Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The ReadyGen instructional materials for Grades K, 1, and 2 meet expectations for alignment. The materials include include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Students have opportunities to build skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and they integrate language work throughout. Texts include a balance of genres and are appropriately rigorous and complex for primary students. Most tasks and questions are grounded in evidence. Materials support students with foundational skills instruction to support students' building their reading abilities to comprehend increasingly complex texts over the course of the school year. Vocabulary is addressed in each module, though academic vocabulary is not built across multiple texts. The materials meet use and design expectations, including teacher tools to plan and differentiate instruction, as well as incorporate useful technology applications.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
53
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
28
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
34
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

Kindergarten instructional materials meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. Most tasks and questions text based and grounded in evidence. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning during reading. Materials also provide opportunity to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level. Overall, appropriately complex grade-level texts are are accompanied by quality tasks aligned to the standards of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language to build foundational skills and strengthen literacy skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
20/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials meet expectations for text quality and complexity. Central texts are of publishable quality and address topics of interests to Kindergarten students. The instructional materials include a mixture of both literary and informational texts, most of which are at an appropriate level of complexity and rigor. The instructional materials include a text complexity analysis with rubrics and rationales for their purposes and placement. The materials support students increasing literacy skills over the year and provide students with many opportunities to engage in a range and volume of reading throughout each unit and module through read alouds, supporting texts, and leveled libraries.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations that anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests. Anchor texts and text sets encompass multiple themes and integrate content areas such as social studies and science. Texts can be examined multiple times for multiple purposes and are used to expand big ideas, build academic vocabulary, and facilitate access to future texts while building toward independent grade level reading. Anchor texts are read aloud throughout the materials beginning in Unit 1 continuing through Unit 6.

Some samples of anchor texts that support the high-quality expectations of this indicator include:

Unit 1: Living Together: This is Home

  • In Module A, students are read Where is Home Little Pip? by Karma Wilson and Jane Chapman. This text is children’s literature and is classified as a picture book. This text takes place along the Antarctic shore, where the main character becomes lost and tries to find her way back home. The main character encounters friendly animals who guide her along the journey figuring out her way home. The book offers opportunities to build vocabulary and foundational reading skills such as rhyming.
  • In Module B, students are read Life in a Pond by Carol K. Lindeen. This text is classified as informational and is supported with illustrations. This text builds scientific knowledge of plants and animals that live in ponds and offers opportunities to build rich vocabulary.

Unit 2: Understanding Then and Now

  • In Module A, students are read The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton. The Little House received the Randolph Caldecott Medal in 1943. This text is children’s literature and is classified as a picture book. This text has rich vocabulary and appealing illustrations to help students understand point-of-view.
  • In Module B, students are read Farming: Then and Now by Charles R. Smith Jr. and illustrated by Jessika Von Innerebner. This text is classified as historical nonfiction and is supported with illustrations. This historical text exposes students to a history lesson in farming by explaining things that take place on a farm then and now. For example, students learn how to milk a cow or shear a sheep. The text uses challenging vocabulary to explain the differences in farming in the past compared to challenges in farming in the present.

Unit 3: Predicting Change

  • In Module A, students are read Come on, Rain by Karen Hesse. This text is classified as poetry. This Newbery Medal author uses figurative, exquisite language to help paint a mental picture. This story encompasses language from the past but uses pictures to scaffold the meaning of the language.
  • In Module B, students are read What will the Weather Be? by Lynda Dewitt and illustrated by Carolyn Croll. This text is classified as scientific nonfiction and is supported with illustrations. The text uses meteorology terms to explain how and why the weather is so difficult to predict.

Unit 4: Learning about Each Other and the World

  • In Module A, students are read I Love Saturdays y Domingos by Alma Flor Ada and illustrated by Elivia Savadier. This text was recognized as being on the Américas commended list in 2002. It is children’s literature and is classified as a picture book. This story provides rich vocabulary in both Spanish and English while portraying the similarities of two different cultures.
  • Module B, students are read Making Music by Cameron Macintosh. This text is classified as children’s literature. This book uses pictures and rich vocabulary to describe how music is made around the world.

Unit 5: Knowing About Patterns and Structures

  • In Module A, students are read The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle. This text is classified as nonfiction and is supported with illustrations. This story describes a single seed’s journey into the life cycle of a plant. The story has colorful pictures which help deepen young learners’ understanding of content vocabulary. The text conveys the importance of perseverance.
  • In Module B, students are read Plant Patterns by Nathan Olson. This text is classified as non-fiction. This text is a scientific book, taking students through patterns found in plants. Through the use of vibrant rich photographs, students learn extensive vocabulary.

Unit 6: Exploring Communities

  • In Module A, students are read On the Town: A Community Adventure by Judith Casely. This text is children’s literature and is classified as a picture book. This text uses pictures to explain the different vocabulary that guide students through a social studies explanation on different parts of a community.
  • In Module B, students are read A Neighborhood Walk City by Peggy Pancella. This text is children’s literature and is classified as a picture book. This text has rich language and academic vocabulary, appealing illustrations, and complex characters.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. There is a balance of literature and informational text and also a variety of text types. The text sets in Kindergarten include literary picture books, poetry, scientific nonfiction, and historical nonfiction.

In Unit 1, Living Together: This is Home texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - Where is Home, Little Pip? by Karma Wilson and Jane Chapman. (Literary Text, Narrative Picture book)
    • Supporting Text - A House for Hermit Crab by Eric Carle. (Literary Text, Narrative Picture book)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - Life in a Pond by Carol K Lindeen.(Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - A Bed for the Winter by Karen Wallace. (Informational Text)
  • Poems:
    • “Sea Creatures” by Meisch Goldish
    • “Ducks Quack Me Up” by Charles Ghigna
    • “Daddy Fell Into the Pond” by Alfred Noyes
    • “Deer Mouse” by Aileen Fisher

In Unit 2, Understanding Then and Now texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton. (Literary Text, Narrative Picture book)
    • Supporting Text - Four Seasons Make a Year by Anne Rockwell. (Literary Text, Narrative Picture book)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - Farming Then and Now by Charles R. Smith Jr. and illustrated by Jessika Von Innerebner. (Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - The Old Things by Diana Noonan. (Informational Text)
  • Poems:
    • “Houses” by Aileen Fisher
    • “Seasons of the Year” by Meisch Goldish
    • “Grandpa’s Stories” by Langston Hughes
    • Children of Long Ago by Lessie Jones Little

In Unit 3, Predicting Change texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - Come On, Rain! by Karen Hesse. (Poetry)
    • Supporting Text - The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats. (Literary Text, Narrative Picture book)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - What Will the Weather Be? by Lynda Dewitt and illustrated by Carolyn Croll. (Scientific Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - Weather Words and What They Mean by Gail Gibbons. (Informational Text)
  • Poems:
    • “Spring Rain” by Marchette Chute
    • “Listen” by Margaret Hillert
    • “Weather Together” by Lillian M. Fisher
    • “Weather” by Meisch Goldish

In Unit 4, the theme is Learning About Each Other and the World. Unit texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - I Love Saturdays y Domingos by Alma Flor Ada and illustrated by Elivia Savadier. (Literary Text, Narrative, Picture book)
    • Supporting Text - Apple Pie 4th of July by Janet S. Wong. (Literary Text, Narrative Picture book)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - Making Music by Cameron Macintosh. (Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - Clothes in Many Cultures by Heather Adamson. (Historical Nonfiction Informational Text)
  • Poems:
    • “Grandmas and Grandpas” by Mary Ann Hoberman
    • “The Crayon Box That Talked” by Shane DeRolf
    • “It’s a Small World” by Richard M. and Robert B. Sherman
    • “Kids” by Bobbi Katz

In Unit 5, Knowing About Patterns and Structures texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle.(Literary Text, Narrative, Picture book)
    • Supporting Text - Jack’s Garden by Henry Cole. (Literary Text, Narrative, Picture Book)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - Plant Patterns by Nathan Olson. (Scientific Non Fiction Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - Swirl by Swirl by Joyce Sidman. (Nonfiction Informational Text supported as a picture book)
  • Poems:
    • “The Seed” by Aileen Fisher
    • “Green” Plants by Meisch Goldish
    • “Rainbow” by Meisch Goldish
    • “Zigzag” by Loris Lesynski

In Unit 6, Exploring Communities texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - On the Town: A Community Adventure by Judith Casely. (Literary Text, Narrative. Picture book)
    • Supporting Text - Places in my Neighborhood by Shelly Lyons. (Literary Text, Narrative, Picture book)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - Neighborhood Walk: City by Peggy Pancella. (Nonfiction Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - While I Am Sleeping by Malaika Rose Stanley. (Nonfiction Informational Text)
  • Poems:
    • “This is My Community” by Carlos Elliot
    • “Our Block” by Lois Lenski
    • “Sing a Song of Cities” by Lee Bennett Hopkins
    • “Skyscraper” by Dennis Lee
    • “Manhattan Lullaby” by Norma Farber

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for this grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task(s).Texts in Kindergarten are read aloud to students and fall in the lexile level range of 310-740 as provided in Appendix A of the Common Core State Standards. The reader and task outlined in the Teacher Guides complexity rubrics provide rationale for texts being of high complexity levels.

Examples of texts that support appropriate complexity include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, students are read the literary text Where is Home Little Pip? by Karma Wilson and Jane Champman. The text has a quantitative measure of 510 Lexile. This text has multiple levels of meaning, both literal and figurative, of “finding home and “home is where the heart is.” There is some conversational dialog, a mix of simple and complex sentences, alliteration, onomatopoeia, and content area vocabulary. This text is chronological fiction told from the third person point of view; the text appears in fonts of different sizes and is curved. The reader and task suggestions are to share images of different homes, discuss the meaning of the word home as a place where people or animals live, brainstorm a list of animals and where they live, invite the students to create illustrations of the characters in the story, and work with a partner to use their illustrations to retell the story.
  • In Unit 1, Module B students are read the informational text Life in a Pond by Carol K Lindeen. The text has a quantitative measure of 310 Lexile. This text has an accessible concept (relationships in an ecosystem) and is organized in four subsections. There are topic specific terms which are defined and reinforced with photographs. This text includes a glossary, resources, and index. The vocabulary includes several specific terms included in the glossary and general specific vocabulary that is reinforced through photographs. The reader and task suggestions include to discuss with the students what a pond is, where they will find a pond, and what plants and animals they might see near the pond. Students will reread the text with the teacher and identify relationships among the plants, animals, and elements in a pond. Sentence starters such as “Plants need sunlight and pond (water) to grow”, and Animals such as frogs and ducks eat pond (insects).”
  • Unit 2, Module A, students are read the literary text The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton. The text has a quantitative measure of 890 Lexile. This text has an accessible concept and is conventional in structure with sequential events over the passage of time. Setting is described in a way that appeals to the senses and has repeating words and phrases. The reader and task suggestions include to discuss with children what life is like in the city and how it might be different than life in the country. The teacher points out that the area where they live was once, a long time ago, more like the country. Students then identify the changes that take place in the landscape surrounding the little house as time passes and describe the impact of these changes.
  • Unit 2, Module B, students are read students are read the informational text Farming, Then and Now by Charles R. Smith Jr. and illustrated by Jessika Von Innerebner. The text has a quantitative measure of 600 Lexile. This text has an accessible concept (farm life in the past and present) and is structured with compare and contrast features guided by fictional characters and non-fiction text features such as headings, tables, and a glossary. Most of the sentences are compound with a few simple sentences. The vocabulary is challenging while the character comments on facts throughout the text. The reader and task suggestions include inviting the students to brainstorm a list of they know about farms. The students then create a venn diagram to compare and contrast farms in the past and the present. Students should use evidence from the text to support their ideas.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, students are read the literary text Come on, Rain by Karen Hesse. The text has a quantitative measure of 780 Lexile. This text has an accessible theme with multicultural aspects along with weather. The structure is conventional to a narrative with advanced vocabulary throughout and poetic images. The text has a clear sequence of events. The reader and task suggestions include having students share how they felt on a very hot day and how a lack of rain might affect people and plants. Students then list words from the text that describe people and plants before and after the rain. Then students have discussions based on what effects the rain has on the neighborhood.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, students are read the informational text What will the Weather Be? By Lynda Dewitt and illustrated by Carolyn Croll. The text has a quantitative measure of 500 Lexile. This text is complex focusing on how weather forecasting is made possible and which tools are used. This is a conventional narrative that provides context for detailed technical information about weather. The vocabulary is content specific and complex. Pictures support the text along with diagrams. The reader and task suggestions include asking students what they know about weather forecasts, then having the students name different types of weather. The students then review the vocabulary from the text and practice using them in sentences correctly. The teacher provides sentence frames for the students.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, students are read the literary text I Love Saturdays y Domingos by Alma Flor Ada and illustrated by Elivia Savadier. The text has a quantitative measure of 510 Lexile. This text is accessible in theme with multicultural concepts. The text includes repeated compare and contrast patterns of events, and Spanish words and phrases, some of which are defined. The reader and task suggestions include asking the children to describe activities they do with different family members. The students then identify how these activities might be similar and different. The teacher rereads the text with the students stopping to identify how the activities the narrator experiences with her grandma and grandpa are both similar and different to the experiences she experiences with her abuelita and abuelito. The students then explain why the narrator loves both Saturdays and domingos and what she can learn from her diverse cultural background.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, students are read the informational text Making Music by Cameron Macintosh. The text has a quantitative measure of 390 Lexile. This text has an accessible concept, is an informational text with a clear main idea and supporting details that includes tables, headings, photographs, captions, etc. The text has many simple sentences and some complex, the vocabulary is concept-related. The reader and task suggestions include walking through the text and pointing out the text features such as headings, table of contents, labels and glossary. The teacher explains the purpose of the text features and how to use them. Students then draw a fact they learned from the text and share their work in a small group.
  • In Unit 5, Module A, students are read the literary text The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle.The text has a quantitative measure of 400 Lexile. This text has an accessible theme concerning how plants grow, sequencing, and mostly short simple sentences with on-level vocabulary. The reader and task suggestions include discussing what a seed is and ensuring that students understand what plants contain seeds and that this is what new plants grow from. The students then identify, with the help of the teacher, the challenges a seed faces when becoming a plant.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, students read students are read the informational text Plant Patterns by Nathan Olson. The text has a quantitative measure of 740 Lexile. This text has accessible concept concerning how plants show different patterns. Colorful photographs and descriptive labels support the text and sentences range from simple to complex. The vocabulary is topic specific and appropriate. The reader and task suggestions include discussing with the students the meaning of the word pattern and then asking students to name other patterns they have seen. The students then describe the pattern discussed on each page and decide whether it is a color or shape pattern.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, students are read the literary text On the Town, A Community Adventure by Judith Casely. The text has a quantitative measure of 570 Lexile. This text has the theme of community which is accessible and the structure is conventional for a narrative. Dialogue throughout is mixed into simple, compound, and complex sentences with some topic-specific vocabulary. The reader and task suggestions include discussing with students the meaning of community and asking them to name some people and places they have in their community. Students then draw and label one place they visit in their community. A class book can be made.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, students are read the informational text A Neighborhood Walk City by Peggy Pancella. The text has a quantitative measure of 620 Lexile. This text addresses the concept of city communities which is accessible and organized by topics with headings. The photographs and captions reinforce the concepts. The text has mostly simple sentences with topic specific terms. The reader and task suggestions include having students discuss how a city community might be different than other communities. Students describe their day-to-day activities while living in the city. Students then reread the text with the teacher and then retell details about the city life that they learned in the text.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectation that materials support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade-level skills. In the Kindergarten materials, the reading of texts is done by the teacher through a rich read-aloud text. With the reader and task considerations, the read-aloud texts fall within all areas of text complexity and increase students’ comprehension skills throughout the school year.

