Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Grade 4 meet expectations for alignment. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Texts include a balance of genres and are appropriately rigorous and complex for Grade 4 students. Most tasks and questions are grounded in evidence. Materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundationalskills and making meaning during reading. Materials also provide opportunity to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level. The instructional materials support the building of knowledge through repeated practice with appropriate grade-level complex text organized around a topic. Vocabulary is addressed in each module, though academic vocabulary is not built across multiple texts. Culminating tasks require students to read, discuss, analyze, and write about texts while students participate in a volume of reading to build knowledge. Modules are developed to support and build knowledge, integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening to demonstrate grade-level literacy proficiency at the end of the school year.


See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
38
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
30
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
33
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The Grade 4 instructional materials meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. Most tasks and questions are grounded in evidence. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.Materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundationalskills and making meaning during reading. Materials also provide opportunity to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level.Overall, appropriately complex grade-level texts are are accompanied by quality tasks aligned to the standards of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language to build foundational skills and strengthen literacy skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
18/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials meet expectations for text quality and complexity. Central texts are of publishable quality and address topics of interests to Grade 4 students. The instructional materials include a mixture of both literary and informational texts. The level of complexity of most texts is appropriate for Grade 4. The instructional materials include a text complexity analysis with rubrics and rationales for their purposes and placement.The materials support students increasing literacy skills over the year and provide students with many opportunities to engage in a range and volume of reading throughout each unit and module through anchor texts, supporting texts, and leveled libraries.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worth of careful reading and consider a range of interests. Texts are examined multiple times for multiple purposes and are used to expand big ideas, build academic vocabulary, and facilitate access to future similar texts. Most texts are engaging, build knowledge, and facilitate access to future text while building towards independent grade-level reading.

Unit 1 Topic: Science Integration: Becoming Researchers

  • Unit 1, Module A: Porpoises in Peril by Gwendolyn Hooks builds knowledge of a challenging concept using scientific facts and terms. The text is engaging and facilitates access to other texts in the module’s text set.
  • Unit 1, Module B: Skeletons Inside and Out by Claire Daniel has straightforward explanations and contains domain-specific vocabulary words that are defined both within the text and in a glossary to expand on the modules big idea.

Unit 2 Topic: Social Studies Integration: Exploring Culture and Nature

  • Unit 2, Module A: Why the Sea is Salty by Dot McHarry engages students in a story of chronological events while including academic vocabulary and other challenging terms.
  • Unit 2, Module B: The Longest Night by Jacqueline Guest is a narrative of a Native American boy and his rite of passage. The text builds knowledge of cultures that may be different than that of students.

Unit 3 Topic: Science Integration: Exploring Impact and Effect

  • Unit 3, Module A: Earthquakes by award winning author Seymour Simon has both stories about real life earthquakes as well as facts about what causes earthquakes. There is a balance of text features and text to help students understand earthquakes to build knowledge and understanding that will help them access future texts.
  • Unit 3, Module B: Anatomy of a Volcanic Eruption by Amy Leavitt contains chapters that include academic vocabulary as well as domain-specific words that have been defined to support students' knowledge of volcanoes and build toward the big idea of understanding the impact and effect of nature on people.

Unit 4 Topic: Social Studies Integration: Creating Innovative Solutions

  • Unit 4, Module A: Lunch Money by Andrew Clements has a challenging theme organized in a series of titled chapters. Students must be able to follow and understand the frequent use of dialogue between characters to build knowledge and determine the theme of the text.
  • Unit 4, Module B: Using Money contains a series of subtopics with graphics to support the building of knowledge with the text. There are domain-specific vocabulary and topics that include the origins and purposes of money and banking. This text supports the big idea of the module and helps to build students ability to access future text in the module.

Supplementary texts included in each module’s text set also encompass the Unit themes and help to integrate content areas while expanding big ideas and academic vocabulary.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards.

There is an overall balance of informational and literary texts within the anchor texts and supporting texts. Of the 8 anchor texts, four are informational texts and four are literary. There are also 17 supporting texts. Of these supporting texts, 9 texts are literary and 8 are informational. There is an overall balance of informational and literary texts, including both science and social studies topics.

Examples representing the balance of text types and genres include the following:

  • Anchor Text - Porpoises in Peril (Literary, Adventure)
  • Supporting Text -A Girl Who Cracked Open the World (Informational)
  • Supporting Text - Fragile Frogs (Informational)
  • Anchor Text - Skeletons Inside and Out (Informational)
  • Supporting Text - Movers and Shapers (Informational)
  • Supporting Text - King of the Parking Lot (Informational)
  • Anchor Text - Why the Sea is Salty (Literary, Tale)
  • Supporting Text - How the Stars Fell into the Sky (Literary, Legend)
  • Supporting Text - Pecos Bill and John Henry from American Tall Tales (Literary, Folktale)
  • Anchor Text - The Longest Night (Literary, Narrative Fiction)
  • Supporting Text - Northwest Coast Peoples from Kids Discover (Informational)
  • Supporting Text - Three Native Nations: Of the Woodlands, Plains, and Desert (Informational )

Poetry is included in the supporting texts (4-6 poems) and is listed in the Implementation Guide. A drama is included in Unit 4.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet expectations for text complexity, according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task(s).

The materials include quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task information in the Teacher Resources section. Most texts are aligned to the complexity requirements outlined in the Common Core Standards with text complexity rubrics appearing at the back of each ReadyGEN Teacher’s Guide.

  • Unit 1 Module A Porpoises in Peril by Gwendolyn Hooks 850L (Literary): This text contains a challenging concept with scientific facts and terms. It is a narrative fiction told with some sarcasm by an omniscient narrator. Topics include endangered species, mining, and snorkeling.
  • Unit 1 Module B Skeletons Inside and Out by Claire Daniel 740L (Informational): This text has a straightforward explanation and contains domain–specific vocabulary. There is a glossary and index at the end.
  • Unit 2 Module A Why the Sea is Salty by Dot McHarry 720L (Literary): This text has accessible folk talk, chronological events, some challenging vocabulary, and compound and complex sentences with some simple sentences.
  • Unit 2 Module B The Longest Night by Jacqueline Guest 780L (Literary): This narrative about a Native American boy and his rite of passage is a chronological story that includes Native American terms. Students need background awareness of Native American culture.
  • Unit 3 Module B Anatomy of a Volcanic Eruption by Amy Leavitt 890L (Informational): This text contains a straightforward explanation, an introductory example, and domain–specific vocabulary.
  • Unit 4 Module A Lunch Money by Andrew Clements 840L (Literary) : This text has a challenging theme, a series of titled chapters, frequent dialogue, some advanced vocabulary, and occasional sarcasm.
  • Unit 4 Module B Using Money by 920L (Informational): This text contains a series of subtopics with graphics to support the text. There are topics that include the origins and purposes of money and banking and domain-specific vocabulary.

Of the texts that are not within the grade-level stretch band, a qualitative feature analysis gives additional insight as to the appropriateness of their placement in the curriculum. The following text has a Lexile level above the grade level stretch band, yet the qualitative and reader and task components make the text accessible for fourth grade readers.

  • Unit 4, Module A Earthquakes by Seymour Simon (Informational, 1010L): Even though the Lexile is above the grade level stretch band, the level of meaning is straightforward. Vocabulary is defined. Examples, photos, and diagrams reinforce the details. To help Grade 4 students with background knowledge, the teacher can pre-teach earthquake related terms. The qualitative and reader and task features makes this text accessible for Grade 4 students.

Every text in the close reading materials (Sleuth) is within the Lexile band outlined in the standards.

The Leveled Text Library includes readers for each unit. The books in the library begin at the Lexile band at 270L (The Hoover Dam by John Manos) and go slightly above the Lexile band to 1130L (Birds Take Flight by Lillian Duggan).

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet expectations for supporting students' ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. Over the course of the school year, students engage with texts that are within the appropriate levels of text complexity, but there is not a clear organizational strategy of text placement from beginning of the year to the end. While the rigor of text is appropriate in aggregate over the course of the school year, students will engage with texts at varying levels Unit to Unit and quarter to quarter in a structure that may not provide support for accelerating their literacy growth.

Some representative examples of how the program partially meets this indicator are shown by examining these texts examples:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, students read the literary text Porpoises in Peril. This text has a quantitative measure of 850 Lexile and is 48 pages, which is appropriate for its challenging content and tone. This is followed in Module B by the informational text Skeletons Inside and Out. The text has a quantitative measure of 740 Lexile and is 153 pages long and includes domain-specific vocabulary.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, students read the literary folk tale, Why the Sea is Salty, which has a quantitative measure of 720 Lexile and is 40 pages long. Module B includes the literary text The Longest Night, which has a quantitative measure of 780 Lexile and is 48 pages long. Over the course of the first two Units, students are engaging with rich texts, but the consistency of the texts' rigor may not support students' accelerating and growing reading skills.
  • In Unit 3, there are texts that are considerably more challenging, such as the literary text "Earthshaker's Bad Day," which has a quantitative measure of 740 but includes much dialogue and allusions as well as mythology connections. This text is in the same Unit as the mythology text "The Monster Beneath the Sea," which has a quantitative measure of 780, and the informational text A Tsunami Unfolds, which measures at 890 Lexile.
  • Unit 4 includes texts that have consistent quantitative measures as well, such as Lunch Money in Module A, a literary text that has rich content and rigorous vocabulary about advertising and entrepreneurship, that has a quantitative measure of 840 Lexile and is 222 pages long. Module B includes the informational text Using Money, which has a higher Lexile of 920 and includes different text features such as charts and graphs.

While the second half of the year presents students with more rigorous readings overall, the first part of the year offers students a consistent level of challenge that may not support their readiness to fully engage with the subsequent texts.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectation that anchor texts and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

The anchor texts and supporting texts have a "Text Complexity Rubric" page in the Teacher Resources section that covers quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task measures.

Quantitative metrics are provided for each anchor text in four categories: Lexile Level, Average Sentence Length, Word Frequency and Page or Word Count. Qualitative measures are provided for each anchor text and supporting text in four categories: levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and theme and knowledge demands. Metrics provided for qualitative measures are in list form. Reader and Task Suggestions are in narrative form and provide teachers with suggestions for preparing all students to read the text as well as leveled tasks. For example, the following contains the Text Complexity Rubric for the supporting text Max Malone Makes a Million (Unit 4, Module A):

  • Quantitative Measures- Lexile: 810L; Average Sentence Length: 11.47; Word Frequency: 3.62; Page Count: 20
  • Qualitative Measures- Levels of Meaning: accessible theme (boys learn by trial and error that making money is not so easy as it seems; Structure: conventional sequence of events; Language Conventionality and Clarity: simple vocabulary; some complex sentences; Theme and Knowledge Demands: basic knowledge of business planning
  • Reader and Task Suggestions: Preparing to Read the Text: Discuss with students why planning is important before starting a business; Leveled Tasks: Divide students into small groups and have them create a business proposal with detailed descriptions of supplies, tasks, and anticipated profit

At the beginning of each Module, teachers are provided with a Lexile and genre reminder about the upcoming text set. Lexiles and genres are listed for the anchor text and supporting texts. Lexiles are provided for the Sleuth texts and the Leveled Text Library. Following the Text Set information, teachers are also provided with more information about vocabulary in a section called Vocabulary to Unlock Text. This provides the teacher with Benchmark Vocabulary and Tier II and Tier III Words for the anchor text and supporting texts.

