Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The ReadyGen instructional materials for Grades K, 1, and 2 meet expectations for alignment. The materials include include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Students have opportunities to build skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and they integrate language work throughout. Texts include a balance of genres and are appropriately rigorous and complex for primary students. Most tasks and questions are grounded in evidence. Materials support students with foundational skills instruction to support students' building their reading abilities to comprehend increasingly complex texts over the course of the school year. Vocabulary is addressed in each module, though academic vocabulary is not built across multiple texts. The materials meet use and design expectations, including teacher tools to plan and differentiate instruction, as well as incorporate useful technology applications.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
53
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
28
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
34
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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-
Gateway One Details

Grade 1 instructional materials meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. Most tasks and questions text based and grounded in evidence. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning during reading. Materials also provide opportunity to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level. Overall, appropriately complex grade-level texts are are accompanied by quality tasks aligned to the standards of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language to build foundational skills and strengthen literacy skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
20/20
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials meet expectations for text quality and complexity. Central texts are of publishable quality and address topics of interests to Grade 1 students. The instructional materials include a mixture of both literary and informational texts, most of which are at an appropriate level of complexity and rigor. The instructional materials include a text complexity analysis with rubrics and rationales for their purposes and placement.The materials support students increasing literacy skills over the year and provide students with many opportunities to engage in a range and volume of reading throughout each unit and module through anchor texts, supporting texts, and leveled libraries.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations that anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.Anchor texts and texts sets encompass multiple themes and integrate content areas such as social studies and science. Text are examined multiple times for multiple purposes and are used to expand big ideas, build academic vocabulary, and facilitate access to future text while building towards independent grade level reading. The anchor texts are read aloud in Units 1 and 2; however, students begin reading independently the anchor texts in Units 3, 4, 5, and 6.

Some examples of anchor texts that support the high-quality expectations of this indicator include:

Unit 1: Connecting to Our World

  • In Module A, students are read Stellaluna by Janell Cannon. The text is children’s literature and is classified as a fable, a folktale, and a myths picture book. This text won American Booksellers Book of the year. Illustrations help readers gain understanding of characters by showing realistic qualities. The text combines science and fantasy and includes factual information about bats and their world.
  • In Module B, students are read Time to Sleep by Jill McDougall. This text is classified as children’s literature. This scientific text uses pictures, text features, and rich vocabulary to explain the different ways animals sleep.

Unit 2: Becoming a Classroom Citizen

  • In Module A, students are read A Fine, Fine School by Sharon Creech. This text is classified as a realistic fiction picture book. This text contains rich language and the character development throughout the story helps students understand the theme of the text.
  • In Module B, students are read Far From Home by Sue Pickford. This text is classified as children’s literature. This text addresses what it is like to be a citizen in a new country and uses pictures to help display the feeling and mood of the character.

Unit 3: Making Choices

  • In Module A, students read The Winners’ Choice by Ana Galan illustrated by Christos Skaltsas. This is a culturally diverse text with rich vocabulary that supports the identified theme.
  • In Module B, students read Goods and Services by Jane Adil. This social studies text is rich in content specific vocabulary and provides context clues to help young learners understand the new terms. This text also uses photography to help students identify theme.

Unit 4: Planting for the Future

  • In Module A, students read Arbor Day Square by Kathryn O. Gallbraith. This text is classified as historical fiction. The text uses a narrative to portray the first Arbor Day which took place in Nebraska. Through the use of pictures, students are able to visualize the theme of the story.
  • In Module B, students read How Seeds Grow by Helene J. Jordan and illustrated by Loretta Krupinski. This text is classified as non-fiction. The book uses rich, detailed pictures to help portray the scientific theme of how a seed grows.

Unit 5: Observing the Messages of the Natural World

  • In Module A, students read King Kafu and the Moon by Trish Cooke and illustrated by Andrea Castellani. This text is a fable that introduces students to the science concept of the moon and outer space, using content specific vocabulary.
  • In Module B, students read Our World in Space: Planets by Erin Dealy. This text is classified as scientific nonfiction. The text contains dense language and context development throughout the story. The use of descriptive vocabulary, language, and photographs helps student visualize space and the planets.

Unit 6: Celebrating Diversity

  • In Module A, students read One Classroom, Many Cultures by Elizabeth Massie. The text uses personal narratives of characters in the story to help students understand the culturally rich vocabulary.
  • In Module B, students read Whose is This? by Narinder Dhami and illustrated by Victor Taverse. This text uses culturally diverse vocabulary to help students examine and understand different cultures.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. There is a balance of literature and informational text and also a variety of text types. The text sets in Grade 1 include: literary picture books, scientific nonfiction, and historical nonfiction.

Examples representing the balance of text types and genres include the following:

In Unit 1, Connecting to Our World texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - Stellaluna by Janell Cannon. (Literary Text, Narrative, picture book)
    • Supporting Text - Dragons and Giants from Frog and Toad Together by Arnold Lobel. (Literary Text, Narrative, picture book)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - Time to Sleep by Jill McDougall. (Scientific Nonfiction, Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - What Do you Do with a Tail Like This? By Steve Jenkins and Robin Page. (Informational Text)
  • Poems:
    • “Batty” by Shel Silverstein
    • “The Elephant” by Arnold Sundgaard

In Unit 2, Becoming a Classroom Citizen texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - A Fine, Fine School by Sharon Creech. (Literary Text, Narrative, Picture book
    • Supporting Text - The Recess Queen Make a Year by Alexis O’Neill and Laura Huliska-Beith. (Literary Text, Narrative, Picture book)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - Far from Home by Sue Pickford. (Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - Going to School by Margaret Clyne, Rachel Griffiths, and Cynthia Benjamin. (Informational Text)
  • Poems:
    • “School Bus” by Lee Bennett Hopkins
    • “Countdown to Recess” by Kalli Dakos
    • “Crayons” by Jane Yolen
    • “Numbers” by Elizabeth Madox Roberts

In Unit 3, Making Choices texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - The Winners Choice by Ana Galan. (Literary Text, Narrative, picture book)
    • Supporting Text - The Hunter’s Money Jar by Charlotte Guillain. (Literary Text, Narrative)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - Goods and Services by Jane Adil. (Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - Supermarket by Kathleen Krull. (Informational Text)
  • Poems:
    • “My Lemonade Stand” by Rebeccah Kai Dotlich
    • “Mud Pies a Penny” by Alan Benjamin
    • “Food” by Meisch Goldish
    • “To Market, To Market” by Anne Miranda

In Unit 4, Planning For the Future texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - Arbor Day by Kathryn O. Gallbraith. (Literary Text, Historical Narrative)
    • Supporting Text - The Family Tree by David McPhail. (Literary Text, Narrative)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - How a Seed Grows by Helene J. Jordan. (Scientific Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - The Life Cycle of an Apple Tree by Linda Tagliaferro. (Scientific Informational Text)
  • Poems:
    • “Garden Tip” by George Shannon
    • “Dancing in the Breeze” by George Shannon
    • “Zucchini” by George Shannon

In Unit 5, Observing the Messages of the Natural World texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - King Kafu and the Moon by Trish Cooke. (Literary Text, Narrative)
    • Supporting Text - Let's Visit the Moon by Patricia Newman. (Literary Text, Narrative)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - Our World in Space: Planets by Erin Dealy. (Scientific Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - The Sun by Martha E. H. Rustad. (Scientific Informational Text)
  • Poems:
    • “Running Moon” by Elizabeth Coatsworth
    • “Last Song” by James Guthrie
    • “Sleeping Outdoors” by Marchette Chute
    • “Sun” by Nancy Elizabeth Wallace
    • “A Circle of Sun” by Rebecca Kai Dotlich
    • “Sunflakes” by Frank Asch

In Unit 6, Celebrating Diversity texts include:

  • Module A:
    • Anchor Text - One Classroom, Many Cultures by Elizabeth Massie. (Historical Nonfiction, Informational Text)
    • Supporting Text - A Picnic in October by Eve Bunting. (Literary Text, Narrative)
  • Module B:
    • Anchor Text - Whose is This? by Narinder Dhami illustrated by Victor Taverse. (Literary Text, Narrative)
    • Supporting Text - L is for Liberty by Wendy Cheyette Lewison. (Historical Nonfiction Informational Text)
  • Poems:
    • “Statue of Liberty” by J. Patrick Lewis
    • “Lady Liberty” by Laura Purdie Salas
    • “Happy Birthday” to Us! By Laura Purdie Salas
    • “Flag Music” by Laura Purdie Salas

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for this grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task(s).Texts in first grade are read aloud in Units 1-2 therefore the lexile levels are higher. However students are responsible for the reading beginning in Unit 3, 4, 5, 6. There is no lexile band according to the Common Core State Standards however, the range in first grade falls from 310- 740. . The reader and task outlined in the Teacher Guides complexity rubrics provide rationale for texts being of high complexity levels. As the students progress through the units they do more of the reading independently.

Examples of texts that support appropriate complexity include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, students are read the literary text Stellaluna by Janell Cannon. The text has a quantitative measure of 550 Lexile. This text is an accessible narrative with literal meaning about a lost bat and also dives into more complex themes about survival, appreciating others, and adaptation. There is some informational components about bats at the end of the book and is a conventional narrative with some advanced vocabulary and compound sentences. The reader and task suggestions include inviting the students to share what they know about bats and birds to build background knowledge. The students then create a venn diagram that compares and contrasts story information about bats and birds. The students should discuss that humans can learn from the story.
  • In Unit 1, Module B, students are read the informational text Time to Sleep by Jill McDougall. The text has a quantitative measure of 140 Lexile. This text has an accessible concept with an explicit main idea. Main idea and key details are organized into sections with illustrations and photographs that support the text. Vocabulary is content-area based and sentences are simple with a few complex. Reader and task suggestions include asking the students to discuss where and when they sleep. The teacher helps the students understand that they can use the index to find important information in the text. The students then work with a partner using the index to locate and identify the remaining animals listed in the index.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, students are read the literary text A Fine, Fine School by Sharon Creech.The text has a quantitative measure of 890 Lexile. This text has a conventional plot with a single unified theme. It is in chronological order, and the artwork supports the text and theme. There is some advanced vocabulary concerning religion, holidays, and historical topics. Sentences, phrases, and paragraphs are repeated. The reader and task suggestions include discussing the length of a school day and year. Then students support their opinions with logical resources. Then the students, with the help of the teacher, identify how many number of days the students is in while enrolled in their group.
  • In Unit 2, Module B, students are read the informational text Far From Home by Sue Pickford. The text has a quantitative measure of 260 Lexile, Non-Fiction, This text has an accessible concept (farm life in the past and present), it is structured with compare and contrast features which is guided by fictional characters and non-fiction text features such as headings, tables, and a glossary. Most of the sentences are compound with a few simple sentences. The vocabulary is challenging while the character comments on facts throughout the text. The reader and task suggestions include using a globe to locate China. Ask students to share what they know about China. The students, with the teachers help, create a story map.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, students read the literary text The Winners’ Choice by Ana Galan illustrated by Christos Skaltsas. The text has a quantitative measure of 370 Lexile. This text is an accessible realistic story which has chronological order, dialogue, omniscient narrator and supporting illustrations. There is some challenging topic-related vocabulary, multiple meaning words, and simple sentences. The reader and task suggestions include having the students take a picture walk of the text and make predictions. The teacher records those predictions. Before reading the text the teacher records main events from the story on sentence strips. The students then pair up and after reading the story they use the sentence strips to sequence the events in the story.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, students read the informational text Goods and Services by Jane Adil.The text has a quantitative measure of 630 Lexile. This text has literal meaning about producers and consumers with descriptive informational text features that focus on main idea. There is content specific vocabulary that is defined in the text. The reader and task suggestions include inviting students to share their experiences with money that they have earned and spent. The teacher reviews with the students how many allows people to acquire goods and services and how people use money as produces and consumers. Then the students act out a story in which they show their understanding of the terms.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, students read the literary text Arbor Day Square by Kathryn O. Gallbraith. The text has a quantitative measure of 470 Lexile. This text is an accessible fictional story set in a prairie town. The structure is chronological with dialogue, supporting illustrations and a historical piece about Arbor Day is included. There is some challenging vocabulary, simple sentences, figurative and sensory language and subject-verb agreement. The reader and task suggestions include having the students talk with their families about a tradition that has been passed down in their family, the students then share that tradition with the class and why it is important. The teacher makes sentence strips with main ideas, the students then place the sentence strips in the correct order.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, students read the informational text How a Seeds Grow by Helene J. Jordan and illustrated by Loretta Krupinski. The text has a quantitative measure of 340 Lexile. This text has an accessible concept with literal meaning. It includes a step by step process in an informational format, content-specific vocabulary that is defined in context and through illustrations. The reader and task suggestions include having discussions about plants that have seeds, what seeds look like and sharing pictures of different seeds. Students then work in small groups and grow different seeds. The students observe the plants growing and discuss the similarities and differences at different growing stages. The students explain the entire lifecycle of a seed.
  • In Unit 5, Module A, students read the literary text King Kafu and the Moon by Trish Cooke illustrated by Andrea Castellani. 480 Lexile. This text is an accessible humorous story with a conventional narrative. The structure of the text includes a table of contents, three illustrated chapters, problem-solution, challenging vocabulary, simple sentences, figurative language, and exclamatory sentences. The reader and task suggestions include having the students observe the moon for a week before reading the story. The students then draw pictures of the moon and what they noticed about it, have the students share their observations. Students then sequence key events from the story. The students then write a sentence to go with pages from the text that have been photocopied and they must put them in order.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, students read the informational text Our World in Space, Planets by Erin Dealy. The text has a quantitative measure of 520 Lexile. This text is an accessible story about children in first grade, the text is illustrated which supports the text and key details and main idea are obvious. There are six sections, and introduction and conclusions, with some advanced vocabulary including geographical references to cultures, context clues are strong for word meaning, there are short simple sentences and possessive nouns. The reader and task suggestions include having students name planets they know and what they know about them. The students then create a mobile of the planets, making sure to label them and add details.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, students read the literary text One Classroom, Many Cultures by Elizabeth Massie. The text has a quantitative measure of 530 Lexile. This text has the theme of community which is accessible and the structure is conventional for a narrative. Dialogue throughout is mixed into simple, compound, and complex sentences with some topic-specific vocabulary, including geographical and cultural references. The reader and task suggestions include having students create an illustrated personal profile page, making sure to include sentences about what they like to do and their family’s traditions. The students then share their profiles with the class. Students create a venn diagram comparing and contrasting two children from the text. Students should use evidence from the text when discussing similarities and differences.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, students read the literary text Whose is This? by Narinder Dhami illustrated by Victor Taverse. The text has a quantitative measure of 490 Lexile. This is an accessible text that celebrates cultural diversity. It is a chronological, narrative, fictional story with an omniscient narrator, clear structure, illustrations to support the text and four chapters. There is culturally related vocabulary, multiple-meaning words, and some compound sentences. The reader and task suggestions include having a discussion about what a fair is and what is done at a fair. Students bring in an object from their culture. The class then tries to guess what the object is used for, the student shares the objects meaning.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation that materials support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence in grade-level skills. In the Grade 1 materials, the reading of texts is done by the teacher through a rich read aloud text. There are a variety of texts ranging in Lexile levels, but the texts do not increase from low to high. While the read aloud texts (anchor and supporting), fall within quantitative and qualitative measures, overall the texts do not provide students with access to increasing rigorous texts. However, with the reader and task considerations, the read aloud texts fall within all areas of text complexity and increase students’ comprehension skills throughout the school year.

Some examples that demonstrate supporting students’ increasing literacy skills include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Happy Endings, students hear and see a 360L text where the sentence length is 6.57. However, the text has applied figurative language which brings the reader and task to a higher level than being called out on the lexile.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, the teacher reads aloud The Recess Queen by Alexis O’Neill. This text contains a Lexile of AD450. Qualitatively, the text contains straightforward literal meaning. The text contains invented words. The theme is complex and requires Kindergarten students to understand friendships. Therefore, the Essential Question focuses on helping students understanding the theme: How do readers retell text to demonstrate understanding of the central message? In Lesson 7 of The Recess Queen, the teacher asks students to look at the cover illustration and make predictions about the character on the cover. After reading the text aloud, the teacher asks the following question to help students understand friendship: How does Katie Sue change the action of the story? In Lesson 12, the teacher helps students analyze characters’ actions in order to compare how the characters’ actions change from the beginning to the end of the text. The teacher models how the main character’s actions change and asks the students to talk in pairs about supporting character’s actions.
  • In Unit 3, texts range from 260L to 630L. The average sentence length is slightly higher at 6.8 to 12 words. Chronological events and dialogue, illustrations supporting each page, and an all-knowing narrator increase the rigor from Unit 1. In addition the reader tasks become more rigorous. Students are drawing illustrations, acting out understanding of money and its use, and writing a steps-in-a-process flow chart for a market product from source to purchase.
  • In Unit 6, texts range from 310L to 540L, with average sentence length from 5.75 to 10 words. The reader and task become more rigorous as students determine main idea and key details, and story structure (beginning, middle, end, introduction, and conclusion). The text also present texts with six sections and text with four chapters that provide additional challenge for first graders.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation that the anchor texts and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in for the grade level.