Some examples that demonstrate supporting students’ increasing literacy skills include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, the teacher reads aloud the literary narrative text Where is Home, Little Pip by Karma Wilson. This text is quantitatively measured as a 520L. The qualitative measures include multiple levels of meaning. The text is chronological fiction told from the third person perspective, and the dialogue is conversational. The teacher reads aloud the text while students use the illustrations and their verbal responses to teacher asked questions to help them build their comprehension and vocabulary. The text is appropriate for beginning of the year Kindergarten students as the text provides challenging content based on a theme.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, the anchor text The Little House is lexiled at an 890L. The text in Unit 2, Module B is Farming Then and Now is lexiled at 600L. Both texts show a range of conventional narrative structure and informational text show a range of genres. Students are asked to sequence the events, and state a reason using a picture to create a valid opinion statement. The texts in both of the units and the complexity of the words or phrases increases slightly. In addition, the sentence length and word count increase in difficulty from Unit 1 to Unit 2, showing the depth and complexity working toward Standard 10.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, students listen to the teacher read aloud, Come On, Rain! by Karen Hesse. This picture book written in poetry form has a quantitative measure of 780L. This is the first time poetry is read to students. Qualitatively, this text has complex vocabulary. Students clarify the meaning of unknown words with frequent advanced vocabulary throughout the text. In addition, the text has poetic images throughout it, which show a range in complexity from that of the first two units. The students are asked to: describe events, add details to characters and define characters’ reactions in the story. These student tasks show the increasing rigor behind what students are being asked to do with the read aloud text.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, a supporting text, Clothes in Many Cultures by Heather Adamson, has a lower Lexile (520) than previous texts; however, the students are now hearing and seeing a historical informational text. The lessons about this text focus on main idea and details, text features, and words and phrases. The teacher support materials include graphic organizers to help scaffold student understanding of the text.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, Neighborhood Walk: City by Peggy Pancella, students are seeing and hearing an informational text with headings, subheadings and captions to help reinforce the text’s concepts. The texts in Unit 6 are a bit more complex based on the quantitative measures being at a 570-620 lexile level. The average sentence length and word frequency also increased in Unit 6. The texts are more complex in this unit based on the qualitative measures: while still being conventional in structure there are places in dialogue, first- person narration, rhyme and repetition, along with synonyms and short verb phrases. The tasks in this unit are more complex since students are asked to create something from what they have learned from the texts.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectation that the anchor texts and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

The anchor texts and supporting texts have a “Text Complexity Rubric” located on page TR52- TR55 under the Teacher Resources section of the Teacher Guide. The Text Complexity Rubric covers quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task measures. Quantitative metrics are provided for each anchor text in four categories: Lexile level, average sentence length, word frequency and page or word count. Qualitative measures are provided for each anchor text and supporting text in four categories: levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and theme and knowledge demands. Metrics provided for qualitative measures are in list form. Reader and Task Suggestions are in narrative form and provide teachers with suggestions for preparing all students to read the text as well as leveled tasks. For example, on page XVIII in the teacher's guide the teacher will find what makes the text for Farming Then and Now Challenging with a qualitative chart and scaffolded strategies page to help young learners access a complex text. Below is an example of the Qualitative Measures Chart:

  • Levels of Meaning: fictional time travelers used as means for examining actual past- and present farming methods: theme of change developed through changes on a farm.
  • Structure: past and present farming methods in then-and now format for comparison: clear connections between past and present; in text boxes, speech bubbles, and sidebars, photographs supporting written text.
  • Language Conventionality and Clarity: challenging academic and domain-specific vocabulary, some in context clues to meaning and a glossary, time-related words, comparison words, simple and complex sentences.

Part two of the chart has a breakdown of how to support students needs in overcoming the challenges of the texts based on the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook to support: English Language Learners, struggling readers, and accelerated readers. Below is an example of a Reader and Task Suggestion Chart based on the Text Complexity Rubrics found in the Teacher Resource Guide on pages TR 52- 55.

  • Preparing to Read the Text “Come On, Rain” on pg TR 52. Have children share how they felt on a very hot day. Discuss how lack of rain might affect people and plants.
  • Leveled Tasks:Have children list words from the text that describe people and plants before the rain and after the rain. Clarify meanings of any words that are unfamiliar. Then discuss, based on these words, what effects the rain has on the neighborhood.

At the beginning of each Module, teachers are provided with a Lexile and genre reminder about the upcoming text set. Lexiles and genres are listed for the anchor text and supporting texts. Lexiles are provided for the Sleuth texts and the Leveled Text Library. Within each unit and module, the texts are focused on a theme, which provides some rationale as to why the text was chosen.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Kindergarten meet the expectations of anchor and supporting texts providing opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading, and there are supports to build students’ comprehension of grade level texts in various shared read-alouds. Students also have access to leveled readers which provided leveled support to help build kindergarten grade level reading proficiency. In addition, there are on grade-level trade books and text selections, grade level small group “Sleuth” selections, independent reading books, and a student reader and I Can Read Selections at students’ reading levels.

Additionally, the program includes eTexts which includes all of the Teacher Guides, Anchor Texts, Supporting Texts, Leveled Readers, Scaffolding Resources, Games, Performance Based Assessment, and Foundational Skills lessons used in center based learning.

The Teacher Guide is laid out with a routines section under Teacher Resources on page TR1 which provides a list of all the years spiraled routines for the students to partake in to help foster comprehension and reading fluency. The routines include Think- Pair- Share, Whole Class Discussion, Small Group Discussion, Read Alouds, Shared Reading, Independent Reading, Text Club, and Informational and Literary Benchmark Vocabulary Routines.

Structures are built within the day to provide students with opportunities to practice silent and oral reading. Each day students engage in independent reading with a specific focus including building stamina and becoming independent readers. In addition, small group instruction each day either focuses on vocabulary, fluency, critical thinking or comprehension. Comprehension and vocabulary instruction dominates the small group instruction, but the few fluency lessons focus on a specific aspect of fluency such as phrasing, expression, and pacing. Students hear and see the teacher model reading the text and then practice using the same text. For example:

  • In Module A, Unit 1, students select a text to read. The teacher announces that the two focus points are engagement and identity and comprehension. The teacher guides the students in applying the reading analysis lesson to their self-selected text. “We learned about the roles of authors and illustrators in telling stories. As you go through your book, mark the author’s and illustrator’s names with sticky notes. Think about how they help tell the story.” Students record in their daily reading log by drawing a picture or dictating or writing a word.

A scaffolded strategies handbook is also provided, which gives teachers additional ways to teach the concepts to struggling learners and English language learners. In addition, throughout the teacher’s guide there are "if/then" sections which provide the teachers with concrete things to do when students do not understand the concept.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The Kindergarten instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent and build towards a culminating tasks to integrates skills. The instructional materials provide multiple opportunities for evidence-based discussion that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and support student listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching. The materials include frequent opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Materials meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials reviewed provide many tasks and opportunities for evidence-based discussions and writing using evidence from texts to build strong literacy skills.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations of most questions, tasks, and assignments being text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly. Students draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text using classroom conversation to help scaffold what the text is saying.

Explicit question examples include:

  • "What is the temperature like in fall? What does the text say? (Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 8, Four Seasons Make a Year)
  • “What is a color pattern?” (Unit 5, Module B, Plant Patterns)
  • "Where do Charlie, Papa, and Mama go first? What does Papa buy Mama?” Students will use the think pair routine to help them discuss where in the text the answer is found. (Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 6, On the Town: A Community Adventure)

Implicit question examples include:

  • "Why do you think the plants on page 17 are named cattails?” (Unit 1, Module B, Life in a Pond)
  • “Look at the headings on page 34, 40, 44, 50. How do these text features help you understand the text?” (Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 7, Clothes in Many Cultures)
  • "What opinion do you think the author has about the pizza parlor? Why?” (Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 6, On the Town: A Community Adventure)

Many lessons have a Reading Analysis section where students are working toward a specific standard and engage in either whole class or small group work to complete a task involving the text. The majority of lessons have a turn and talk after the students read, which requires the students to discuss something from the text.

Most questions require students to engage with the text by referring back to the text for evidence or examining the text for author’s craft. For example, in Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 7, students must go back into the text, Life in a Pond, to answer the question, “Where does the dormouse live at the beginning of the text?” Also, in Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 11, students compare and contrast the two texts What Will the Weather Be? and Weather Words and complete a venn diagram based on the text using the Small Group Discussion Routine.

Each lesson has small group options which include opportunities for students to answer text-based questions. For example, some options are extensions of the Close Reading or Reading Analysis sections. In Unit 4, Module B, students are read the text Clothes in Many Cultures. Students will draw one kind of traditional clothing from the text and then they will draw a picture of a traditional piece of clothing that they now wear in real life. Children will dictate and/or write their ideas on a sheet of paper by answering the following questions that require them to go back into the text to find the answers: How do traditional clothes of both groups of people look alike? How do they look different?

All lessons have a Close Reading section that includes 3-4 text-based questions. For example, in Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 3 examples include:

  • How were the cows milked one hundred years ago? How do you know that? Let's read the sentence where you found that aloud together.
  • How are cows milked today? How do you know that?
  • Why do machines make milking cows faster?

Additional materials that support students engaging with the text include:

  • In the Sleuth close reading materials, there is a gather evidence section for each close read which requires students to find evidence from the text.
  • The Reader's and Writer's Notebook provides evidence-based questions.
  • The Baseline Assessment also includes evidence-based questions.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations of materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Every module offers a culminating task (performance-based assessment) where students write, draw, or dictate to address a prompt. Many of the performance assessments at the end of each module and unit require the students to use evidence from the text they have read. The lessons and questions leading up to the task offer support to complete the task.

For example, students are asked to use the text from the lessons is in Unit 2, Module A, to create a simple personal narrative about something they did when they were younger that they do differently now. The students draw “Then I…”and Now I…” pictures to show a difference in how they do something. Second, they dictate or write about the two events using the sentence starters, “Then I…” and “Now I…”. There is a reproducible page to distribute to students as well. Lastly, there is a review and revise portion and a shared writing to complete the assessment.

Text-based questions and activities lead up to the following culminating tasks are included in the instructional materials:

  • Unit 1, Module A: Write about an Animal- Students choose an animal from one of the selections. They tell about an animal and its home.
  • Unit 1, Module B: Write about a Special Home- Students choose one animal or plant from Life in a Pond or A Bed for the winter. Tell something about the animal’s or plant’s home.
  • Unit 2, Module A: Write about Changes Narrative- Create a simple narrative. Tell about something you did when you were younger that you do differently now.
  • Unit 2, Module B: Write about Life on a Farm Opinion- Children state an opinion about whether they would like to live on a farm.
  • Unit 3, Module A: Create a Story Narrative- Children write a story about the main character in Come On Rain! And what she might do in a snowstorm.
  • Unit 3, Module B: Predict the Weather, Informative/Explanatory Task- Children pretend that they are weather forecasters. They use what they learned from What the Weather Be? and Weather Words and What They Mean to write a simple weather forecast.
  • Unit 4, Module A: Write About a Day With My Friend: Narrative Task- Children pretend they are friends with the main character in either I love Saturdays y Domingos or Apple Pie for the 4th of July. They draw, dictate, or write a simple narrative telling about a day they spend together.
  • Unit 4, Module B: Write Questions and Answers, Informative/Explanatory Task- Children think of two questions about the selections Making Music and Clothes in Many Cultures. They use evidence from the texts to answer the questions.
  • Unit 5, Module A: Write About My Favorite Task-Opinion Task- Children state an opinion about plants they like better, The Tiny Seed or Jack’s Garden.
  • Unit 5, Module B: Create A Did You Know? Book ,Informative/Explanatory Task- Children research patterns in nature using Plant Patterns and Swirl by Swirl Spirals in Nature along with additional sources found during shared research. Children then write Did You Know? books about patterns in nature that include information learned from their research.
  • Unit 6, Module A: Write a Book Review, Opinion Task- Children state and support an opinion about which selection they like better, On the Town: A Community Adventure or Places in My Neighborhood.
  • Unit 6, Module B: Create A Travel Brochure, Opinion Task- Using information from the anchor and supporting texts and their own words and pictures, children create a travel brochure that convinces people to visit a big city.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Examples of opportunities for students to have evidence based discussions include:

  • Close reading structures are included with discussion questions so that students respond to questions with evidence from the text (Implementation Guide p. 41). “Engage the class in a discussion about what you just read. Establishing agreed- upon rules for discussions, such as listening to others and taking turns speaking. Remind children that they can use words and pictures to help them understand the text. Use these questions to guide the discussion and confirm understanding of the text, and ask children to support their answers with evidence”.
  • Structures are provided for students to work in pairs or small groups to complete a graphic organizer. For example, children work together to identify the sequence of events and fill out a chart using the Small Group Discussion Routine on page TR10-TR11. (Unit 3, Module A Lesson 4).
  • Students read aloud the sentence from the text with the word plow Using the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine for Literary Text on TR32-TR35 to teach the meaning of the word. Students discuss the words (Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 6)
  • Students read texts and write to share their opinion as to What Will the Weather Be and Weather Words and What They Mean, present their thoughts to the class as a speech which is recorded by the teacher on a Venn Diagram, and are given the opportunity to respond to questions. After the model, students then write in the same manor to compare and contrast the same two stories by creating compare and contrast books. They will write and read aloud their sentences. (Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 11)

Teacher Resources offers teachers a number of routines to provide opportunities for evidence-based discussions. For example:

  • Think-Pair-Share Routine: Included in this routine are suggestions for accountable talk such as "I agree with you" when discussing the text. The routine provides children with structured support as they engage in text- reliant conversations. Asking children thought- provoking questions to get them involved in richer text-based discussions. This routine is found on TR6-7.
  • Whole Class Discussion Routine: For example, "We are going to talk about this book together. Let’s focus on ____. If you have something to add to our conversation, raise your hand. Listen carefully to what your classmates say so you add new ideas." The purpose of this discussion routine is to have thoughtful conversations about texts and topics to provide opportunities for children to expand their oral vocabulary as they interact socially with their classmates. This routine is found on pages TR8-9.
  • Small Group Discussion protocol that assigns roles to each student in the group. The routine emphasizes that students should go back to the text to find evidence. The purpose of this routine is to allow individuals to practice and expand their oral vocabulary as they engage in thoughtful conversations about a topic or texts. This routine is found on pages TR10-TR11.
  • Read Aloud Routine: For example, "As I read aloud to you, listen carefully for moments when the main character reacts to challenges. I’ll stop on occasion for us to talk about what I’ve read." The purpose of this routine is to model fluent reading and allow children to take in new vocabulary through oral language conversations. This routine is found on pages TR12-TR13.
  • Text Club Routine: For example, " Text Clubs are your opportunity to work with classmates to read and discuss different texts. The Clubs will focus on a particular aspect of reading, and every group member will have a different role to play. After you read the text independently, you will meet with your Text Club to have meaningful discussions about it." This routine is found on pages TR 24-25.

Vocabulary routines are provided in Benchmark Vocabulary Routines for Informational and Literary Texts which are found in Teacher Resources. Following the Text Set information, teachers are also provided with more information about vocabulary in a section called Vocabulary to Unlock Text. This provides the teacher with Benchmark Vocabulary and Tier II and Tier III Words for the anchor text and supporting texts. For example, in Unit 4, Module B, students find and read aloud sentences from the text with the words drumsticks and rattles. Then using the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine for Informational Text students will learn the meanings of the words. Students use the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show their contextual understanding of the vocabulary.

The program promotes evidence based discussions and provides protocols for the discussion but lacks protocols in the routines to help students use vocabulary in their discussions. For example, stems for discussion to scaffold syntax are not present.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for supporting students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Most lessons provide discussion protocols for turn and talks, whole group discussions, and small group discussions. There are opportunities in all of these routines for students to speak and listen about what they read. Collaborative routines are included in the daily lessons along with protocol explanations and discussion structures. This is found in the Teacher Resource section of the Teacher’s Guide.

Writing lessons provide opportunities for students to share their writing. For example, students think about the books they read, Neighborhood Walk: City and While I am Sleeping. Using information from the books and your own words and pictures to make a travel brochure. Students will share their brochures with their classmates by reading aloud the text and showing their visuals. Students listening in the audience will have a chance to ask the presenter questions (Unit 6, Module B, Performance Task).

In Sleuth, close reading materials, structures are included for students to gather evidence, ask questions regarding the text, use evidence to make a case, and prove their case to other students within their team, with all team members having a voice. At the end of each writing lesson, there are opportunities for students to share. For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 3, students are asked to answer questions from the read aloud School Buses Then and Now on page TR3 of the Teacher's Guide as students follow along. Student use text evidence to support their answers.