Within each unit and module, the texts are focused on a theme, which provides some rationale as to why the text was chosen.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 meet the expectations of indicator 1f. The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading, and there are supports to build students’ comprehension of grade level texts in oral and silent reading.

Resources are provided to offer students texts to engage in a range and volume of reading. The eText Library includes leveled readers. The database is searchable by Lexile, Guided Reading, DRA, and Reading Maturity Matrix for initial search. Then, as a secondary search, texts can be chosen by grade level, language, comprehension skill, text feature, genre, and content area. Each unit has trade books which are authentic literary and informational texts. These trade books are available in digital format. In addition to texts, there are independent reading activities that students can access online.

Structures are built within the day to provide students with opportunities to practice silent and oral reading. Each day students engage in independent reading with a specific focus including building stamina and becoming independent readers. In addition, small group instruction each day either focuses on vocabulary, fluency, critical thinking or comprehension (Implementation Guide). Comprehension and vocabulary instruction dominates the small group instruction, but the few fluency lessons focus on a specific aspect of fluency such as phrasing, expression, and pacing. Students hear and see the teacher model reading the text and then practice using the same text.

A scaffolded strategies handbook is also provided, which gives teachers additional ways to teach the concepts to struggling learners and English language learners. In addition, throughout the teacher’s guide there are "if/then" sections which provide the teachers with concrete things to do when students do not understand the concept.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The Grade 4 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent and build towards a culminating tasks to integrates skills. The instructional materials provide multiple opportunities for evidence-based discussion that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and support student listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching. The materials include frequent opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Materials meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials reviewed provide many tasks and opportunities for evidence-based discussions and writing using evidence from texts to build strong literacy skills.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations of most questions, tasks, and assignments being text-specific and requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

Some explicit question examples include:

  • "What details from the text support the idea that men and women had different roles among the people of the Northwest Coast?” (Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 7)
  • Where can you find information about how scientists classify volcanoes? What are the three classifications? What detail is discussed in each classification?” (Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 3)

Some implicit question examples include:

  • "What does Mary think about at the seacoast? How does she feel about working with her father?” (Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 9)
  • "How do the events in these last two chapters help you answer the question: Why is the sea salty?” (Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 4)

Many lessons have a Reading Analysis section where students are working toward a specific standard and engaging in either independent work or small group work to complete a task involving the text. The majority of lessons have a turn and talk after the students read, which requires the students to discuss something from the text. Some of the questions are about the text itself while some are questions that focus on author’s craft, but the majority of them require students to be engaging with the text.

  • For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 14 students identify the motivations of characters and complete the Web B Chart along with answering text-specific questions regarding the characters’ motivation.

Each lesson has small group options which include several options for students to answer text-dependent questions.

  • For example, some options are extensions of the Close Reading or Reading Analysis sections. Students will read pieces of text, find evidence in order to answer specific questions, ask questions related to what they have read, and prove their case with evidence from the text. Depending on students’ readiness, questions are modified to meet students’ needs still addressing the standards.

All lessons have a Close Reading section that includes 3-4 text-dependent questions.

  • For example, “What conclusion can you draw about compound interest from the chart on page 44 and the text on page 45? What conclusion can you draw about the advantage of saving your money in a commercial bank, rather than a piggy bank?” (Unit 4 Module B Lesson 8)

Additional materials that support students engaging with the text include:

  • In the Sleuth materials (close reading texts), there is a gather evidence section for each close read which requires students to find evidence from the text.
  • The Reader's and Writer's Notebook provides evidence-based questions.
  • The Baseline Assessment also includes evidence-based questions.

There is the Reader/Writer Journal which asks students to answer text-dependent questions in writing for each lesson.

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the expectations for the indicator of providing sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination). The text dependent questions in the close reading section as well as some of the reading analysis sections should help students in completing the end of unit assessment successfully. However, not all Performance Based Assessments (PBAs) or end- of- unit assessments require text evidence. In addition, not all of the lessons leading up to the PBA will support the student's ability to successfully complete it.

Units are designed in themes. Most questions allow for students to develop an understanding of the theme in the text and build toward the culminating task.

  • For example, Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 2 the Close Reading section asks students to identify where the majority of earthquakes occur, locate the plates and faults near North America, and identify patterns observed based on maps provided. The theme for this particular unit is Exploring Impact and Effect.
  • The performance based task at the end of Unit 3, Module A requires students to use text evidence over the course of the module to complete the task. Students are required to analyze two of the texts and state which one is more effective in portraying the impact of earthquakes.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, students research and use text evidence to write a news report that explains the effects of a natural event. There are lessons throughout the unit that teach students research skills to help them successfully complete this Performance Based Assessment, though the lessons are writing lessons and not reading lessons.

Not all lessons include text based questions that will lead students to successfully completing the Performance Based Assessment. In some sections, the task is not concretely connected to the texts that precede it. For example, in Unit 1, Module A the Performance Based Assessment has students write a biography about a scientist or researcher who has made a difference, though there are no biography texts in the unit as a model; therefore, students are not provided questions to help them understand this genre in order to successfully write a biography

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectation for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. Students are given opportunities for evidence-based discussions as they work with other students in pairs and small groups.

Opportunities for discussion include:

  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 16 the teacher models the academic language of text structure for students. Students are reminded to use the examples in Text Talk discussion.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 17 structures are provided for students to work in pairs or small groups to complete a graphic organizer and discuss their responses using evidence from the text.
  • In the Performance Based Assessment in Unit 3, Module B students read texts and write to share their opinion as to which article reflects the impact of earthquakes. Then they present their writing with the class as a speech and are given the opportunity to respond to questions and receive constructive comments from their peers.
  • Close reading structures are included with discussion questions where students respond to questions with evidence from the text. (Implementation Guide p. 41)
  • Many of the questions are evidence based (i.e. How does the physical setting make it difficult for the islanders to get the salt they need Unit 2 Module A Lesson 1 or What details in the text explain how the Northwest Coast people have tried to preserve their cultures? Unit 2 Module B Lesson 8), and some are about the writing craft.

In each unit there are protocols for discussions including protocols for Think–Pair–Share Routine, Small Group Discussion Routine, and Whole Class Discussion Routine.

  • Each routine includes steps, a rationale, implementation for success, and going deeper. In each protocol there is also a suggestion about how to model it.
    • For example, the Think–Pair–Share Routine suggests modeling how you would prepare for discussions by modeling thinking through ideas to express them clearly and supporting ideas with text evidence.
  • In the small group section of each daily lesson in the Teacher's Guide, there are additional opportunities for evidence – based discussions such as the extend in the reading analysis section of the lesson and having students do additional Think–Pair–Shares for those who need extra support.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet indicator 1j for supporting students listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

The materials reviewed provide opportunities for speaking and listening that include whole group discussions and small group discussions. There are protocols in the Teacher's Guide that explain how to implement all of these discussions and how to model best practices for speaking and listening.

  • For example, the Small Group Discussion Routine modeling includes referring to the text or topic in the discussion and posing and responding to questions to check and clarify understanding.
  • Routines are provided for teachers on how to summarize the texts and topics discussed. This also correlates to many of the Common Core Speaking and Listening Standards, including SL 4.3 (identifying the reasons and evidence a speaker provides).

In Sleuth (Close Reading materials), structures are included for students to gather evidence, ask questions regarding the text, use evidence to make a case, and prove their case to other students within their team, with all team members having a voice. For example, in Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 17 students work in pairs or small groups to complete a graphic organizer and discuss their responses using evidence from the text.

In the writing workshop component, students are asked to share their writings. There are directions for both the speaker and the listener.

  • For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1 students are asked to share their writing, and the audience is asked to identify the situation established in the opening paragraph.

Although students have opportunities for discussing posed questions, students have fewer opportunities to pose their own questions (SL.4.1c) and explain their own ideas (SL.4.1d).

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 meet the expectations of this indicator. Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Explicit instruction guides students through the writing process, requiring them to analyze good writing models from the text sets they read. There are 4 units and two modules (A & B) within each unit. The 18 lessons within each module focus on one type of writing.

Each Module’s writing lessons are based on text(s) and offer a model for students as they write. On-demand writing occurs each day when students write to what they have read in various formats. Examples of writing include taking notes, short answer, or paragraph construction. Lessons have been structures, so that by the end of the Module, students have addressed all components of the writing process.

Each module is structured the same way regarding process and on-demand writing. Representative examples of process writing include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 13 (Narrative Writing Component): Using the text as a model, students are taught how Thunder Cake includes the necessary elements for a narrative. Students are instructed to read specific pieces at the beginning and end of the text to see what the author did to provide a sense of closure. Students are then given an opportunity to choose a problem to write about and a solution to that problem that creates closure. During independent writing practice, students are to write a brief narrative that provides a sense of closure.
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 1 (Informative Writing): Students write informative/explanatory paragraphs that express views and provide factual information. Students are reminded to have a main idea and details to support it. Students will use the text, City Homes, as a model for how to write an informative/explanatory text. Students are to write their paragraphs in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal and are encouraged to add a digital component where they are to find pictures with details to support their main idea. Scaffolds are provided as well as specific examples from the text to support students. Many of the tasks listed are preparing students for process writing.

On-demand writing occurs each day and vary from short answers to paragraph instruction. On-demand writing occurs in high stakes environments (e.g. assessments) as well as frequent low-stakes writing (e.g. Sample writing tasks that are on-demand include, but are not limited to, the following focused work

In Unit 2, Module B, students read various texts and use evidence to support text-based opinions. Portions of the texts will serve as writing models and students will have opportunities to practice writing tasks independently after seeing text models. The on-demand writing tasks in this Unit and Module include short writing activities in which students:

  • Form, state and support an opinion, including text evidence
  • Organize and group related ideas
  • Practice quoting accurately from text in short writes
  • Use linking words and phrases in short responses
  • Summarize the texts

Other examples of on-demand and process writing are evident throughout the materials. On-demand tasks often connect to the larger process assignment, such as the writing performance-based assessment in Unit 4: “Students will analyze two of the texts they have read in this module – Earthquakes and Quake! –and state and support an opinion about which text more effectively portrays the impact of earthquakes on human beings.”