The anchor texts and supporting texts have a “Text Complexity Rubric” located on page TR48- TR54 under the Teacher Resources section of the Teacher Guide. The Text Complexity Rubric covers contains quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task measures. Quantitative metrics are provided for each anchor text in four categories: Lexile level, average sentence length, word frequency and page or word count. Qualitative measures are provided for each anchor text and supporting text in four categories: levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and theme and knowledge demands. Metrics provided for qualitative measures are in list form. Reader and Task Suggestions are in narrative form and provide teachers with suggestions for preparing all students to read the text as well as leveled tasks.

For example on page XVIII there is a page dedicated to what makes the text challenging using a qualitative analysis for the teacher to help with planning instruction.

  • Levels of meaning: informational texts on how a seed grows and developes into a plant
  • Structure: illustrations; explanatory structure including how-to direction; experiment
  • Language Conventionality and Clarity: simple straightforward explanatory sentences; some unfamiliar content-specific words; first- and second person pronouns refer to the reader and students pictured in the text
  • Knowledge Demands: Planting; gardening

The resources page also has a breakdown for the reader and task addressing different scaffolds students may need in accessing the complex text using the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook for English Language Learners, struggling readers, and accelerated readers. At the bottom of each rubric there is a reader and tak suggestion to help students access and understand the complex text.

An example from Unit 6: Reader and Task Suggestions “One Classroom, Many Cultures” pg TR48.

  • Preparing to Read the Text:Invite children to create an illustrated personal profile page, similar to those featured in the text. The profile should include several sentences about what the child enjoys doing and some of their family’s traditions. Children can share their profiles with the class.
  • Leveled Tasks: Work with children to create a Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting two children featured in the book. Children should make sure to use evidence from the text when discussing the similarities and differences.

At the beginning of each Module, teachers are provided with a Lexile and genre reminder about the upcoming text set. Lexiles and genres are listed for the anchor text and supporting texts. Lexiles are provided for the Sleuth texts and the Leveled Text Library. Within each unit and module, the texts are focused on a theme, which provides some rationale as to why the text was chosen.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations of anchor and supporting texts providing opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading, and there are supports to build students’ comprehension of grade level texts in a variety of shared read alouds, oral and silent reading.sleuth, leveled readers, e-text, and scaffold handbook. Students also have access to leveled readers which provided leveled support to help build first grade level reading proficiency. In addition, there are on grade level trade books and text selections, grade level small group “Sleuth” selections, independent reading books, and a student reader and I Can Read Selections at students’ reading levels.

Additionally, the program includes eTexts which includes all of the Teacher Guides, Anchor Texts, Supporting Texts, Leveled Readers, Scaffolding Resources, Games, Performance Based Assessment, and Foundational Skills lessons used in center based learning.

For teachers there is a routine section in the in the Teacher Guide under Teacher Resources that lays out routines the students partake in throughout the year to help build comprehension and reading fluency by the end of the year. These routines are found on page TR1 and they include: Think- Pair- Share, Whole Class Discussion, Small Group Discussion, Read Alouds, Shared Reading, Independent Reading, Text Club, and Informational and Literary Benchmark Vocabulary Routines.

Structures are built within the day to provide students with opportunities to practice silent and oral reading. Each day students engage in independent reading with a specific focus including building stamina and becoming independent readers. In addition, small group instruction each day either focuses on vocabulary, fluency, critical thinking or comprehension (Implementation Guide). Comprehension and vocabulary instruction dominates the small group instruction, but the few fluency lessons focus on a specific aspect of fluency such as phrasing, expression, and pacing. Students hear and see the teacher model reading the text and then practice using the same text. For example:

  • In Module B, Unit 4, students select a text to read. The teacher points out that the focus sills and engagement and identity and vocabulary knowledge. The teacher points out that they learned that authors provide clues in the details and pictures to help readers determine the meanings of unknown words. The teacher asks the students to select words that are difficult as they read, and identify how a struggling reader can use the supporting details and pictures to help determine the words’ meanings. The students record in their daily reading log; what they read, whether or not they enjoyed the book, why or why not, the author, title and number of pages they read.

A scaffolded strategies handbook is also provided, which gives teachers additional ways to teach the concepts to struggling learners and English language learners. In addition, throughout the teacher’s guide there are "if/then" sections which provide the teachers with concrete things to do when students do not understand the concept.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The Grade 1 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent and build towards a culminating tasks to integrates skills. The instructional materials provide multiple opportunities for evidence-based discussion that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and support student listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching. The materials include frequent opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Materials meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials reviewed provide many tasks and opportunities for evidence-based discussions and writing using evidence from texts to build strong literacy skills.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations of most questions, tasks, and assignments being text-based and requiring students to engage with the text directly. Students draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text using classroom conversation to help scaffold what the text is saying.

Explicit question examples include:

  • "What do the illustrations tell you about how Jean treats the other children? What do the other children think about Jean? Students will use the think pair routine to help them discuss where in the text the answer is found. (Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 8, The Recess Queen)
  • "How do the characters in each book feel about each other?” (Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 10, Stellaluna, Dragons and Giants)
  • “How are the Nigerian stand and the Indian stand on pages 14 and 15 alike? How are the stands different?” (Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 7, Whose is This)

Implicit question examples include:

  • "How does Katie Sue change the mood of the playground in the story?” (Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 12, The Recess Queen)
  • “Look at page 15. What sentence is repeated? Why do you think the author chose to repeat the line?” (Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 4, Arbor Day Square)
  • "How does Stellaluna feel about the birds in the end? Let’s read what she says. What does Stellaluna do to show how she feels about the birds? Show me in the pictures.” (Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 6, Stellaluna)

Many lessons have a Reading Analysis section where students are working toward a specific standard and engaging in either whole class or small group work to complete a task involving the text. The majority of lessons have a turn and talk after the students read, which requires the students to discuss something from the text. Most questions require students to engage with the text by referring back to the text for evidence or examining the text for author’s craft. For example, in the reading analysis section for Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1, the teacher models for the student how to identify story elements by completing a 3-column chart, character, setting and event. The students then complete a chart independently or by working in small groups. Also, in Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 3, students must refer back to the text, The Life Cycle of an Apple Tree, to answer “What did you read about how apples grow?”

Each lesson has small group activities which include several options for students to answer text-based questions. One example of small group through extension is under the Reading analysis extension activity in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 10 with the text, The Recess Queen. Students are asked to work in pairs to compare the characters Katie Sue from The Recess Queen and Tillie from A Fine, Fine School. The questions students are to consider are “What does Katie Sue do that none of the other children do?”, “What does Tillie do that none of the other children in her class do?”, and “How are Katie Sue and Tillie the same? How are they different?”

All lessons have a Close Reading section that includes 3-4 text-based questions. For example, in Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 10, A Picnic in October, students are directed to “Look at page 22. How can you use context clues to figure out what ‘Chow time’ means? What does it mean to ‘make a hands barrier’ to help keep the candles lit? How can you use context clues to figure out what Brave, Bella means?”

Additional materials that support students engaging with the text include:

  • In the Sleuth close reading materials, there is a gather evidence section for each close read which requires students to find evidence from the text.
  • The Reader's and Writer's Notebook provides evidence based questions.
  • The Baseline Assessment also includes evidence based questions.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations of containing sets of high-quality sequences of text dependent questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Every module offers a culminating task (performance-based assessment) where students write, draw, or dictate to a prompt. Many of the performance assessments at the end of each module and unit require the students to use evidence from the text they have read. The lessons and questions leading up to the task offer support to complete the task.

For example, students are asked to use the text from the lessons in Unit 4, Module A, students recall the importance of families in the stories that they read. Children write a narrative that tells a story about a family. Children write a narrative in which two or more events are properly sequenced using temporal words, include some descriptive details about the events, and provide some sense of closure to the story.

Text dependent questions and activities lead up to the following culminating tasks are included in the instructional materials:

  • Unit 1, Module A: Write about Friendship, Narrative Task- Children think about the friendship between the birds and Stellaluna. Then they illustrate and write sentences about how the characters showed their friendship when they first met and then later in the story.
  • Unit 1, Module B: Write Questions and Answers. Informative/Explanatory Task- Children use facts from Time to Sleep and What Do You Do With a Tail Like This? to write questions about animals.
  • Unit 2, Module A: Write About Classroom Citizens, Opinion Task- Children think about The Recess Queen and A Fine, Fine School and how characters acted as good classroom citizens. Children write their opinion about how good classroom citizens act and supply a reason for the opinion.
  • Unit 2, Module B: Write About Global Students, Informative/Explanatory Task- Children think about what they have learned about students from around the world. They choose one student from Far From Home or Going to School. Children compare and contrast their own school experiences with this student’s school experiences.
  • Unit 3, Module A: Write About Choices, Narrative Task- The selections in this unit are about choices and making decisions. Children write a short story about a choice they made to save or spend money.
  • Unit 3, Module B: Write About Making Choices. Opinion Task- In this module, children read about goods and services and how people make choices about which goods and services they purchase. As a class, children compose a list of goods (e.g. paper products) and services (e.g. butcher, baker) they find at their local grocery store. Then each child choose a good or service from the list that he or she feels is especially important and write his or her opinion about it. Children support their opinion with a reason.
  • Unit 4, Module A: Write a Family Story, Narrative Task- Children recall the importance of families in the stories they read. Children write a narrative that tells a story about a family.
  • Unit 4, Module B: Write Steps In A Sequence, Informative/Explanatory Task- Children use the information and features found in How a Seed Grows and The Life Cycle of an Apple Tree to write their own book explaining how a tree grows.
  • Unit 5, Module A: Write A Moon Story, Narrative Task- Children write a story that includes the moon as a central feature. It can be make-believe or realistic fiction. Encourage children to use King Kafu and the Moon and Let’s Visit the Moon for ideas and inspiration.
  • Unit 5, Module B: Write a Question-And-Answer Book, Informative- Children write a question-and-answer book about a planet or another element of the solar system. Children use Our World in Space: Planets and the Sun, as well as other texts, to write their questions and answers.
  • Unit 6, Module A: Write a Book Review, Opinion Task- Children write a review that states their opinion of one of the texts they have read. They include information from the text that helped them form their opinion.
  • Unit 6, Module B: Write An Opinion Piece, Opinion Task- Children think about the lost items they read about in Whose Is This? and decide which one they think was most interesting and why. They write their opinion and include information from the text that helped them form their opinion.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Examples of opportunities for students to have evidence based discussions include:

  • Close reading structures are included with discussion questions so that students respond to questions with evidence from the text (Implementation Guide p. 41). “Engage the class in a discussion about what you just read. Establishing agreed- upon rules for discussions, such as listening to others and taking turns speaking. Remind children that they can use words and pictures to help them understand the text. Use these questions to guide the discussion and confirm understanding of the text, and ask children to support their answers with evidence. This routine is found in every Unit.
  • Structures are provided for students to work in pairs or small groups to complete a graphic organizer. For example, children work together to identify the sequence of events and fill out a chart using the Small Group Discussion Routine on page TR10-TR11. (Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 13).
  • Students read aloud the sentence from the text with the word plow Using the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine for Literary Text on TR32-TR35 to teach the meaning of the word. Students discuss the words(Unit 4 Module A, Lesson 11).
  • Students read texts and write to share their opinion as to Goods and Services. They will create statements, support them with text (review topic, state an opinion, use supporting details, and move into their independent writing. There is an option to teach children about conventions and editing and then the students have an opportunity to share their writing with each other (Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 8).

Teacher Resources offers teachers a number of routines to provide opportunities for evidence-based discussions. For example:

  • Think-Pair-Share Routine: Included in this routine are suggestions for accountable talk such as "I agree with you" when discussing the text. The routine provides children with structured support as they engage in text- reliant conversations. Asking children thought- provoking questions to get them involved in richer text- based discussions. This routine is found on TR6-7.
  • Whole Class Discussion Routine: For example, " We are going to talk about this book together. Let’s focus on ____. If you have something to add to our conversation, raise your hand. Listen carefully to what your classmates say so you add new ideas." The purpose of this discussion routine is to have thoughtful conversations about texts and topics to provide opportunities for children to expand their oral vocabulary as they interact socially with their classmates. This routine is found on pages TR8-9.
  • Small Group Discussion protocol that assigns roles to each student in the group. The routine emphasizes that students should go back to the text to find evidence. The purpose of this routine is to allow individuals to practice and expand their oral vocabulary as they engage in thoughtful conversations about a topic or texts. This routine is found on pages TR10-TR11.
  • Read Aloud Routine: For example, "As I read aloud to you, listen carefully for moments when the main character reacts to challenges. I’ll stop on occasion for us to talk about what I’ve read." The purpose of this routine is to model fluent reading and allow children to take in new vocabulary through oral language conversations. This routine is found on pages TR12-TR13.
  • Text Club Routine: For example, " Text Clubs are your opportunity to work with classmates to read and discuss different texts. The Clubs will focus on a particular aspect of reading, and every group member will have a different role to play. After you read the text independently, you will meet with your Text Club to have meaningful discussions about it." This routine is found on pages TR 24-25.

Vocabulary routines are provided in Benchmark Vocabulary Routines for Informational and Literary Texts which are found in Teacher Resources. Following the Text Set information, teachers are also provided with more information about vocabulary in a section called Vocabulary to Unlock Text. This provides the teacher with Benchmark Vocabulary and Tier II and Tier III Words for the anchor text and supporting texts. During the speaking and listening routines, students engage with this practice with academic vocabulary.

The program promotes evidence based discussions and provides protocols for the discussion but lacks protocols in the routines to help students use vocabulary in their discussions. For example, stems for discussion to scaffold syntax are not present.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for supporting students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

Most lessons provide discussion protocols for turn and talks, whole group discussions, and small group discussions. There are opportunities in all of these routines for students to speak and listen about what they read. Collaborative routines are included in the daily lessons along with protocol explanations and discussion structures. This is found in the Teacher Resource section of the Teacher’s Guide.

Writing lessons provide opportunities for students to share their writing. For example, students read their opinions to the class about goods and services that are important to their families. (Unit 3, Module B, Performance Task).

In Sleuth, close reading materials, structures are included for students to gather evidence, ask questions regarding the text, use evidence to make a case, and prove their case to other students within their team, with all team members having a voice. At the end of each writing lesson, there are opportunities for students to share. For example, in Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 8, students are asked to read and answer questions from Pizza, Pizza Everywhere on pages 20-21 Sleuth. Then students will discuss questions with the group using text evidence to support their answer.” on page TR3 of the Teacher's Guide as students follow along.

The Performance Based Assessments at the end of each module, provide an opportunity for students to share their writing. For example, in Unit 1, Module A, children share their writing with the class. Students worked on writing about friendship. The audience members are encouraged to ask questions and provide feedback.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 1 meet the expectations of materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Explicit instruction guides students through the writing process, requiring them to analyze good writing models from the text sets they read. There are 6 Units and two Modules (A and B) within each unit. The 12 Lessons within each module focus on one type of writing. Each Module’s writing lessons are based on text(s) and offer a model for students as they write. On-demand writing occurs each day when students write to what they have read in various formats. Examples of writing include taking notes, short answer, or paragraph construction. Lessons are structured, so that by the end of the Module, students have addressed all components of the writing process..

Each module is structured the same way regarding process and on-demand writing. Representative examples of process writing include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 6, Informative / Explanatory Task: Using the text Going to School as a model, students write facts about a topic. The teacher instructs how facts are found in text that is true. In shared writing students are shown how to rewrite information in their own words. Scaffolds are provided as well as specific examples from the text to support students. Students work with a partner to orally tell two things learned from reading the text, then students individually draw an illustration of one the things they learned and write a sentence about it.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 2 , Narrative Writing: Students review the illustrations they drew in Lesson 1 showing the beginning and middle of The Winners’ Choice. Tell children that today they will use their illustrations to write about the event. Have students write one sentence about the beginning, and one sentence about the middle of the story on page 155 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.