The Performance Based Assessments at the end of each module provide an opportunity for students to share their writing. For example, in Unit 3, Module B, students share their informative writing. The student presents their information as their forecast as if they are a real meteorologist would be pointing to their drawings as they tell about the weather. The audience members are encouraged to ask questions and provide feedback.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Kindergarten meet the expectations of materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Explicit instruction guides students through the writing process, requiring them to analyze good writing models from the text sets they read. There are 6 Units and two Modules (A and B) within each unit. The 12 Lessons within each module focus on one type of writing. Each Module’s writing lessons are based on text(s) and offer a model for students as they write. On-demand writing occurs each day when students write to what they have read in various formats. Examples of writing include taking notes, short answer, or paragraph construction. Lessons are structured so that by the end of the Module, students have addressed all components of the writing process.

Each module is structured the same way regarding process and on-demand writing. Representative examples of process writing include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1, students practice a Narrative Writing Component: “Using the text as a model students are taught how to write a narrative. Students are instructed to dictate, or draw about the changes in the Little House experiences over time. Students are taught to understand that things that happened “then” happened in the past. That could mean yesterday or many years ago. Things that happen “now” are happening in the present. There is a chart for children to make documenting their ideas and comparing things in they did in the past to things that are doing in the present.”
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 1, students work on an Informative Writing: “Students are reminded that sometimes they will be asked to write questions and answers about facts in an informational text they have read. Reminding them that they can find the answers to the questions they ask in the words and pictures in the text. Students are asked to draw or write to ask questions about the book. Then have them draw or write the answers to their questions using facts about key details from the book. Have them write one question on page 263 of their Reader’s Writer’s Journal.”
  • In Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 6, students work on an Opinion Writing: “Students are reminded that sometimes writers write to tell their opinion, or how they think or feel about a topic. One kind of opinion is a book review when writers write about a book they read and state their opinion. Students are directed through a step by step process beginning with the choosing of a text, The Poky Little Puppy, recall details from the texts, form an opinion. Sentence instruction is provided for students that may need help organizing their opinion on paper so there are sentences stems available if the students need them.”

On-demand writing occurs across the yearlong materials. Examples of on-demand writing appear in each unit and typically provide practice with component skills as they build to a larger project. For example, their Performance Based Assessment at the end of each module allows for the opportunity for students to go back to the text, gather information, and synthesize the information into a written final project where they can draw, dictate, or write. Unit 2, Module B has a performance based assessment in which the students were asked to create an opinion piece based on their opinion about how it would be to live on a farm. Students revisit the text to discover how characters shared their opinions.

On demand writing for Kindergarten is spiraled throughout each unit and module. There is a daily/lesson specific writing routine, writing opportunities in phonics and vocabulary and students are asked to edit and revise only some of their pieces such as a narrative. If the teacher uses the Scaffolding guide, students are also given another opportunity to provide on demand writing through the scaffolding writing routine portion.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for providing opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards. Each lesson includes a writing lesson, and over the course of the school year, students engage with multiple genres and modes of writing. Writing rubrics that are aligned to the standards are provided for all types of writing in the Teacher's Guide.

Examples of writing prompts that address the different text types of writing and reflect the distribution required by the standards include:

  • Unit 1, Module A, Narrative: Students write about animals homes by choosing an animal from Where is Home, Little Pip? or A House for Hermit Crab. Students tell about the animal and it’s home.
  • Unit 1, Module B, Informative/Explanatory: Students select and animal or plant from one of the selections. Students explain the animal’s or plant’s home.
  • Unit 2, Module A, Narrative: Students write about changes by creating a simple personal narrative about something they did when they were younger that they do differently now.
  • Unit 2, Module B, Opinion: Students draw, dictate, or write an opinion comparing and contrasting two things in Farming Then and Now or The Old Things. Students compare the texts and write their opinion in the Writer’s Journal.
  • Unit 3, Module A, Narrative: Students create a story about the main character in Come on, Rain! And what she might do in a snowstorm.
  • Unit 3, Module B, Informational/Explanatory: Students pretend that they are weather forecasters. Students use what they learned from What Will the Weather Be? and Weather Words and What They Mean to write a simple weather forecast.
  • Unit 4, Module A, Narrative: Students write about a day with a friend by pretending they are friends with the main character in either I Love Saturdays y domingos or Apple Pie 4th of July. Students draw, dictate, or write a simple narrative telling about a day they spend together.
  • Unit 4, Module B, Informative/Explanatory: Students write questions and answers by thinking of two questions about the selections Making Music and Clothes in Many Cultures. Students use evidence from the texts to answer the questions.
  • Unit 5, Module A, Opinion: Students state an opinion about which story about plants they like better, The Tiny Seed or Jack’s Garden.
  • Unit 5, Module B, Informative/Explanatory: Students create a Did You Know? book by researching patterns in nature using Plant Patterns and Swirl by Swirl: Spirals in Nature along with additional sources found during shared research. Students then write Did You Know? books about patterns in nature that include information learned from their research.
  • Unit 6, Module A, Opinion: Students write a book review by stating and supporting an opinion about which selection they like better, On the Town: A Community Adventure or Places in My Neighborhood.
  • Unit 6, Module B, Opinion: Students create a travel brochure using information from the anchor and supporting texts and their own words and pictures that convince people to visit a big city.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for the materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level. Students are taught each day to carefully analyze and synthesize sources and defend claims as part of Whole Group Writing instruction. Each writing lesson focuses on a writing mode that is specified in the Common Core Standards. The Reading and Writing Journal (RWJ) frequently provides “Write in Response to Reading” prompts. Students are required to gather and use evidence from the text to support their responses.

Opportunities for evidence-based writing in the instructional materials include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Module A, students draw, dictate, or write a detail about an animal character from the text, including what the character looks like, what it does, or how it feels.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 1, students draw, dictate, or write questions about the book What Will the Weather Be? Then the students work with a partner to answer their questions.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 3, students dictate or write to narrate the events from Saturday or Sunday in I Love Saturdays y Domingos. Students write the sequence words from p. 181 of their Reader’s and Writer’s journal.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 10, the teacher reminds students of the main topic of Swirl by Swirl: Spirals in Nature. Students choose a spread from the text and think about how the details in the text and in the pictures tell about the main topic. Students then dictate or write about the details in the text and pictures teach about spirals and write one comment in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. (Sentence frames are included: This shows how _____. This teaches me that _____.)
  • In Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 2, students write their opinion about the text. Choosing a photograph and caption from the day’s text, they dictate or write their opinion about this part of the book. Next, they write their opinion in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.

Performance-Based Assessments (PBA) are assigned at the end of each module. These include writing projects where students use the anchor text and the major writing skill from the module in order to respond to questions to synthesize learning. These projects lead students to analyze and synthesize the texts they have read. For example, in the Unit 5, Module A, students state and support an opinion about which plant story (The Tiny Seed or Jack’s Garden) they preferred. Students state their opinion of the story and draw, dictate, or write at least two reasons to support their opinion.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of the context.

Grammar lessons align to the Kindergarten Common Core State Standards for Language including.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, students are taught to identify uppercase and lowercase letters, capitalize first words in sentences, use the pronoun I, and recognize ending punctuations.
  • In Unit 1, Module B, students are taught to identify nouns (animals, places, things, people), identify nouns for more than one, use verbs that tell about actions, question words, and produce complete sentences.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, students are taught to identify and use verbs, produce complete sentences, use end punctuation, and use questions words.
  • In Unit 2, Module B, students are taught to expand sentences and identify and use prepositions.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, students are taught to write short sentences, capitalize names and first words in sentences, capitalize the pronoun I, identify and use present, past and future tenses of verbs, and complete sentences (subject and predicate).
  • In Unit 3, Module B, students are taught to print short sentences, use prepositions and prepositional phrases, and expand sentences.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, students are taught to write sentences (including exclamations), identify and use nouns and verbs, and capitalize the pronoun I.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, students are taught to print sentences (including questions), produce complete sentences, expand sentences, use capitalization, and use ending punctuation.
  • In Unit 5, Module A, students are taught to write sentences, use question words, capitalize the pronoun I, and produce sentences of their own.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, students are taught to print sentences, use nouns for more than one, and use present, past and future tenses of verbs.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, students are taught to write short sentences and produce complete sentences, use capitalization and ending punctuation, and expand sentences.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, students are taught to print sentences, work with plural nouns, identify nouns and verbs in sentences, expand sentences, and use prepositional phrases.

Language and convention expectations are included in each writing rubric found within each Unit Module writing task to assess each student in language standards.

Grammar lessons require students to practice the skill in and out of context, for example:

  • Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 11, the Teacher’s Guide states, “Students produce complete sentences. Teach and model a complete sentence. Remind them of what this means. Then apply by writing sentences.” Students write their own sentences using exclamation marks on a separate sheet of paper.
  • Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 2, the Teacher’s Guide states,“Write the sentences on the board: Let's go downtown. Where is the subway? It is so noisy! We can walk instead. Remind children that we print upper and lowercase letters to write words that make sentences.” Students write their own sentences using uppercase letters, lowercase letters, and proper punctuation on a separate sheet of paper.

For each grammar lesson, there is additional practice in the Reader's and Writer's Journal. This practice may or may not be in context. The Reading/Writing Journal includes lessons specific to the conventions of writing and provides students with on-demand writing tasks.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
18/22
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials partially meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and multimodal practice to address the acquisition of print concepts including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).Materials meet expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.Materials partially meet the expectations that materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported. While there are many assessment opportunities of foundational skills, explicit instructions and guidance on how to address foundational skills with students are minimal. Materials partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

The instructional materials provide students with frequent opportunities to learn and understand phonemes. In the Foundational Skills tab section of each unit’s Teacher's Guides, phonemic awareness activities are on Day 1 and Day 3 of each week. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 6: Phonemic Awareness: listen and say /m/ “What sound does moon begin with? Phonics: Students name the sound /m/ in a variety of words.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1: Introduce the new sound of the initial and medial /a/. Listen carefully: /a/, say it with me /a/. The teacher displays the picture card alligator. Alligator begins with /a/. Display the picture card for a car. Cat has /a/ in the middle. What sound do you hear in the middle of the word cat? Students practice with the words: astronaut and apple explaining where they hear the /a/ sound either initially or in the middle.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 3: Phonemic Awareness: Display picture card and identify /f/. Students spell words with /f/.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 11: The teacher reviews with the students that they have learned the new sound /i/. Say it with me: /i/. The teacher displays the Picture Card kite. Kite has a long I sound in the middle. What sound does kite have in the middle? Continue with the picture card five. Students say the word five. The word five has the long I sound in the middle. We can make new words with the long I sound by changing the sounds in five. I will start. I will change the /f/ to a /d/: /d/ /i/ /v/ /e/, dive. Now let's change the /v/ in the middle to a /m/ in dime to /t/ /i/ /m/ /e/. What is the new word?
  • In Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 11: Phonemic Awareness: Students review words with long and short vowel sounds. Phonics: Students write words with long and short vowel sounds. They are directed to point to the word with the specified vowel sound (ex. cap/cave- point to the word with short a).

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words. The foundational skills tab section of the Teacher's Guides contain phonics activities for Day 1 and Day 3 of each week and decoding activities for Day 2 and Day 4 each week. Examples include the following:

  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 1: Students are introduced to the alphabet card Ff. The teacher discusses that fountain begins with /f/. Students point to the letter f in the word fountain. Then students point to the letters Ff on the card. The sound we are learning is the letter f. The names of these letters are uppercase F and lower case f. What is the sound of the letter? What is the name of the letters? Students practice singing the Phonics and Rhymes Chart 16, Four Funny Buddies. As students sing the song they point to the letter f.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 11: The teacher introduces a new sound. Listen carefully /y/, say it with me. Show picture card yak. Yak begins with /y/, yak. Continue with routine and picture cards yarn and yellow. Yes begins with /y/ and ends with /es/. Let’s put the /y/ sound with the ending sounds. Say /y/ /es/. What word did we say, yes? Continue with words yarn, year, what do these words begin with? Display the alphabet card Y. Display phonics and rhymes chart 30. Sing the song Yolla Yak, at the end of the routine students complete p. 284 in their Reader’s and Writer’s journal.


The sequence of phonics begins with letter recognition of the 26 letters (both uppercase and lowercase) in Unit 1, Module A and Unit 1, Module B. After learning the letters, phonics instruction begins in Unit 1, Module B with /m/ spelled Mm and /t/ spelled Tt. The first vowel sound is introduced in Unit 2, Module A with /a/ spelled Aa. Individual letter sounds are addressed through Unit 5. In Unit 6, other vowel sounds with common spellings such as ee, ea.

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

Materials include lessons for students to learn how to identify and produce letters. Lessons are not multimodal for Kindergarten students to learn to make the letters of the alphabet. Examples include:

  • The progression of teaching and learning the letters of the alphabet is as follows:
    • Unit 1, Module A, Lessons 1-5 introduce Aa, Bb, Cc, Dd, Ee,
    • Unit 1, Module A, Lessons 6-10 introduce Ff, Gg, Hh, Ii, Jj, Kk, Ll, Mm, Nn.
    • Unit 1, Module A, Lessons 11-13 introduce Oo, Pp, Qq, Rr, Ss.
    • Unit 1, Module B, Lessons 1-5 introduce Tt, Uu, Vv, Ww, Xx, Yy, Zz.
  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 1- Introduce: Display the Alphabet Aa Card. Teacher points to and says “This is the uppercase letter A. What is this letter?” Teacher points and says “This is the lowercase letter a. What is this letter?” Use the alphabet cards to introduce the letters Bb and Cc. Practice: Display Phonics and Songs Rhymes Chart “A Bus Comes Along Every Day”. Point out how the letters make the words and words make the sentences. Have them point to the letters Aa, Bb, Cc. Students complete p. 1 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Apply: Display the Alphabet Cards for Aa, Bb, Cc. Have students write each letter on a piece of paper as you write it.
  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 4- Give students Student Reader K.1.1 At School, Teacher points to title and says “The title of the story is Cat and Dog At School. Point to the word Cat. Teacher says “This is the word Cat. This picture of a cat will help you read the word. Say the letters with me: c-a-t, cat. Repeat with Dog. Children will reread Cat and Dog At School to develop automaticity reading high-frequency words and identifying the letters, Aa, Bb, Cc, Dd, Ee.

Materials include frequent and adequate tasks and questions about the organization of print concepts (e.g. follow words left to right, spoken words correlates sequences of letters, letter spacing, upper-and lowercase letters). Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 2: Teachers explain that when we write letters, we write from left to right. They show children how to space the letters properly when writing them in a row. As students apply this, students are reminded to use proper left-to-right progression and proper spacing between letters. (p. 1.30)
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 4, the teacher distributes Student Reader K.3.1 and points to the title of the book. The teacher explains the title of the book is on the cover and reads the title to the students. Then the teacher points to each word in the title and has the students read it with the teacher. The teacher points to each word as she reads the story, teaching students to track print left to right. Then, students preview the story, looking at the illustrations. The teacher calls out that in the story they will read words with the /b/ sound and spelling of b. Students then read the story in pairs switching readers after each page.

The Print Concept Routine is found on Page 278 of the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook:

  • Parts of a Book:
    • Show the students how to hold a book, with the spine on the left and the cover showing. Point out and explain the title, author and illustrator’s name. Discuss how the illustrations go with the text. Page through the book, and show how the story continues. Point to the text on each page. The teacher then releases the students to practice holding the book correctly, finding the author, turning the pages, and pointing to the text on each page.
  • Letters and Words:
    • Display text in a large format. Read aloud a sentence, point to each word while reading it. Then, frame one word with two fingers and read it aloud. Explain that it is a word, point out the spacing before and after the word, and count the letters. Students are then asked to point to other words on the page and to count to the letters within the words.
  • Tracking Print:
    • As you read a book aloud, put your finger on the starting point in the text on each page. Show that you read from left to right by moving your finger along lines of a text. Use your finger to show how to sweep back from the end of a line to the beginning of another and how to find the beginning of a text on the next page. Then have students use their finger to show the correct movement as you read the text aloud again.