To complete this task, students will read texts and understand that both literary and informational texts can be analyzed for ideas and information, and then use the test to complete on-demand tasks which are later synthesized into process pieces. Some shorter writing tasks have students complete:

  • Link opinions to reasons in paragraphs
  • State and support an opinion, using facts and details from the text
  • Research and draw evidence
  • List opinions and reasons

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for indicator 1l. Materials provide opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards. Students are given opportunities for instruction and practice in a variety of genres addressed in the standards over the course of the school year. Examples of text types practiced include informational, opinion, and narrative tasks such as research projects, tall tales, and opinion essays.

Performance Based Assessments can be found at the end of each unit. The assessments provide a variety of writing opportunities that reflect the distribution by the standards. In the examples below, students are engaged in narratives, informative/explanatory and opinion writing.

  • Unit 1, Module A- Informational - Research Paper
  • Unit 1, Module B- Informational - Investigation Project
  • Unit 2, Module A- Narrative - Write a tall tale
  • Unit 2, Module B- Opinion - Essay on Native Americans
  • Unit 3, Module A- Opinion - Essay on impact of Earthquakes
  • Unit 3, Module B- Informational - Research a Natural Event
  • Unit 4, Module A- Narrative - Write a short story
  • Unit 4, Module B- Opinion - Essay on impact of innovation

Other genres/modes of writing are found throughout the materials reviewed. They include tall tales, short stories, summaries, biographies, brochures, interviews, news reports, as well as with opinion and informative essays. There were no noted opportunities for students to write poetry.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for the materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.

Students are taught each day to carefully analyze and synthesize sources, write to sources, and defend claims as part of Whole Group Writing instruction. Each writing lesson focuses on a writing mode that is specified in the Common Core Standards

The Reading/Writing Journal provides on-demand writing tasks that require students to produce evidence based responses.

Some examples of opportunities for evidence-based writing in the instructional materials include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 1, students “Read about a person and write an introductory paragraph about the achievements of that person using evidence from the text.” Other tasks within that lesson include answering questions using evidence such as “What key details does the author provide…?” and “What do the characters learn…?”
  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 2, students will reread p. 22 of Porpoises in Peril. A snorkeler tells the squad that the porpoises look thin and hungry. The question asks, “What key details does the author provide that might help explain this? Support your answer using text evidence."
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 6, students read How the Stars Fell Into the Sky, and answer the following questions:
    • What evidence from the text shows that First Woman trusts Coyote?
    • What details from the text indicate that First Woman is precise in how she places the stars? Show me where the text says so.
    • How does Coyote feel about First Woman “tacking up the night sky” with her jewels? What text evidence can you find that supports this?
    • Later in the lesson, students will use this information to write about how the author establishes tone.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 8, students are told to use pages from the text to help them write facts and quotations on what life is like living in the shadow of a volcano.

Performance-Based Assessments (PBA) are assigned at the end of each module. These include writing projects where students use the anchor text and the major writing skill from the module in order to respond to questions to synthesize learning. These projects lead students to analyze and synthesize the texts they have read.

  • For example, students will revisit the text, The Boy Who Invented TV, and how different inventions affected other peoples’ lives. As students revisit the text, they are to take notes on the innovations and their effects so they can use the notes to help them write an opinion task that includes a main idea and details to support their opinion. (Unit 4, Module B)

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

In each lesson, there are materials that include explicit instruction of grammar and conventions. Conventions are included in the writing rubrics within each Unit (Writing Rubric) as well. Language (grammar) lessons are included in each lesson and meet the standards for 4th grade. Skills include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 1: nouns, pronouns, simple verb tenses, adverbs, adjectives, prepositional phrases, capitalization, punctuation
  • Unit 2: sentence structures, adjectives, quotation marks, prepositional phrases, relative pronouns, adverbs, progressive verb tenses, capitalization, dialogue, commas, coordinating conjunctions, nouns
  • Unit 3: verb tenses, adjectives, capitalization, prepositional phrases, commas, quotation marks, compound sentences, relative adverbs, relative pronouns, fragments, run-on sentences, progressive tenses, coordinating conjunctions
  • Unit 4: adjectives, subject-verb agreement, progressive verb tenses, modal auxiliaries, relative adverbs, prepositional phrases

In the lessons, the teacher provides instruction and models the skill, then offers practice. Some of the practice includes using the text of the day and other practice comes in the Reader's and Writer's Journal. There is a guided practice section where the student practices on the board and discusses it with students before they engage in the independent practice.

The Reading/Writing Journal, found online, includes lessons specific to the conventions of writing, as well as providing students with on-demand writing tasks.

Note: Unit 1, Module 1 includes a review of skills addressed in Grade 3 standards.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
5/6
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks addressing grade-level CCSS for foundational skills to build comprehension by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, syntax, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression. Materials provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading while providing students ample opportunity to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks addressing grade-level CCSS for foundational skills to build comprehension by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, syntax, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression.

Lessons include grade-appropriate foundational skills including phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, syntax, and fluency. Each lesson provides a teacher-directed mini-lesson related to foundational skills. These lessons include isolated reading and reading the words in context. The reading in context is not from the Unit anchor texts but additional short passages for students to practice reading in context.

Word analysis mini lessons are found within each lesson and include introductions to isolated foundational skills, practice with the skill, and application of the skill with specific words/sentences/phrases.

The following is the progression of foundational skills taught.

  • Unit 1 skills focus on –ed and -ing; -er and -est; -or; -er; compound words; –ist, -ive, and -ess; synonyms and antonyms; un- and in -; and words from other languages.
  • Unit 2 skills focus on Latin prefixes dis–, re–, and non-; compound words; the suffix –ly; unknown words; words from Latin; Greek roots; related words; and Latin roots struct, scrib, and scrip.
  • Unit 3 skills focus on multiple meaning words; suffixes –ian, -ist, and - ism; Latin roots aqua and dict; prefixes I'm– and in–; Greek & Latin prefixes trans – and tele-, Greek prefixes amphi- and anti-; synonyms and antonyms, words from French, and suffixes –ous, -able, and -ible.
  • Unit 4 skills focus on related words; the suffix –ion; words from German; homographs; Latin roots gener, port, dur, and ject; words from French; Greek roots; and Greek and Latin suffixes.

Lessons include direct and explicit instruction of how to decode unknown words.

  • For example in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 16 students are taught how to break up the word endure by breaking it up into two syllables.

Lessons are provided for the teacher that can be used for whole group instruction, as well as optional small group tasks.

  • Word Work suggestions are provided as small group options in the Implementation Guide.
  • There are a series of foundational skill lessons that include opportunities to practice in and out of context with practice applying the skills reading in the Practice Reader.
    • In Unit 3, Module A Lesson 15 the Practice Reader 20A-20C tasks include instruction regarding the word roots aqua and dict, write the meaning of the root, describing the use of roots in words in context, using a dictionary to confirm the meaning of the roots, and reading.

There is also a printable foundational skills page that includes additional practice of the foundational skills, with a focus on the spelling of the words as well as the definitions.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks guiding students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading. There are limited opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in the context of their reading.

Materials include Language Analysis mini lessons as a part of some lessons. Language Analysis mini lessons are sometimes about word analysis, and Language Analysis lessons are not in every lesson. In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 6, there is a Language Analysis mini lesson for Word Meanings. In the teacher’s edition instructs the teacher to model how to determine the a meaning of open area on p. 32. The teacher asks, “What is the topic of the paragraph in which this word appears?” The teacher invites the students to determine the meaning of the word calm.

Materials include Word Analysis Foundational Skill mini lessons. Students have opportunities to read words in context, however, these passages are not from the anchor text or supporting texts that students will read in the reading lesson. For example, tasks include instruction regarding the word roots aqua and dict. Students are to write the meaning of the root, describe the use of roots in words in context, use a dictionary to confirm the meaning of the roots, and read Practice Readers 20A, 20B, and 20C (Unit 3 Module A Lesson 15). In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 12 of Foundational Skills lessons, students learn related words. Students look at mixture and unmixed and look for commonalities. In the Practice step, students write respectable, respectful, and disrespectful and identify common base words. In Apply, partners identify how words are related and determine the meaning of the base word. There is a missed opportunity to practice related word analysis with the anchor or supporting texts, although some word analysis lessons can be practiced with Practice Readers.

In the Teacher Materials for helping students with Benchmark Vocabulary in Close Reading Lessons, the teacher is reminded to use the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine for Literary or Informational Text. This protocol lists steps to help students pronounce unknown words, read the paragraph in which the word is found, discuss the meaning of the word in context, have the students use the word in a sentence, and discuss synonyms and antonyms. A Tips and Tools section suggests helping students recognize context clues and make word webs (Unit 1, TR30).

During Close Reading instruction, the teacher’s edition contains Scaffolded Instruction to help students use context clues. For example in Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 4, the instructional materials direct the teacher to remind students to use visuals as clues to help them understand what words mean as they read stories.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for providing students ample opportunity to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level.

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Fluency practice is included as a section within the small group options portion of the materials.
Several lessons in small group time are devoted to fluency.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 14, the fluency lesson uses the Oral Reading Fluency Quick Check. The teacher models and points out how to read with appropriate phrasing and then students are asked to read the same passage.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 2, students are reading from Why the Sea is Salty and then students focus on accuracy.
  • In Unit 1 Module A Lesson 6 Fluency tasks include model fluent reading aloud with expression from Porpoises in Peril and students practice reading aloud from the same text.

Fluency assessments are included in the Assessment Book and include scoring guides. There are benchmark fluency passages to be administered in the beginning, middle, and end of the year. There is also a great deal of information for teachers on how to administer fluency assessments and a class record chart is provided.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials meet expectations for building knowledge with texts, vocabulary, and tasks. The instructional materials support the building of knowledge through repeated practice with appropriate grade-level complex text organized around a topic. Vocabulary is addressed in each module, though academic vocabulary is not built across multiple texts. There is evidence of the materials providing coherently sequenced questions and tasks to support students in developing literacy skills. Culminating tasks require students to read, discuss, analyze, and write about texts while students participate in a volume of reading to build knowledge. Modules are developed to support and build knowledge, integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening to demonstrate grade-level literacy proficiency at the end of the school year.

Criterion 2a - 2h

30/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for texts being organized around a topic/topics to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. Anchor texts, supporting texts, daily tasks, and Performance Based Assessments are built around a topic for each unit.

Modules in each unit are built around a unit topic. In each module the anchor text and supporting texts center around the topic.