On-demand writing occurs across the yearlong materials. Examples of on-demand writing appear in each Unit and typically provide practice with component skills as they build to a larger project. For example, their Performance Based Assessment at the end of each module allows for the opportunity for students to go back to the text, gather information, and synthesize the information into a written final project where they can draw, dictate, or write. Unit 2, Module B, has a performance based assessment in which the students were asked to compare and contrast their own school experiences with this student’s school experiences. Students must revisit the text to identify details to compare and contrast their own experiences to.

Many of the tasks listed are preparing students for process writing. On-demand writing occurs across the year long materials. Examples of on-demand writing appear in each Unit and typically provide practice with component skills as they build to a larger project. The examples in Unit 6 are indicative of the types of on-demand writing activities that take place in each Unit. For example, their Performance Based Assessment at the end of each module allows for the opportunity for students to go back to the text, gather information, and synthesize the information into a written final project where they can draw, dictate, or write. Unit 5, Module B, has a performance based assessment in which the students were asked to create an informative/explanatory question-and-answer book about a plant or another element of the solar system. Students use Our World in Space: Plants and The Sun as well as other texts to create their questions and are given prompts as to how to create these questions and what is required from them.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for providing opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards. Each lesson includes a writing lesson, and over the course of the school year, students engage with multiple genres and modes of writing.Writing rubrics that are aligned to the standards are provided for all types of writing in the Teacher's Guide.

Examples of writing prompts that address the different text types of writing and reflect the distribution required by the standards include:

  • Unit 1, Module A, Narrative: Students write about friendship between birds and Stellaluna. Students illustrate and write sentences about how the characters showed their friendship when they first met and then later in the story.
  • Unit 1, Module B, Informative/Explanatory: Students use facts from Time to Sleep and What Do you Do With a Tail Like This? to write questions and answers about animals.
  • Unit 2, Module A, Opinion: Students write about classroom citizens by thinking about The Recess Queen and A Fine, Fine, Fine School and how the characters acted as good classroom citizens. Students write their opinion about how good classroom citizens act and supply a reason for their opinion.
  • Unit 2, Module B, Informative/Explanatory: Students write about global students by thinking about what they have learned about students from around the world. Students choose one student from Far From Home or Going to School. Students compare and contrast their own school experiences with this student’s school experiences.
  • Unit 3, Module A, Narrative: Students write about choices using the selections from this unit (that were about choices and making decisions). Students write a short story about a choice they made to save or spend money.
  • Unit 3, Module B, Opinion: Students write about making choices using the texts they used in this module about goods and services and how people make choices in addition to which goods and services they purchase. As a class, children compose a list of goods and services they find at their local grocery story. Then, each child choose a good or service from the list that he or she feels is especially important and write his or her opinion about it. Students support their opinion with a reason.
  • Unit 4, Module A, Narrative: Students write a family story by recalling the importance of families in the stories they read. Students write a narrative that tells a story about a family.
  • Unit 4, Module B, Informative/Explanatory: Students write steps in a sequence using information and features found in How a Seed Grows and The Life Cycle of an Apple Tree to write their own book explaining how a seed grows.
  • Unit 5, Module A, Narrative: Students write a moon story that includes the moon as a central feature. It can be make believe or realistic fiction. Students are encouraged to use King Kafu and the Moon and Let’s Visit the Moon for ideas and inspiration.
  • Unit 5, Module B, Informative/Explanatory: Students write a question,and,answer book about a planet or another element of the solar system. Students use Our World in Space: Planets and The Sun, as well as other texts, to write their questions and answers.
  • Unit 6, Module A, Opinion: Students write a book review that states their opinion of one of the texts they have read. Students include information from the text that helped them form their opinion.

Unit 6, Module B, Opinion: Students write an opinion piece thinking about the lost items they read about in Whose Is This? and decide which one they think is the most interesting and why. Students write their opinion and include information from the text that helped them form their opinion.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for the materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level. Students are taught each day to carefully analyze and synthesize sources and defend claims as part of Whole Group Writing instruction. Each writing lesson focuses on a writing mode that is specified in the Common Core Standards. The Reading and Writing Journal (RWJ) frequently provides “Write in Response to Reading” prompts. Students are required to gather and use evidence from the text to support their responses.

Opportunities for evidence-based writing in the instructional materials include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 5, students brainstorm activities, games, or other adventures that Frog and Toad might do together as friends. Students use that list to help them draw a picture that shows the characters doing something together and write a sentence about Frog and Toad’s friendship.
  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 8, students work with a partner to review the questions asked in What Do You Do With a Tail Like This? Together they discuss one of the questions and practice answering it, using information about each of the animals mentioned in the text. Each student draws a picture of one the the animals, writes a question based on the information given about the animal, and writes an answer to their question.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 3, children write an opinion and support the opinion using evidence from the text, about one of the characters other than Mr. Keen in A Fine, Fine School.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 2, students are asked to review illustrations they drew in Lesson 1 showing the beginning and middle of the The Winners Choice. Children use their illustrations to write about the events. Children write one sentence about the beginning and one sentence about the middle of the story.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 2, students review their opinion they wrote in lesson 1 and answer the question, “Are goods or service more important?” Students use the chart from lesson 2 to write a supporting reason.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 4, students brainstorm questions they have about planets, including questions that can be answered in Our World in Space: Planets or questions that require additional sources. Print and digital sources are provided so that students can gather information that answer their questions.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 10, students review and revise their work from their book review of King Kafu and the Moon before it is published. Teachers explain that authors read what they have written to see if it makes sense and to see if the writing should be changed. Questions that writers ask include: Are my opinions supported by reasons? Does my writing make sense?--If it doesn’t, what do I need to change or add so that it does? Students read aloud their drafts from the previous lesson, circling any errors and identifying one or two sentences to which they can add details.

Performance-Based Assessments (PBA) are assigned at the end of each module. These include writing projects where students use the anchor text and the major writing skill from the module in order to respond to questions to synthesize learning. These projects lead students to analyze and synthesize the texts they have read. For example, in the Unit 4, Module A, students recall the importance of families in the module’s texts that they have read. Students then write a narrative that tells a story about a family.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of the context.

Grammar lessons align to the Grade 1 Common Core State Standards for Language.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, students are taught to print uppercase and lowercase letters, spell words phonetically, write complete sentences, use end punctuation (periods, question marks, exclamation points), capitalize sentences, capitalize names of people, and write complete sentences.
  • In Unit 1, Module B, students are taught to identify and use nouns, use common and proper nouns, use plural nouns, and use the to be verb (is and are).
  • In Unit 2, Module A, students are taught to identify and use commas in a series, use verb tense (past, present, future) capitalize, use quotation marks, use adjectives, use commas, use indefinite and possessive pronouns, use personal pronouns I and me, and use conjunctions.
  • In Unit 2, Module B, students are taught to: identify and use verbs to tell about the present, personal and possessive pronouns, use singular and plural pronouns, use prepositions, use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs, use singular and plural pronouns, use proper nouns, use capitalization and punctuation, and use articles.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, students are taught to use personal pronouns, use possessive pronouns, use adjectives, use possessive nouns, use conjunctions, produce and expand compound sentences, use root words and their inflectional forms, use commas in a series, use past, present, and future tense verbs, and use demonstratives.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, students are taught to use indefinite pronouns, use common and proper nouns, use root words and their inflectional forms, use adjectives that compare, forms of the to be verb, use subject-verb agreement, use prepositions, and use past, present, and future tense verbs.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, students are taught to use irregular past tense verbs, use nouns with matching verbs, and expand simple and compound sentences.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, students are taught to use singular and plural nouns, use verbs with singular and plural nouns, write declarative sentences, periods and question marks, prepositions in phrases.
  • In Unit 5, Module A, students are taught to use imperative sentences, spell words with common patterns, identify affixes as clues to meaning, capitalize dates and use commas, and spell frequently occurring words
  • In Unit 5, Module B, students are taught to spell irregular words and common spelling patterns, and use subject/verb agreement.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, students are taught to produce and expand imperative, interrogatory and exclamatory sentences, use commas in dates, use determiners, and capitalize dates.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, students are taught to write compound sentences, place commas in dates and series.

Grammar lessons require students to practice the skill in and out of context:

  • For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 11, students use the personal pronouns I and me. The teacher models and reviews that a pronoun takes the place of a noun. Partners work together to practice using the pronouns I and me. Students are provided sentence frames and orally state the sentences.
  • For example, in Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 9, students capitalize proper nouns referring to particular places. The teacher models the names of particular places are proper nouns and they always begin with a capital letter. Students then write the provided sentence and identify the words that need to be capitalized.

For each grammar lesson, there is additional practice in the Reader's and Writer's Journal. This practice may or may not be in context. The Reading/Writing Journal includes lessons specific to the conventions of writing and provides students with on-demand writing tasks.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
18/22
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and multimodal practice to address the acquisition of print concepts including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).Materials meet expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.Materials partially meet the expectations that materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported. While there are many assessment opportunities of foundational skills, explicit instructions and guidance on how to address foundational skills with students are minimal. Materials partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Instructional materials provide students with frequent opportunities to learn and understand phonemes. In the Foundational Skills section of each unit’s Teacher’s Guide, one finds phonemic awareness activities on Day 1 and Day 3 of each week. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1, the teacher shows the Picture Card apple. “The sound I hear at the beginning of apple is /a/. The sound /a/ is called the short a sound.” The teacher then shows the cat Picture Card. “Cat has /a/ in the middle. The short a sound can be at the beginning or at the middle of the word.” The teacher helps students name other objects that have the sound /a/. For the practice section of the lesson, the teacher shows the ant Picture Card and states, “There are three sounds in ant: /a/ /n/ /t/. The first sound in ant is /a/. I am going to say a word. If you hear the /a/ sound at the beginning of the word raise your hands.” Then the teacher states other words contain /a/ and words not containing /a/.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 1, the teacher teaches oi and oy. “Listen to the words coin and toy. Say the words with me: coin, toy. The word coin has the vowel sound /oi/ in the middle. The word toy ends with the vowel sound /oi/. What is the vowel sound in coin and toy?” For the practice section, the teacher states, “Listen to the sounds in the word join: /j/ /oi/ /n/. Let’s blend those sounds to make a word: /j/ /oi/ /n/, join.” The teacher then guides the students to segment and blend the sounds in point and boy.

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words. The foundational skills section contains phonics activities for Day 1 and Day 3 of each week and decoding activities for Day 2 and Day 4 of each week. Examples include the following:

  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 3: Foundational Skills Mini-Lesson
    • Inflectional Ending –ing
    • “Listen to these sounds; /g/, /i/, /v/, /i/, /ng/. Let’s blend the sounds that make the word.” Repeat with leaving and taking.
    • Show Sound-Spelling Card 126. “The letters ing stand for the sounds /i/, /ng/.” Write ticking. Segment and blend the word. Have children blend with you.
    • Write these words: hopping, mixing, tapping, picking. Have children segment and blend the words.
    • More explicit instruction is found on p. FS16 in the Teacher's Guide.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 12: Foundational Skills Mini-Lesson
    • Inflected Ending -es; Plural -es
    • Preview: Distribute Decodable Practice Reader 15A. Ask children to read the title and words on p. 183. Then have children preview the story. Remind them that they will read words with inflected ending -es and plural -es.
    • Decoding in Context: Have pairs of children read the story, switching readers after each page. Monitor as they decode.
    • Fluency: Have children reread Decodable Practice Reader 15A to develop automatically decoding words with inflected ending -es and plural -es.

Students receive decoding lessons around student readers to help students build understanding of letter and sounds toward reading standards.

  • An example of a shared read comes from Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 12. The teacher distributes the Decodable Practice Reader 21A “Sloan’s Goat.” In addition, the teacher asks the students to read the title listed words on page 49. Then children preview the story. Reminding the students that they will read words with long o spelled oa or ow. Students work in pairs reading the story switching readers each page. The teacher monitors the students reading. Students reread the same Decodable Practice Reader to develop automaticity decoding words with vowel digraphs oa and ow.
  • In Unit 4, Module A Lesson 1 students study the vowel sounds of y. The teacher displays the Sound Spelling Card 77 and has students point to the y. The long e sound can be spelled with a y. However, the long I sound can also be spelled with a y. Students practice with the words cry and bunny and word from page 225 of their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. In addition, students write the words: muddy, try, puppy, shy, pony, my, handy, try, fuzzy, dandy, dry. Have children blend the words. Children use the Letter Tiles to spell the words with the long i or long e vowel sound with the sound of y.

The sequence of phonics begins with the sounds of the 26 letters in Unit 1, Module A and Unit 1, Module B. Short vowels are taught in Unit 2 as well as inflected endings (-s, -ing) and consonant blends. In Unit 3, consonant digraphs are taught as well as long vowels. In Unit 4, r-controlled vowels are taught as well as endings (-es, -er, -est). Vowel digraphs are taught in Unit 5. In Unit 6, diphthongs, vowel patterns, and syllable patterns are taught.

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

Materials include frequent and adequate lessons and multimodel tasks and questions about the organization of print concepts (e.g. recognize features of a sentence). There are routines for informational and literary text found in the teacher resources. These routines are referred to in the Teacher’s Guide to be explained and discussed with students. In these routines, basic print concepts are reviewed, such as title, author, illustrator, etc. Other examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 1: Introduce the Book Stellaluna. Use this time to review and model basic print concepts, including proper book orientation and arrangement of print on the page.
  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 3: Display p. 2 of Time to Sleep. Discuss the types of sentences. “The first two lines of text are grouped together. The writer uses two types of sentences: a question and a statement. Which type of sentence does the writer use first? The second sentence is a question. How are the two sentences related? Look at the third and fourth sentences. First, the writer asks if the reader sleeps on one leg. Then what does the writer do?
  • In the Foundational Skills Lessons, opportunities to learn to recognize distinguishing features of a sentence includes only general instructions for teachers. For example, in Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 7, the decoding lesson states: Ask children to identify the beginnings and ends of the sentences on p. 199.

Materials provide students with frequent and adequate opportunities to identify text structures (e.g. main idea and details, sequence of events, problem and solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect). Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 3: After students have completed their drawing showing a government service, have them find another service in the text. Have students draw and label that service. Have students work with partners to answer the following questions: How is a government service different from another kind of service? How do we pay for government services?
  • In Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 4: Explain that the events in a story often include problems and solution. “I see on page 11 that the guard tells the villagers that the moon is disappearing. I remember that this makes King Kafu upset, so this is a problem in the story. How does King Kafu decide to fix the problem? I see at the bottom of the page that King Kafu says he will give money to anyone who can bring him the moon. This is King Kafu’s solution, or answer to the problem.” Have students work in small groups to identify the problem and solution on p. 12-13. Have students draw or write the problem and solution in their graphic organizers. Then have them discuss.

Materials include frequent and adequate lesson and activities about text features (e.g. byline, title, headings, table of contents, glossary, pictures, illustrations). Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 2: Display the table of contents of Time to Sleep. Explain that a table of contents is a type of text feature. “The table of contents shows the chapter titles and on what page number each chapter begins.” Ask students to look for words that are capitalized in the table of contents. Explain that the words in the table of contents are capitalized because they are chapter titles. Ask students to think about how features in information texts help readers understand the main topic, how the organization helps writers explain information. “In this lesson, we are going to use text features to find information in this book.” Have students partner up and discuss after reading the story, How many sections are in this book? How can you find out?
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 9: Explain to students that informational texts often include text features such as table of contents, headings, and a glossary. “Let’s use the chart to record the information that the text features in The Sun provide. What information is given in the Table of Contents? How are the headings used in the Table of Contents? How is a glossary like a dictionary? How is it different?” Have students find these features in The Sun. Have them complete the Text Features T-Chart.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

Students have opportunities to purposefully read on-level text in core materials over the course of a year. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 2, students practice reading grade-level text while practicing appropriate rate. During small group time, students listen to the teacher model appropriate rate while reading A Fine, Fine School by Sharon Creech. The teacher reviews why a reader would not want to read too slowly or too quickly. Then students take turns reading aloud a portion of an appropriately leveled text at an appropriate rate.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 6, students practice reading grade-level text while practicing appropriate phrasing. The teacher explains that appropriate phrasing means correctly pausing and chunking text based on punctuation cues and phrasing to help the listener understand the context. The teacher models reading with appropriate phrasing with How a Seed Grows. Then students take turns reading aloud a portion of an appropriately leveled text using appropriate phrasing.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 12, students students practice reading grade-level text while practicing reading with expression. The teacher has the students follow along while they read A Picnic in October. The teacher will pick a passage that includes dialogue to model varying their voice between characters. Students will practice reading with expression from a leveled text.

Materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and decodable words. Examples include:

  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 2, students read Decodable Practice Reader 16A. Students read the title and words on p. 217. Students are reminded that they will read words with inflected endings (-ed, -ing). Students read the text in pairs and switch readers after each page. The teacher monitors as students decode. Students also reread Decodable Practice Reader 16A to develop automaticity decoding words with inflected endings.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 11, students read Decodable Practice Reader 27A. Students read the title and the words on p. 193. Students preview the story and are reminded that they will read words with the vowel sound they hear in foot. Students read the text in pairs and switch readers after each page. The teacher monitors as students decode. Students also reread Decodable Practice Reader 27A to develop automaticity decoding words with the vowel sound in foot.

Materials support reading of texts with attention to reading strategies such as rereading, self-correction, and the use of context clues. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 8, students are taught about using context clues. The teacher models using context clues by stating: “We can use clues in the text to determine unknown words. For example, the word swung on page 33 might be an unknown word. Now let’s find some clues to help us figure out what that word means. First, I know the children are on a playground. That’s a clue. I’ll write that in the second column. If I keep looking through the book, I see on page 41 that Katie Sue swung and she is holding a bat” (p. 84). Students practice using context clues by trying to find context clues to figure out kicked and bounced.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 1, students are taught to use context and pictures to help understand words. The teacher models by saying “We are going to learn how readers can use other words on a page and pictures to understand new words. Look at the cover and title of The Life Cycle of an Apple Tree. How do the cover pictures relate to the title?” Students will practice using pictures and headings to help understand the key details in the text.

Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 12, students practice reading irregularly spelled words such as puts, the, for, many, under, are, little, work, they, to, a, said. The teacher is to say: “Some words we learn by remembering the letters.” Then students are to say and spell each word, first with the teacher and then without the teacher.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 2, students practice reading irregularly spelled words such as puts, the, find, are, two, a, into, looks, people. The teacher says: “Some words we learn by remembering the letters.” The teacher has the students say and spell the words, first with them and then by themselves.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations that instructional expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 1, students receive instruction in phonemic awareness. Students are learning the sounds /m/, /s/, /t/. Using the picture card moon, students are practicing hearing and saying the beginning sound /m/, this is repeated with the picture card sun and sound /s/ and with the picture card ten, sound /t/. Then students raise their hands when they hear the /m/ sound at the beginning of a word, teacher says man, cat, mouse, mop, rock. The process is repeated for the /s/ and /t/ sounds.
    • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 2, high-frequency words are part of instruction. Students are exposed to cards with the word, I. They are told that such words are learned by remembering the letters. Students respond by using the words in their own sentences.
    • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 8, phonics is part of instruction. Students are introduced to the short /a/ sound. Students say the sounds in pan, then write the letters. The teacher tells the students that they hear /a/ in the middle of pan, this stands for the short vowel a. Teacher displays pictures cards with the short /a/ sound, students say the name of the pictures. Students then complete p. 22 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Children write and spell the words nap, man, tap, pat.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 1, phonics is part of instruction. Students are practicing the skills of added endings -ed, -ing. Teacher displays the sound spelling card 121, explaining that the word is flipped, which is made from the base word flip and the ending -ed is added. This is continued with the words swimming and spotted. Students then complete pg. 264 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Students are asked to practice and apply their skills by identifying the root words and then using letter tiles to add -ing or -ed endings.
    • Lesson 2 high-frequency words are part of instruction. Students are exposed to cards with the word, do, could, a, people, look, you, was, good, into. They are told that such words are learned by remembering the letters. Students respond by using the words in their own sentences.
    • Lesson 12 decoding is part of instruction. Students read decodable practice reader 18 A The Hardest Job. Students will be reading words with comparative endings -er, -est.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 1, phonics is part of instruction. Students are learning the diphthongs ow, ou. Teacher displays the sound spelling card 98. Students practice with the word now, loud, brown, cloud, etc. Then they complete p. 375 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Students use letter tiles to practice spelling words with the diphthongs ou, ow.
    • In Lesson 2, high-frequency words are part of instruction. Students are exposed to cards with the word, puts, the, find, are, two, a, into, looks, people. They are told that such words are learned by remembering the letters. Students respond by using the words in their own sentences.
    • In Lesson 7, decoding is part of instruction. Students read decodable practice reader 26A Puppy Roundup. Students will be reading words with -ow, -ou. Students will develop automaticity with decoding words with the vowel patterns -ow,-ou.

Every lesson contains Small Group Options, Steps 1 and 2. Within Step 1, there is a Process and Strategy focus. Each lesson has one Process and one Strategy focus that is selected for that day’s lesson. Within the Strategy focus, there is a word recognition and decoding focus which is related to the Foundational Skills instruction time where children apply phonics strategies to decode new words. For example:

  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 3, Teacher’s Guide p. 34 – Strategy Focus is Decoding and Word Recognition: Children point to the words with the consonant-vowel pattern in their book and read the words aloud to you. Children can also log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed in their book. For further guidance, see the Independent Reading Routine on pp. TR12-TR19 in the Teacher’s Guide.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 5, Teacher’s Guide p. 205 – Strategy Focus is Decoding and Word Recognition: Students point to words with the –er or –or endings they found in their book. Have them read the words aloud to you. Children can also log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed for their book. For further guidance, see the Independent Reading Routine on pp. TR12-TR19.


Within Step 2, there is a Phonics focus which guides the teacher to the Foundational Skills section of the Teacher’s Guide to guide instruction for helping students that struggled with the week’s foundational phonics skills.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported. While there are many assessment opportunities of foundational skills, explicit instructions and guidance on how to address foundational skills with students are minimal.

Multiple assessment opportunities are available in core materials allowing students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills. Examples include:

The Assessment Book in the Teacher’s Guide gives an overview of the program’s assessment system. The program includes four main parts to its assessment system; baseline assessments, formative assessments, performance-based assessments and summative assessments. The guide provides teachers with the protocols for administering the assessments and includes rubrics for scoring.

  • The Baseline Assessment is used to determine each student's instructional needs in the areas of foundational skills, comprehension, vocabulary, and writing. This assessment is given at the beginning of the year to guide and scaffold instruction to meet the needs of all learners.
    • The Baseline Assessments starts with Letter Recognition. An example of the questions asked are: “I am going to ask you to find some letters. I will say a letter, and you will find the letter and draw a circle around it. Look at the letters in row 1, find the letter H, draw a circle around the letter H. This section asks students to identify both uppercase and lowercase letters.
    • The next section is Phonics-Initial Consonants. An example of the questions asked are: “Look at the picture in the first row by the square. It is a nest. Circle the letter for the sound that begins the word nest. Which letter begins the word nest?”
    • Another section is Phonics-Vowel Sounds. An example of the questions asked are: “Look at the picture by the 8. It is a bat. Look at the words in the row. Circle the word that has the same middle sound as bat...bat.”
    • The final foundational skills section is Word Recognition. An example of the questions asked are: “Look at the words by the 3. Listen to this sentence: You can play with me. Circle the word you...you.”
    • The baseline assessment includes a Phonemic Awareness individual test. It measures Initial and Final Consonant Sounds, Segmenting Words, and Blending Words.
  • Formative Assessments are integrated into every module. They include Fluency Checks and Foundational Skills Check Progress.
    • Fluency Checks examples include:
      • Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1: Use the Oral Reading Fluency Quick Check. Model reading accurately using A Fine, Fine School. There are detailed instructions on how to administer a fluency assessment can be found in The Assessment Book a Teacher’s Guide.
    • Foundational Skills Check Progress examples include:
      • Unit 1: Phonics: Circle the name of the picture. Picture of fan, circle fan. Read the sentences “The bug was big.” (High-Frequency Words).
      • Unit 6: Read the sentence. Fill in the circle for the answer. “The large hawk flew down from the tall tree. Which word has the same vowel sound as tall? Fill in the circle for the word that completes the sentence. “Did you____ the hat you lost?” here, looks, find.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding and support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward foundational skills. The assessments and progress checks are very predictable and generic. They lack explicit instructions/guidance on how to address the skills students are missing in order to demonstrate mastery in foundational skills. Examples include:

  • In each Foundational Skills Check Progress, there is a box that says Monitor Progress. In Unit 1: If students have trouble reading words with consonants and short vowels, then reteach the lesson that targets the skill children have difficulty with. If a child cannot read the high-frequency words, then reteach the high-frequency word sections of each lesson and have the child practice reading the words with a fluent reader.
  • After each assessment from the Assessment Book, there is a section that is labeled Using the Assessment Results to Inform Instruction. An example, is after the Baseline Assessment the guide states: It is recommended that you compare test results for each student only with the scores of others in your class. This will allow you to inform future instruction by examining general trends in the student’s grade-level knowledge and abilities. You can use the results from each section to identify students who are on grade level, those who need more support and those who could benefit from additional challenge and to establish a “starting point” for individualized instruction for each child.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills.While students have opportunities to practice grade-level foundational skill components, the guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting is general suggestions often in the form of if, then statements. The guidance frequently suggested is remodeling and rereading, which are not specific differentiation suggestions to assist students in working toward mastery of foundational skills.

Materials provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for students to reach mastery of foundational skills. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 1: Display the sound-spelling card 15. Point to M. “The letter m stands for the sound /m/, which you hear at the beginning of mountain.” Students will say /m/ several times as the teacher points to the letter m. The teacher will continue with the letter s, and t. The teacher writes the word mat. “Say this word with me, mat. What is the first sound in mat? What letter stands for the sound /m/? Let’s all write the letter m.”
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 7: Students get decodable practice reader 11A June and Pete. Students read the title and words on p. 97, then they preview the story. They are reminded that they will read words with long u and long e in a vowel-consonant-vowel pattern. Students read the story in pairs and reread for fluency.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 11: “Listen to this word, wood. The middle sound I hear in wood is /u/. The end sound is /d/. Sound out the word with me, /w/ /u/ /d/, wood. Listen to the sounds in the word cook, /c/ /u/ /k/.” Students will segment and blend other words, hoof, look, hood.

Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides support at the module level for all learners. More specifically, it is designed to provide differentiation for English language Learners, struggling readers, students with disabilities, and accelerated learners.

Differentiation in instruction is also provided in Quick Check boxes to guide teachers with “if” “then” statements. These statements offer general suggestions for differentiation. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 6, Teacher’s Guide p. 217:
    • Quick Check: Monitor Progress - If….children mispronounce words as they read, then….have them practice reading aloud with a partner who can help them pronounce the words correctly. If...children are skipping or adding words as they read, then...have them point to each word as they read it aloud to ensure they do not miss or add any words.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 7, Teacher’s Guide p. 87:
    • Quick Check: Monitor Progress - If...children are reading slowly, then...have them practice reading aloud with a partner who can provide cues for the reader to speed up. If...children are reading too quickly...then, remind them to slow down so that it is easier for listeners to understand what they are saying.
  • In Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 7, Teacher’s Guide p. 77:
    • Quick Check: Monitor Progress- If...children do not pause for punctuation, then...have them point to each punctuation mark on the page. Remind them that it is important to pause when they come to these marks. If...children group words incorrectly, then...read the words in groups and have children repeat after you.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 4, Teacher’s Guide p. 197:
    • Quick Check: Monitor Progress - If...children are reading too slowly, then...encourage them to practice the passage several times. If...children are rushing and reading too quickly, then...remind them to read at a speed that the listener can understand.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

Grade 1 instructional materials meet expectations for building knowledge with texts, vocabulary, and tasks. The instructional materials support the building of knowledge through repeated practice with appropriate grade-level complex text organized around a topic. Vocabulary is addressed in each module, though academic vocabulary is not built across multiple texts. There is evidence of the materials providing coherently sequenced questions and tasks to support students in developing literacy skills. Culminating tasks require students to read, discuss, analyze, and write about texts while students participate in a volume of reading to build knowledge. Modules are developed to support and build knowledge, integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening to demonstrate grade-level literacy proficiency at the end of the school year.

Criterion 2a - 2h

28/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for texts being organized around a topic/ topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Texts are connected by a grade-level appropriate topic. Each module in every unit is built around a topic. In each module, there are anchor and supporting texts centered around the topic. Examples include:

  • Unit 1: Connecting Our World
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand the theme around survival through adaptation, friendship, and the appreciation of differences.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand how animals and people sleep.
  • Unit 2: Becoming a Classroom Citizen
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand the theme of a story.
    • In Module B, students are expected to identify with a young boy that moves and adapts to new places, new schools, all with the embedded use of Chinese culture.
  • Unit 3: Making Choices
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand helping others is needed to make good choices.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand how producers and consumers interact to provide goods and services that create an economy.
  • Unit 4: Planting for the Future
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand growth, tradition, and change.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand specific facts about how apple trees grow from a seed to an apple.
  • Unit 5: Observing Messages of the Natural World
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand that you can still be brave yet afraid at the same time.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand information about the planets and their place in our solar system.
  • Unit 6: Celebrating Diversity
    • In Module A, students are expected to understand the similarities and differences between children described in the text, cultural diversity, and diversity enriching classroom.
    • In Module B, students are expected to understand how friends celebrate cultural diversity.

Texts build knowledge, vocabulary, and the ability to read/listen and comprehend complex texts across a school year. In each lesson there is a benchmark vocabulary section taught. Benchmark vocabulary words are important for understanding concepts within a text. These words are needed to deeply comprehend a text and central to understanding the text. There is a Benchmark Vocabulary Routine included for teaching students the meaning of words. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 3, the benchmark vocabulary words are limb, land, and perched. The teacher uses the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine to teach the meaning of the words, the students use p. 7 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the words.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 8, the benchmark vocabulary word are shiny and bossy. The teacher uses the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine to teach the meaning of the words, the students use p. 172 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the words.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 11, the benchmark vocabulary words are cloth, competition, and believe. The teacher uses the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine to teach the meaning of the words, the students use p. 443 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the words.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for containing sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.

Each lesson includes a Language or Reading Analysis section in which students analyze language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. Language or Reading Analysis is also included in some small group lessons. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 4, students use the Story Sequence, a graphic organizer on p. TR37 to retell the story. They go back into the text Dragons and Giants on pp. 6 and 7 to figure out what happens at the beginning of the story. They are then guided to go through the rest of the text to complete the chart thinking about what Frog and Toad are doing and what they decided to do (in sequence).
  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 9, students look for information that is alike and different to help make connections and better understand the text. They complete the Compare and Contrast graphic organizer about how the two schools in Russia and South Africa are alike and different.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 2, students work on filling out a Three- Column Graphic Organizer filling out text features (headings, bold words, photographs). The explicit instruction around text features helps students better understand the boldfaced words or academic vocabulary. Once modeling the first three boxes students then work collaboratively in a small group to complete the graphic organizer.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 7, students tell about stories and informational texts. During the language analysis support section of small group time, the teacher helps children use the T-chart to find examples of ways the Author’s Note (information) and (story) in Arbor Day Square are different. Stories tell about a setting. In the left column, What setting does the story tell about? Facts are in the right column: In the first sentence on p.30, students identify facts.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 4, students work on clarifying meaning of unknown words completing a word web. Through the use of questions and answers around each part of the web students build a deeper conceptual understanding of the word and or term float away.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, Lesson 11, students tell about stories and informational texts. A T-chart helps students find examples of ways Whose Is This? And L is for Liberty are different. Both texts tell about people who come from different places to live in America. Whose Is This? Tells about made-up characters from different places who are at a
    culture fair in a made-up town. How does- L is for Liberty-tell about people from different places?