Other opportunities to practice print concepts include:

  • Shared Reading Routine TR14-TR15: Step 3- Point out print conventions. Besides unlocking text meaning, this is an opportunity to model how text works. For example, reading from the top to bottom and left to right, navigating text features, and attending to punctuation.
  • An example of a shared read comes from Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 9. The teacher distributes the student reader (Our Boat). Let’s read the title page together. Point to each word as the children read it with you. The author’s name is Maura Albrecht. The story was illustrated by Hector Borlasca. Have children preview the story looking at the illustration on each page. Remind students that we read words left to right beginning at the top of the page. Students work in pairs to read the story switching after each reader working on developing automaticity reading high frequency words and words that end with ks, /x/.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

Students have the opportunity to read and practice high-frequency words. Examples include:

  • High frequency word instruction takes place during lessons 2, 7, and 12 of each module during Whole Group Time as a Foundational Skills Mini-Lesson. Plans for Instruction on high-frequency words are included in the Foundational Skills section of each Teacher’s Guide.
    • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 2, the teacher writes two high-frequency words: I and am. Students say and spell the words with and without the teacher. The teacher demonstrates the meaning of the high-frequency word in a sentence. Students are guided to use the high-frequency words in their own sentences.
    • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 7, the teacher writes three high-frequency words: here, go, and from. The students say and spell the words with and without the teacher. Students get to practice reading one of the high-frequency words in context in The Red Sleds, a text from Student Reader K.4.5.
    • In Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 11, the teacher displays the High-Frequency Word Cards for three, said, look and you. The teacher says “Some words we learn by remembering the letters.” Have the students say and spell each work, first with the teacher and then by themselves. Point to the letter h in have. “What is the letter and what is its sound?” Continue point out other familiar letter-sounds in the high-frequency words. Model using the words in sentences. Then guide students to say their own sentences using each of the words.

Materials provide students with multiple opportunities over the course of the year in core materials to purposefully read emergent-reader texts. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lessons 4-5, students read an emergent reader called Cat and Dog At School to develop automaticity in reading high-frequency words and identifying letters Aa, Bb, Cc, Dd, and Ee. Students reread the text for fluency practice.
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lessons 2-3, students read a text from the Student Reader K.2.4 called Winter Fun. Students read the title with the teacher. The teacher teaches the rebus words such as door, cold, snowballs, snowball, and snow. The students read book in pairs, switching readers after each page.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 12, students read Pam at Bat from the Student Reader K.3.3. Students read the text with the teacher as the teacher points to the words. Students are reminded to read words left to right, top to bottom, and page to page. Students read the story in pairs, switching readers after each page.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 12, students read from the Student Reader K.4.3, reading an emergent text called A Home for Flap. Students point to the title and read the title with the teacher. Students are reminded to read words left to right, top to bottom, and page to page. Students read the story in pairs, switching readers after each page.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 12, students read We Get Set from the Student Reader K.4.6. The teacher is directed to frame the word get on p. 2. Students find get on other pages. Students read the story in pairs, switching readers after each page.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 12, students read Where Do Animals Live? From the Student Reader K.6.6. Students read the title with the teacher and students read the text in pairs. Students reread the text to develop automaticity of high-frequency words and words with short and long vowels.

Materials support the development of students’ automaticity and accuracy of grade-level decodable words over the course of the year. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 7, students are provided Student Reader K.1.5, Eat Together. The teacher writes Mom and says “This is the word Mom, Name the letters with me, m-o-m.” Repeat with talking, mixing, muffins, reading, mouse, eating, meatball, and mess. “Look for these words in the book we read today. There will be a picture above the word to help you read it.”
  • Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 2, students are provided Student Reader K.3.1, The Baby Panda. The teacher writes zoo. “This is the word zoo. Name the letters with me: z-o-o.” Repeat with mom. “Look for these words in the book we read today. There will be a picture above the word to help you read it.”
  • Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 12, students are provided Student Reader K.6.6, Where Do Animals Live? Have pairs read the story, switching readers after each page. Have students reread the story to develop automaticity reading high-frequency words and words with short and long vowel sounds.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills in connected text and tasks. Materials also provide students frequent opportunities to read high-frequency words in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Unit 1 Module A Lesson 1, students receive phonemic awareness instruction in rhyming words (word families -ap, -ig, etc.). Students practice saying words together as they listen to the middle and ending parts of the words. They identify which two of the three-word sets rhyme and say an additional words that rhymes with those two words.
    • Lesson 2 high-frequency words are part of instruction. Students are exposed to cards with the words, I and am. They are told that such words are learned by remembering the letters. Students respond by using the words in their own sentences.
    • Lesson 6 syllables are part of the instruction. Students are taught to clap words’ syllables while viewing picture cards (i.e., carrot, bus, crayon, bubble, duck).
  • In Unit 3 Module B Lesson 1, students receive phonemic awareness instruction in isolating the initial sound of words with the /f/ sound. Students practice identifying words that begin with /f/, five, fingers, fort, fun, etc. When you hear a word that starts with the /f/ sound fan yourself.
    • Lesson 2 high-frequency words are part of instruction. Students are exposed to cards with the words, see, look, for. They are told that such words are learned by remembering the letters. Students respond by using the words in their own sentences.
    • Lesson 12 decoding is part of instruction. Students read student reader K.3.6 (Rob’s Dots). Children frame the word can on page 2, then look for the word can on other pages.
  • Unit 6 Module A Lesson 1, students receive phonemic awareness instruction in long vowel /a/ sound. Students practice with the picture cards rake and lake. “What sound you you hear in the middle of rake? The vowel sound is /a/”. Continue with lake. Point to the picture that has the same vowel sound as rake.
    • Lesson 2 high-frequency words are part of instruction. Students are exposed to cards with the words, do little, with, what. They are told that such words are learned by remembering the letters. Students respond by using the words in their own sentences.
    • Lesson 6 phonics is part of instruction. Students are introduced to the ee, ea sounds. They practice with the leaf and queen picture card, then practice with the songs and rhymes chart (p.36) Quickly, Thump on the Mud. Students clap their hands when they hear a word with the long /e/ sound. Then students apply their skills by using letter tiles to make words with ee, ea.

Every lesson contains Small Group Options, Steps 1 and 2. Within Step 1, there is a Process and Strategy focus. Each lesson has one Process and one Strategy focus that is selected for that day’s lesson. Within the Strategy focus, there is a word recognition and decoding focus which is related to the Foundational Skills instruction time where children recognize high-frequency words and apply phonics strategies to decode new words. For example:

  • In Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 7- Strategy and Focus is Decoding and Word Recognition: Guide children in recognizing and reading high- frequency words in their self-selected texts. Write the words yellow, green, blue, and for. Students go through the book looking for these words and marking them with a colored tab. Children can also log into Pearson Realize to find an Independent Reading Activity that is appropriate for the text they are reading.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 12, Teacher’s Guide p. 275 – Strategy Focus is Decoding and Word Recognition: Children point to several of the words they marked with tabs and read aloud the sentences in which the words appear. Children can also log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed for their book. Further guidance can be found in the Independent Reading Routine on pp. TR16-TR23.

Within Step 2, there is a Phonics focus which guides the teacher to the Foundational Skills section of the Teacher’s Guide to guide instruction for helping students that struggled with the week’s foundational phonics skills.

Other opportunities to practice with text include:

  • Leveled Text Library: Teachers model how to decode unfamiliar words by locating known word patterns.
  • Kindergarten Student Reader: Students practice phonics skills and reread for fluency.
  • Kindergarten I Can Read selections: Students practice reading.
  • Big Books: All units include this resource. Teachers facilitate whole group instruction, including word recognition and analysis skills.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations that materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported. While there are many assessment opportunities of foundational skills, explicit instructions and guidance on how to address foundational skills with students are minimal.

Multiple assessment opportunities are available in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills. The Assessment Book in the Teacher’s Guide provides an overview of the program’s assessment system. The program includes four main parts: baseline assessments, formative assessments, performance-based assessments and summative assessments. The protocols for administering the assessments and includes rubrics for scoring are included.

  • The Baseline Assessment is used to determine each student's instructional needs in the areas of foundational skills, comprehension, vocabulary, and writing. This assessment is administered at the beginning of the year to guide and scaffold instruction to meet the needs of all learners.
    • The Baseline Assessment starts with Readiness skills. An example of the questions asked are: “Which picture shows the boy at the bottom of the slide? Circle the picture that shows the boy at the bottom of the slide.”
    • The next section is Letter Recognition. An example of the questions asked are: “Put your finger on the star. Look at the letters. Find the letter “N”. Circle the “N”.” Both uppercase and lowercase letters are asked to be identified.
    • The following section in Phonemic Awareness. An example of the questions asked are: “Put your finger on the circle. Look at the pictures: sun, rug, top. Which begins with the same sound as six….six?” This section ask questions about beginning sounds, ending sounds, and rhyming words.
    • Another foundational skills section is Concepts of Print. An example of questions in this section are: “Where should we start reading? Now which way should we go? At the end of the line, which way should we go?”
    • The final foundational skill section is Phonemic Awareness. Examples of questions in this section are: “Listen to the following sounds and then blend them to make a word. /k/ /a/ /p/. What word do these sounds make? /k/ /a/ /p/. Listen to this word: rug. Tell me the sounds you hear in rug.”
  • Formative Assessments are integrated into every module. Each unit includes a Foundational Skills Check Progress for assessing students’ phonics and word analysis skills as well as their word reading in context. They indicate a student's progress toward the Performance-Based Assessment and inform small group time.
    • Examples of Foundational Skills Check Progress are:
      • Unit 2: Phonics: Say the picture name. Circle the letter for the beginning sound in the picture name. Picture of a car, m, t,c. High-Frequency Words: Read the sentences. I like my cap.
      • Unit 5: Phonics: Say the picture name. Circle the letter for the beginning sound in the picture name. Picture of a yolk, y, k, j. High-Frequency Words: Read the sentences. She said yes.

Assessment materials provide teachers with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding and support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress in foundational skills. The assessments and progress checks are very predictable and generic. They do not contain explicit instructions/guidance on how to address the skills students are missing in order to demonstrate mastery in foundational skills. Examples include:

  • In each Foundational Skills Check Progress, there is a box that says Monitor Progress.
    • In Unit 2: If students have trouble reading words with consonants s, p, c, and short vowels a, i, then reteach the lesson that targets the skill children have difficulty with. If a student cannot read the high-frequency words, then reteach the high-frequency word sections of each lesson and have the child practice reading the words with a fluent reader.
  • After each assessment from the Assessment Book, there is a section labeled Using the Assessment Results to Inform Instruction. An example, is after the Baseline Assessment the guide states: It is recommended that you compare test results for each student only with the scores of others in your class. This will allow you to inform future instruction by examining general trends in the student’s grade-level knowledge and abilities. You can use the results from each section to identify students who are on grade level, those who need more support and those who could benefit from additional challenge and to establish a “starting point” for individualized instruction for each child.
  • The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides models of scaffolded instruction, useful strategies, and practical routines that a teacher can employ during reading and writing to support English Language Learners, struggling readers, students with disabilities, and accelerated learners. The intention is that lessons from this book be done during small group instruction time.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills. While students have opportunities to practice grade-level foundational skill components, the guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting is general suggestions often in the form of if, then statements. The guidance frequently suggested is remodeling and rereading, which are not specific differentiation suggestions to assist students in working toward mastery of foundational skills.

Materials provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for students to reach mastery of foundational skills. Students have multiple practice opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 1: Students are introduced to rhyming words. “Listen as I say some rhyming words, pig, dig, wig, big. Say the words with me. These are rhyming words because the middle and ending parts of the words are the same.”
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 6: Students are introduced to the short vowel sound i as an initial and medial sound. Display the picture card igloo. “Igloo begins with /i/, igloo. What sound does igloo begin with?” Display the picture card quilt. “Quilt has /i/ in the middle, quilt. What sound do you hear in the middle of quilt?”
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 12: Display the high-frequency word cards they, of, you, we. “Some words we learn by remembering the letters.” Students say and spell each word, first with the teacher then without them.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 2: Students are given the student reader K.4.1 A Day to Play. “The title of the story is A Day to Play. Let’s read the title together. The author’s name is Ann Rossi. The story was illustrated by Jaime Smith.” The students preview the story by looking at the illustrations. The teacher points out how to read words from left to right, top to bottom, and page to page.
  • In Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 6: “Today we will learn a new sound. Listen carefully, ‘ks’. Say it with me, /ks/.” Display the picture card box. “Box ends with /ks/, box, /ks/. What sound does box end with? I am going to say two words. One of those words with end with /ks/. I want you to tell me which word ends with /ks/. I will do the first one, six, sip. Which word ends with /ks/? I hear /ks/ at the end of six. Do you? Now you try…”

Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides support at the module level for all learners. More specifically, it is designed to provide differentiation for English language Learners, struggling readers, students with disabilities, and accelerated learners. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 8, Teacher’s Guide p.91 Scaffolded Instruction English Language Learners: Letters and Sounds: Children may benefit from copying a word from the board. Work with them to spell the word orally as you write the letters. Reinforce the idea that every word is made of sounds and that the letters are used to represent the sounds. Emphasize each sound and the letter that spells the sound as you write the words.

Differentiation in instruction is also provided in Quick Check boxes to guide teachers with “if” “then” statements. These statements offer general suggestions for differentiation. Example:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 6, Teacher’s Guide p. 67:
    • Quick Check: Monitor Progress - If….children are reading too slowly, then….identify words and sentences that are causing problems and help children reread them until they can read them easily. If….children are reading too quickly, then...model reading at an appropriate rate and have children mimic your reading.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 7 Teacher’s Guide p. 227:
    • Quick Check: Monitor Progress - If...children have difficulty reading the text, then...identify and focus on reading and explaining any words or phrases that are causing problems before having them read the text again.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway Two Details

Kindergarten instructional materials meet expectations for building knowledge with texts, vocabulary, and tasks. The instructional materials support the building of knowledge through repeated practice with appropriate grade-level complex text organized around a topic. Vocabulary is addressed in each module, though academic vocabulary is not built across multiple texts. There is evidence of the materials providing coherently sequenced questions and tasks to support students in developing literacy skills. Culminating tasks require students to read, discuss, analyze, and write about texts while students participate in a volume of reading to build knowledge. Modules are developed to support and build knowledge, integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening to demonstrate grade-level literacy proficiency at the end of the school year.

Criterion 2a - 2h

28/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for texts being organized around a topic/topics to build students’ knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Texts are connected by a grade-level appropriate topic. Each module in every unit is built around a topic. In each module, anchor and supporting texts are centered around the topic. Examples include:

  • Unit 1: Living Together: This is Home
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand the topic of finding one’s home. Students are expected to infer using levels of meaning that a home can be anywhere you are with people who care and love you, regardless of where your location may be.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand the relationship among different species in a pond and understand their ecosystem and how it works.
  • Unit 2: Understanding Then and Now
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand how land changes over the course of time due to the rapid growth of people within expanding cities.
    • In Module B, students are expected understand the differences from farming then and farming now through the use of understanding the theme of change.
  • Unit 3: Predicting Change
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand how neighborhood filled with different cultures is impacted, as well as united, by the weather.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand meteorology terms to explain how and why the weather is so difficult to predict using special weather instruments.
  • Unit 4: Learning about Each Other and The World
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand how to connect with both sets of grandparents, being from a multicultural family, through connecting in different ways.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand what music is, why it is important, and identify different instruments used around the word in many different cultures.
  • Unit 5: Knowing About Patterns and Structures.
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand how plants grow in nature as well as, identify the challenges plants face growing to maturity.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand how to visualize different patterns in plants.
  • Unit 6: Exploring Communities
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand places and people form a community.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand how people, places, and things form a city’s community.