  • Unit 1 centers around the topic of Becoming Researchers.
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand how researchers and scientists do their work.
    • In Module B, students are expected to identify and use evidence for multiple sources to build an idea.
  • Unit 2 centers around the topic of Interactions in Nature and Culture.
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand the interactions between culture and nature.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand how interactions among communities affect cultures and people.
  • Unit 3 centers around the topic of Exploring Impact and Effect.
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand that the ways in which people explain natural phenomena have changed over time.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand the effects of changes to Earth's surface.
  • Unit 4 centers around the topic of Creating Innovative Solutions.
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand how creativity, cooperation, and innovation can make a difference in people's lives.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand how innovative ideas spark economic growth.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for containing sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.

Each lesson includes an Analysis section in which students analyze language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Language Analysis is also included in some small group lessons.

  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 9, students break an informational text into main idea and key details and record on a graphic organizer.
  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 18, students analyze word choice in the three texts. Students scan specific paragraphs from the texts for characteristics of language choices the authors made, such as giving facts, telling a story, using formal or conversational language, and utilizing specific vocabulary.
  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 18, students study word choice and formal language. Students answer questions that include, the following: “How is the language in these texts alike or different? Why did the authors make these choices?”, “Where have you read language similar to these texts?", “How is the language similar to or different from the other texts? Why did the author make this choice?”, and “Where have you read language similar to this text?”
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 2, students analyze author’s word choice when discussing reasons for choosing "weeping" over other synonyms. Students host a small group discussion.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 3, students study point of view of narrative text. Students find evidence of third person and first person points of view in a text and then create the first person point of view version of the event.
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 5, students locate figurative language in a text and use context and personal knowledge to determine meaning of words and phrases.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 9, students analyze idioms in a text to describe the meaning of the idiom and the effect the idiom has on the text.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 1, students find evidence in an informational text by looking at how the author organizes information. Students work individually or in small groups to complete a sequence of events organizer for the informational text.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 14, students use key details in the text to determine the meaning of words found in a myth. Students complete a context clues three-column graphic organizer to determine the unfamiliar word and context clues or key details that lead them to the meaning as used in the text.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 1, students study the characteristics of narrative fiction including characters, plot, and setting. Students answer the question “What do I learn about Greg from the things he does?” Students complete a t-chart to record information about character development.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 6, students analyze descriptive details authors use to help readers visualize characters, settings, and events.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 10, students answer questions about word choice that include the following: “What is the effect of the word click-clacking in this sentence?”, “What does it mean to gasp?”, “Why did the author choose this word instead of breathed in, for example?”,“What does snapped mean in this sentence?”, and "What does this sentence tell you about Gloria’s personality?”

The Scaffolded Instruction Handbook also includes lessons to support the unit lessons.

  • On page 12 of the Scaffolded Instruction Handbook students discuss how a writer sometimes describes two events that happen at the same time. Students discuss point of view and answer how the text would be different if it had been told by Drake Darkly.
  • On page 117 of the Scaffolded Instruction Handbook students discuss questions that include the following: “What word does the author use to describe the soil?”, “What does riches mean?”, and “Why do you think the author chose to use this word instead of just saying 'great soil'?”
  • On page 179 of the Scaffolded Instruction Handbook students look closely at author’s craft. Students look closely to see that their sentences work together within each paragraph to support the main idea and demonstrate sequence.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 meet the expectations that the materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

The majority of questions in a module require students to analyze text. Many of the questions measure at levels 2 and 3 on the Depth of Knowledge scale. Students reason, analyze and evaluate the text or texts, and questions and tasks are sequenced so that students analyze and integrate knowledge during each lesson.

  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 4 students read the text The Longest Night and draw inferences from the text by using details in order to form an opinion. Students answer questions such as the following: “What details indicate that the first night of Wind Runner’s Vision Quest was difficult?”, “Why does Wind Runner say the rattlesnake is not to be trusted? What details from the text help you infer this?”, “What details on page 27 help you infer that events didn’t unfold as Wind Runner expected?”, and “What details on page 28 help you infer that Worthless One possibly saved Wind Runner’s life? Students then state and support reasons in an opinion writing, using the text to support reasons with evidence.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 9 students read the text Lunch Money and use elements of a narrative to better understand and determine theme. Students answer questions such as the following: “What have Maura and Greg learned about how to achieve their goals?”, “What causes Mrs. Davenport to change her mind about the value of comic books?”, and “What does the School Committee decide? What conclusion can you draw based on this decision?” Students then write a sequel to Lunch Money in which Greg and Maura discuss adding a new product to their Chunky Comics business.

Multiple lessons in each module require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

  • Unit 1 Module B, Lesson 17 students analyze and answer questions across the texts Skeletons Inside and Out, Movers and Shapers, and “King of the Parking Lot.” Students make connections and better understand a topic by reading multiple texts. Students discuss how the illustrations in the texts help the reader understand the meaning and compare information presented in different sources to make connections across texts. Students answer questions such as “How is the focus of Skeletons Inside and Out and Movers and Shapers similar? Show me where the text says so.” Students are asked to consider the function of skeletons in all three texts. Students make connections across texts by looking at elements such as topics, main ideas, and means of presentation to complete a three-column chart.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 17 students analyze and answer questions across the texts Earthquakes, Quake!, “Earthshaker’s Bad Day,” and “The Monster Beneath the Sea.” Students compare and contrast how explanations of earthquakes have changed over time. Students discuss the kinds of details that are included in informational texts about earthquakes and the kind of details included in literary texts. Students answer questions that include the following: “What is the cause of earthquakes, according to all three texts?”, “Why do you think the texts have different explanations?", "What common event in history do both Earthquakes and Quake! discuss?", and "How do they treat the same event differently?" Students then compare text purposes to describe the causes and effects of earthquakes as they are described in each text.

Other examples of lessons that integrate knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 17 students analyze and answer questions across the texts Science Squad, Porpoises in Peril, Mary Anning, The Girl Who Cracked Open the World, and “Fragile Frogs.”
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 17 students analyze and answer questions across the texts Why the is Salty, How the Stairs Fell into the Sky, “Pecos Bill,” and “John Henry.”
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lessons 17 and 18 students analyze and answer questions across the texts The Longest Night, “Northwest Coast Peoples,” and Three Native Nations, Of the Woodlands, Plains, and Desert.
  • In Unit 3 Module B, Lessons 16, 17, and 18 students analyze and answer questions across the texts Anatomy of a Volcanic Eruption, Escape from Pompeii, and A Tsunami Unfolds.
  • In Unit 4 Module A, Lessons 16, 17, and 18 students analyze and answer questions across the texts Lunch Money, Max Malone Makes a Million, and “Coyote School News.”
  • In Unit 4 Module B, Lessons 16, 17, and 18 students analyze and answer questions across the texts Using Money, A Tale of Two Poggles, and The Boy Who Invented TV.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the criteria for questions and tasks that support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g., combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening). Culminating tasks do not consistently integrate reading, writing, speaking, and listening, nor do they require close reading and comprehension of the texts read. Rather, the tasks use the texts as vehicles to support the writing process and occasionally, speaking and listening skills.

Each Module ends in a Performance-Based Assessment that is broken into five parts in the Teacher’s Guide. Students are asked to Prepare, Create, and then Present. The teacher is also provided with Scaffolded supports and Reflect and Respond if… then.. statements to address students’ weaknesses at the end of the assessment. The Performance-Based Assessments assess the three types of writing genres: informative/explanatory, opinion, and narrative. Each Performance-Based Assessment has students write to answer a prompt.During Independent Writing Practice, students practice the specific writing skills that will prepare them for the genre of the Performance-Based Assessment. The writing skills taught in each lesson build on previous lessons to provide students with the skills and practice they need to complete the culminating Performance-Based Assessment.

Most culminating tasks are not dependent on comprehension or knowledge gained from a text. These tasks ask students to use the texts of the module as a mentor text and emulate style or format. Students do not need to analyze a text or multiple texts to complete the tasks. These tasks focus heavily on writing and do not consistently integrate reading, speaking, or listening. Speaking and Listening skills are included in the Performance-Based Assessment but are not integrated with reading and writing. Students present after each Performance-Based Assessment, but this presentation is often just a showcase of what the student created. Little guidance is given on how to prepare students for presentations and there are no rubrics or checklist to ensure students meet the speaking and listening standards.

  • In Unit 1, Module A students complete a short investigative project about a scientist or researcher who has made a difference. They conduct research and use that information to write a biographical spotlight about their subject. Students are told to write about their subjects in a style similar to the one used in Mary Anning: The Girl Who Cracked Open the World. Students do not need to draw evidence from any text read in the Module or demonstrate comprehension of the text to complete this task. Students present their reports to the class. Students present their reports to the class in the form of a speech with little guidance about how to prepare for and what is expected of this presentation format.
  • In Unit 1, Module B students conduct a short investigative project on an animal of their choice and create an infographic that indicates the key features of the animal. Students are encouraged to think about how Skeletons Inside and Out uses many graphic elements to provide information about skeletons. Students do not need to draw evidence from any text read or demonstrate comprehension of the text to complete this task. Students present their reports to the class in the form of a speech with little guidance about how to prepare for and what is expected of this presentation format.
  • In Unit 2, Module A students write a tall tale that includes an element of nature and displays the characteristics of the genre: larger-than-life characters, a problem that is solved in a humorous way , and exaggeration of characters and events. STudents are reminded to think about how the module texts’ authors built stories around people's relationships with nature and use these relationships to explain natural occurrences. Students share their writings with the class.
  • In Unit 3, Module B students choose a natural event to research (for example, a hurricane, a tornado or other storm, a flood, a volcanic eruption, or erosion). They will write a news report that explains the effects of the natural even on both living things and Earth. Students are reminded that in Anatomy of a Volcanic Eruption, the author describes the different kinds of volcanoes, their features, and how an erupting volcano affects the land around it. Students are told that when they think about the information necessary for the Performance-Based Assessment, they will be looking for details and definitions and creating illustrations that will make their news reports factual and interesting. Students then share their writings with the class as a news report. The format of a news report is not taught during the module, it is introducing in Lesson 18 when students publish and present their final unit writing before the Performance-Based Task.
  • In Unit 4, Module A students write a short story about a character who solves a problem or overcomes a challenge with an innovative solution. Students are reminded that in Lunch Money, Greg and Maura find that if they work together, they can be successful, while in “Coyote School News” the students work together to not only expand their writing skills but also to let other know what they are doing at school. Students are told that when they think about writing their own narrative for the Performance-Based Assessment, they will think about establishing a problem or situation for the main character and then creating a series of events that shows the character coming up with an innovative solution. Students participate in an author presentation where a student sits in the author’s chair and reads their writing aloud.
  • In Unit 4, Module B students brainstorm a list of technology-related innovations that have impacted the economy and changed the way people do things, such as televisions, ATMs, cell phones, etc. Students choose one innovation that they feel has had the greatest impact on people’s daily lives. Students state and support their opinion. Student are reminded how the author of The Boy Who Invented TV told about how different inventions affected the characters. Students present their writings as a speech.

