show the World How to Forgive,” small groups discuss whether or not Desmond Tutu’s speech is persuasive.

Independent Learning: After choosing a text from the selections offered as independent readings for this unit, students are asked to share what they have learned with classmates (pairing or small groups). The task is as follows: “Reflect on the text you explored independently and write notes about its connection to the unit. In your notes, consider why this text belongs in the unit.” Under “Learn From Your Classmates,” students are asked to “Share your ideas about the text you explored on your own. As you talk with others in your class, jot down a few ideas that you learned from them.”

Indicator 3s

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Indicator Rating Details

Digital materials for Grade 10 are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers, “platform neutral,” follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Students can use the BouncePage app wherever they see “Scan for Multimedia” to access. Additionally, they can access multimedia resources directly from print by using their mobile or tablet device.

Additional digital resources can be found in the Interactive Student Edition and myPerspectives website. Digital resources, including editable worksheets, can be found in the myPerspectives website.

Assessments can be administered in print and/or online. Pearson Realize provides powerful data reporting.

Indicator 3s3v

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials in My Perspectives: English Language Arts - Grade 10 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Digital materials are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers, “platform neutral,” follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate is supported. There are multiple opportunities for teachers to differentiate instructional materials for multiple student needs, including supports for before, during, and after each selection.

The materials can be easily customized for local use. Digital Perspectives identifies online resources for each lesson.

Indicator 3t

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Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 10 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

The Student Edition gives instructions for downloading Pearson’s BouncePages App from the Apple App or Google Play Store. When a student aims their camera at the Student Edition, they can tap the screen to scan the page. When they press “Play,” a video or audio can be listened to of that particular text. Also, students can access digital novels, interactive lessons, and games using this app.

Audio Summaries: Audio summaries are available online in both English and Spanish in the interactive Teacher’s Edition or Unit Resources. Assigning these summaries prior to reading the selection may help students build additional background knowledge and set a context for their first read.

Indicator 3u

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Indicator 3u.i

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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 10 include digital materials that give opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive technological innovations.

There are multiple opportunities for teachers to differentiate instructional materials for multiple student needs, including supports for before, during, and after each selection. Digital Perspectives offers suggestions for using digital resources to strengthen concepts being taught. Pearson Realize gives teachers access to manage and customize units by rearranging content, uploading their own content, adding links to online media, and editing resources and assessments.

Indicator 3u.ii

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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials can be easily customized for local use. Differentiation and extension opportunities available throughout the instructional materials allow many opportunities to personalize learning as appropriate for students. Teachers are also able to add notes to the materials.

Indicator 3v

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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials include technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other.

Digital Perspectives identifies online resources for each lesson. The Student Edition is Interactive with access to online annotations tools for reading selections. Students also have access to embedded, interactive graphic organizers and activities that allow for interaction when students are working with a particular text. Additionally, the Integrated Student Notebook gives students opportunities to share their work.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials in My Perspectives: English Language Arts - Grade 10 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Digital materials are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers, “platform neutral,” follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate is supported. There are multiple opportunities for teachers to differentiate instructional materials for multiple student needs, including supports for before, during, and after each selection.

The materials can be easily customized for local use. Digital Perspectives identifies online resources for each lesson.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. This qualifies as substitution and augmentation as defined by the SAMR model. Materials can be easily integrated into existing learning management systems.
0/0
+
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Indicator Rating Details

Digital materials for Grade 10 are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers, “platform neutral,” follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Students can use the BouncePage app wherever they see “Scan for Multimedia” to access. Additionally, they can access multimedia resources directly from print by using their mobile or tablet device.

Additional digital resources can be found in the Interactive Student Edition and myPerspectives website. Digital resources, including editable worksheets, can be found in the myPerspectives website.

Assessments can be administered in print and/or online. Pearson Realize provides powerful data reporting.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate and providing opportunities for modification and redefinition as defined by the SAMR model.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 10 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

The Student Edition gives instructions for downloading Pearson’s BouncePages App from the Apple App or Google Play Store. When a student aims their camera at the Student Edition, they can tap the screen to scan the page. When they press “Play,” a video or audio can be listened to of that particular text. Also, students can access digital novels, interactive lessons, and games using this app.

Audio Summaries: Audio summaries are available online in both English and Spanish in the interactive Teacher’s Edition or Unit Resources. Assigning these summaries prior to reading the selection may help students build additional background knowledge and set a context for their first read.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 10 include digital materials that give opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive technological innovations.

There are multiple opportunities for teachers to differentiate instructional materials for multiple student needs, including supports for before, during, and after each selection. Digital Perspectives offers suggestions for using digital resources to strengthen concepts being taught. Pearson Realize gives teachers access to manage and customize units by rearranging content, uploading their own content, adding links to online media, and editing resources and assessments.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized by schools, systems, and states for local use.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials can be easily customized for local use. Differentiation and extension opportunities available throughout the instructional materials allow many opportunities to personalize learning as appropriate for students. Teachers are also able to add notes to the materials.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials include technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other.

Digital Perspectives identifies online resources for each lesson. The Student Edition is Interactive with access to online annotations tools for reading selections. Students also have access to embedded, interactive graphic organizers and activities that allow for interaction when students are working with a particular text. Additionally, the Integrated Student Notebook gives students opportunities to share their work.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Fri May 19 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
My Perspectives English Language Arts Grade 10 Teacher's Edition 978-0-1333-3869-0 Copyright: 2017 Pearson 2017
My Perspectives English Language Arts Grade 10 Student Edition 978-0-1333-3896-6 Copyright: 2017 Pearson 2017

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Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

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ELA HS Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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