Texts build knowledge, vocabulary, and the ability to read/listen and comprehend complex texts across a school year. In each lesson there is a benchmark vocabulary section taught. Benchmark vocabulary words are important for understanding concepts within a text. These words are needed to deeply comprehend a text and central to understanding the text. There is a Benchmark Vocabulary Routine included for teaching students the meaning of words. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 5, the benchmark vocabulary words are ruffled and cozy. The teacher uses the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine to teach the meaning of the words, the students use p. 11 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the words.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 7, the benchmark vocabulary word is powwows. The teacher uses the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine to teach the meaning of the words. The students use p. 218 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the words.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 12, the benchmark vocabulary words are borrow, offer, and rush. The teacher uses the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine to teach the meaning of the words. The students use p. 344 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the words.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for containing sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

Each lesson includes a Language or Reading Analysis section in which students analyze language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Language or Reading Analysis is also included in some small group lessons. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 6, students complete a Story Sequence graphic organizer to analyze their reading through a story retell. They use key details about the characters, setting, and events.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 8, students study context clues or picture clues which help them figure out what words mean in a text. The teacher guides the students to use clues in the sentences and pictures to help “us” find the meaning of the word golden. Questions are asked, “What can I find out about the word gold from the other words in the sentence?”, What can I tell about the word golden just from reading it?”, and How can I use the picture to help me figure out what golden means?” These questions are sequenced and scaffolded to allow students to pull out words and phrases and then students discuss in their small groups the meaning of the word golden as the teacher checks for understanding.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 7, students are reminded that they can ask and answer questions about words they do not know. Students are also reminded that readers look at the pictures and other words in the text to help them answer their questions. Teacher and students complete a Question and Answer Chart with Weather Words and What They Mean.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 8, students use the Events and Details graphic organizer to analyze and write details about a major or important event from the story, Web B on p. TR49. A major event is chosen and the students are refer back to the text to find four details that support this being a major or important event from the story.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 2, students fill out a T-Chart around what a pattern is and what is not a pattern. The teacher models information from the story Plant Patterns to help fill information from the reading.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 9, students and the teacher complete a T-Chart, Ask and Answer Questions. The teacher models using What is a Neighborhood. Students ask questions and use the text, words and photographs to find answers to their questions.

The Scaffolded Instruction Handbook also includes lessons to support the unit lessons. Examples include:

  • Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 10, references using the Scaffolded Instruction Handbook to provide support with using sequence words and phrases to help tell the order of events in a story. Students can use a wordless picture book or story cards to model telling events in order. Use words like, first, then, next, last, at the beginning, in the middle, at the end. Guide children to retell the story using sequence words and phrases.

Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 3, references using the Scaffolded Instruction Handbook, so students who are having difficulty knowing which punctuation make to use at the end of the sentence are able to review that a telling sentence ends with a period, and asking sentence ends with a question mark, and an exclamation or sentence with a strong feeling ends with an exclamation mark.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for containing a coherently sequenced set of text-based questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Most sets of coherent questions and tasks support students’ analysis of knowledge and ideas. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 9, students read the text A House for Hermit Crab and study how writers understand that pictures and words about events help tell a story. They can use both the words and the pictures in a story to help tell about the characters, setting, and events in the story. Students turn and talk to answer the question, “Whom is the story about? and “What happens in the story?” During the second read, Close Read, students cite evidence to focus on where, why and how questions concerning Hermit Crab. For example, “Where does Hermit Crab live? Why does Hermit Crab need a new shell? How does Hermit Crab make his new shell look less plain? and Why does Hermit Crab leave his shell at the end of the story?”
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 12, students read the text Weather Words and What they Mean and use its illustrations and other text features to better understand weather and weather words. Students focus on the fact that readers understand that asking and answering questions helps them understand the text. Students turn and talk about what they read on page 25-32 and discuss questions and use pictures to help them better understand the text. Students cite evidence to focus on the various structures and features that readers use to understand a text. Students answer the questions “How are snowstorms and blizzards different? and What causes wind?” Students then share using the Think-Pair-Share Routine on pp. TR6-TR7 to discuss and explain the answers to their questions. On their second reading,Close Read, students refer back to the text to answer, “What happens first (with snowflakes)? What happens next? and Let’s find and read the sentences that tell us about these vents.”

Sets of questions and tasks provide opportunities to analyze, describe, compare/contrast, and explain across multiple texts as well as within single texts. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lessons 11 and 12, students analyze and answer questions across the texts The Farming Then and Now and The Old Things. Students compare and contrast key details using words and pictures. Students discuss questions, “Why have people’s lives both on farms and not on farms become easier than they were long ago? What is the main topic of Farming Then and Now? What details does the book give about the topic? What is s the main topic of The Old Things? What details does the book give about the topic? How are the topics of the book alike? How are the topics of the book different? and What do you learn from these books about how tools and other things have changed?”
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 4, Using the text What Will the Weather Be?, students analyze and answer questions across the text in their Reading Analysis Extension portion of the lesson to extend their learning. The teacher displays pp. 4-17 and students are provided a T-chart with headings of questions or answers. The following questions guide the discussion,“What part of the picture made you think of a question? Was the answer to the question on the same page as the picture, or did you find the answer on another page? Are there any questions that you could not find answers to in the text? and How can you find answers to those questions?”
  • In Unit 4 Module A, Lessons 12 and 13, students analyze, compare and contrast, and answer questions across the texts I Love Saturdays y domingos, and Apple Pie for the 4th of July. Students describe, compare, and contrast key details from the stories to learn more about characters, settings, and major events from the story. Students discuss questions the questions, “What happened at the beginning of I Love Saturdays y dominga? and What happened at the end of Apple Pie for 4th of July?” Students are asked, on the second/Close Read to read specific pages of each text and are then asked questions specifically about that text, “Read pp. 30-31 in I Love Saturdays y dominga. What happens in this part of the story? What does the picture show? How does the family share experiences from two different cultures? Point to a place in the picture where you see this? Read pp. 8-11 Apple Pie for 4th of July. What words does this author use to help the readers imagine what the narrator hears and smells? and How does the community share characteristics from American and Chinese cultures?”
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 1, using the text Plant Patterns, students analyze and answer questions across the text, “Look at the front cover of the book. What is the book mostly about?” What different kinds of patterns can plans make? What is one example of a plant that makes a pattern? What pattern does it make? Listen closely to these sentences from p. 13. Look closer, do you see a star pattern? Who Is the author telling to look closer? Why do you think the author asks readers to look closely for a star pattern? What kind of pattern do these plants in each photograph make? Look at page 25. How does a Venus flytrap work? and How do you know?”

By the end of the year, integrating knowledge and ideas is embedded in students’ work through tasks and/or culminating tasks. Every module includes a culminating performance-based assessment where students write, draw, or dictate to a prompt. Many of the performance assessments at the end of each module and unit require the students to use evidence from the texts they have read. The lessons and questions leading up to the task offer support to complete the task. For example, students use the text from the lessons in Unit 2, Module A, when they create a simple personal narrative about something they did when they were younger that they do differently now. The students draw “Then I…” and Now I…” pictures to show a difference in how they do something. Next, students dictate or write about the two events using the sentence starters, “Then I…” and “Now I…”. There is a reproducible page to distribute to children as well. Lastly, there is a review and revise portion and a shared writing to complete the assessment.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet expectations for providing questions and tasks that support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Culminating tasks provide students the opportunity to demonstrate comprehension and knowledge of a topic or topics. Culminating tasks are provided and they are partially multifaceted, requiring students to demonstrate mastery of several different standards (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) at the appropriate grade level. Culminating tasks do not consistently integrate reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The tasks use the texts as vehicles to support the writing process, but speaking and listening skills standards are not included or addressed.

Examples include:

  • Unit 1
    • Module A: Write about an Animal: Students choose an animal from one of the selections and then tell about the animal and its home.
    • Module B: Write about a Special Home: Students choose one animal or plant from Life in a Pond or A Bed For The Winter and tell something about the animal’s or plant’s home.
  • Unit 2
    • Module A: Write about Changes Narrative: Create a simple narrative. Tell about something you did when you were younger that you do differently now. Students are reminded to draw “Then I…” and “Now I …” pictures, showing how they do something differently. Students dictate or write about two events and use the sentence starters “Then I …” and “Now I…”
    • Module B: Write about Life on a Farm Opinion: Students state an opinion about whether they would like to live on a farm. Students then state their opinion about whether they would like to live on a farm and draw, dictate, or write one reason for their opinion.
  • Unit 3
    • Module A: Create a Story Narrative: Children will write a story about the main character in Come On Rain! and what she might do in a snowstorm.
    • Module B: Predict the Weather – Informative/Explanatory Task: Children pretend that they are weather forecasters. They use what they learned from What Will the Weather Be? and Weather Words and What They Mean to write a simple weather forecast.
  • Unit 4
    • Module A: Write About a Day With My Friend – Narrative Task: Children will pretend they are friends with the main character in either I love Saturdays y Domingos or Apple Pie for the 4th of July and draw, dictate, or write a simple narrative telling about a day they spend together.
    • Module B: Write Questions and Answers – Informative/Explanatory Task: Children will think of two questions about the selections Making Music and Clothes in Many Cultures. They will use evidence from the texts to answer the questions.
  • Unit 5
    • Module A: Write About My Favorite Task – Opinion Task: Children state an opinion about the plants they like better from the texts Tiny Seed or Jack’s Garden.
    • Module B: Create A Did You Know? Book – Informative/Explanatory Task: Children research patterns in nature using Plant Patterns and Swirl by Swirl: Spirals in Nature along with additional sources found during shared research. Children then write Did You Know Books about patterns in nature that include information learned from their research.
  • Unit 6
    • Module A: Write a Book Review – Opinion Task: Children state and support an opinion about which selection they like better, On the Town: A Community Adventure or Places in My Neighborhood.
    • Module B: Create A Travel Brochure – Opinion Task: Using information from the anchor and supporting texts and their own words and pictures, children create a travel brochure that convinces people to visit a big city.

Earlier questions and tasks will give the teacher usable information about student’s readiness to complete culminating tasks. Such as in Unit 5, Module B, the lessons require students to practice writing each day to prepare for the culminating task. These daily writings give the teacher information about each student’s readiness to be successful writing their own Did You Know? book at the end of the module.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet expectations for providing a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials partially provide teacher guidance outlining a cohesive year long vocabulary development component. The materials use the approach of Generative Vocabulary. This provides systems for understanding how words work. This focuses on sets of rare Tier II and Tier III words that unlock meaning, build knowledge of critical content domains, and help students internalize word-learning strategies.

Teachers are provided with a chart containing the main vocabulary words they should use throughout each unit. These lists are provided in the Teacher's Guide in the section entitled Vocabulary to Unlock Text. The texts that the vocabulary words are chosen from are both anchor and supporting texts. These pages outline for teachers how to teach vocabulary throughout every unit and module throughout the year. This practice is carried out during the Small Group Time. Examples of vocabulary outlined include:

  • Benchmark Vocabulary: “Important words for understanding concepts within a text defined as words needed to deeply comprehend a text, words from other disciplines, words that are part of a thematic, semantic, and/or morphological network, and words central to unlocking the Enduring Understanding of the text.”
  • By-The-Way Words: “Sophisticated or unusual Tier II and Tier III words for known concepts that can be stumbling blocks to comprehending a text. They should be defined quickly during reading, but instruction should not interfere with the fluent reading of the text. These are addressed during Close Reading and are defined as words that don’t require lengthy discussion within a particular text, words supported by the text for meaning, and words that are more concrete.”
  • Generative Vocabulary in Speaking and Writing: “Children should demonstrate a deep understanding of vocabulary by using these words and words generated from conversation, writing practice, and the Performance-Based Assessments.”
  • Additional Vocabulary Support: “For spanish cognates, see the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook.”


Attention is paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high value academic words. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 5, p. 53 By-The-Way Words: “During close reading, define the following words for children involving known concepts that can be stumbling blocks to comprehending the text. East and west, p. 18: Explain that east and west name two of the four direction of the sunrise. West is the direction of the sunset. Draw a compass and label, it with the direction words.”
  • Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 4, p. 193 By-The-Way Words: “During close reading, define the following word for children involving known concepts that can be stumbling blocks to comprehending the text. Coastlines, p. 21: Have children use the illustration on p. 21 to see that a coastline is land along the ocean. The boy is standing on the coastline.”
  • Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 7, p. 222 By-The-Way Words: “During close reading, define the following word for children involving known concepts that can be stumbling blocks to comprehending the text. Fern, p. 34: Point out the Glossary on p. 30 of Plant Patterns and explain to children that they can use the glossary to find the meaning of the word fern.”

Students are supported to accelerate vocabulary learning with vocabulary in their reading, speaking, and writing tasks. During the small group time, Step 1, there is a specific daily process and strategy focus. In the strategy focus portion, Vocabulary Knowledge is one of the possible strategies the teacher should focus on. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 3, Vocabulary Knowledge: “Have students review with you the colored tabs they placed in their book. Discuss how each thing might glitter or flutter. Alternatively, have students log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed in their workbook.”
  • Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 10, Vocabulary Knowledge: “Have students review the words they marked and what weather they think each word could describe. Alternatively, have students log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed in their workbook.”
  • Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 13 Vocabulary Knowledge: “Have students review the action words they marked and choose several to act out for the class. Alternatively, have students log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed in their workbook.”

Although students are asked to look back in the text and answer questions, there is little instruction directly focused on vocabulary. In small groups, vocabulary words may be discussed and sometimes focused on a strategy, but the guidance for what teachers should be doing with their vocabulary lists and how to teach students these words and links is not explicit. The words that should be covered for each lesson are outlined in the Module Planners in every Teacher's Guide for every unit and every module.

Vocabulary is not repeated across multiple texts. Some morphological, semantic, and narrative instruction is included in a “network.” There is no evidence that vocabulary words are systematically repeated throughout texts. The focus is on teaching the children the skills to make connections to the links in all words rather than repeating vocabulary words.

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for containing a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts. Each writing lesson focuses on a standard based writing type (narrative, opinion, or informative/explanatory). Students receive explicit instruction that guides them through the writing process. Students have writing models from anchor and supporting texts that they can use to examine writers’ styles and techniques. Students have the opportunity to apply writing skills during Independent Writing Practice and share their work at the end of each lesson. Students develop grammar, usage, and convention skills by practicing in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.

Materials include writing instruction aligned to the standards for the grade level, and writing instruction spans the whole school year. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 2, on pp. 178-179 the goal is to write to tell an opinion about the topic. The students read Farming Then and Now and their opinion focus is based on the question, “Which do you think is better: farming in the past or farming today?”.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 3, on pp. 38-39 the goal is to write a narrative which has characters, setting, and events. Students write a narrative with the understanding that events in a story are the things that happen to the characters. They reference their anchor text I Love Saturdays y domingos.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 7, on pp. 228-229 the goal is to write an informative/explanatory piece that focuses on finding more information about a topic. Students include facts and details and write about one main idea that includes all the facts and details from the text in their idea. They reference back to their anchor text Plant Patterns for information using pictures and relying on the teacher for read aloud information.

Each module ends with a Performance-Based Assessment. The task provide opportunities for students to apply the skills they learned during the module to their own writing. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Module A, students create a simple personal narrative about something they did when they were younger that they do differently now.
  • In Unit 4, Module B: Students think of two questions about the selections Making Music and Clothes in Many Cultures. They use evidence from the texts to answer questions.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, students state and support an opinion about which selection they like better, On the Town: A Community Adventure or Places in My Neighborhood.

Writing instruction supports students’ growth in writing skills over the course of the school year. Each lesson includes a writing task. It varies from narrative, opinion to explanatory/informative across the lessons. Included in lesson is an Independent Writing Practice lesson, Conventions Mini-Lesson and a Shared Writing section where students get the opportunity to share their writing. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 6, the focus writing is Narrative Writing. In Setting the Purpose the Teacher's Guide states, “Explain to students that after a writer has written a story, the writer may revise, or change the story by adding details. Explain that today the students will add details to the setting they created for their animal character.” During Teach and Model, “Write the following text and read it aloud: Far away, after sailing for a long time, there’s a house-that’s where my puppies play.” Teacher’s say “Suppose this was the writer’s description. Does it tell many details about the place where the dog’s home is located? Does it help you see the place where the dog’s home is located?” The teacher models revising writing by adding details. During the Independent Writing Practice students go back to their writing in lesson 3. They revise it by adding details through writing or pictures. Students have the opportunity to share their writing. The Conventions Mini-Lesson focuses on teaching and modeling writing the uppercase and lowercase letters Pp, Qq, and Rr. Students have the opportunity to practice writing these letters in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 9, the focus writing is Informational/Explanatory Writing. In Setting the Purpose the Teacher's Guides states, “Explain to students that when they write an informative/explanatory text they plan first, then draft, then revise and finally publish. Explain that today the students will look at how writers publish their writing.” In Teach and Model, “Display Weather Words and What they Mean. Explain that this writer published her writing in a book. Then display a weather forecast from a newspaper. Explain that this writer published their writing in the newspaper. Make sure students understand that there are many different ways to publish writing.” In Present Your Writing, “Show students steps that they can use to publish their writing.” Independent Writing Practice, “Have students draw a picture or find a photograph to accompany the text in the weather forecasts they wrote in Lesson 6 and revised in Lesson 8. Ask them to write their final versions on p. 167 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Students can share their writings. Conventions Mini-Lesson: Read aloud the sentence The wind blows. Then say The wind blows and howls. Explain to students that adding details to sentences they make it tell more. Have students practice expanding sentences by adding actions on p. 167 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.”