Only two culminating task require students to demonstrate comprehension knowledge of a topic gained from module texts.

  • In Unit 2, Module B asks students to think about the various Native American cultures they read about and write an opinion essay explaining in which group they would have like to grow up. Students are to provide reasons for their opinion and use text evidence to support them. Students are told to compare the information provided in all three texts read during the module to make their decision. Students read their writing out loud during and author celebration.
  • In Unit 3, Module A: Students identify effective writing by analyzing two texts and stating and supporting an opinion about which text more effectively portrays the impact of earthquakes on human beings. The Enduring Understandings of the module are that readers will understand that different types of texts can be used to analyze similar topics and ideas, writers will understand that evidence can be drawn from both literary and informational texts to state and support opinions about a topic, and that learners will understand that science is a newer method of explaining natural phenomena. Students incorporate information learned from Quake! and from Earthquakes to complete the written task. After completing the Performance-Based Assessment, students present their writings to the class as a speech.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

The materials use a generative approach to vocabulary instruction. In each module of the curriculum, there are Benchmark Vocabulary words that are, according to the Publisher's Guide, important for understanding concepts within the text. This vocabulary is addressed during Focused Reading Instruction where students find and read sentences from the text with the words. Students develop contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary words in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.

  • There are benchmark vocabulary routines for informational texts where students learn 2-6 words. Teachers write the sentence or display the passage that contains the unknown word. Then they encourage students to use context clues or go back in the text to help determine the word. The materials suggest that teachers have students create a semantic map as a class and give students time to talk with a partner using the word.
    • In Unit 1, Module B, benchmark vocabulary words include, but are not limited to, supports, framework, flexible, vary, sturdy, ancient, tissue, segments, armor, internal, rigid, and fused.
  • There is a benchmark vocabulary routine for literary texts where students learn 2-6 new words. Teachers write the sentence or display the passage that contains the unknown word. Then students look up the word in the dictionary. Then the teacher uses the word in other ways, and the class discusses the word in more depth. Students compare and contrast the word with synonyms and have a conversation with a partner using the word.
    • In Unit 4, Module A, benchmark vocabulary words include, but are not limited to, profit, bargain, activate, imitation, conceited, contritely, efficient, agenda, negotiations, envelope, and quality.

In each module of the curriculum, there are By-the-Way Words that are sophisticated or unusual words for known concepts that can be stumbling blocks to comprehending a text. The words are defined quickly during reading without interfering with the fluent reading of the text. These words are addressed during Close Reading.

  • In Unit 2, Module A, when reading the text “How the Stars Fell into the Sky,” By-The-Way Words include moons and hogans.

Students demonstrate their understanding of the generative vocabulary process by using words in conversations, in their writings, and in the Performance-Based Assessments.

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 meet the expectations for materials including instruction in writing aligned to the standards, including well-designed plans, models, and protocols to support students writing.

Each writing lesson focuses on a standards-based writing type (narrative, opinion, or informative/explanatory). Students receive explicit instruction that guides them through the writing process. Students have writing models from anchor and supporting texts that they can use to examine writers’ styles and techniques. Student have the opportunity to apply writing skills during Independent Writing Practice and share their work at the end of each lesson. Students develop grammar, usage, and convention skills by practicing in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.

Each module has a writing goal aligned to grade-level standards.

  • In Unit 2, Module A, the writing goal is that writers will understand that dialogue and description reveal character traits and story themes. This aligns with standard W.4.3b, use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.

Each module lesson includes writing that is connected either by genre or topic to the texts being read in the lesson. Writing lessons align to the grade-level standards as seen in Unit 3, Module A:

  • Standard W.4.1.a requires students to introduce a topic with an opinion, which is taught in Lessons 1, 2, and 5 of this module.
  • Standard W.4.1b requires students to provide reasons that are supported by facts and details, which is taught in lessons 3, 7, 8, 9, and 10 of this module.
  • Standard W.4.1c which states that students link opinions, which is taught in lessons 6 and 16 of this module.
  • Standard W.4.1d which is about writing a concluding statement is taught in lessons 14 and 15 of this module.

Teachers support students during writing and tasks offer multiple opportunities for students to revisit and edit writings edit as their skills develop.

Several of the lessons connect to texts or text sets. For example, in Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 13 has students compare two text on earthquakes and decide which text offers a stronger account of an earthquake. However, some writing tasks do not connect to a text. In Unit 1, Module A, the writing assignment is not connected to a text when students conduct an investigation on an animal of their choice.

All of the performance based assessments have a presentation opportunity to share students’ writings and involve a writing assignment that aligns to the writing focus of the module.

  • In Unit 3, Module B, which focuses on informative writing, students choose a natural event to research and then have to write a news report that explains the effects of the natural event on both living things and the Earth.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, students write a narrative and have the opportunity to share their writings with the class with the class as an author presentation.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, students are writing about an innovation that has impacted the economy and has change the way people do things. They are given the option of researching their chosen innovation online.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 fully meet the expectations of indicator 2g. Students engage in a progression of short research projects to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

A number of research opportunities are provided within each unit.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 12, students prepare to write an informative text, brainstorm a topic, and develop a research topic.
  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 5, students research an animal of their choice using 2-3 sources.
  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 7, students learn how writers group related information into paragraphs.

Several Performance Based Assessments (found at the end of each unit) include research projects.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, students conduct research on a scientist and write a biography.
  • In Unit 2, Module B, students read The Longest Night, "Northwest Coast Peoples" and Three Native Nations and write an opinion piece on which Native American tribe they would like to grow up with and have the option of conducting research online to further prove their point.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, students analyze Earthquakes and Quake! In order to state and support an opinion about which text more effectively portrays the impact of earthquakes on human beings.
  • In Unit 3, Module B students research a natural event and the effects it has on people and earth. It also requires students to research a natural event and analyze the information in order to group related information into paragraphs with headings.

The materials provide research center options within small group time with several suggestions for additional research.

  • For example, in Unit 2, Module B one option is researching how muscles and tendons work together and another option is to research medical advances in regards to muscle injuries.

The research lessons throughout the year progress from the simple looking up of information to share facts in Unit 1 to collecting evidence to write a persuasive opinion piece on the most important scientific innovation in Unit 4, Module B.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 4 meet the standards for providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. Independent reading is part of the daily reading instruction. A number of resources are provided to assist students as they engage in a volume of independent reading. Students are provided regular opportunities to apply their learning in the reading lessons to texts of their own choosing. The instructional materials provide students a number of opportunities to extend and apply what they have learned to a “just right” text of their choice.

  • The Independent Reading Routine on page TR14 of Teacher’s Guide provides teachers with support and a rationale for implementation.
  • Independent Reading Rubric is included on TR16 of the Teacher’s Guide.
  • Students are guided in how to apply the content of the day's Reading Analysis lesson to their self-selected text.
  • Students monitor their reading by recording it in their daily reading log. TheyA B gauge and record their engagement.
  • Students can review books they read on Pearson Realize as well as find an Independent Reading Activity that is appropriate for the text they are reading.
  • Each module includes 15 leveled texts which can be used for independent reading.
  • Each module includes center time which involves independent reading. During independent reading, the teacher can have the student focus on either a process focus or a strategy focus. A process focus is where students either focus on independence, stamina, or engagement. The strategy focus has students focus on fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, or critical thinking.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway Three Details

The materials reviewed meet the expectations for usability. Materials are well-designed and include support for implementation over the course of a school year. Materials include clearly labeled navigation and support to aid teachers to support students’ literacy growth. The design of the materials supports effective lesson structure and pacing. Student resources include review and practice problems, clear directions, and explanations, and correct labeling of reference aids. Visual design is not distracting to students and support students’ learning.

The materials support teachers in helping students to learn and understand the concepts in the standards. Teacher’s editions explain the role of specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. Implementation Guides contain explanations of the instructional approaches of ReadyGEN and identify research-based strategies. However, the materials do not include are strategies for communicating with stakeholders about the program and how they can support students in their learning.

There are a variety of assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Not all assessments denote which standards are being assessed. There is sufficient guidance for interpreting student performance on assessments and suggestions for follow-up. Materials also provide routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress, including, Reading and Writing Keystones, Fluency Quick Checks, Check Progress, etc. Students are accountable for independent reading.

Materials meet expectation for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. There are clear supports for students who struggle as well as those who work above grade level. The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides extensive follow-up to support students who read, write, speak, or listen in a language other than English to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Instructional materials include useful technology to enhance student learning. They include materials to support students’ personalized learning via navigable online platforms. The digital platform offers opportunities to enhance student learning.

Overall, the materials meet the expectations for usability.

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
8/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The Grade 4 instructional materials meet expectations for being well-designed and including plans to support implementation over the course of a school year. The materials include clearly labeled navigation and supports to aid teachers in implementing the work to better support students' literacy growth. Visual designs for 5th grade students are not distracting and instead support students' learning.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Grade 4 instructional materials meet expectations for being well-designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Daily lessons include structures and resources for both whole group and small group literacy instruction.

  • Daily lesson structures include the components of the Literacy Workshop with 30-40 minutes for whole group reading instruction, 30-40 minutes for small group instruction, and 30-40 minutes for whole group writing instruction (Teacher’s Guide p viii).
    • Whole group instruction includes Built-In Foundational Skills Mini-Lessons, Building Understanding, Close Reads, Reading Analysis Lessons, and Focused Independent Reading. The suggested pace for the building understanding first read is 10-15 minutes, the close read second read is 10 minutes, and reading/language analysis is 10-15 minutes. (Implementation Guide p. 19)
    • Small Group Instruction includes Small Group Options such as additional instruction, practice, or extension as needed, Independent Literacy Work, and ReadyGen Intervention. It is suggested that teachers meet with up to 3 small groups per day for 10-15 minutes each. (Implementation Guide p.19)
    • Whole Group Writing Instruction contains focused lessons on a specific writing type critical to college and career readiness and conventions mini-lessons. The suggested pace for whole group writing includes introduction to the writing type for 15-20 minutes, independent practice for 10-15 minutes, and sharing writing for 5 minutes. (Implementation Guide p. 19)
  • In Unit 3, Module A there are 18 lessons. The suggested pacing includes 30-40 minutes of Reading in which students build understanding, close read, are introduced to benchmark vocabulary and analyze text. Also include are 30-40 minutes of small group time in which students participate in focused independent reading and other small group options. Writing is also given 30-40 minutes in this module. Students are building toward writing and publishing an opinion piece independently.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for the teacher and student reasonably being able to complete the content within a regular school year with the pacing allowing for maximum student understanding.