The Scaffolded Instruction Handbook also includes lessons to support the unit lessons. Examples include:

  • Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 7, references using the Scaffolded Instruction Handbook to provide support with vocabulary. Students are guided to understand how producers earn money and then become consumers when they spend the money they earn. Students then use play money and props to act out the earning, buying, and spending money process to connect with the text.
  • Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 11, references using the Scaffolded Instruction Handbook, where students who are having difficulty with inferencing are guided through extra practice. The teacher reminds students they can use details from the text to make inferences about how a character feels. They look back at p. 14 about another character in the story and discuss how his feelings at the beginning of the story help children to understand how he feels when he seems them on the island on p. 33.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for containing a coherently sequenced set of text-based questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Most sets of coherent questions and tasks support students’ analysis of knowledge and ideas. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 9, students read the text Stellaluna and study how writers understand that pictures and words about events help tell a story. They can improve their comprehension by identifying story elements. Students turn and talk to answer the question, “How does Mother Bat recognize Stellaluna?” During the second read (Close Read), students cite evidence to focus on events in the middle of the story on pp. 30-33. Readers look for details in the words and illustrations to better understand the story. Students are asked, “Who is Stellaluna talking to? What makes the other bat come talk to Stellaluna? Let’s read together what the other bat says. Why is the bat so interested in what Stellaluna has to stay? What does ‘Wrong for a bird, maybe, but not for a bat’ mean? When can something be wrong in one situation but not in another? How does the illustration on p. 31 help readers understand the conversation Stellaluna has with the other bat? and Show me in the picture, which bat is Stellaluna?”.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 3, students read the text Goods and Services to understand that an opinion should be supported with a reason and focus on finding the main topic of the text which is what the text is mostly about. Students focus on the fact that readers understand asking and answering questions helps them understand the text. Students turn and talk about what they read on page 5 and discuss questions and use pictures to help them better understand the text. Students cite evidence to focus on the various structures and features that readers use to understand a text. Students answer questions using the text to cite and support their answers that include the following: “What kind of service do you see most often in the community?”

Sets of questions and tasks provide opportunities to analyze, describe, compare/contrast, and explain across multiple texts as well as within single texts. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lessons 11 and 12, students analyze and answer questions across the texts Far from Home and Going to School. Students compare and contrast key details using words and pictures. Students discuss questions the following questions, “How are the schools in these texts alike and different? What do children in China, Afghanistan, and Australia do during recess? How is recess in these places similar? In what ways are Bryan, Maria, and Rosita similar? and In what ways are these children different?”
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 5, using the text The Winners Choice, pp. 20-21 students analyze and answer questions across the text in their Reading Analysis Extension portion of the lesson to extend their learning. Partners turn to pp. 20-21 and work together to find details in the words and pictures that tell about the setting on these pages. The following questions guide the partner discussion, “Where does this part of the story take place? Point to the sentence in the text that helped you figure this out. When does this part of the story take place? How do you know? How is the soccer field damaged by the earthquake? and Point to details in the words and picture that tell you this.”
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lessons 12 and 13, students analyze, compare and contrast, and answer questions across the texts Arbor Day Square pp. 24-29, and The Family Tree pp. 7-9, 22-41. Students re-read parts of these stories to compare and contrast important ideas and details in the books. The teacher notes that when students compare and contrast, they tell how things are alike and different. Students discuss questions that include, “Why are the trees in the books special? How are Katie’s family and the boy’s family alike? How are these families different? Point to details in the texts that help you understand how the families are alike and different. How is the Grandma tree similar to the family tree? What can you tell me about the townspeople in Arbor Day Square? Let’s look for details that support this idea (students look at p. 24, 29 to find supporting details). How are workers in The Family Tree and the townspeople in Arbor Day Square alike? and How are the workers and townspeople different?”
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 1, using the text Our World in Space, pp. 32-43, students analyze and answer questions. The following questions are asked, “What does the chapter heading on p. 34 tell readers? Show me where it says so. What does the chapter heading on p. 34 tell readers? Show me where the text says so.What do you notice about the text on p. 35? Look at p. 36. How does the chapter heading relate to the text? What can you observe in the night sky? What are the lights in the night sky? and What information have you learned about plants so far?”

By the end of the year, integrating knowledge and ideas is embedded in students’ work through tasks and/or culminating tasks. Every module includes a culminating performance-based assessment where students write, draw, or dictate to a prompt. Many of the performance assessments at the end of each module and unit require the students to use evidence from the texts they have read. The lessons and questions leading up to the task offer support to complete the task. For example, students are asked to use the text from the lessons in Unit 4, Module A, students recall the importance of families in the stories that they read. Children write a narrative that tells a story about a family. Children also write a narrative in which two or more events are properly sequenced using temporal words, include some descriptive details about the events, and provide some sense of closure to the story.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet expectations for providing questions and tasks that support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Culminating tasks provide students the opportunity to demonstrate comprehension and knowledge of a topic or topics. Culminating tasks are provided and they are partially multifaceted, requiring students to demonstrate mastery of several different standards (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) at the appropriate grade level. Many of the performance assessments require the students to use evidence from the text they have read. The lessons and questions leading up to the task offer support to complete the task. The tasks use the texts as vehicles to support the writing process, but speaking and listening skills standards are not included or addressed. Examples include:

  • Unit 1
    • Module A: Write about Friendship – Narrative Task: Students think about the friendship between the birds and Stellaluna. Then they illustrate and write sentences about how the characters showed their friendship when they first met and then later in the story. Students illustrate two events in the order in which they occurred in the story and write a sentence to tell about each event and how they birds and Stellaluna showed their friendship.
    • Module B: Write Questions and Answers - Informative/Explanatory Task: Students use facts from Time to Sleep and What Do You Do With a Tail Like This? to write questions about animals. Students write two questions of their own about one or two animals they read about and find the answers to their questions in the texts. Students write both questions and answers.
  • Unit 2
    • Module A: Write About Classroom Citizens – Opinion Task: Students will think about The Recess Queen and A Fine, Fine School and how characters acted as good classroom citizens. Students write their opinion about how good classroom citizens act and supply a reason for the opinion.
    • Module B: Write About Global Students – Informative/Explanatory Task: Students think about what they have learned about students from around the world. They choose one student from Far From Home or Going to School and compare and contrast their own school experiences with this student’s school experiences.
  • Unit 3
    • Module A: Write About Choices – Narrative Task: The selections in this unit are about choices and making decisions. Students write a short story about a choice they made to save or spend money.
    • Module B: Write About Making Choices – Opinion Task: In this module, students read about goods and services and how people make choices about which goods and services they purchase. As a class, students compose a list of goods (e.g. paper products) and services (e.g. butcher, baker) they find at their local grocery store. Then each student chooses a good or service from the list that he or she feels is especially important and writes his or her opinion about it and support with one reason.
  • Unit 4
    • Module A: Write a Family Story- Narrative Task: Students recall the importance of families in the stories they read. Students write a narrative that tells a story about a family.
    • Module B: Write Steps In A Sequence – Informative/Explanatory Task: Students use the information and features found in How a Seed Grows and The Life Cycle of an Apple Tree to write their own book explaining how a tree grows.
  • Unit 5
    • Module A: Write A Moon Story – Narrative Task: Students write a story that includes the moon as a central feature. It can be make-believe or realistic fiction. Students are encouraged to use the texts King Kafu and the Moon and Let’s Visit the Moon for ideas and inspiration.
    • Module B: Write a Question-And-Answer Book – Informative: Students write a Question-and-Answer Book about a planet or another element of the solar system. Students use Our World in Space: Planets and the Sun, as well as other texts, to write their questions and answers.
  • Unit 6
    • Module A: Write a Book Review – Opinion Task: Students write a review that states their opinion of one of the texts they have read. They include information from the text that helped them form their opinion.
    • Module B: Write An Opinion Piece – Opinion Task: Students think about the lost items they read about in Whose Is This? and decide which one they think was most interesting and why. They write their opinion and include information from the text that helped them form their opinion.

Earlier questions and tasks give the teacher usable information about student’s readiness to complete culminating tasks. Such as in Unit 6, Module B, the lessons require students to practice writing each day to prepare for the culminating task. These daily writings give the teacher information about each student’s readiness to be successful writing an opinion piece of one of the module texts, including information from the text that helped them form their opinion.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet expectations for providing a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials partially provide teacher guidance outlining a cohesive year long vocabulary development component. The materials use the approach of Generative Vocabulary. This provides systems for understanding how words work. This focuses on sets of rare Tier II and Tier III words that unlock meaning, build knowledge of critical content domains, and help students internalize word-learning strategies.

Teachers are provided a chart containing the main vocabulary words the should use throughout each unit. These lists are provided in the Teacher's Guide in the section entitled Vocabulary to Unlock Text. The texts that the vocabulary words are chosen from are both anchor and supporting texts. These pages outline for teachers how to teach vocabulary throughout every unit and module throughout the year. This practice is carried out during the Small Group Time. Examples of vocabulary outlined include:

  • Benchmark Vocabulary: “Words are important for understanding concepts within a text. and defined as words needed to deeply comprehend a text, words from other disciplines, words that are part of a thematic, semantic, and/or morphological network, and words central to unlocking the Enduring Understanding of the text.”
  • By-The-Way Words: “Sophisticated or unusual Tier II and Tier III words for known concepts that can be stumbling blocks to comprehending a text. They should be defined quickly during reading, but instruction should not interfere with the fluent reading of the text. These are addressed during Close Reading can can also be defined as words that don’t require lengthy discussion within a particular text, words supported by the text for meaning, and words that are more concrete.”
  • Generative Vocabulary in Speaking and Writing: “Children should demonstrate a deep understanding of vocabulary by using these words and words generated from them in conversation, writing practice, and the Performance-Based Assessments.”
  • Additional Vocabulary Support: “For spanish cognates, see the scaffolded STrategies Handbook.”

Attention is paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high value academic words. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 6, By-The-Way Words: “During close reading, define the following words for children involving known concepts that can be stumbling blocks to comprehending the text. excitedly, p. 40: Help students to recognize the word part excited. Tell them that Stellaluna speaks in an excited way.’
  • Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 4, By-The-Way Words: “During close reading, define the following word for children involving known concepts that can be stumbling blocks to comprehending the text. departments, p. 35: Departments are sections or parts of the store. Some departments include fruit and vegetable, dairy, frozen, meat, and bakery.”
  • Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 5, By-The-Way Words: “During close reading, define the following word for students involving known concepts that can be stumbling blocks to comprehending the text. Butterfly nets, p. 18: Explain that a butterfly net is made from a piece of fabric that is attached to the end of a handle. It is used to catch butterflies and other insects.”


Students are supported to accelerate vocabulary learning with vocabulary in their reading, speaking, and writing tasks. During the small group time, Step 1, there is a specific daily process and strategy focus. In the strategy focus portion, Vocabulary Knowledge is one of the possible strategies the teacher should focus on. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 7, Vocabulary Knowledge: “Have students review with you their list of interesting action or describing words. Ask them to use ordinary words to tell what they words in their book mean. Alternatively, have students log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed in their workbook.”
  • Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 11, Vocabulary Knowledge: “Have students review with you the list of words they made. Ask them to explain the two meanings of the words and how they determined the correct meaning based on the context clues. Alternatively, have students log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed in their workbook.”
  • Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 1, Vocabulary Knowledge: “Have students review people or things in their book that they marked. Have them tell why each is brave or sparkly. Alternatively, have students log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed in their workbook.”

Although students are asked to look back in the text and answer questions, there is little instruction directly focused on vocabulary. In small groups, vocabulary words may be discussed and focused on a strategy, but the guidance for what teachers should be doing with their vocabulary lists and how to teach students these words and links is not explicit. The words covered for each lesson are outlined in the Module Planners in every Teacher's Guide for every unit and every module.

Vocabulary is not repeated across multiple texts. Although some morphological, semantic, and narrative instruction is included in a “network”. There is no evidence that vocabulary words are systematically repeated throughout texts. The focus is on teaching the children the skills to make connections to the links in all words rather than repeating vocabulary words.

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for containing a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

Each writing lesson focuses on a standard based writing type (narrative, opinion, or informative/explanatory). Students receive explicit instruction that guides them through the writing process. Students have writing models from anchor and supporting texts that they can use to examine writers’ styles and techniques. Students have the opportunity to apply writing skills during Independent Writing Practice and share their work at the end of each lesson. Students develop grammar, usage, and convention skills by practicing in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.

Materials include writing instruction aligned to the standards for the grade level, and writing instruction spans the whole school year. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 2, Informative/Explanatory Writing: The teacher helps students identify the main topic from Far from Home. They work together to write a topic sentence about an informational text. “I will begin my topic sentence in a way that lets my readers know what I am writing about. One way I can begin my topic sentence is This book is all about_____. This lets readers know that I am going to write about the topic of the book.” Students will write their own topic sentences in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal about Far from Home.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 1, Opinion Writing: The teacher explains what an opinion is, then states that they should provide opinions about topics they are familiar with and cite sources to support their opinion. Teacher asks the students Are good or services more important? Teacher and students work together to complete a t-chart about goods and services. Then the teacher models how to write an opinion. “When I look at the chart, I think that goods are more important. This is my opinion because other people might not think that goods are more important than services.” Students will then write a response to the question in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 12, Narrative Writing: The teacher helps students discuss the ending of the Family Tree. Through discussion the teacher will help students see that the story ends with a memorable event. Students revise their story from Lesson 11. Then they will write an ending for their story in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.

Each module ends with a Performance-Based Assessment. The task provide opportunities for students to apply the skills they learned during the module to their own writing. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, students think about the friendship between the birds and Stellaluna. They they illustrate and write sentences about how the characters showed their friendship when they first met and then later in the story.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, students write a short story about a choice they made to save or spend money.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, students think about the lost items they read about in Whose is This? and decide which one they think was most interesting and shy. They write their opinion and include information from the text that helped them form their opinion.

Writing instruction supports students’ growth in writing skills over the course of the school year. Each lesson includes a writing task. It varies from narrative, opinion to explanatory/informative across the lessons. Included in lesson is an Independent Writing Practice lesson, Conventions Mini-Lesson and a Shared Writing section where students get the opportunity to share their writing. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 4, the focus writing is Opinion Writing. During Set the Purpose the Teacher's Guide states, “Explain that opinions show what characters think, feel, or believe about something. Explain that students will continue to write their own opinions today.” During Teach and Model, “‘When I go out to dinner, I prefer vegetarian meals. I dislike meat because I don’t like the fact that it comes from animals. This is an opinion I have. Other people may not like vegetarian meals. They may prefer the taste of meat to the taste of vegetables. This is their opinion.’ Point out that your opinion told how you feel about certain foods. You told why you disliked meat and provided a reason. You also told the opinion of others and gave a reason. Provide the example from p. 15-16 to show Mr. Keene’s opinion and how he supports it.” During Independent Writing Practice, “Students imagine themselves as a character from A Fine, Fine School. They pretend to go to school with Tillie and Mr. Keene. Students use p. 87 of their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to write or dictate an opinion they would share with Mr. Keene about his decision to have more school.” Students can share their writing. Conventions Mini-Lesson: Teacher model using quotation marks. Students revisit p. 20 in A Fine, Fine School. They identify quotation marks and read it aloud. Students practice using quotation marks on p. 87 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 11, the focus writing is Informational/Explanatory Writing. During Set the Purpose the Teacher's Guide states, “‘Writers check to make sure their ideas make sense and that the facts they use are correct. They also check for errors in capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and spelling.’ Review the checklist that many writers think about while revising and editing. Review with students the five steps in the writing process.” During Independent Writing Practice students continue to work on their planet books by making revisions and edits. Students trade books with their peers to check for mistakes and offer suggestions. Students can share their writing. Conventions Mini-Lesson: Teacher write sentences with errors, then edit together with students. Students practice editing on p. 370 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.

Instructional materials include a variety of well-designed lesson plans, models, and protocols for teachers to implement and monitor students’ writing development. For example, in each lesson, the teacher’s guide provides lesson plans for setting the purpose and teaching and modeling. Each lesson is scripted and outlines what the teacher says and does. There are rubrics in the Assessment Handbook for end of the unit assessments.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for including a progression of focused shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

Materials support teachers in employing projects that develop students’ knowledge on a topic via provided resources. Materials provide opportunities for students to apply Reading, Writing, Speaking & Listening, Language skills to synthesize and analyze per their grade level readings. Research projects are sequenced across a school year to include a progression of research skills. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module B, the performance based assessment requires students to use facts from Time to Sleep and What You Do With a Tail Like This? to write questions and answers about animals.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, the performance based assessment requires students to think about The Recess Queen and A Fine, Fine School and how the characters acted as good classroom citizens. Children write their opinion about how good classroom citizens act and supply a reason for the opinion.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, the performance based assessment requires students to use the selections from this unit to write a short story about a choice they made to save or spend money.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, the performance based assessment requires children to use the information and features in How a Seed Grows and The Life Cycle of an Apple Tree to write their own book explaining how a seed grows.
  • In Unit 5, Module A, the performance based assessment requires students to write a story that includes the moon as a central feature. It can be make-believe or realistic fiction. Children are encouraged to use King Kafu and the Moon and Let’s Visit the Moon for ideas and inspiration.
  • In Unit 6, Module A, the performance based assessment requires students write a review that states their opinion of one of the texts they have read. They include information from the text that helped them form their opinion.