Instructional materials include a variety of well-designed lesson plans, models, and protocols for teachers to implement and monitor students’ writing development. For example, in each lesson the Teacher Guide provides lesson plans for setting the purpose and teaching and modeling. Each lesson is scripted and outlines what the teacher says and does. There are rubrics in the Assessment Handbook for end of the unit assessments.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for including a progression of focused shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

Materials support teachers in employing projects that develop students’ knowledge on a topic through provided resources. Materials provide opportunities for students to apply Reading, Writing, Speaking & Listening, Language skills to synthesize and analyze per their grade level readings. Research projects are sequenced across a school year to include a progression of research skills. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, the performance based assessment requires to choose an animal from one of the selections they read. They tell about the animal and its home.
  • Unit 1, Module B, the performance based assessment requires students to write an informative/explanatory text after choosing an animal or plant from one of the selections. They explain about the animal’s or plant’s home.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, the performance based assessment requires students to use information from Come on, Rain! to write a story about the main character and what she might do in a snow storm.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, the performance based assessment requires students to pretend they are weather forecasters. They use what they learned from the selections to write a simple weather forecast.
  • In Unit 4, Module B. In the performance based assessment, children think of two questions about the selections they read. They use evidence from the texts to answer the questions in their informative/explanatory task.
  • In Unit 5, Module A, the performance based assessment requires students to write an opinion piece stating an opinion about which plants they like better from , The Tiny Seed or Jack’s Garden.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, the performance based assessment requires students use information from the anchor and supporting texts and their own words and pictures to create a real travel brochure that convinces people to visit a big city.

The materials also include an optional center called The Research Center that can be visited daily. Suggested research topics are included in each module. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Module A, suggestions include researching about what was used before an object that was invented, research two different technologies, such as the computer and the cellular phone, or research an invention to discover why someone invented it. Sources include books that tell about clothes for different kinds of weather and photos of people in rainy-day gear.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, suggestions include researching answers to questions about the weather in their community, or researching what the weather there is like in each season.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Most texts are organized with built in supports/scaffolds to foster independence. Examples include:

  • ReadyUp! Intervention provides additional instruction with the lesson’s reading and foundational skills standards.
  • The Leveled Text Library allows students/teachers to choose texts based on student’s needs.
  • Reading Analysis Support provides additional support for students who are struggling as well as Unlock the Text.
  • The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides additional support for each lesson.

Procedures are organized for independent reading included in the lessons. Examples include:

  • Focused Independent Reading instruction is the first step of Small Group Time each day.
  • The Independent Reading Routine provides teachers with support for introducing and continuing Independent Reading, as well as a rationale for implementation.
  • The Text Club Routine provides teacher with support for a protocol to have children read a text then discuss it with meaning and purpose. Each text club has assigned roles for students.
  • A Pearson Realize online contents page links to Independent Reading Activities. The teacher can direct and students can access Dash content to input comprehension and vocabulary notes.

There is sufficient teacher guidance to foster independence for all readers. Examples include:

  • Students are guided how to apply the content of each day's Reading Analysis lesson to their self-selected text, starting with Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 1.
  • Teachers meet with two or three individual students during Small Group Time each day to discuss their texts and support independent reading. This is found on each lesson’s fifth page.
  • Each module includes center time which involves independent reading. During independent reading, the teacher directs students to focus on either a process focus or a strategy focus. A process focus is where students either focus on independence, stamina, or engagement. The strategy focus has students focus on fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, or critical thinking.

There is a proposed schedule for independent reading. For example, teachers prepare students for Focused Independent Reading that they do during Small Group Time while teachers teach mini-lessons and assess individual students.

There is a tracking system (which may include a student component) to track independent reading. For example, students monitor their reading by recording it in their daily reading log. They gauge and record their engagement, their opinion of what they read, and their plan for the next day’s reading.

Student reading materials span a wide volume of texts at grade levels (and at various lexile levels within the grade). For example, students can use the Leveled Text Library and online leveled texts to practice reading at their independent levels. Texts are related to the unit topic and offer a range of levels to meet every student’s needs.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway Three Details

The materials reviewed meet the expectations for usability. Materials are well-designed and include support for implementation over the course of a school year. Materials include clearly labeled navigation and support to aid teachers to support students’ literacy growth. The design of the materials supports effective lesson structure and pacing. Student resources include review and practice problems, clear directions, and explanations, and correct labeling of reference aids. Visual design is not distracting to students and support students’ learning.

The materials support teachers in helping students to learn and understand the concepts in the standards. Teacher’s editions explain the role of specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. Implementation Guides contain explanations of the instructional approaches of ReadyGEN and identify research-based strategies. However, the materials do not include are strategies for communicating with stakeholders about the program and how they can support students in their learning.

There are a variety of assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Not all assessments denote which standards are being assessed. There is sufficient guidance for interpreting student performance on assessments and suggestions for follow-up. Materials also provide routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Students are accountable for independent reading.

Materials meet expectation for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. There are clear supports for students who struggle as well as those who work above grade level. The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides extensive follow-up to support students who read, write, speak, or listen in a language other than English to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Instructional materials include useful technology to enhance student learning. They include materials to support students’ personalized learning via navigable online platforms. The digital platform offers opportunities to enhance student learning.

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
8/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for being well-designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Daily lessons include structures and resources for both whole group and small group literacy instruction.The materials meet the expectations for the teacher and student reasonably being able to complete the content within a regular school year with the pacing allowing for maximum student understanding These lessons are intended to be done one a day, totaling an hour and a half to fit in both Reading and Writing. The materials meet the requirements for resources including ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanations, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g. visuals, maps, etc). The materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. The visual design that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for being well-designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Daily lessons include structures and resources for both whole group and small group literacy instruction.

Daily lesson structures include the components of Reading with 30-40 minutes for whole group reading instruction, 30-40 minutes for small group instruction, and 30-40 minutes for whole group writing instruction. The pacing is defined in the following way:

  • Whole group instruction includes Built-In Foundational Skills Mini-Lessons, Building Understanding, Close Reads, Reading Analysis Lessons, and Focused Independent Reading.
  • Small Group Instruction includes Small Group Options such as additional instruction, practice, or extension as needed in the areas of fluency, foundational skills, and reading and language analysis, Independent Literacy Work with a choice between student-selected grade level text, leveled text library books, and decodable and practice readers, and ReadyGen Intervention which provides support for struggling readers.
  • Whole Group Writing Instruction contain focused lesson on one specific writing types critical to college and career readiness and conventions mini-lessons. During these lessons the teacher sets the purpose, teaches and models, prepares students to write, and gives students time for independent writing. In addition to whole group there are also daily conventions mini-lessons.

Following is a detailed example of the lesson structure from Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 5:

  • Whole Group Reading Instruction: 1) Building Understanding, during this portion of the lesson, teachers “Set the Purpose” by telling students the following: “We can ask and answer questions about key details in a text to help us understand the meanings of “then” and “now.” 2) Read, Four Seasons Make a Year with the students. Have the students read along with you. When you get to the end of a page ask them what you should do next. During this first reading students should focus on understanding who or what the story is about and what happens. 3) Turn and Talk, after these pages, the teacher has the students turn to a partner and discuss this question using examples: “How does the farm change as the seasons change?” 4) Close Read: Engage the class in a discussion about what they just read . . . Use these questions to guide the discussion: “Look at the pictures on pages 30-35. What happens during spring?” “What happens during summer? Point to the pictures that show this.” “What is sold at the roadside stand? Why would people want to buy these things from a roadside stand?” “What season is it? How do you know?” “These pictures show how the farm changed over the year. What is alike and different about these pictures?” 5) Benchmark Vocabulary: Teachers use the “Benchmark Vocabulary Routine for Literary Text” “Students find and read sentences from the text with the words spring and droops.” 6)Text Analysis: Students work on identifying the roles of the author and illustrator. Students work in small groups to discuss the roles of authors and illustrators in telling stories.
  • Small Group Time: Focused Independent Reading: Students read their self-selected texts. The teacher announces the two focus points to the class for their self-selected reading. For Unit 2 Module A, Lesson 5, the focus is “Engagement and Identity” and “Comprehension”. During focused independent reading, students look for the names of the author and illustrator of their book and how they help tell the story. Teachers monitor students’ progress by having them record their reading in a daily reading log and having them point out the author and illustrator of their text. Additional instruction, practice and extension during “Small Group Time” are offered through a variety of options: Word Analysis use pp. WA2-WA4 in Teacher’s Guide, Unlock the Text use pp. 8-13 in Scaffolded Strategies Handbook, teachers conference each day with two or three students to discuss their self-selected texts, Reading Analysis Support for students who struggle with point of view, there is a “Support Reading Analysis Mine-Lesson.” and Reading Analysis Extension for students who easily understand point of view, there is an “Extend Reading Analysis Mini-Lesson.”
  • Whole Group Writing Instruction: Students focus on narrative writing, and first “Establish The Sequence of a Story.” The teacher sets the purpose by going back to the essential question. The teacher uses models from Four Seasons Make a Year to chart and then make a story sequence chart. Next, during Write Events in Order students make a story sequence chart about their first day of school. Finally, during Independent Writing Practice students use the prompt on p. 71 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal and write about their first and last events on their story sequence chart. After writing, students can volunteer to share their introductions with the class.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for the teacher and student reasonably being able to complete the content within a regular school year with the pacing allowing for maximum student understanding These lessons are intended to be done one a day, totaling an hour and a half to fit in both Reading and Writing. The suggested pacing has students reading, in small groups, and then writing during these 90 minutes. Each lesson is broken down by Read, Benchmark Vocabulary, Reading Analysis, and Writing.

  • There are 6 units that are each broken into 2 modules. Module A in every unit contains 13 lessons and Module B in every unit has 12 lessons. There are a total of 150 lessons in the Kindergarten materials.
  • Lessons are set up for 90 or 120 minute blocks that include Reading (Build Understanding, Close Read, Benchmark Vocabulary, Text Analysis – either language or reading) Small Group Time (Focused Independent Reading, Small Group Options), and Writing (Focused Writing, Independent Writing Practice).
  • Additional lessons are included for the Performance Based Assessment as well as other unit assessments. Time is built in for teachers to modify lessons to tailor to their student’s needs.
  • Pacing suggestions are provided in the Implementation Guide that suggests teachers can vary the lessons from day to day based on the text, needs of the students, and the amount of scaffolding necessary to delivery instruction appropriately. (Implementation Guide p. 19)

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the requirements for resources including ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanations, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g. visuals, maps, etc). Students have access to an array of materials including the Text Collection, anchor texts, Sleuth, leveled text library, online resources, and center options. Other resources available to students include, trade books, text collections, Close Reading, performance tasks, Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Independent Reading Activities, as well as digital interactive tools such as Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Envision It! Animations, TikaTok (students as authors), and Grammar Jammers. In the online resources, activities and exercises are found, such as Monster Word Mania and Pack Up The Skills interactive games. There are Close Reading and Independent Reading modeling videos. Each of these resources include ample opportunity to review and practice, clear directions, and correct labeling.

Some examples of the resources that provide review and practice opportunities are:

  • Daily Focused Independent Reading routines and structures allow students to extend and apply what they are learning in daily whole group instruction to a text of their own choosing,at their ability and interest level.
  • Daily Independent Writing Practice gives students opportunity to apply the writing skills and conventions they have discussed and learned in whole class instruction to a daily writing prompt that prepares them for Performance Based Writing Assessment at the end of each module.
  • Digital Opportunities for Writing and Reading are provided daily during Small Group Instruction.
  • Daily mini-lessons in Language Conventions focus on one or more language standards. Students apply these conventions to their own writing, then practice these newly acquired skills for teacher to monitor progress in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.
  • Sleuth, a collection of short, high interest selections, serves to support and extend daily close reading lessons for struggling and accelerated learners. Three to four times in each unit, or sixteen times over the course of the school year, the Scaffolded Instruction during Small Group lessons use Sleuth to reteach, practice, and apply close reading skills and strategies .
  • Scaffolded Strategies Handbook Part One: Unlock the Text contains lessons for every anchor and supporting text, the section Express and Extend allows struggling and accelerated learners opportunities to react to the text through discussion and writing.
  • During Small Group Instruction, students use independent center activities to practice and apply standards in Reading, Writing, Word Work, and Research. Digital Components are available and suggested for each of these four sections.
  • There is a scaffolded strategies handbook, along with teacher resources, that has a multitude of graphic organizers, rubrics, and sentence frames that are available for students to use.
  • Common Core Correlations section in Implementation Guide shows where each standard is addressed in Units’ Teacher’s Guides across the units and across the year.

Examples of clear explanation and directions included in materials are:

  • In the Kindergarten Scaffolded Strategies Handbook on p. 328, the directions for the Unit 1,Module A, Part 4, Unlock Language Learning states, “For students who need support in access key ideas and key language in Where is Home, Little Pip? Use the Sentence Talk Routine on pp. 408-409 to draw students’ attention to the relationships between meaning and the words, phrases, and clauses in the text.
  • On page 123 of the Kindergarten Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, the directions for Language Benchmark Vocabulary routine for Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 3, state, “Have children use p. 123 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Monitor children’s vocabulary development.”
  • On p. 10 of the Teacher's Guide for Unit 4, Module A, as a writing center, students Write in Response to Reading by completing the appropriate writing response to Reading prompts, found within pp. 175-203 of their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Children log into TikaTok and write their own book about their own life or about the life of a classmate or friend. Have them go to www.tikatok.com.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. In the Implementation Guide there is a Scope and Sequence of all four units, that show where each of the standards is hit within the curriculum. Lessons clearly denote standards alignment. Standard documentation is found in the lesson objectives.

Examples of materials of publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed include, but are not limited to:

  • The Implementation Guide’s Scope and Sequence section lists all English Language Arts standards for Kindergarten, and which unit and module addresses them.
  • The Implementation Guide’s Unit Overviews Standards Maps section describes the Performance Based Writing Assessment for each module. It lists Essential Questions, Enduring Understanding, and Goals for each module, along with corresponding standards, and lists all standards addressed in each module.
  • The Implementation Guide’s Common Core Correlations section lists Common Core Standards along with page numbers in each Unit’s Teacher’s Guide where these standards are addressed in lesson, task, assignment, or assessment.

Standards and Lesson Objectives are clearly stated on left hand side of Teacher Guides at the beginning of each lesson. For example:

  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 4 publisher-produced alignment to standards is provided. Students will:
    • RL.K.7 pp. 42, 44, 47 – Describe the relationship between pictures and the story in which they appear. Tell how pictures are related to the story in which they appear. Tell how pictures are related to the story in which they appear.
    • RL.K.10 p. 42 – Engage group in reading activities.
    • RL.K.4 p. 44 – Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
    • L.K.6 p. 44 – Use words acquired from texts.
    • RL.K.7 p. 44 – Tell how pictures are related to the story in which they appear.
    • RF.K.4 Build fluency through oral reading.
    • W.K.3 pp. 48, 49 – Draw and dictate or write about an event.
    • W.K.7 p. 48 – Participate in a shared narrative writing task.
    • W.K.6 p. 49 – Use technology to produce and publish writing and to collaborate with others.
    • L.K.1.b Use frequently occurring nouns.
  • In the Unit 1, Module A, Performance Based Assessment, standards being assessed are included. Students will:
    • W.K.3 p. 142 – Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing.
    • W.K.3 p. 142 – Tell about a character and setting.
    • W.K.3 p. 142 – Narrate a single event.
    • W.K.6 p. 142 – Explore a variety of digital tools to publish and produce writing.
    • SL.K.4 p. 142 – Describe familiar places, things, and events and provide additional details.