  • There are 4 units that are each broken into 2 modules. Each module contains 18 lessons. There are a total of 144 lessons in the Grade 4 materials.
  • Lessons are set up for 90 or 120 minute blocks that include Reading (Build Understanding, Close Read, Benchmark Vocabulary, Text Analysis), Small Group Time (Focused Independent Reading, Small Group Options), and Writing (Focused Writing, Independent Writing Practice).
  • Additional lessons are included for the Performance Based Assessment as well as other unit assessments. Time is built in for teachers to modify lessons to tailor to their student’s needs.
  • Pacing suggestions are provided in the Implementation Guide that suggest teachers can vary the lessons from day to day based on the text, needs of the students, and the amount of scaffolding necessary to delivery instruction appropriately (Implementation Guide p. 19). The program allows flexibility for teachers to rely on professional judgment to modify pacing.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the requirements for resources including ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).

  • Materials provided include trade books, text collections, scaffolded strategy activities, Sleuth close-reading texts, performance tasks, Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, a leveled text library, and Ready Up! Interventions, as well as digital interactive tools such as Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Monster Word Mania, Pack Up the Skills, Envision It! Animations, Letter Tile Drag and Drop, and Grammar Jammers. Each of these resources includes ample opportunity to review and practice, clear directions (in some interactive tools directions are also given orally), and correct labeling.
  • On Page 259 of the Grade 4 Scaffolded Strategies Handbook the Ask and Answer Questions routine is clearly explained. The handbook includes the purpose, procedure, teaching tips and an extension for the routine of asking and answering questions to better understand a text.
  • The Dash Web online tool for student’s independent reading activities give clear instructions for each step of the independent reading response. For example, when working with theme for literary texts, students are directed to find the theme of a text, blog about it, and create their own activity about the theme in the book they are reading.
  • On page 14 of the Grade 4, Unit 3 Teacher’s Guide, directions to practice/apply are clearly stated. The guide states, “Have students work independently or in small groups to complete the graphic organizer. Use the Small Group Discussion Routine on pp. TR6-TR7 to have students discuss the details and examples from the text that support their ideas. Check understanding by asking students to share or by circulating among students or groups.” Also include on this page are clear directions on how to model filling out the graphic organizer as well as an exemplar completed graphic organizer on sequencing events.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Grade 4 instructional materials meet expectations for including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. Daily lessons and Performance Based Assessments specifically denote the standards to which the lessons and tasks are aligned.

  • In the Unit 2, Module A, Foundational Skills Lesson on page FS3 of the Teacher’s Guide the standards that align to the lesson are included. Students analyze Latin prefixes and apply their knowledge with new words. Standards CCSS RF.4.4, CCSS RF.4.3.a, and CCSS L.4.4.b are addressed in the lesson.
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 1, publisher-produced alignment to standards is provided. Students form, state, and support an opinion. Standards CCSS.W.4.1a and CCSS.W.4.1.b are included in the lesson objectives in the Teacher’s Guide.
  • In the Unit 3, Module A, Performance Based Assessment standards being assessed are clearly noted. Students analyze two of the texts they read in the module and state and support an opinion about which text more effectively portrays the impact of earthquakes on human beings. Standards CCSS.W.4.1.a, CCSS.W.4.1.b, CCSS.W.4.1.c, CCSS.W.4.1.d, CCSS.W.4.4, CCSS.W.4.5, CCSS.W.4.6, and CCSS.W.4.8 are included in objectives of the assessment.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Grade 4 instructional materials meet expectations for visual design that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

  • Units are color coded to allow for easy navigation through the units. Pages within the units are colored with Unit 1 purple, Unit 2 pink, Unit 3 green, and Unit 4 orange (Teacher’s Guides).
  • Graphic organizers are free of any distracting words or pictures. They are very simple and clear. For example, in the Unit 3, Module A Performance task, a scaffolding activity found on page 195 of the Teacher’s Guide includes a T-Chart graphic organizer. The organizer does not include any distracting or chaotic features.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lessons 6-10, the Foundational Skill Practice include an assignment in the Practice Reader 10C. This Practice Reader assignment is clear, includes a word bank, and is free of any distracting designs.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 meet expectations for teacher learning and understanding of the standards. including annotated teacher's edition materials with suggestions on how to present the content. The materials include adult-level explanations and examples and explanations of the role of specific standards in the context of the overall materials, including some instructional recommendations and supports. The materials do not include a strategy to engage all stakeholders in the ELA program to support student learning beyond the school day.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectation for materials containing a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

Materials include a teacher’s edition that includes a clear outline of each unit as well as notes and suggestions of how to present content. The Teacher’s Edition also includes the objectives of the lesson, explanations of where to find descriptions of routine, and suggested ways to present content as well as possible questions to ask that are noted in blue. Each question asked is followed by a sample student answer. The teacher’s edition also includes scaffolded instruction boxes to address learners needs with suggestions and ideas on how to differentiate instruction for those students in need.

  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 4 the teacher is provided with a first read guide. The teacher is directed to set the purpose, explore poetry, and engage students. Also included are the “Think-Pair-Share” routine and a foundational skills mini-lesson. The teacher is directed to use the Teacher Resources pages to implement the think-pair-share routine and are given a place to go in foundational skills for more explicit instruction of the mini-lesson.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 10 the teaching guide includes a language analysis text talk which includes modeling as students complete a graphic organizer. On page 104, the Teacher’s Guide states, “On page 55, I hear one cowpoke exclaim to Bill, ‘You’re a cowboy! So start acting like one!’ On page 56, the ranch hands talk about the toughest bunch of 'low life varmints that ever grew hair,' to which Bill responds, ‘Sounds like my kind of folks.’ These lines of dialogue tell me that unlike the ranch hands, Bill values the characteristics of animals more than those of humans. I am going to write in my web, Bill prefers to be wild and free.”
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 3 the Small Group Time directions describe how a teacher can monitor progress of Focused Independent Reading. The Teacher’s Edition page 235 directs teachers to monitor progress based on a process focus or a strategy focus. Teachers are also directed to the Teacher Resources pages 12-19 for further guidance on the independent reading routine.
  • In the Unit 4, Module A, Scaffolded Strategies Handbook, on page 134 teachers are given guidance on how to offer more support to English Language Learners and struggling readers when dealing with text vocabulary.

Materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 18 students publish a narrative with a visual. Guidance is provided for teachers to implement this technology.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 7 teachers are provided with guidance on how students can use digital sources during research. On page 278 of the Teacher’s Edition the teacher is directed to set the purpose and teach and model the use of digital sources during research.
  • In all Units and Modules Digital Centerpieces center options include Students as Authors, Students as Thinkers, Students as Word Workers, and Students as Readers. Each of these centers include an online technology piece provided.
  • In the Unit 4, Module B, Performance Based Assessment a digital option is included and guidance given on how to incorporate technology. On Page 394 of the Teacher’s Edition, teachers are provided information about how to use technology during the assessment.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectation of materials containing a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary. The materials also include an Implementation Guide to provide specific explanations, rational, and examples of key concepts that are needed to improve knowledge of the subject.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, page 2 of the Teacher’s Edition explains how to use vocabulary to unlock the text. Definitions of generative vocabulary are included. Teachers learn about benchmark vocabulary and by-the-way words. Teachers are also directed to a webpage and the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook for vocabulary support.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1, the scaffolded instruction notes explain what a phrasal verb is. In the Teacher’s Edition on page 13 it states, “Help students understand the nature of phrasal verbs-a verb plus an adverb or a verb plus a preposition. Direct their attention to two examples from Chapter 2: “Great piles of salt rose up to the roof” and “Vines and twisted tree roots grew across the path.”
  • On pages 8 and 9 of the Implementation Guide, vocabulary instruction in the curriculum is outlined including detailed definitions of the multiple types of vocabulary found throughout lessons.
  • On page 10 of the Implementation Guide, text complexity measures definitions and uses are explained.
  • Modeling videos are also provided including Close Reading Modeling Videos and Independent Reading Modeling Videos to aid teachers in implementation of these strategies.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet expectations for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

  • On page 66-71 of the Implementation Guide, a scope and sequence chart includes all Common Core Standards and which Unit and Module they are addressed.
  • On pages 74-81 of the Implementation Guide, Standards maps are provided for each Module. These maps include a description of the performance based assessment, essential questions that are linked with standards, a list of anchor and support texts, a list of all standards covered, Module goals that are linked to standards, and enduring understandings that are linked to standards.
  • On pages 84-94 of the Implementation Guide, a Common Core Correlations Chart is included that lists all Grade 4 Common Core Standards and then gives the Unit and page number the standard is addressed.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies.

Materials include an Implementation Guide that provides a walkthrough of the curriculum citing and explaining the rationale and research-based strategies including but not limited to the principals of backwards design and the design principle of backward mapping.

  • Page 22 of the Implementation Guide states “ReadyGEN uses the principles of backward design to help teachers deliver instruction based on learning goals.” This is connected to the quote on the bottom of the page form the research of Wiggins and McTighe.
  • Page 24 of the Implementation Guide states “ReadyGEN offers a robust range of assessments.” This is connected to the quote on the same page from the research of Peter Afflerbach about formative and summative assessments.
  • Page 45 of the Implementation Guide states “Quick Checks provide formative assessments opportunities to monitor student’s fluency progress.”
  • Page 50 of the Implementation Guide states “Performance-Based Assessments emphasize integration of reading, writing, and speaking and listening as students draw from the texts sets to demonstrate their knowledge of core understandings.” This is connected to the quote on page 51 from the research of Linda Darling-Hammond and Frank Adamson.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 do not contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
7/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 meet expectations for providing teacher resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the standards. Formative and summative assessment opportunities are provided throughout the materials. All assessments clearly indicate which standards are being emphasized, and teachers are provided guidance on how to interpret student performance and suggestions for follow-up, with exception of end-of-unit work, where standards are not consistently highlighted. Routines and opportunities to monitor student progress are included throughout the materials.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Materials for Grade 4 meet expectations for regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Materials include a baseline assessment, multiple formative assessments, performance-based assessments, and end-of-unit assessments. Each of these assessments are included in the Assessment Book along with an overview, directions, passages, running records, student tests, test administration information, answer keys, and rubrics.