The materials also include an optional center called The Research Center that can be visited daily. Suggested research topics are included in each module. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, suggestions include researching a community and making a small poster with facts about that community and its people.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, suggestions include researching two different cultures and creating a compare-and-contrast chart on a word processing document.
  • In Unit 6, Module B, suggestions include researching stories of real pioneers who helped our country grow, and write a paragraphs about one of them, as well as researching online a journey they would like to take, and write a description of the journey using a computer.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for providing a design, including accountability, for how students regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Most texts are organized with built in supports/scaffolds to foster independence. Examples include:

  • ReadyUp! Intervention provides additional instruction with the lesson’s reading and foundational skills standards.
  • The Leveled Text Library allows students/teachers to choose texts based on student’s needs.
  • Reading Analysis Support provides additional support for students who are struggling as well as Unlock the Text.
  • The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides additional support for each lesson.

Procedures are organized for independent reading included in the lessons. Examples include:

  • Focused Independent Reading instruction is the first step of Small Group Time each day.
  • The Independent Reading Routine provides teachers with support for introducing and continuing Independent Reading, as well as a rationale for implementation.
  • The Text Club Routine provides teacher with support for a protocol to have children read a text then discuss it with meaning and purpose. Each text club has assigned roles for students.
  • A Pearson Realize online contents page links to Independent Reading Activities. The teacher can direct and students can access Dash content to input comprehension and vocabulary notes.

There is sufficient teacher guidance to foster independence for all readers. Examples include:

  • Students are guided how to apply the content of each day's Reading Analysis lesson to their self-selected text, starting with Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 1.
  • Teachers meet with two or three individual students during Small Group Time each day to discuss their texts and support independent reading. This is found on each lesson’s fifth page.
  • Each module includes center time which involves independent reading. During independent reading, the teacher directs students to focus on either a process focus or a strategy focus. A process focus is where students either focus on independence, stamina, or engagement. The strategy focus has students focus on fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, or critical thinking.

There is a proposed schedule for independent reading. For example, teachers prepare students for Focused Independent Reading that they do during Small Group Time while teachers teach mini-lessons and assess individual students.

There is a tracking system (which may include a student component) to track independent reading. For example, students monitor their reading by recording it in their daily reading log. They gauge and record their engagement, their opinion of what they read, and their plan for the next day’s reading.

Student reading materials span a wide volume of texts at grade levels (and at various lexile levels within the grade). For example, students can use the Leveled Text Library or online leveled texts to practice reading at their independent levels. Texts are related to the unit topic and offer a range of levels to meet every student’s needs.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The materials reviewed meet the expectations for usability. Materials are well-designed and include support for implementation over the course of a school year. Materials include clearly labeled navigation and support to aid teachers to support students’ literacy growth. The design of the materials supports effective lesson structure and pacing. Student resources include review and practice problems, clear directions, and explanations, and correct labeling of reference aids. Visual design is not distracting to students and support students’ learning.

The materials support teachers in helping students to learn and understand the concepts in the standards. Teacher’s editions explain the role of specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. Implementation Guides contain explanations of the instructional approaches of ReadyGEN and identify research-based strategies. However, the materials do not include are strategies for communicating with stakeholders about the program and how they can support students in their learning.

There are a variety of assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Not all assessments denote which standards are being assessed. There is sufficient guidance for interpreting student performance on assessments and suggestions for follow-up. Materials also provide routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Students are accountable for independent reading.

Materials meet expectation for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. There are clear supports for students who struggle as well as those who work above grade level. The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides extensive follow-up to support students who read, write, speak, or listen in a language other than English to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Instructional materials include useful technology to enhance student learning. They include materials to support students’ personalized learning via navigable online platforms. The digital platform offers opportunities to enhance student learning.

Criterion 3a - 3e

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8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for being well-designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Daily lessons include structures and resources for both whole group and small group literacy instruction.The materials meet the expectations for the teacher and student reasonably being able to complete the content within a regular school year with the pacing allowing for maximum student understanding These lessons are intended to be done one a day, totaling an hour and a half to fit in both Reading and Writing. The materials meet the requirements for resources including ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanations, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g. visuals, maps, etc). The materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. The visual design that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for being well-designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Daily lessons include structures and resources for both whole group and small group literacy instruction.

Daily lesson structures include the components of Reading with 30-40 minutes for whole group reading instruction, 30-40 minutes for small group instruction, and 30-40 minutes for whole group writing instruction. The pacing is defined in the following way:

  • Whole group instruction includes Built-In Foundational Skills Mini-Lessons, Building Understanding, Close Reads, Reading Analysis Lessons, and Focused Independent Reading.
  • Small Group Instruction includes Small Group Options such as additional instruction, practice, or extension as needed in the areas of fluency, foundational skills, and reading and language analysis, Independent Literacy Work with a choice between student-selected grade level text, leveled text library books, and decodable and practice readers, and ReadyGen Intervention which provides support for struggling readers.
  • Whole Group Writing Instruction contain focused lesson on one specific writing types critical to college and career readiness and conventions mini-lessons. During these lessons the teacher sets the purpose, teaches and models, prepares students to write, and gives the students time for independent writing. In addition to whole group there are also daily conventions mini lessons.

Following is a detailed example of the lesson structure from Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 3:

  • Whole Group Reading Instruction: 1) Building Understanding, during this portion of the lesson, teachers “Set the Purpose” by telling students the following: “A reader’s purpose is to understand the information in a text. Text features can be very helpful to readers.” Read aloud the poem” A Circle of Sun”. “What feelings do you get from hearing this poem?” “What words in the poem suggest those feelings?” 2)Read, teachers read aloud Our World in Space: Planets. Students should be able to read the name of each planet. Have students read aloud the headings and icons in this section. 3)Turn and Talk, after these pages, have students turn to a partner and discuss “Why is earth the only place that can have life?”. Have them use examples from the text. 4) Close Read, “Engage the class in a discussion about what they just read . . . Use these questions to guide the discussion . . .” “Look at pages 40 and 41. This is a diagram. A diagram is a picture that explains something. What does the diagram show?” “How are the inner planets and the giants different?” “Let’s find details to support our thinking. The text on page 43 says the inner planets are closest to the sun. They are made of rock, dirt and metal. Page 46 says the giant planets are far from the sun. They are made of gas and liquid. When we look at the diagram on pages 40 and 41, the inner planets are much smaller than the giants.” 5) Benchmark Vocabulary, teachers use the “Benchmark Vocabulary Routine for Literary Text” on pages TR24-TR27. “Students find and read sentences from the text with the words dwarf. 6) Text Analysis, students use a graphic organizer to complete a three column chart on text features. They work on identifying pages where diagrams, headings and text boxes are located.
  • Small Group Time: During Focused Independent Reading students read their self-selected texts. The teacher announces the two focus points to the class for their self-selected reading. For Unit 5 Module B, Lesson 3, the focus is “Engagement and Identity” and “Comprehension”. Students identify vocabulary words that are shown in text features and write their definitions. Teachers monitor students’ progress by having them record their reading in a daily reading log and having them review their graphic organizer with the teacher. Additional instruction, practice and extension during “Small Group Time” are offered through a variety of options: Word Analysis in Teacher’s Guide, Unlock the Text in Scaffolded Strategies Handbook, Teacher conferences each day with two or three students to discuss their self-selected texts, Reading Analysis Support for students who struggle with point of view, there is a “Support Reading Analysis Mine-Lesson.” and Reading Analysis Extension for students who easily understand point of view, there is an “Extend Reading Analysis Mini-Lesson.”
  • Whole Group Writing Instruction: Students focus on informative/explanatory writing, and creating text features. The teacher sets the purpose by going back to the essential question. Students and teacher make a list on the planets from the closest to the furthest away from the sun. Students ask and answer questions about the size of the planets, record their thoughts to use as a reference. During Independent Writing Practice students create a rough sketch of their diagram, labeling each planet with their name.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for the teacher and student reasonably being able to complete the content within a regular school year with the pacing allowing for maximum student understanding These lessons are intended to be done one a day, totaling an hour and a half to fit in both Reading and Writing. The suggested pacing has students reading, in small groups, and then writing during these 90 minutes. Each lesson is broken down by Read, Benchmark Vocabulary, Reading Analysis, and Writing.

  • There are 6 units that are each broken into 2 modules. Module A in every unit contains 13 lessons and Module B in every unit has 12 lessons. There are a total of 150 lessons in the first grade materials.
  • Lessons are set up for 90 or 120 minute blocks that include Reading (Build Understanding, Close Read, Benchmark Vocabulary, Text Analysis – either language or reading) Small Group Time (Focused Independent Reading, Small Group Options), and Writing (Focused Writing, Independent Writing Practice).
  • Additional lessons are included for the Performance Based Assessment as well as other unit assessments. Time is built in for teachers to modify lessons to tailor to their student’s needs.
  • Pacing suggestions are provided in the Implementation Guide that suggests teachers can vary the lessons from day to day based on the text, needs of the students, and the amount of scaffolding necessary to delivery instruction appropriately. (Implementation Guide p. 19)

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the requirements for resources including ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanations, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g. visuals, maps, etc). Students have access to an array of materials including the Text Collection, anchor texts, Sleuth, leveled text library, online resources, and center options. Other resources available to students include, trade books, text collections, Close Reading, performance tasks, Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Independent Reading Activities, as well as digital interactive tools such as Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Envision It! Animations, TikaTok (students as authors), and Grammar Jammers. In the online resources, activities and exercises are found, such as Monster Word Mania and Pack Up The Skills interactive games. There are Close Reading and Independent Reading modeling videos. Each of these resources include ample opportunity to review and practice, clear directions, and correct labeling.

Some examples of the resources that provide review and practice opportunities are:

  • Daily Focused Independent Reading routines and structures allow students to extend and apply what they are learning in daily whole group instruction to a text of their own choosing,at their ability and interest level.
  • Daily Independent Writing Practice gives students opportunity to apply the writing skills and conventions they have discussed and learned in whole class instruction to a daily writing prompt that prepares them for Performance Based Writing Assessment at the end of each module.
  • Digital Opportunities for Writing and Reading are provided daily during Small Group Instruction.
  • Daily mini-lessons in Language Conventions focus on one or more language standards. Students apply these conventions to their own writing, then practice these newly acquired skills for teacher to monitor progress in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal.
  • Sleuth, a collection of short, high interest selections, serves to support and extend daily close reading lessons for struggling and accelerated learners. Three to four times in each unit, or sixteen times over the course of the school year, the Scaffolded Instruction during Small Group lessons use Sleuth to reteach, practice, and apply close reading skills and strategies .
  • Scaffolded Strategies Handbook Part One: Unlock the Text contains lessons for every anchor and supporting text, the section Express and Extend allows struggling and accelerated learners opportunities to react to the text through discussion and writing.
  • During Small Group Instruction, students use independent center activities to practice and apply standards in Reading, Writing, Word Work, and Research. Digital Components are available and suggested for each of these four sections.
  • There is a scaffolded strategies handbook, along with teacher resources, that has a multitude of graphic organizers, rubrics, and sentence frames that are available for students to use.
  • Common Core Correlations section in Implementation Guide shows where each standard is addressed in Units’ Teacher’s Guides across the units and across the year.

Some examples of clear explanation and directions include:

  • In the First Grade Scaffolded Strategies Handbook on p. 187, the directions for the Unit 1, Module A, Part 2, Unlock the Writing, Narrative, states, “Break Apart the Task: Distribute copies of the task found on p. 146 of the Teacher’s Guide. Read the task aloud to the students. Think about how the characters in Stellaluna showed their friendship. As questions such as: How did Stellaluna become friends with the birds? How did the birds show they cared for Stellaluna? Later in the story, how did Stellaluna show she was friends with the birds? Make a list of ideas and share. Read the task for the students. Work with the students to name an highlight the key points in the task.”
  • On page 157 of the first grade Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, the directions for Language Benchmark Vocabulary routine for Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 3 state, “Have children use p. 157 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Monitor children’s vocabulary development.”
  • On p. 10 of the Teacher's Guide for Unit 4, Module A, as a writing center, students Write in Response to Reading by completing the appropriate writing response to Reading prompts, found within pp. 225-263 of their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Children log into TikaTok and write their own book about their own life or about the life of a classmate or friend. Have them go to www.tikatok.com.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. In the Implementation Guide there is a Scope and Sequence of all four units, that show where each of the standards is hit within the curriculum. Lessons clearly denote standards alignment. Standard documentation is found in the lesson objectives.

Examples of materials of publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed include, but are not limited to:

  • The Implementation Guide’s Scope and Sequence section lists all English Language Arts standards for Kindergarten, and which unit and module addresses them.
  • The Implementation Guide’s Unit Overviews Standards Maps section describes the Performance Based Writing Assessment for each module. It lists Essential Questions, Enduring Understanding, and Goals for each module, along with corresponding standards, and lists all standards addressed in each module.
  • The Implementation Guide’s Common Core Correlations section lists Common Core Standards along with page numbers in each Unit’s Teacher’s Guide where these standards are addressed in lesson, task, assignment, or assessment.

Standards and Lesson Objectives are clearly stated on left hand side of Teacher Guides at the beginning of each lesson. For example:

  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 3 publisher-produced alignment to standards is provided. Students will:
    • RI.1.2 pp. 182, 184, 186 - Identify the main topic and retell key details of the text. Use supporting details and photographs to describe key ideas.
    • RI.1.1 p. 182 - Ask and answer questions about key details in the text.
    • RI.1.4 and L.1.6 p. 184 – Determine the meaning of words in a text.
    • RI.1.7 p. 184 – Use supporting details and photographs to describe key ideas.
    • SL.1.5 p. 184 – Add drawings to clarify ideas.
    • RF.1.4.b p. 187 – Read grade-level text with appropriate expression.
    • W.1.2 p. 188, 190 – Understand the elements of informative writing. Write facts about the topic.
    • W.1.6 p. 190 – With guidance, use technology to produce and publish writing and to collaborate with others.
    • L.1.1.c p. 190 – Use singular and plural nouns.
  • In Unit 1, Module A, Performance Based assessment, standards being assessed are included. Students will:
    • W.1.3 p. 142 – Write a narrative recounting two sequenced events with details.
  • In the Unit 6, Module B, Performance Based Assessment, standards being assessed are included. Students will:
    • W.1.1. p. 282 – Write an opinion piece. Name the topic of an opinion piece. Supply reasons for the opinion. Provide a sense of closure.

Standards are also listed at the bottom of each Foundational Skills lesson which are located in the Foundational Skills portion of every Teacher's Guide. For example in Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 3, on p. FS4 standards include:

  • RF.1.2.c Isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single syllable words.
  • RF1.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • RF.1.3.b Decode regularly spelled one-syllable words.
  • RF.1.4.a. Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
  • L.1.2.e Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for visual design that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The ReadyGen Language Arts curriculum printed version supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject due to its visual design. Student materials reviewed for First Grade include the Text Collections: Volume 1 and 2, Sleuth, a collection of close reading passages for struggling and accelerated readers, Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, and an online component that contains leveled readers, anchor and supporting texts, a variety of grammar games, software to publish students’ stories, and a mechanism with which the teacher can assign personalized writing prompts to communicate with individual students.