Standards are also listed at the bottom of each Foundational Skills lesson which are located in the Foundational Skills portion of every Teacher's Guide. For example in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1, on p. FS2 standards include:

  • RF.K.1.d Recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet.
  • RF.K.2 Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).
  • RF.K.2.d Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial, vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words.
  • RF.K.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • RF.K.3.b Associate the long and short sounds with common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for visual design that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The ReadyGen Language Arts curriculum printed version supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject due to its visual design. Student materials reviewed for Kindergarten include the Text Collections: Volume 1 and 2, Sleuth, a collection of close reading passages for struggling and accelerated readers, Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, and an online component that contains leveled readers, anchor and supporting texts, a variety of grammar games, software to publish students’ stories, and a mechanism with which the teacher can assign personalized writing prompts to communicate with individual students.

Components that support students engaging thoughtfully with the subject include but are not limited to:

  • Units are color coded in the Teacher Guide to allow for easy navigation through the units. Pages within the units are coded with Unit 1 purple, Unit 2 pink/magenta, Unit 3 green, and Unit 4 orange, Unit 5 Teal, and Unit 6 Salmon/Grapefruit.
  • Graphic organizers are free of any distracting words or pictures. The design simple and clear. For example, in Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 2, on p. 174, during the reading analysis portion of the lesson, the main idea graphic organizer is displayed which is found on p. TR40 in the Teacher's Guide. The students and teacher work together to title the organizer, include the main topic, and find supporting details. Students then use the completed graphic organizer to draw a picture of the main topic, or idea, of Life in a Pond.
  • Graphic organizers are located in the Teacher Resources in the back of every Teacher's Guide on pp. TR36-TR50.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectation for materials containing a Teacher's Guide with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.The materials contain a Teacher's Guide that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literary concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject as necessary. The materials reviewed meet expectations for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. Materials reviewed contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies. The materials reviewed do not contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectation for materials containing a Teacher's Guide with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

Materials include a Teacher's Guide that includes a clear outline of each unit as well as notes and suggestions of how to present content. The Teacher's Guide also includes the objectives of the lesson, explanations of where to find descriptions of routine, suggested ways to present content, as well as possible questions to ask are noted in blue. Each question asked is followed by a sample student answer. The Teacher's Guide includes scaffolded instruction boxes to address learners’ needs with ideas on differentiating instruction for those students in need of strategic or English language support.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 1, the teacher is provided with a Teach and Model guide to present the way illustrations and words convey the meaning in stories. Teachers use discussion questions to probe students’ recognition of the actions and feelings of the characters. The teacher uses a T-chart to explain author and illustrator roles.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 12, the Close Read section gives directives and suggestions on students citing evidence. The Close Read section states, “Engage the class in a discussion about the two texts. Remind children to focus on the adventures and experiences of the characters in the two stories. Use these questions to guide and continue the discussion, and ask students to support their answers with evidence.” The teacher is provided guided questions to lead a class discussion that requires evidence.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 8, the Writing Workshop section of the lesson provides teachers with plans to model the creation of storyboards with story events and details.
  • On pages 64-71 of the Implementation Guide, a scope and sequence chart includes all Common Core Standards and the Unit and Module where each is addressed.
  • On pages 72-81 of the Implementation Guide, Standards Maps are provided for each Module. These maps include a description of the Performance Based Assessment, essential questions that are linked with standards, essential questions, a list of anchor and support texts, a list of all standards covered, Module goals linked to standards, and enduring understandings that are linked to standards.
  • On pages 82-101 of the Implementation Guide, a Common Core Correlations Chart is included that lists all Grade 1 Common Core Standards and then gives the Unit and page number where the standard is addressed.

Materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

  • In Unit 2, Module A, the Performance Based Assessment offers a digital option, “You may incorporate technology into the Performance-Based Assessment. Use presentation software to create children’s personal narratives. Have children type their sentences or dictate them to you to type. After children draw their pictures, scan or photograph the pictures and upload them.”
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 10, the teacher’s guide lists the digital publishing studio TikaTok as a resource for students to write and illustrate their own books.
  • In all Units and Modules Digital Centerpieces center options include the Reading Center, Writing Center, Word Work Center, and Research Center. Each of these centers includes an online technology piece.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations of materials containing a Teacher's Guide that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literary concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject as necessary. The materials also include an Implementation Guide to provide specific explanations, rational, and examples of key concepts that are needed to improve knowledge of the subject. Common Core Correlations, located in the Implementation Guide, list all of Kindergarten ELA standards by strand, then the page numbers in each unit’s Teacher’s Guide where these standards are addressed.

The Teacher's Guides include:

  • Instructional Routines, along with their rationales, are located in the Teacher Resource Section in the back of each of the Teacher’s Guides.
  • Generative Vocabulary Instruction is explained in the Implementation Guide as “helping students learn about words.” A white paper on generative vocabulary instruction is available online at pearsonrealize.com. It’s further described in each unit of the Teacher’s Guide at the beginning of each module. Teachers learn about benchmark vocabulary (words that are important for understanding concepts within a text) and by-the-way words (sophisticated or unusual Tier II and Tier III words).
  • Text Complexity Rubrics are available for each Anchor and Supporting Text. Rubrics explain quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task considerations, and provide the teacher with information on potential challenges students may have in accessing the text. These rubrics are located in the Teacher’s Resource Section in the back of each unit’s Teacher’s Guide.
  • Tips and Tools sidebars throughout the Teacher’s Guides, Scaffolded Strategies Handbook, and Teacher Resource sections provide quick definitions of literary and language terms being taught in each lesson. For example, “Tips and Tools” of the “Routines” portion of the Teacher Resources offers definitions for affix, inflectional ending, and root words for the teacher.
  • Independent Reading Continuum, located in Teacher’s Resource Section of each unit’s Teacher’s Guide, “shows a progression of the essential elements of independent reading in the elementary grades, describing strategies and processes that students practice when engaged in purposeful, self selected reading.”

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

  • On pages 64-71 of the Implementation Guide, a scope and sequence chart includes all Common Core Standards and the Unit and Module they are addressed.
  • On pages 72-81 of the Implementation Guide, Standards maps are provided for each Module. These maps include a description of the performance based assessment, essential questions that are linked with standards, a list of anchor and support texts, a list of all standards covered, Module goals that are linked to standards, and enduring understandings that are linked to standards.
  • On pages 82-101 of the Implementation Guide, a Common Core Correlations Chart is included that lists all Grade K Common Core Standards and then gives the Unit and page number where the standard is addressed.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies.

Materials include an Implementation Guide that provides walkthrough of the curriculum, citing and explaining the rationale and research-based strategies including but not limited to the principles of backwards design and the design principle of backward mapping.

  • On page 22 of the Implementation Guide, it states, “ReadyGEN uses the principles of backward design to help teachers deliver instruction based on learning goals.” This is connected to the quote on the bottom of page 23 from the research of Fisher and Frey: “Reading widely is a habit that students must develop, but they also need instruction in reading increasingly complex texts so their reading diet is more balanced. We suggest that more difficult texts with scaffolded instruction should become part of the classroom equation.”
  • On page 24 of the Implementation Guide, it states, “ReadyGEN offers a robust range of assessments.” This is connected to the quote on the same page from the research of Peter Afflerbach about formative and summative assessments.
  • On page 45 of the Implementation Guide, it states, “Quick Checks provide formative assessment opportunities to monitor students’ fluency progress.”
  • On page 50 of the Implementation Guide, it states, “Performance-Based Assessments emphasize integration of reading, writing, and speaking and listening as students draw from the texts sets to demonstrate their knowledge of core understandings.” Which is connected to the quote on page 51 from the research of Linda Darling-Hammond and Frank Adamson.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

There are two places in the curriculum where a home school connection is mentioned. Once, when assigning online games and activities, there is a parent letter available online that explains that students will be using online curriculum. The second mention is on page of 32 of the Ready Up Intervention booklet available to review online. It mentions the importance of a home school connection.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Materials include a baseline assessment, multiple formative assessments, performance-based assessments, and end-of-unit assessments. Materials reviewed meet the expectations for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized. Standards are clearly labeled in the daily lessons and are found on the performance based assessments for each unit, standards are also noted on the End-of-Unit Assessments and the Baseline Assessment (Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide). Materials meet the expectations for assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments and interpreting results through rubrics and scoring guidance documents. Instructional materials meet the expectations for including routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Ongoing progress monitoring formative assessments are integrated within every module. Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Materials include a baseline assessment, multiple formative assessments, performance-based assessments, and end-of-unit assessments. Each of these assessments are included in the Assessment Book along with an overview, directions, passages, running records, student tests, test administration information, answer keys, and rubrics.

  • Opportunities are provided during daily lessons for monitoring student progress in reading and writing, as well as opportunities to assess oral reading fluency.
  • Reading Keystones are formative assessments in every lesson to assess children’s understanding of key language, structures, and ideas. These keystones help the teacher check children’s progress toward the Performance-Based Assessment. The reading keystones include Benchmark Vocabulary Practice, Text Analysis practice/application, and Write in Response to Reading. For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 6, children use p. 73 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary to monitor children’s vocabulary development.
  • Writing Keystone Checklists are placed throughout the unit to assess children’s opinion, narrative, or informative writing. These checklists help the teacher determine how children are progressing toward the task in the Performance Based Assessment. For Example, in Unit 5 Module A Lesson 7 p. 80, the Writing Keystone Checklist provides places to mark a Topic, Opinion, and a Reason. This checklist is used to assess children’s opinion writing. If children need additional support with one or more of these elements of opinion writing, teachers use Unlock Opinion Writing beginning on p. 236 of the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook.
  • Oral Reading Fluency Quick Checks are included in the Small Group Options for daily lessons. Oral Reading Fluency can be assessed using text and guidelines provided for Running Records in the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide. For example, in Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 12, the Guide states, “ Distribute I Can Read Reader 33 on pp. 411-412 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to children. Ask them to point to the title of the story, “Ben Begs.” Review the irregularly spelled words is, look, what, does, and he. Let’s read the story together. Follow along as I read. Then ask children to read the story again with you. Ask the following questions and have children complete the following activities. What is the dog’s name? (Ben) What does Ben want? (He wants a bone) Circle the things that Ben does not want. Underline the question in the story.”
  • Performance-Based Assessments are included with each Module where students complete a task that requires analysis and demonstrating knowledge in writing. For example in Unit 2, Module A, on p.142 the Performance-Based Assessment requires that children create a simple personal narrative about something they did when they were younger that they do different now.
  • End-of-Unit Assessments are provided to help the teacher further measure their students’ mastery of reading and language arts standards. Included in the Assessment Book Teacher’s Manual is teacher information, answer keys, and class record charts. Student tests can be found in the Assessment Student Book and online. For example, each End of Unit Assessment includes one passage of complex text. Students listen to the teacher read aloud the passage before each section of the text and then answer questions about it. Each passage is either literary or informational, and the texts become increasingly complex of the course of the school year. After the teacher reads aloud, students answer a series of selected-response questions that contain grade-appropriate Tier 2 and Tier 3 vocabulary. The writing portion of each End-of-Unit Assessment contains a narrative, informative/explanatory, or opinion prompt that is based on the passage. This task requires students to draw pictures and either complete sentence frames or write sentences in response to the prompt.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized. Standards are clearly labeled in the daily lessons and are found on the performance based assessments for each unit, standards are noted on the End-of-Unit Assessments and on the Baseline Assessment (Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide).

Daily lessons that include formative assessments clearly denote standards being taught, along with opportunities for students to practice. For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 7 on p. 76 of the Teacher’s Edition students are tested by the teacher to check for their Fluency with Oral Reading. It is clearly marked that what is being tested is CCSS RF.K.4 - Fluency: Read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding (the name of the standard is printed but the language used is “build fluency through oral reading).

Performance Based Assessments denote standards being assessed in the objectives box in the Teacher’s Edition. For example in the Unit 6, Module A p. 142, Performance-Based Assessment students will state and support an opinion about which selection they like better, On the Town: A Community Adventure or Places in My Neighborhood. Standards W.K.1 and W.K.6 are are provided in the Teacher’s Guide. W.K.1 Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book. W.K.6 With Guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

On pages 66-71 of the Implementation Guide, a standards map is provided that lists all standards in a module along with the Performance-Based Assessment Task.

End-of-Unit Assessments do not provide standards being emphasized in student facing material or the Assessment Teacher’s Guide.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments and interpreting results through rubrics and scoring guidance documents. Guidance includes but is not limited to:

  • Performance Based Assessments provide teachers with notes and guidance regarding administration of assessments. Information is provided which guides teachers how to allow students to complete the assessment over multiple lessons, to review the Essential Questions, and revisit the texts. Also provided are scaffolded supports for students as they are completing the assessments and follow-up support for students scoring a 0, 1, or 2 on the assessment wit Reflect and Respond “if…then…” statements. Teachers are also provided a Writing Rubric with each assessment that directly connects to the type of writing being tested whether it be a narrative, informational/explanatory, or opinion writing or project.
  • Guidance is provided for teachers in administering and scoring assessments, along with interpreting student assessment scores on End-of-Unit Assessments. For example, in the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide on page T49-T50 guidance is given for scoring of selected response questions along with the writing prompt. A rubric is also provided to guide teachers in scoring the End-of-Unit writing.
  • The Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide provides guidance on what to do with assessment results. Teachers are directed to examine results and then use the results to inform instruction. On page T51-T52 of the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide it provides this guidance.
  • Instruction and guidance are provided for administering Running Records with the fluency passages used for the assessments. Information is also provided for teachers in interpreting student scores and specific miscues in the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for including routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Ongoing progress monitoring formative assessments are integrated within every module. Progress monitoring opportunities include but are not limited to:

  • Reading and Writing Keystones that assess students’ reading and writing and their understanding of key language, structure, and ideas. For example, in Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 9, on p. 94 Practice it states, “Have children use p. 21 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Monitor children’s vocabulary development.”
  • Fluency Quick Checks that offer If. . . Then... suggestions to monitor students’ fluency progress and provide an assessment tool for teachers to quickly assess students in a small group of 2-3 students at a time. For example, in Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 6, the teacher models fluent reading aloud from an appropriately leveled reader. Children then chorally read the same page with you and at an appropriate rate several times. Suggestions are given for if the child is reading too slowly or too quickly.
  • Check Progress assessments in each unit that assess students’ phonics, word analysis, and high frequency word skills. These are located at the end of every Foundational Skills section. For Example, in Unit 4 p. FS27-FS29 Unit 4 Check Progress.
  • Student work in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, including Write in Response to Reading prompts that require students to cite text evidence as they write about what they’ve read. For example, in Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 7, on p. 76, states, “Use Write in Response to Reading on p. 189 of the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to check children’s understanding of key details in I love Saturdays y domingos.”
  • If. . . Then... suggestions for monitoring progress also appear in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation. Examples include:

  • Pages TR 16-23 of all units Teacher Resources include the rationale behind the Independent Reading Routine as well as an independent reading rubric and reading log.
  • Small Group Time includes a Focused Independent Reading Time. During this time student focus on a process whether it be Engagement and Identity, Independence, or Stamina. Students also focus on a Strategy such as Vocabulary Knowledge, Critical Thinking, Fluency, or Comprehension. The teacher is given guidance to monitor the student’s progress by outlining two possible activities to quickly assess the process and strategy focus for that day.
  • During Small Groups, students are guided to apply the content of the Reading Analysis and Language Analysis lesson to their self-selected text. For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 6, students note the key details to retell a story. They focus on Spring as their main topic and use the Web A Graphic organizer on p. TR48 and write “Spring” in the circle. Students then Practice and Apply. Together you find key details using pp. 30-35 in the text and then the teacher uses the Small Group Discussion routine from pp. TR10-TR11. Also, in Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 5, students are reminded that when authors write, they make choices about what kinds of words they use to tell a story. Readers can sometimes sort these into groups or categories. The group uses the Two Sorting Boxes graphic organizer from p. TR46 to organize and sort their information. Next, they Practice and Apply. The teacher helps children to find the words silver, big, and grande and record them in the correct boxes on the chart (colors and sizes) using the Small Group Discussion Routine on pp. TR10-TR11.