  • Opportunities are provided during daily lessons for monitoring student progress in reading and writing, as well as opportunities to assess oral reading fluency.
  • Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 7, page 317 of the Teacher’s Edition includes a Quick Check to monitor student progress. If… then… statements help teachers assess students’ progress and offer immediate adjustments and feedback.
  • Reading Keystones and Writing Keystones formative assessments are included in daily lessons with sections titled “practice” or “application.”
  • Oral Reading Fluency Quick Checks are included in the Small Group Options for daily lessons. For example, Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 7, page 277 of the Teacher’s Edition includes an Oral Reading Fluency Quick Check to assess accuracy.
  • Oral Reading Fluency can be assessed using text and guidelines provided for Running Records (Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide).
  • Performance-Based Assessments are included with each Module in which students complete a task that requires text analysis and demonstrating knowledge in writing.
  • End-of-Unit Assessments are provided that include both constructed-response items and extended-response items with checklists and rubrics to use in scoring (Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide).

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Grade 4 instructional materials partially meet the expectations for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized. While standards are clearly labeled in the daily lessons and are found on the performance based assessments for each unit, standards are not noted on the End-of-Unit Assessments.

  • Daily lessons that include formative assessments clearly denote standards being taught. For example, in Unit 3, Module 3, Lesson 14 on page 294 of the Teacher’s Edition students use the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Standard CCSS.L.3.5.b is clearly labeled.
  • Performance Based Assessments denote standards being assessed in the objectives box in the Teacher’s Edition. For example, in the Unit 2, Module A, Performance-Based Assessment students write a tall tale that includes an element of nature and includes larger-than-life characters, a problem that is solved in a humorous way, and exaggeration of characters and event. The standards CCSS.W.4.3, CCSS W.4.3.b, CCSS W.4.6, and CCSS SL.4.5 are provided in the Teacher’s Guide.
  • On pages 74-81 of the Implementation Guide, a standards map is provided that lists all standards in a module along with the Performance-Based Assessment Task.
  • End-of-Unit Assessments do not provide standards being emphasized noted in student facing material or the Assessment Teacher’s Guide.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Grade 4 instructional materials meet the expectations for assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments and interpreting results through rubrics and scoring guidance documents.

  • Performance Based Assessments provide teachers with notes and guidance regarding administration of assessments. Information is provided which guides teachers to allow students to complete the assessment over multiple lessons, to review the Essential Questions, and revisit the main selection texts. Also provided are scaffolded supports for students as they are completing the assessments and follow-up support for students scoring a 0, 1, or 2 on the assessment with “if…then…” statements.
  • Guidance is provided for teachers in administering, scoring assessments, and interpreting student assessment scores on End-of-Unit Assessments. For example, in the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide on page T65 guidance is given on scoring of constructed response items using a rubric. A rubric is also provided for scoring the extended response items of the End-Of-Unit Assessment.
  • The Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide provides guidance on what to do with assessment results. Teachers are directed to examine results and then use the results to inform your instruction. Page T52 of the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide provides this guidance.
  • Instruction and guidance are provided for administering Running Records with the fluency passages used for the assessments. Information is also provided for teachers in interpreting student scores and specific miscues in the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Grade 4 instructional materials meet the expectations for including routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Ongoing progress monitoring formative assessments are integrated within every module.

Progress monitoring opportunities include:

  • Reading and Writing Keystones that assess students’ reading and writing and their understanding of key language, structure, and ideas. For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 5 a writing keystone checklist provides a checklist for narrative writing.
  • Fluency Quick Checks that offer If. . . then suggestions to monitor students’ fluency progress; Check Progress assessments in each unit that assess students’ phonics and word analysis skills. For example, in Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 1 it is suggested that if students are reading too slowly then the teacher should encourage them to practice the passage several times to become more confident with the words.
  • Student work in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, including Write in Response to Reading prompts that require students to cite text evidence as they write about what they’ve read. For example, in Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 1 students record their reading in a daily reading log. They note each part that they found difficult and explain why that part was challenging.
  • If. . . then suggestions for monitoring progress in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

  • Pages TR 14-19 of the Unit 1 Teacher Resources include the rationale behind the Independent Reading Routine as well as an independent reading rubric and reading log.
  • Small Group Time includes a Focused Independent Reading Time. During this time students focus on a process such as Engagement and Identity, Independence, or Stamina. Students also focus on a Strategy such as Vocabulary Knowledge, Critical Thinking, Fluency, or Comprehension.
  • During Small Group time, students are guided to apply the content of the Reading Analysis lesson to their self-selected text.
    • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 2 students take notes about how the visuals add information to the text.
    • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 6 students list words and phrases that appeal to the five senses.

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Grade 4 meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. There are clear supports for students who struggle as well as those who work above grade level. Grouping strategies included are inclusive of multiple opportunities.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for providing strategies to meet the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and support them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standard.

The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook addresses English Language Learners, students with disabilities, struggling readers, and accelerated learners.

  • The handbook provides models of scaffolded instruction, useful strategies, and practical routines to employ during reading. The lessons provided are intended to be used during small-group time with students the teacher determines to need additional scaffolded instruction.
  • Small group instruction is provided based on student need with options such as:
    • Unlock the Text which supports students in accessing ideas, key language, and key structures
    • Word Analysis which supports students with their foundational skills.
    • Conferencing which helps students to grow their independent reading accountability as they discuss their self-selected texts with the teacher.
    • Support Instruction which targets students who need additional scaffolding for the instructional focus of each lesson.
    • Extensions which are intended for students who understand the lesson focus and would benefit from opportunities to extend the lesson and enhance learning.
    • Sleuth which is used three to four times each unit for small group lessons to reteach, practice, and refine close-reading skills and strategies.
  • The Scaffolding Strategies Handbook is organized into four parts.
    • Within Part 1, titled Unlock the Text, every anchor and supporting text is supported with scaffolds and strategies. The lessons are divided into Prepare to Read, Interact with Text, and Express and Extend.
    • Part 2 is titled Unlock the Writing. These lessons work to scaffold the module-level Performance Based Assessments and it also provides additional lessons to teach the writing types required by the standards.
    • In Part 3 of the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook routines, graphic organizers, and activities are provided to support students.
    • Part 4 is titled Unlock Language Learning and focuses on supporting English Language Learners construct the meaning and explore vocabulary of a text. This section provides support to build background, talk about sentences, speak and write about the text, expand understanding of vocabulary, and write about the anchor and supporting text.

The Teacher’s Guide includes Scaffolded Instruction notes throughout all lessons.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 6 on p. 63 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for Strategic Support. The note states, “Technology: Tell students that the picture recognition software Jada uses on pp. 34-35 actually exists. The software can find the identity of someone in a photograph and then supply information about the person. That’ how the Squad discovers who Drake Darkly is and what he’s up to.”
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 11 on p. 323 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for Strategic Support. The note states, “Key Details: Students may have difficulty absorbing all the information presented on each page. Guide them to read the main body text and then review the illustrations and captions. Encourage them to start at the top and move across the page to ensure they do not miss important details.”
  • Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 16 on p. 363 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for Strategic Support. The note states, “Visuals: Help students compare the visuals as well as understand reasons for the differences. Have students count the number of diagrams, maps, or charts in each text. They might note how many disasters are represented. They might count photographs of people, and determine the roles of people who are presented and the purpose for their inclusion.”
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 3 on p. 23 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for Strategic Support. The note states, “Character’s Thoughts: Help students recognize that the author uses italics to tell what Greg is actually thinking. Contrast this with other parts of the narrative where the author describes Greg’s general feelings or ideas. The narrator’s descriptions of Greg’s feelings are written in regular text.”

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards. The Teacher’s Guide provides daily scaffolding for immediate feedback during lessons, and the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides more extensive follow up to support English Language Learners.

The Teacher’s Guide provides on-the-spot scaffolds in each lesson. These address common stumbling blocks encountered by English Language Learners and struggling readers and writers. They are highlighted at the bottom of each lesson in blue.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 18 on page 191 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for English Language Learners. The note states, “Frequently Confused Words: Help students understand that many words that sound the same can have different meanings. Give students a few examples, such as capital and capitol, lessen and lesson, or reign, rain, and rein. Explain the different meanings of the words. Students may wish to start a list of such words or search online for lists of words and definitions that fall into this category.”
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 6 on page 213 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for English Language Learners. The note states, “Cultural References: Help students understand cultural language and terms such as Wind Runner, Raven People, sacred drum, Vision Quest, warrior, fourteen summers, and ceremonial fire. Discuss the meaning of the names and define unfamiliar words. Prompt students to share what they know about native peoples from their cultures.”
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 5 on page 81 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for English Language Learners. The note states, “Quotation Marks: Help students understand that quotations are the exact words that people or characters say. Tell them that in English, quotation marks are used in writing to show where the speaker’s exact words begin and end. Remind students that quotation marks look like two apostrophes and that they always are written in pairs.”
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 9 on page 103 the Scaffolded Instruction note is for English Language Learners. The note states, “Puns: Students may not understand the pun in the chapter title “In the Chips.” Explain that chocolate chips are pieces of chocolate baked into cookies, but chips may also refer to money. Being “in the chips” means having a lot of money. In this case, a boy makes money selling chocolate-chip cookies.”

The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook has a number of resources for teachers to assist English Language Learners, struggling readers and writers as well as students with disabilities. These are intended to be used during small group time.

The handbook has four sections of resources that include:

  • Unlock the Text: This section includes text complexity rubrics that offer insight into the quantitative, qualitative and reader and task measures of text. The qualitative measures provide strategies for levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands. Cognate charts are provided for each anchor text and supporting text in this section of the handbook as well.
  • Unlock Writing: This section provides scaffolded lessons for the Performance-Based Assessments and grade level support and guidelines for teaching the standards based writing types.
  • Routines and Activities: This section includes routines, reproducible graphic organizers, and activities that can be used to support teaching the standards.
  • Unlock Language Learning: This section provides specific resources for English Language Learners to construct meaning in the selections as well as explore vocabulary of texts. The strategies and activities are designed to develop mastery of reading, writing and speaking around the areas of Building Background, talking about Sentences, Speaking and Writing about the Texts, and Expanding Understanding of Vocabulary.

If/then sections are provided in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook to support students.

  • In the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook on page 181 students are to Unlock the Task: Create an Infographic. Students break apart the task, answer questions about the task, and then restate the task. If/then statements are provided to monitor and support struggling students. For example, “If …. students are intimidated by the task, then…. Review with them what an infographic is. Ask: Who can remind us what an infographic is? How can we define it using the words info and graphic? Who can give us examples of an infographic that we have studied in this unit? As students answer the questions, assess their understanding of an infographic. Clear up any misconceptions.”

To build speaking and listening skills the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook lists a Listening Skills Log on pages 301-302 and a Prepare for Discussions Routine and Rating Sheet pages 304-305.