Components that support students engaging thoughtfully with the subject include but are not limited to:

  • Units are color coded in the Teacher Guide to allow for easy navigation through the units. Pages within the units are coded with Unit 1 purple, Unit 2 pink/magenta, Unit 3 green, and Unit 4 orange, Unit 5 Teal, and Unit 6 Salmon/Grapefruit.
  • Graphic organizers are free of any distracting words or pictures. The design simple and clear. For example, in Unit 3 Module B, Lesson 4 p. 194 Teacher's Guide, students use a T-Chart to record their points and support for their points. The T-Chart is located in the Teacher's Guide Teacher Resources section on p. TR39. The Teacher's Guide states to model, “Let’s look at p. 41. The Author states that “the best smells float around in the bakery.” This is a statement that requires support. The author supports that the bakery smells good by saying that doughnuts and breads are baked every day. Doughnuts and breads smell good. Have children work independently or in small groups to complete the graphic organizer finding other points the author makes.”
  • Graphic organizers are located in the Teacher Resources in the back of every Teacher's Guide on pp. TR32-TR46.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation for materials containing a Teacher's Guide with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.The materials contain a Teacher's Guide that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literary concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject as necessary. The materials reviewed meet expectations for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. Materials reviewed contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies. The materials reviewed do not contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectation for materials containing a Teacher's Guide with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

Materials include a Teacher's Guide that includes a clear outline of each unit as well as notes and suggestions of how to present content. The Teacher's Guide also includes the objectives of the lesson, explanations of where to find descriptions of routine, and suggested ways to present content as well as possible questions to ask are noted in blue. Each question asked is followed by a sample student answer. The Teacher's Guide includes scaffolded instruction boxes to address learners’ needs with ideas on differentiating instruction for those students in need of strategic or English language support.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 1, the teacher is provided with a Teach and Model guide to present the way the text identifies characters’ responses. Teachers use discussion to guide students to recognize characters and their actions. Included in this section is a diagram that demonstrates how the text gives character details.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 8, the teaching guide includes a Quick Check suggesting how teachers progress monitor two to three students daily as they are practicing Oral Reading Fluency. The Quick Check states, “If students are reading at a rate that is too slow, then encourage them to practice reading at a faster pace where the words flow better together.”
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 5, the Close Read section gives directives and suggestions on students citing evidence. The Close Read section states, “During guided close reading, have students discuss what they just read. Remind children that readers use details and examples to explain or connect ideas or events in a text. Use these questions to guide the discussion, and ask students to support their answers with evidence.” The teacher is provided with guided questions to lead a class discussion that requires evidence.
  • In Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 10, the Independent Writing section of the lesson provides teachers with plans to create storyboards with events and their details.
  • On pages 64-71 of the Implementation Guide, a scope and sequence chart includes all Common Core Standards and the Unit and Module where each is addressed.
  • On pages 72-81 of the Implementation Guide, Standards maps are provided for each Module. These maps include a description of the Performance Based Assessment, essential questions that are linked with standards, essential questions, a list of anchor and support texts, a list of all standards covered, Module goals linked to standards, and enduring understandings that are linked to standards.
  • On pages 82-103 of the Implementation Guide, a Common Core Correlations Chart is included that lists all Grade 1 Common Core Standards and then gives the Unit and page number where the standard is addressed.

Materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, the Performance Based Assessment has a digital option stating, “You may incorporate technology into the Performance-Based Assessment. Have children type their stories using word processing software. Then they add illustrations by printing out the pages and drawing pictures above or below the text.”
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 10, the teacher’s guide lists the digital publishing studio TikaTok as a resource for students to write and illustrate their own books.
  • In all Units and Modules Digital Centerpieces center options include the Reading Center, Writing Center, Word Work Center, and Research Center. Each of these centers includes an online technology piece.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations of materials containing a Teacher's Guide that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literary concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject as necessary. The materials also include an Implementation Guide to provide specific explanations, rational, and examples of key concepts that are needed to improve knowledge of the subject. Common Core Correlations, located in the Implementation Guide, list all of First Grade ELA standards by strand, then the page numbers in each unit’s Teacher’s Guide where these standards are addressed.

The Teacher's Guides include:

  • Instructional Routines, along with their rationales, are located in the Teacher Resource Section in the back of each of the Teacher’s Guides.
  • Generative Vocabulary Instruction is explained in the Implementation Guide as “helping students learn about words.” A white paper on generative vocabulary instruction is available online at pearsonrealize.com. It’s further described in each unit of the Teacher’s Guide at the beginning of each module. Teachers learn about benchmark vocabulary (words that are important for understanding concepts within a text) and by-the-way words (sophisticated or unusual Tier II and Tier III words).
  • Text Complexity Rubrics are available for each Anchor and Supporting Text. Rubrics explain quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task considerations, and provide the teacher with information on potential challenges students may have in accessing the text. These rubrics are located in the Teacher’s Resource Section in the back of each unit’s Teacher’s Guide.
  • Tips and Tools sidebars throughout the Teacher’s Guides, Scaffolded Strategies Handbook, and Teacher Resource sections provide quick definitions of literary and language terms being taught in each lesson. For example, “Tips and Tools” of the “Routines” portion of the Teacher Resources offers definitions for affix, inflectional ending, and root words for the teacher.
  • Independent Reading Continuum, located in Teacher’s Resource Section of each unit’s Teacher’s Guide, “shows a progression of the essential elements of independent reading in the elementary grades, describing strategies and processes that students practice when engaged in purposeful, self selected reading.”

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

  • On pages 64-71 of the Implementation Guide, a scope and sequence chart includes all Common Core Standards and the Unit and Module they are addressed.
  • On pages 72-81 of the Implementation Guide, Standards maps are provided for each Module. These maps include a description of the performance based assessment, essential questions that are linked with standards, a list of anchor and support texts, a list of all standards covered, Module goals that are linked to standards, and enduring understandings that are linked to standards.
  • On pages 82-103 of the Implementation Guide, a Common Core Correlations Chart is included that lists all Grade 1 Common Core Standards and then gives the Unit and page number where the standard is addressed.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies.

Materials include an Implementation Guide that provides walkthrough of the curriculum, citing and explaining the rationale and research-based strategies including but not limited to the principles of backwards design and the design principle of backward mapping.

  • On page 22 of the Implementation Guide, it states, “ReadyGEN uses the principles of backward design to help teachers deliver instruction based on learning goals.” This is connected to the quote on the bottom of page 23 from the research of Fisher and Frey: “Reading widely is a habit that students must develop, but they also need instruction in reading increasingly complex texts so their reading diet is more balanced. We suggest that more difficult texts with scaffolded instruction should become part of the classroom equation.”
  • On page 24 of the Implementation Guide, it states, “ReadyGEN offers a robust range of assessments.” This is connected to the quote on the same page from the research of Peter Afflerbach about formative and summative assessments.
  • On page 45 of the Implementation Guide, it states, “Quick Checks provide formative assessment opportunities to monitor students’ fluency progress.”
  • On page 50 of the Implementation Guide, it states, “Performance-Based Assessments emphasize integration of reading, writing, and speaking and listening as students draw from the texts sets to demonstrate their knowledge of core understandings.” Which is connected to the quote on page 51 from the research of Linda Darling-Hammond and Frank Adamson.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

There are two places in the curriculum where a home school connection is mentioned. Once, when assigning online games and activities, there is a parent letter available online that explains that students will be using online curriculum. The second mention is on page of 32 of the Ready Up Intervention booklet available to review online. It mentions the importance of a home school connection.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Materials include a baseline assessment, multiple formative assessments, performance-based assessments, and end-of-unit assessments. Materials reviewed meet the expectations for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized. Standards are clearly labeled in the daily lessons and are found on the performance based assessments for each unit, standards are also noted on the End-of-Unit Assessments and the Baseline Assessment (Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide). Materials meet the expectations for assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments and interpreting results through rubrics and scoring guidance documents. Instructional materials meet the expectations for including routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Ongoing progress monitoring formative assessments are integrated within every module. Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Materials include a baseline assessment, multiple formative assessments, performance-based assessments, and end-of-unit assessments. Each of these assessments are included in the Assessment Book along with an overview, directions, passages, running records, student tests, test administration information, answer keys, and rubrics.

  • Opportunities are provided during daily lessons for monitoring student progress in reading and writing, as well as opportunities are provided to assess oral reading fluency.
  • Reading Keystones are formative assessments in every lesson to assess children’s understanding of key language, structures, and ideas. These keystones help the teacher check children’s progress toward the Performance-Based Assessment. The reading keystones include Benchmark Vocabulary Practice, Text Analysis practice/application, and Write in Response to Reading. For example, in Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 2, children use p. 154 in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Monitor children’s vocabulary development.
  • Writing Keystone Checklists are placed throughout the unit to assess children’s opinion, narrative, or informative writing. These checklists help the teacher determine how children are progressing toward the task in the Performance Based Assessment. For Example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 8, p. 90, the Writing Keystone Checklist for Stating and Supporting and Opinion is a checklist to assess children’s opinion writing. If children need additional support with one or more of these elements of opinion writing, teachers use Unlock Opinion Writing beginning on p. 260 of the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook.
  • Oral Reading Fluency Quick Checks are included in the Small Group Options for daily lessons. Oral Reading Fluency can be assessed using text and guidelines provided for Running Records (Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide). For example, in Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 4, “Tell children that reading with expression means reading with a feeling or emotion. Have children follow along as you read aloud p. 17 from One Classroom, Many Cultures. First, model reading with no expression. Ask children which they preferred and why. Place children into groups. Have children take turns reading aloud the same excerpt or a portion of a leveled text. Encourage them to read with expression. Walk around the room to monitor fluency and understanding.”
  • Performance-Based Assessments included with each Module have students complete a task that requires analysis and demonstrating knowledge in writing. For example, in Unit 4, Module A, p.142 the Performance-Based Assessment requires children to recall the importance of families in the stories that they read. Children write a narrative that tells a story about a family. Children write a narrative in which two or more events are properly sequenced using temporal words, include some descriptive details about the events, and provide some sense of closure to the story.
  • End-of-Unit Assessments are provided to help the teacher further measure their students’ mastery of reading and language arts standards. Included in the Assessment Book Teacher’s Manual is teacher information, answer keys, and class record charts. Student tests can be found in the ASsessment Student Book and online. For example, each End of Unit Assessment includes one passage of complex text. In Units 1-2, students listen to the teacher read aloud the passage before each section of the test and then answer questions about it. In units 3-6, students read the passage themselves and then answer the questions. Each passage is either literary or informational, and the texts become increasingly complex of the course of the school year. After listening to oral reading of the passage, students answer a series of selected-response questions that contain grade-appropriate Tier 2 and Tier 3 vocabulary. The online End-of-Unit Assessments for Units 4-6 include technology-enhanced items (TEIs). These are responses that go beyond the traditional multiple-choice and constructed response item types to include drag-and-drop and text entry. The writing portion of each End-of-Unit Assessment contains a narrative, informative/explanatory, or opinion prompt that is based on the passage. In Units 1-2, this task requires students to draw pictures and complete sentence frames. In Units 3-6 students write sentences in response to the prompt.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized. Standards are clearly labeled in the daily lessons and are found on the performance based assessments for each unit, standards are also noted on the End-of-Unit Assessments and the Baseline Assessment (Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide).

Daily lessons that include formative assessments clearly denote standards being taught, along with opportunities for students to practice. For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 7, on p. 76 of the Teacher’s Edition students are tested by the teacher to check for their Fluency with Oral Reading. It is clearly marked that what is being tested is CCSS RF.1.4.b - Fluency: Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. Read grade-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. (the actual CCSS is paraphrased where listed “Read grade-level text with appropriate expression”).

Performance Based Assessments denote standards being assessed in the objectives box in the Teacher’s Edition. For example, in the Unit 3, Module A, on p. 142, Performance-Based Assessment students write a short story about a choice they made to save or spend money making connections back to the text from this unit that are about choices and making decisions. Standards W.1.3 and L.1.6 are are provided in the Teacher’s Guide. W.1.3 Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure. W.1.6 With Guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including collaboration with peers.

On pages 66-71 of the Implementation Guide, a standards map is provided that lists all standards in a module along with the Performance-Based Assessment Task.

End-of-Unit Assessments and Baseline assessments provide standards being emphasized in student facing material or the Assessment Teacher’s Guide.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 instructional materials meet the expectations for assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments and interpreting results through rubrics and scoring guidance documents. Guidance includes but is not limited to:

  • Performance Based Assessments provide teachers with notes and guidance regarding administration of assessments. Information is provided which guides teachers how to allow students to complete the assessment over multiple lessons, to review the Essential Questions, and revisit the texts. Also provided are scaffolded supports for students as they are completing the assessments and follow-up support for students scoring a 0, 1, or 2 on the assessment wit Reflect and Respond “if…then…” statements. Teachers are also provided a Writing Rubric with each assessment that directly connects to the type of writing being tested whether it be a narrative, informational/explanatory, or opinion writing or project.
  • Guidance is provided for teachers in administering and scoring assessments, along with interpreting student assessment scores on End-of-Unit Assessments. For example, in the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide on p. T69-T70 teachers are guided on options of how to administer the assessments as well as how best to administer this assessment. A rubric is also provided for scoring the extended response items of the End-Of-Unit Assessment in .
  • The Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide provides guidance on what to do with assessment results. Teachers are directed to examine results and then use the results to inform instruction. For example, on page T71-72 of the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide steps that should be taken after the assessment concerning scoring as well as guiding instruction are provided.
  • Instruction and guidance are provided for administering Running Records with the fluency passages used for the assessments. Information is also provided for teachers in interpreting student scores and specific miscues in the Assessment Book Teacher’s Guide.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for including routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Ongoing progress monitoring formative assessments are integrated within every module. Progress monitoring opportunities include but are not limited to:

  • Reading and Writing Keystones that assess students’ reading and writing and their understanding of key language, structure, and ideas. For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1, on p. 14, Practice states, “Have children use p. 77 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Monitor children’s vocabulary development.”
  • Fluency Quick Checks that offer If. . . Then... suggestions to monitor students’ fluency progress and provide an assessment tool for teachers to quickly assess students in a small group of 2-3 students at a time. For example, in Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 6, on p.67 the teacher models fluent reading aloud from p. 7 of A Picnic in October. Children then choose a line or dialogue from the story to read aloud with proper expression. The teacher monitors progress and suggestions are provided if the children are reading with the incorrect expression, or if they are reading without expression.
  • Check Progress assessments in each unit that assess students’ phonics, word analysis, and high frequency word skills. These are located at the end of every Foundational Skills section. For Example, in Unit 4, on p. FS27-FS29 Unit 4 Check Progress tests Phonics and High Frequency words.
  • Students work in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, including Write in Response to Reading prompts that require students to cite text evidence as they write about what they’ve read. For example, in Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 5, on p. 56, states, “Use Write in Response to Reading on p. 13 of the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to check children’s understanding of key ideas in ‘Dragons and Giants.’”
  • If. . . Then... suggestions for monitoring progress also appear in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation. Examples include:

  • Pages TR 12-19 of all units Teacher Resources include the rationale behind the Independent Reading Routine as well as an independent reading rubric and reading log.
  • Small Group Time includes a Focused Independent Reading Time. During this time student focus on a process whether it be Engagement and Identity, Independence, or Stamina. Students also focus on a Strategy such as Vocabulary Knowledge, Critical Thinking, Fluency, or Comprehension. The teacher is given guidance then to monitor the student’s progress by outlining two possible activities to quickly assess the process and strategy focus for that day.
  • During Small Groups, students are guided to apply the content of the Reading Analysis and Language Analysis lesson to their self-selected text. For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 6, students are reminded that characters are people and animals in the story. When we describe characters, we use words and illustrations to describe what they look like. Use the Web B Graphic organizer on p. TR45 to organize information about the character Beans. Next, the children Practice and Apply as they work independently or in a small group to complete the web to describe Tillie on pp. 7-10. The teacher uses the Small Group Discussion Routine outlined on pp.TR6-TR7 to lead the discussion. Also, in Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 1, students are reminded that readers ask questions as they read. The teacher provides the T-Chart Graphic organizer from p.TR 39 to organize and sort their questions and answers. Next, they Practice and Apply. The teacher has the children work independently or in small groups to complete the T-Chart with more questions and answers. Use the Small Group Discussion Routine on pp. TR6-TR7 to discuss their questions and answers.

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. There are clear supports for students who struggle as well as those who work above grade level. Materials meet the expectations for providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English, extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.The Teacher’s Guide provides daily scaffolding for immediate feedback during lessons, and the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides more extensive follow up to support these students.Materials include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level and also provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards and opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. There are clear supports for students who struggle as well as those who work above grade level. Grouping strategies included are inclusive of multiple opportunities.

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.Examples include:

  • The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook addresses English Language Learners, students with disabilities, struggling readers, and accelerated learners. This handbook provides models of scaffolded instruction, useful strategies, and practical routines to employ during reading. The lessons provided are intended to be used during small-group time with students the teacher determines to need additional scaffolded instruction. The Scaffolding Strategies Handbook is organized into four parts.
  • Part 1 is titled Unlock the Text. Provides every anchor and supporting text is with scaffolds and strategies. The lessons are divided into Prepare to Read, Interact with Text, and Express and Extend.
  • Part 2 is titled Unlock the Writing. These lessons work to scaffold the module-level Performance Based Assessments and it also provides additional lessons to teach the writing types required by the standards.
  • Part 3 of the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides routines, graphic organizers, and activities to support students.
  • Part 4 is titled Unlock Language Learning. It focuses on supporting English Language Learners to construct the meaning and explore vocabulary of a text. This section provides support to build background, talk about sentences, speak and write about the text, expand understanding of vocabulary, and write about the anchor and supporting text.