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. There are clear supports for students who struggle as well as those who work above grade level. Materials meet the expectations for providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English, extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.The Teacher’s Guide provides daily scaffolding for immediate feedback during lessons, and the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides more extensive follow up to support these students.Materials include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level and also provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. There are clear supports for students who struggle as well as those who work above grade level. Grouping strategies included are inclusive of multiple opportunities.

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards. Examples include:

  • The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook addresses English Language Learners, students with disabilities, struggling readers, and accelerated learners. This handbook provides models of scaffolded instruction, useful strategies, and practical routines to employ during reading. The lessons provided are intended to be used during small-group time with students the teacher determines to need additional scaffolded instruction. The Scaffolding Strategies Handbook is organized into four parts.
  • Part 1 is titled Unlock the Text. Every anchor and supporting text is supported with scaffolds and strategies. The lessons are divided into Prepare to Read, Interact with Text, and Express and Extend.
  • Part 2 is titled Unlock the Writing. These lessons work to scaffold the module-level Performance Based Assessments and it also provides additional lessons to teach the writing types required by the standards.
  • Part 3 of the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides routines, graphic organizers, and activities to support students.
  • Part 4 is titled Unlock Language Learning. It focuses on supporting English Language Learners to construct meaning and explore vocabulary of a text. This section provides support to build background, talk about sentences, speak and write about the text, expand understanding of vocabulary, and write about the anchor and supporting text.

Small group instruction is provided based on student need with options such as:

  • Unlock the Text which supports students in accessing ideas, key language, and key structures.
  • Word Analysis which supports students with their foundational skills.
  • Conferencing which helps students to grow their independent reading accountability as they discuss their self-selected texts with the teacher.
  • Support Instruction which targets students who need additional scaffolding for the instructional focus of each lesson.
  • Extensions which are intended for students who understand the lesson focus and would benefit from opportunities to extend the lesson and enhance learning.
  • Sleuth which is used three to four times each unit for small group lessons to reteach, practice, and refine close-reading skills and strategies.
  • The Teacher’s Guide includes Scaffolded Instruction notes throughout all lessons. For example, in Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 3, the Guide states, “Make sure student understand the layout of the spread, which repeats throughout the book. Explain that the illustrator uses the two pocket watches to tell readers whether they are reading about the pat or today and the writer uses the phrase One hundred years ago to begin all pages about the past and the word Today to begin all pages about the present. Point out the art and text. Also, in Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 12: Remind students the most nouns add -s or -es to show more than one. Have students search both texts for nouns with -s or -es. Write the words in two list. Ask students which plural nouns appear in both texts. Have volunteers circle those words (seeds, roots, plants, birds).”

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English, extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.The Teacher’s Guide provides daily scaffolding for immediate feedback during lessons, and the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides more extensive follow up to support these students.

The Teacher’s Guide provides on-the-spot scaffolds in each lesson. These address common stumbling blocks encountered by English Language Learners and struggling readers and writers. They are highlighted in blue at the bottom of each lesson. For example, in Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 8, on p. 83 the Scaffolded Instruction notes are for English Language Learners and for Strategic Support.

  • English Language Learners: “Point out to students that the word dear appears on p. 30 and 31. In both cases it has the same meaning-”much loved, precious”- but on p. 30, it is part of the phrase my dear, which means “My much loved or precious one.” Mama is talking to PIp, but instead of saying Pip’s name, Mama says my dear. Offer other terms of endearment in English, such as love, darling, sweetheart, sweetie, baby, sugar, and honey. Encourage students to offer words and phrases that are used in similar ways in their native languages.”
  • Strategic Support: “Use the dialogue on p. 30 to point out the punctuation marks that are used to set off what characters say to one another in a story. Have students look at the first sentence on p. 30. Point to and name the quotation marks. Explain that one set of quotation marks is place at the beginning of the character’s words and another set is placed at the end of the character’s words. That way readers know exactly what words Mama say: Oh, Little Pip!”

The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook has a number of resources for teachers to assist English Language Learners, struggling readers and writers as well as students with disabilities. These are intended to be used during small group time. The handbook has four sections of resources.

  • Unlock the Text: This section includes text complexity rubrics that offer insight into the quantitative, qualitative and reader and task measures of text. The qualitative measures provide strategies for levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands. Cognate charts are provided for each anchor text and supporting text in this section of the handbook as well.
  • Unlock Writing: This section provides scaffolded lessons for the Performance-Based Assessments and grade level support and guidelines for teaching the standards based writing types.
  • Routines and Activities: This section includes routines, reproducible graphic organizers, and activities that can be used to support teaching the standards.
  • Unlock Language Learning: This section provides specific resources for English Language Learners to construct meaning in the selections as well as explore vocabulary of texts. The strategies and activities are designed to develop mastery of reading, writing and speaking around the areas of Building Background, talking about Sentences, Speaking and Writing about the Texts, and Expanding Understanding of Vocabulary.

If/then sections are provided in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook to support students. For example, in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook on page 211 students Unlock the Task: Write About My Favorite Book. Students break apart the task, answer questions about the task, and then restate the task. If/then statements are provided to monitor and support struggling writers. For example, “If … students have difficulty forming an opinion about which book they preferred, then … use a Venn diagram to help students compare the books. Point out differences in the books and ask questions: Which book taught you a new fact? Which book was fun to read? Which book uses rhyme? Which book had pictures you liked? Guide students to form an opinion based on their answers.”

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for including extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Each lesson offers support for accelerated learners in Small Group Options. The small group options provided in the Teacher’s Guide offer teachers opportunities to direct their instruction to the needs of their students. Teachers are encouraged to gather formative assessment information from whole group instruction to help determine student needs during small groups. Opportunities within small groups that include:

  • Independent Reading Conferences: Opportunities for students to discuss self-selected texts can be found in the Teacher Resource Book. Independent reading rubrics are also provided for students to self-assess reading preferences and behaviors.
  • Close Reading Extension or Language Analysis Extension are provided for students who are adept or excel at the skill or lesson. For example, in Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 3, the Close Reading Extension on page 37 asks students to answer questions about “Bear and Fox” by looking for clues (gathering evidence), making their case, asking questions, and proving their thinking.
  • Mini-lessons can also be found in the Sleuth materials that offer extensions for students who excel at close reading or language analysis.

The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook included opportunities outside of the teacher guide for extensions for students who are above grade level. These sections are titled Extend, Accelerated, and Going Deeper. There are four parts in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook. Including Unlock the Text, Unlock the Writing, Routines and Activities, and Unlock Language Learning. Within each part, there are extensions activities and strategies. For example, in Unit 3, Module B on page 74 of the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook students:

  • In Part 1, Unlock the Text to Express and Extend after reading What Will the Weather Be? The Extend section states, “Have students choose a weather instrument from the text and draw a picture explaining how the instrument helps predict weather.” The subsequent Extend section states, “Have students create a weather journal in which they can record their own weather observations throughout the unit. Have students compare their observations with information learned in the text. Work with them to determine cause-and-effect relationships within their observations.”
  • In Part 2, Unlock the Writing on page 262 students are provided with a practice and a deeper practice when working with opinion pieces. Students work together to better understand the connection between topics, opinions, and reasons. The Teacher Guide Edition states, “Consider distributing copies of an opinion piece that you have read in class, and have students identify the topic, the opinion, and at least one supporting reason by underlining each in different colored markers. Ask students to list the linking words they find. Then instruct them to tell which reason and opinion each linking word connects. Students work with a partner to brainstorm another reason for an opinion about the topic of holidays or about another topic of interest. You might have students practice ‘writing in the air’ by first using a formal tone to tell a partner the topic, opinion, and reasons. Ask them to tell their opinion and at least one reason to the class, and have the class identify the opinion and the supporting reasons. “

Opportunities for enrichment occur during whole class instruction. For example, on page TR9 in the Unit 1 Whole Class Discussion Routine, teachers are provided with a Going Deeper activity once students are familiar with the routine. The directions state, “Ask children to restate what the previous participant said before adding their own thoughts to the discussion.” It also states, “Encourages are provided with a Going Deeper activity to help students explore Text Clubs more deeply. The directions state, “Once students are comfortable with the Routine, choose from the following activities to help them explore Text Clubs more deeply.” It also states, “Ask students to reread the same text with the same Text Club members but take on different roles in the group. Doing so will allow children to experience the text from different perspectives.”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the expectations for providing opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. Students participate in partner and small group Think-Pair-Share, Whole Class Discussion, Small Group Discussion, Read Alouds, Shared Reading, Independent Reading, Text Clubs, and Benchmark Vocabulary Discussions for both Informational and Literary texts.

The Teacher Edition provides small group options for teachers to meet the needs of their students. Teachers are encouraged to use information gained from whole group instruction to help determine where students need additional supports or extensions during small groups. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 1, the Teacher Edition has students Turn and Talk, “After reading, have students turn to a partner and discuss this question using pictures and words from the text: Why is predicting the weather important? Use the Think-Pair-Share Routine on pp. TR6-TR7. (Children should explain that if people know what kind of weather to expect, they can prepare for that weather and any problems it might cause.)”
  • In Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 4, the Teacher Edition has the teacher review the words covers, lies, and still on p. 15 with children. Together decide on the meaning used in the story and then think of another meaning for each word. Record the information on the chart. Use the Small Group Discussion Routine on pp. TR10-TR11 to have children discuss how they figured out the meaning. Remind them to ask and answer questions to clarify anything they do not understand and to confirm their understanding of information presented orally or visually.

Indicator 3s

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Materials are available to access with a login and password at www.pearsonrealize.com. Once signed in an educator can access materials such as the Teacher’s Guide for each Unit, Teacher Resources, Standards, Baseline Assessments, Practice Test, Scaffolded Strategies Handbooks, Unit Modules, each unit’s Leveled eText Library, Text Collections, Sleuth, and printable resources.

On the website teachers can create classes to assign work, check on the status of assignments, create groups, and post class calendars. There is also a Data tab to gather and display and use data to promote student mastery of the standards. Also included on this website are Close Reading Modeling Videos, Independent Reading Modeling Videos, Accessible eTexts, and the customizable lesson planning tool: MyGen.

Accessibility was tested on Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Windows, Apple, Android mobile device, Safari, an iPhone. All access was successful. The eTexts are flash based. You will be unable to access eTexts on an iPad since they don’t support Flash. It is recommended to download the eTexts for Schools App if your device does not support the Flash player.

Indicator 3s3v

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers , “platform neutral”, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Materials reviewed meet expectations for supporting effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.They include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovation. Materials can be easily customized for local use.

Indicator 3t

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for supporting effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Materials provide students with the ability to continue learning at home with activities aligned to unit texts, writing modes, and Enduring Understandings. Anchor texts are interactive to build background knowledge and help students access complex texts. Teachers have the option of assigning an e-text or interactive version of the anchor text to students on Pearson Realize. Interactivities can be displayed on an interactive whiteboard for use as part of whole group instruction, or students can access whatever texts have been assigned to them on an individual device. TikaTok allows students to write, illustrate and publish their own digital storybooks and projects. There are also Interactive graphic organizers that allow students to record as they read independently.

Online interactive tools such as Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Monster Word Mania, Pack Up the Skills, Envision It! Animations, Letter Tile Drag and Drop, and Grammar Jammers are provided and can be assigned by the teacher, as well as Close and Independent Reading Videos to support students’ learning.

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. An online Baseline Assessment is used to pinpoint students struggles while assessing the standards with complex text. Digital materials provide program-agnostic College and Career Readiness assessments, Balanced Practice Test, and Performance Tasks. Technology-Enhanced Items appear on the Baseline Assessment in Kindergarten on all End-of-Unit Assessments, and on program-agnostic Balanced Performance Tasks. Teachers can also build their own assessments.

The DATA tab of Realize provides class and student data, including standards mastery, overall progress, and time on task. Teachers can also view data individually by student from the class assignment list. Teachers can use this data to create assignments based on an individual student’s needs.

Indicator 3u.ii

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, MyGen, allows teachers to adapt any unit module. Teachers can replace any anchor or supporting text with another selection, create their own essential questions and enduring understandings, and identify lesson standards. Teachers can also develop Performance-Based assessments that are customized to their classroom.

Indicator 3v

0/
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, MyGen, allows teachers to adapt any unit module. Teachers can replace any anchor or supporting text with another selection, create their own essential questions and enduring understandings, and identify lesson standards. Teachers can also develop Performance-Based assessments that are customized to their classroom.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers , “platform neutral”, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Materials reviewed meet expectations for supporting effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.They include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovation. Materials can be easily customized for local use.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Materials are available to access with a login and password at www.pearsonrealize.com. Once signed in an educator can access materials such as the Teacher’s Guide for each Unit, Teacher Resources, Standards, Baseline Assessments, Practice Test, Scaffolded Strategies Handbooks, Unit Modules, each unit’s Leveled eText Library, Text Collections, Sleuth, and printable resources.

On the website teachers can create classes to assign work, check on the status of assignments, create groups, and post class calendars. There is also a Data tab to gather and display and use data to promote student mastery of the standards. Also included on this website are Close Reading Modeling Videos, Independent Reading Modeling Videos, Accessible eTexts, and the customizable lesson planning tool: MyGen.

Accessibility was tested on Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Windows, Apple, Android mobile device, Safari, an iPhone. All access was successful. The eTexts are flash based. You will be unable to access eTexts on an iPad since they don’t support Flash. It is recommended to download the eTexts for Schools App if your device does not support the Flash player.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet expectations for supporting effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Materials provide students with the ability to continue learning at home with activities aligned to unit texts, writing modes, and Enduring Understandings. Anchor texts are interactive to build background knowledge and help students access complex texts. Teachers have the option of assigning an e-text or interactive version of the anchor text to students on Pearson Realize. Interactivities can be displayed on an interactive whiteboard for use as part of whole group instruction, or students can access whatever texts have been assigned to them on an individual device. TikaTok allows students to write, illustrate and publish their own digital storybooks and projects. There are also Interactive graphic organizers that allow students to record as they read independently.

Online interactive tools such as Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Monster Word Mania, Pack Up the Skills, Envision It! Animations, Letter Tile Drag and Drop, and Grammar Jammers are provided and can be assigned by the teacher, as well as Close and Independent Reading Videos to support students’ learning.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. An online Baseline Assessment is used to pinpoint students struggles while assessing the standards with complex text. Digital materials provide program-agnostic College and Career Readiness assessments, Balanced Practice Test, and Performance Tasks. Technology-Enhanced Items appear on the Baseline Assessment in Kindergarten on all End-of-Unit Assessments, and on program-agnostic Balanced Performance Tasks. Teachers can also build their own assessments.

The DATA tab of Realize provides class and student data, including standards mastery, overall progress, and time on task. Teachers can also view data individually by student from the class assignment list. Teachers can use this data to create assignments based on an individual student’s needs.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, MyGen, allows teachers to adapt any unit module. Teachers can replace any anchor or supporting text with another selection, create their own essential questions and enduring understandings, and identify lesson standards. Teachers can also develop Performance-Based assessments that are customized to their classroom.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, MyGen, allows teachers to adapt any unit module. Teachers can replace any anchor or supporting text with another selection, create their own essential questions and enduring understandings, and identify lesson standards. Teachers can also develop Performance-Based assessments that are customized to their classroom.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Tue Apr 04 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Teacher's Guide Grade K Unit 1 978-0-328-85176-8 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Teacher's Guide Grade K Unit 3 978-0-328-85177-5 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Teacher's Guide Grade K Unit 4 978-0-328-85179-9 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Teacher's Guide Grade K Unit 5 978-0-328-85180-5 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Teacher's Guide Grade K Unit 6 978-0-328-85181-2 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Implementation Guide 978-0-328-85295-6 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Text Collection Grade K Unit 1 978-0-328-85793-7 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Text Collection Grade K Unit 2 978-0-328-85794-4 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Text Collection Grade K Unit 3 978-0-328-85795-1 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Text Collection Grade K Unit 4 978-0-328-85796-8 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Text Collection Grade K Unit 5 978-0-328-85797-5 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Text Collection Grade K Unit 6 978-0-328-85798-2 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

X