  • The Leveled Text Instructional Plan addresses speaking and listening skills in the section titled After Reading on page TR62. During the Talk About It section, it states, “The activities in this section are designed to help students develop their understanding of the unit topic and enhance their listening and speaking skills by engaging in a group discussion.” Discussion questions are provided to help students express their ideas.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 12 students use the Think-Pair-Share Routine to practice speaking and listening. Teachers are reminded to make sure that students are using best practices for speaking and listening as outlined in the routine.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for including extensions and /or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Each lesson offers support for accelerated learners in Small Group Options. The small group options provided in the Teacher’s Guide offers teachers opportunities to direct their instruction to the needs of their students. Teachers are encouraged to gather formative assessment information from whole group instruction to help determine student needs during small groups. Opportunities within small groups that include:

  • Independent Reading Conferences: Opportunities for students to discuss self-selected texts can be found in the Teacher Resource Book. Independent reading rubrics are also provided for students to self-assess reading preferences and behaviors.
  • Close Reading Extension or Language Analysis Extension are provided for students who are adept or excel at the skill or lesson.
  • Mini-lessons can also be found in the Sleuth materials that offer extensions for students who excel at close reading or language analysis.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 3 the Close Reading Extension on page 37 asks students to complete an Extend Mini-Lesson for Sleuth activity. Students discuss questions, gather evidence, ask questions, make their case, and prove their thinking.

The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook included opportunities outside of the teacher guide for extensions for students who are above grade level. These sections are titled Extend, Accelerated, and Going Deeper.

  • ·There are four parts in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook. Including Unlock the Text, Unlock the Writing, Routines and Activities, and Unlock Language Learning. Within each part, there are extensions activities and strategies.
  • In Unit 1, Module A on page 18 of the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook, students Unlock the Text to Express and Extend after reading Mary Anning: The Girl Who Cracked Open the World. The Extend section states, “Have students research another female paleontologist such as Karen Chin, Sue Hendrickson, Ruth Mason, Elizabeth Nicoholis, Patricia Vickers-Rich, or Joan Wiffin. Have them compare and contrast one of these women with Mary Anning.”
  • In Part 2, Unlock the Writing on page 235 students are provided with a practice and a deeper practice when working with informative/explanatory texts. The Deeper Practice note states, “Have students work individually and use their group’s graphic organizer to write a clear introduction to the topic that includes introductory words and phrases. Have them share their introductions, discuss what parts are clear, and explain why.”
  • On page TR11 in the Unit 1 Shared Reading Routine, teachers are provided with a Going Deeper activity once students are familiar with the routine. The directions state, “Once students are familiar with the routine, have them add sticky notes to text sections that cause confusion and are “Aha!” moments. These sections can then be discussed after the reading.”
  • On page TR22 in the Unit 2 Text Club Routine directions, teachers are provided with a Going Deeper activity for when students become comfortable with routine to help them explore Text Clubs more deeply. The directions state, “Have students from each group “jigsaw” with students from other group to share an element of the text they read. This engages all students in all texts being read in the class.” It also states, “Ask students to prepare a Discussion Guide that may be used in future Text Clubs. They can use their own discussions to guide other groups as they read the text.”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for providing opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. Students participate in partner and small group Think/Pair/Share, Whole Class Discussion, Small Group Discussion, Read Alouds, Shared Reading, Independent Reading, Text Clubs, and Benchmark Vocabulary Discussions for both Informational and Literary texts.

The Teacher’s Guide provides small group options for teachers to direct instruction to the needs of their students. Teachers are encouraged to use information gained from whole group instruction to help determine where students need additional supports or extensions during small groups.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 11 the Teacher’s Guide states, “Have students work independently or in small groups to complete the graphic organizer. Use the Small Group Discussion Routine on pp. TR6-TR7 to have students discuss how finding specific details in the text helped them answer the questions. Check understanding by asking students to share or by circulating among students or groups.”
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 6 the Teacher’s Guide has students Turn and Talk, “After reading, have students turn to a partner and discuss these questions using examples from the text: How does the way the text is organized under heading help readers answer the question, “What are the good and bad effects of a volcanic eruption?”

Routines and protocols for grouping strategies are provided in the Teacher Resources section of the Teacher’s Guide.

Indicator 3s

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Materials are available to access with a login and password at www.pearsonrealize.com. Once signed in an educator can access materials such as the Teacher’s Guide for each Unit, Teacher Resources, Standards, Baseline Assessments, Practice Test, Scaffolded Strategies Handbooks, Unit Modules, each unit’s Leveled eText Library, Text Collections, Sleuth, printable resources, a link to the digital publishing tool: Tik a Tok.

On the website teachers can create classes to assign work, check on the status of assignments, create groups, and post class calendars. There is also a Data tab to gather and display and use data to promote student mastery of the standards. Also included on this website are Close Reading Modeling Videos, Independent Reading Modeling Videos, Accessible eTexts, and the customizable lesson planning tool: MyGen.

Accessibility was tested on Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Windows, Apple, Android mobile device, Safari, an iPhone. All access was successful. The eTexts are flash based. You will be unable to access eTexts on an iPad since they don’t support Flash. It is recommended to download the eTexts for Schools App if your device does not support the Flash player.

Indicator 3s3v

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 include useful technology tools to support teacher understanding of the material to support and implement the curriculum. They include materials to help teachers support students' personalized learning via navigable online platforms for students and teachers. The digital platform offers opportunities to enhance students learning.

Indicator 3t

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Materials provide students with the ability to continue learning at home with activities aligned to unit texts, writing modes, and Enduring Understandings. Anchor texts are interactive to build background knowledge and help students access complex texts. Teachers have the option of assigning an e-text or interactive version of the anchor text to students on Pearson Realize. Interactivities can be displayed on an interactive whiteboard for use as part of whole group instruction, or students can access whatever texts have been assigned to them on an individual device. TikaTok allows students to write, illustrate and publish their own digital storybooks and projects. There are also Interactive graphic organizers that allow students to record as they read independently.

Online interactive tools such as Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Monster Word Mania, Pack Up the Skills, Envision It! Animations, Letter Tile Drag and Drop, and Grammar Jammers are provided and can be assigned by the teacher, as well as Close and Independent Reading Videos to support students’ learning.

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. An online Baseline Assessment is used to pinpoint students struggles while assessing the standards with complex text. Digital materials provide program-agnostic College and Career Readiness assessments, Balanced Practice Test, and Performance Tasks. Technology-Enhanced Items appear on the Baseline Assessment in Grades 2-5, on all End-of-Unit Assessments, and on program-agnostic Balanced Performance Tasks. Teachers can also build their own assessments.

The DATA tab of Realize provides class and student data, including standards mastery, overall progress, and time on task. Teachers can also view data individually by student from the class assignment list. Teachers can use this data to create assignments based on an individual student’s needs.

Indicator 3u.ii

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, MyGen, allows teachers to adapt any unit module. Teachers can replace any anchor or supporting text with another selection, create their own essential questions and enduring understandings, and identify lesson standards. Teachers can also develop Performance-Based assessments that are customized to their classroom.

Indicator 3v

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

Professional development is available online through tutorials, onsite orientations, in-depth workshops, and online trainings. Access to professional development can be found on the Pearson website. Teachers can assign work to students and can connect with individual students through a chat feature on the Dash site.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 4 include useful technology tools to support teacher understanding of the material to support and implement the curriculum. They include materials to help teachers support students' personalized learning via navigable online platforms for students and teachers. The digital platform offers opportunities to enhance students learning.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Materials are available to access with a login and password at www.pearsonrealize.com. Once signed in an educator can access materials such as the Teacher’s Guide for each Unit, Teacher Resources, Standards, Baseline Assessments, Practice Test, Scaffolded Strategies Handbooks, Unit Modules, each unit’s Leveled eText Library, Text Collections, Sleuth, printable resources, a link to the digital publishing tool: Tik a Tok.

On the website teachers can create classes to assign work, check on the status of assignments, create groups, and post class calendars. There is also a Data tab to gather and display and use data to promote student mastery of the standards. Also included on this website are Close Reading Modeling Videos, Independent Reading Modeling Videos, Accessible eTexts, and the customizable lesson planning tool: MyGen.

Accessibility was tested on Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Windows, Apple, Android mobile device, Safari, an iPhone. All access was successful. The eTexts are flash based. You will be unable to access eTexts on an iPad since they don’t support Flash. It is recommended to download the eTexts for Schools App if your device does not support the Flash player.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Materials provide students with the ability to continue learning at home with activities aligned to unit texts, writing modes, and Enduring Understandings. Anchor texts are interactive to build background knowledge and help students access complex texts. Teachers have the option of assigning an e-text or interactive version of the anchor text to students on Pearson Realize. Interactivities can be displayed on an interactive whiteboard for use as part of whole group instruction, or students can access whatever texts have been assigned to them on an individual device. TikaTok allows students to write, illustrate and publish their own digital storybooks and projects. There are also Interactive graphic organizers that allow students to record as they read independently.

Online interactive tools such as Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Monster Word Mania, Pack Up the Skills, Envision It! Animations, Letter Tile Drag and Drop, and Grammar Jammers are provided and can be assigned by the teacher, as well as Close and Independent Reading Videos to support students’ learning.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. An online Baseline Assessment is used to pinpoint students struggles while assessing the standards with complex text. Digital materials provide program-agnostic College and Career Readiness assessments, Balanced Practice Test, and Performance Tasks. Technology-Enhanced Items appear on the Baseline Assessment in Grades 2-5, on all End-of-Unit Assessments, and on program-agnostic Balanced Performance Tasks. Teachers can also build their own assessments.

The DATA tab of Realize provides class and student data, including standards mastery, overall progress, and time on task. Teachers can also view data individually by student from the class assignment list. Teachers can use this data to create assignments based on an individual student’s needs.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, MyGen, allows teachers to adapt any unit module. Teachers can replace any anchor or supporting text with another selection, create their own essential questions and enduring understandings, and identify lesson standards. Teachers can also develop Performance-Based assessments that are customized to their classroom.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

Professional development is available online through tutorials, onsite orientations, in-depth workshops, and online trainings. Access to professional development can be found on the Pearson website. Teachers can assign work to students and can connect with individual students through a chat feature on the Dash site.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Tue Apr 04 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
978-0-328-81946-1 Copyright: 2016 0
978-0-328-85198-0 Copyright: 2016 0
978-0-328-85199-7 Copyright: 2016 0
978-0-328-85200-0 Copyright: 2016 0
978-0-328-85201-7 Copyright: 2016 0
978-0-328-85282-6 Copyright: 2016 0
978-0-328-85283-3 Copyright: 2016 0
978-0-328-85299-4 Copyright: 2016 0

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

X