Small group instruction is provided based on student need with options such as:

  • Unlock the Text which supports students in accessing ideas, key language, and key structures.
  • Word Analysis which supports students with their foundational skills.
  • Conferencing which helps students to grow their independent reading accountability as they discuss their self-selected texts with the teacher.
  • Support Instruction which targets students who need additional scaffolding for the instructional focus of each lesson.
  • Extensions which are intended for students who understand the lesson focus and would benefit from opportunities to extend the lesson and enhance learning.
  • Sleuth which is used three to four times each unit for small group lessons to reteach, practice, and refine close-reading skills and strategies.
  • The Teacher’s Guide includes Scaffolded Instruction notes throughout all lessons. For example, in Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 4, the Guide states, “Help students use the visuals to better understand the text. Have them describe what they see in the photograph and compare their description to the words on the page. Encourage students to recognize that pictures are used in books to reinforce or demonstrate the words. Also, in Unit 6, Module A, Lesson 13: Most of the students in One Classroom Many Cultures have families that came to America from another country. Tony’s grandparents came to America from Italy. Explain to students that when families move to America from other places they bring their traditions with them.”

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English, extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.The Teacher’s Guide provides daily scaffolding for immediate feedback during lessons, and the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook provides more extensive follow up to support these students.

The Teacher’s Guide provides on-the-spot scaffolds in each lesson. These address common stumbling blocks encountered by English Language Learners and struggling readers and writers. They are highlighted in blue at the bottom of each lesson. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 8, on p. 83 the Scaffolded Instruction notes are for English Language Learners and for Strategic Support.
    • English Language Learners: “Help children understand where Stellaluna is when she falls into a ‘tangle of branches.’ Focus on the illustration on p. 9. Model first, and then have children trace the branches with a finger as they repeat the phrase. Have them draw a picture or use craft sticks to build a ‘tangle of branches.’”
    • Scaffolded Instruction: “If children have difficulty understanding when a story event happens, have them use the illustrations to answer questions about the setting, such as: What color is the sky? What time of day do you see stars? When do you see the sun shining?
  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 9, on p. 243 the Scaffolded Instruction notes are for English Language Learners and for Strategic Support.
    • English Language Learners: “In Spanish, Korean, and Hmong, comparisons are expressed with phrases rather than with adjectives that change form. In Spanish, for example, fast/faster/fastest becomes rapido/mas rapido/el mas rapido (or rapida for feminine nouns). Explain the phrase the shortest line on p. 45 and provide practice with other comparison adjective.”
    • Scaffolded Instruction: “Children may have difficulty understanding the terms related to the checkout counter. Ask children to recall their own experiences at stores and then act out the roles of a shopper, a clerk scanning bar codes and using a cash register, and the bagger.”
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 5, on p. 203 the Scaffolded Instruction notes are for English Language Learners and for Strategic Support.
    • English Language Learners: “Children may struggle with understanding some of the scientific terms in the text, such as gas, liquid, orbits, and the names of the planets. Take extra time to define and explain these terms. Help children read the planet names, and encourage them to find creative ways of remembering the names.”
    • Scaffolded Instruction: “When texts have a variety of text features, children may struggle to understand the order they should read the text on a page. Where there is main body text, such as p. 46, they would read the main text first and then the labels. On p. 47, they would read the text features in the order they appear, from top to bottom.”

The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook has a number of resources for teachers to assist English Language Learners, struggling readers and writers as well as students with disabilities. These are intended to be used during small group time. The handbook has four sections of resources that include:

  • Unlock the Text: This section includes text complexity rubrics that offer insight into the quantitative, qualitative and reader and task measures of text. The qualitative measures provide strategies for levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands. Cognate charts are provided for each anchor text and supporting text in this section of the handbook as well.
  • Unlock Writing: This section provides scaffolded lessons for the Performance-Based Assessments and grade level support and guidelines for teaching the standards based writing types.
  • Routines and Activities: This section includes routines, reproducible graphic organizers, and activities that can be used to support teaching the standards.
  • Unlock Language Learning: This section provides specific resources for English Language Learners to construct meaning in the selections as well as explore vocabulary of texts. The strategies and activities are designed to develop mastery of reading, writing and speaking around the areas of Building Background, talking about Sentences, Speaking and Writing about the Texts, and Expanding Understanding of Vocabulary.

If/then sections are provided in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook to support students. For example, in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook on page 211 students Unlock the Task: Write About Choices. Students break apart the task, answer questions about the task, and then restate the task. If/then statements are provided to monitor and support struggling writers. For example, “If …. Students have difficulty brainstorming ideas to write about, then … help them identify times they had money and determine what they did with the money. Did you spend your money right away? Did you spend all your money? Did you save your money? Where did you keep it? Were you saving money for something you wanted?

To build speaking and listening skills the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook lists a Listening Skills Log on pages 323-324 and a Have a Discussion Routine and Rating Sheet on pages 329-330. Examples include:

  • Each Unit’s Leveled Text Instructional Plan addresses speaking and listening skills in the section titled After Reading on page TR68. During the Talk About It section, it states, “The activities in this section are designed to help students develop their understanding of the unit theme and enhance their listening and speaking skills by engaging in a group discussion.” Sentence frames are provided to help students express their ideas.
  • In Unit 5, Module B, Lesson 10 students use the Think-Pair-Share Routine on pp. TR2, TR3 to practice speaking and listening. Teachers are reminded to make sure that students are using best practices for speaking and listening as outlined in the routine.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for including extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Each lesson offers support for accelerated learners in Small Group Options. The small group options provided in the Teacher’s Guide offer teachers opportunities to direct their instruction to the needs of their students. Teachers are encouraged to gather formative assessment information from whole group instruction to help determine student needs during small groups. Opportunities within small groups that include:

  • Independent Reading Conferences: Opportunities for students to discuss self-selected texts can be found in the Teacher Resource Book. Independent reading rubrics are also provided for students to self-assess reading preferences and behaviors.
  • Close Reading Extension or Language Analysis Extension are provided for students who are adept or excel at the skill or lesson.
  • Mini-lessons can also be found in the Sleuth materials that offer extensions for students who excel at close reading or language analysis.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 3, the Close Reading Extension on page 37 asks students to answer questions about Kelly’s choice by looking for clues (gathering evidence), asking questions, making their case, and proving their thinking.

The Scaffolded Strategies Handbook included opportunities outside of the teacher guide for extensions for students who are above grade level. These sections are titled Extend, Accelerated, and Going Deeper. There are four parts in the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook. Including Unlock the Text, Unlock the Writing, Routines and Activities, and Unlock Language Learning. Within each part, there are extensions activities and strategies. For example, in Unit 1, Module A, on page 18 of the Scaffolded Strategies Handbook, students:

  • In Part 1, Unlock the Text to Express and Extend after reading Frog and Toad Together. The Extend section states, “Have students write a sentence telling what they think is the most dangerous challenge Frog and Toad face. Provide a sentence frame such as the following: The most dangerous thing Frog and Toad fact is _____.”
  • In Part 2, Unlock the Writing on page 262 students are provided with a practice and a deeper practice when working with opinion pieces. Students work together to better understand the connection between topics, opinions, and reasons. The Teacher Edition states, “Consider distributing copies of an opinion piece that you have read in class, and have students identify the topic, the opinion, and at least one supporting reason by underlining each in different colored markers. Ask students to list the linking words they find. Then instruct them to tell which reason and opinion each linking word connects. Students work with a partner to brainstorm another reason for an opinion about the topic of holidays or about another topic of interest. You might have students practice “writing in the air” by first using a formal tone to tell a partner the topic, opinion, and reasons. Ask them to tell their opinion and at least one reason to the class, and have the class identify the opinion and the supporting reasons.”

Opportunities for extension occur in small group. For example, on page TR7 in the Unit 1 Small Group Discussion Routine, teachers are provided with a Going Deeper activity once students are familiar with the routine. The directions state, “Add a Fact Checker to the roles of a small group. Have the Fact Checker flag text evidence as children share text details in their responses.” It also states, “With the children, brainstorm a list of questions that the Elaborator might ask during group discussions.”

Opportunities for extension appear in Text Club. For example, on page TR23 in the Unit 2 Text Club Routine directions, teachers are provided with a Going Deeper activity to help students explore Text Clubs more deeply. The directions state, “Once students are comfortable with the Routine, choose from the following activities to help them explore Text Clubs more deeply.” It also states, “Ask students to reread the same text with the same Text Club members but take on different roles in the group. Doing so will allow children to experience the text from different perspectives.”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the expectations for providing opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. Students participate in partner and small group Think/Pair/Share, Whole Class Discussion, Small Group Discussion, Read Alouds, Shared Reading, Independent Reading, Text Clubs, and Benchmark Vocabulary Discussions for both Informational and Literary texts.

The Teacher Edition provides small group options for teachers to meet the needs of their students. Teachers are encouraged to use information gained from whole group instruction to help determine where students need additional supports or extensions during small groups. Also, routines and protocols for grouping strategies are provided in the Teacher Resources section of the Teacher Edition. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 1 the Teacher Edition has students Turn and Talk, “After reading, have students turn to a partner and discuss this question using examples from the text: On page 4, the author talks about several ways that people can make the world better. What ways are mentioned? How are they related to the title of the book? Use the Think-Pair-Share Routine on pp. TR2-TR3. (Children should share back examples such as, helping plants and animals.)”
  • In Unit 5, Module A, Lesson 4 the Teacher Edition has students work as a class to describe how reasons support points in a text by using the Whole Class Discussion Routine on pp. TR4-TR5. Have children discuss reasons that support the author’s point that Johnny Appleseed cared about other people. Check children’s understanding by asking questions that encourage children to make inferences.

Indicator 3s

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Materials are available to access with a login and password at www.pearsonrealize.com. Once signed in an educator can access materials such as the Teacher’s Guide for each Unit, Teacher Resources, Standards, Baseline Assessments, Practice Test, Scaffolded Strategies Handbooks, Unit Modules, each unit’s Leveled eText Library, Text Collections, Sleuth, and printable resources.

On the website teachers can create classes to assign work, check on the status of assignments, create groups, and post class calendars. There is also a Data tab to gather and display and use data to promote student mastery of the standards. Also included on this website are Close Reading Modeling Videos, Independent Reading Modeling Videos, Accessible eTexts, and the customizable lesson planning tool: MyGen.

Accessibility was tested on Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Windows, Apple, Android mobile device, Safari, an iPhone. All access was successful. The eTexts are flash based. You will be unable to access eTexts on an iPad since they don’t support Flash. It is recommended to download the eTexts for Schools App if your device does not support the Flash player.

Indicator 3s3v

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers , “platform neutral”, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Materials reviewed meet expectations for supporting effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.They include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovation. Materials can be easily customized for local use.

Indicator 3t

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for supporting effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Materials provide students with the ability to continue learning at home with activities aligned to unit texts, writing modes, and Enduring Understandings. Anchor texts are interactive to build background knowledge and help students access complex texts. Teachers have the option of assigning an e-text or interactive version of the anchor text to students on Pearson Realize. Interactivities can be displayed on an interactive whiteboard for use as part of whole group instruction, or students can access whatever texts have been assigned to them on an individual device. TikaTok allows students to write, illustrate and publish their own digital storybooks and projects. There are also Interactive graphic organizers that allow students to record as they read independently.


Online interactive tools such as Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Monster Word Mania, Pack Up the Skills, Envision It! Animations, Letter Tile Drag and Drop, and Grammar Jammers are provided and can be assigned by the teacher, as well as Close and Independent Reading Videos to support students’ learning.

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. An online Baseline Assessment is used to pinpoint students struggles while assessing the standards with complex text. Digital materials provide program-agnostic College and Career Readiness assessments, Balanced Practice Test, and Performance Tasks. Technology-Enhanced Items appear on the Baseline Assessment in First Grade on all End-of-Unit Assessments, and on program-agnostic Balanced Performance Tasks. Teachers can also build their own assessments.


The DATA tab of Realize provides class and student data, including standards mastery, overall progress, and time on task. Teachers can also view data individually by student from the class assignment list. Teachers can use this data to create assignments based on an individual student’s needs.

Indicator 3u.ii

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, MyGen, allows teachers to adapt any unit module. Teachers can replace any anchor or supporting text with another selection, create their own essential questions and enduring understandings, and identify lesson standards. Teachers can also develop Performance-Based assessments that are customized to their classroom.

Indicator 3v

0/
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, MyGen, allows teachers to adapt any unit module. Teachers can replace any anchor or supporting text with another selection, create their own essential questions and enduring understandings, and identify lesson standards. Teachers can also develop Performance-Based assessments that are customized to their classroom.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers , “platform neutral”, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Materials reviewed meet expectations for supporting effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.They include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovation. Materials can be easily customized for local use.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 include digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Materials are available to access with a login and password at www.pearsonrealize.com. Once signed in an educator can access materials such as the Teacher’s Guide for each Unit, Teacher Resources, Standards, Baseline Assessments, Practice Test, Scaffolded Strategies Handbooks, Unit Modules, each unit’s Leveled eText Library, Text Collections, Sleuth, and printable resources.

On the website teachers can create classes to assign work, check on the status of assignments, create groups, and post class calendars. There is also a Data tab to gather and display and use data to promote student mastery of the standards. Also included on this website are Close Reading Modeling Videos, Independent Reading Modeling Videos, Accessible eTexts, and the customizable lesson planning tool: MyGen.

Accessibility was tested on Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Windows, Apple, Android mobile device, Safari, an iPhone. All access was successful. The eTexts are flash based. You will be unable to access eTexts on an iPad since they don’t support Flash. It is recommended to download the eTexts for Schools App if your device does not support the Flash player.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet expectations for supporting effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

Materials provide students with the ability to continue learning at home with activities aligned to unit texts, writing modes, and Enduring Understandings. Anchor texts are interactive to build background knowledge and help students access complex texts. Teachers have the option of assigning an e-text or interactive version of the anchor text to students on Pearson Realize. Interactivities can be displayed on an interactive whiteboard for use as part of whole group instruction, or students can access whatever texts have been assigned to them on an individual device. TikaTok allows students to write, illustrate and publish their own digital storybooks and projects. There are also Interactive graphic organizers that allow students to record as they read independently.


Online interactive tools such as Reader’s and Writer’s Journal, Monster Word Mania, Pack Up the Skills, Envision It! Animations, Letter Tile Drag and Drop, and Grammar Jammers are provided and can be assigned by the teacher, as well as Close and Independent Reading Videos to support students’ learning.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 include Digital materials that provide opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. An online Baseline Assessment is used to pinpoint students struggles while assessing the standards with complex text. Digital materials provide program-agnostic College and Career Readiness assessments, Balanced Practice Test, and Performance Tasks. Technology-Enhanced Items appear on the Baseline Assessment in First Grade on all End-of-Unit Assessments, and on program-agnostic Balanced Performance Tasks. Teachers can also build their own assessments.


The DATA tab of Realize provides class and student data, including standards mastery, overall progress, and time on task. Teachers can also view data individually by student from the class assignment list. Teachers can use this data to create assignments based on an individual student’s needs.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, MyGen, allows teachers to adapt any unit module. Teachers can replace any anchor or supporting text with another selection, create their own essential questions and enduring understandings, and identify lesson standards. Teachers can also develop Performance-Based assessments that are customized to their classroom.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 can be easily customized for local use. The online tool, MyGen, allows teachers to adapt any unit module. Teachers can replace any anchor or supporting text with another selection, create their own essential questions and enduring understandings, and identify lesson standards. Teachers can also develop Performance-Based assessments that are customized to their classroom.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Tue Apr 04 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Reading Sleuth Grade 1 978-0-328-81943-0 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Teacher's Guide Grade 1 Unit 1 978-0-328-85182-9 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Teacher's Guide Grade 1 Unit 2 978-0-328-85183-6 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Teacher's Guide Grade 1 Unit 3 978-0-328-85184-3 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Teacher's Guide Grade 1 Unit 4 978-0-328-85185-0 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Teacher's Guide Grade 1 Unit 5 978-0-328-85186-7 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Teacher's Guide Grade 1 Unit 6 978-0-328-85187-4 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Text Collection Grade 1 Unit 2 978-0-328-85273-4 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Text Collection Grade 1 Unit 3 978-0-328-85274-1 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Text Collection Grade 1 Unit 4 978-0-328-85275-8 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Text Collection Grade 1 Unit 5 978-0-328-85276-5 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Text Collection Grade 1 Unit 6 978-0-328-85277-2 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016
Implementation Guide Grade 1 978-0-328-85296-3 Copyright: 2016 Pearson 2016

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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