Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the expectations for alignment. The instructional materials do not meet the expectations for Gateway 1. The instructional materials do not meet the expectations of providing opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions about writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Materials partially met expectations of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language supporting foundational reading development and standards alignment and providing texts worthy of students’ time and attention while supporting students’ advancement toward independent reading. The instructional materials were not reviewed for Gateway 2.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
19
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
0
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Does Not Meet Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

Grade 5 Reading Street does not meet the Gateway 1 expectation of providing texts with quality and complexity and alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Materials partially meet the expectation of providing texts worthy of students’ time and attention while supporting students’ advancement toward independent reading. Materials do not meet the expectation of providing opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions about writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Lastly, materials partially meet the expectation of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language supporting foundational reading development and standards alignment.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
10/20
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-
Criterion Rating Details

Reading Street Grade 5 partially meets the expectation of texts being worthy of students’ time and attention. Some main selection texts are of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading. Texts are grouped into thematic units and no text is designated as an anchor text for the unit. Some reading selections are written by well-known award-winning authors and many reading selections would be interesting and engaging for Grade 5 students.

Unit main and paired selection texts include a mix of informational text and literature and a variety of genres, but do not meet the requirement for text distribution. Teachers may need to supplement materials to include more poetry, science and drama. There are no persuasive or argumentative anchor texts to meet the standards or model writing.

Main reading selections include a variety of complexity levels, but do not increase across the school year to encompass a whole grade level’s worth of growth. Many of the main selection texts have quantitative complexity levels that fall outside the Grade 4-5 complexity band or do not have appropriate qualitative complexity or tasks. Explicit rationale explaining complexity and placement of specific texts within the sequence of instruction is not given. Teachers are provided Lexile levels, qualitative measures, reader and task suggestions (anecdotal information), and a general recommended placement statement with no rationale for main selection texts. Generally, texts are related to the identified theme or topic of the week. ReferenceS to research or evidence-based best practices for increasing students’ reading skills through appropriate sequencing of text complexity are not present in the materials. The materials provide opportunities for students to build fluency, but do not provide explicit and systematic practice in both oral and silent reading throughout the year.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading. Texts are grouped into thematic units without a suggested anchor text. There are five texts in each theme and a paired selection to go along with each book, with an optional poem to end the 5-6 week unit.

Some texts are high quality, including rich language and engaging content. Accompanying illustrations are high quality as well, supporting students' understanding and comprehension of the associated text. Some examples of texts that fit this category include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Unit 3 -Special Effects in Film and Television, by Jake Hamilton. The content is clear and comprehensible, and the pictures illustrate the steps taken to make movies/shows.
  • Unit 4 - Tripping Over the Lunch Lady, by Angela Johnson. Well-crafted comic-like illustrations and storyline are included in this text.
  • Unit 6 - King Midas and the Golden Touch, retold by Charlotte Craft. This text includes rich language and clear message in its well-constructed story.

Other selections do not represent the same high quality as the examples provided above. Such texts include excerpts that may be missing information needed for students to understand the text. In some texts, much background knowledge is needed for students to engage with the materials. Some representative examples from the program that demonstrate this include:

  • Unit 1 - Island of the Blue Dolphins, by Scott O’Dell. Students read an excerpt (eight pages of text) from the novel and only get a summary of the main character’s experiences rather than detailed events. Students may be less engaged due to lack of detailed events. The inclusion of a lessonon writing a detailed narrative would more fully support the standards.
  • Unit 2 - A Summer’s Trade, by Deborah W. Trotter. This is a realistic fiction piece about Navajo culture. This text contains more content-specific vocabulary related to the Navajo culture, rather that Tier II vocabulary. Additionally, the illustrations lack a strong connection to the text and do not engage students fully.
  • Unit 5 - Journey to the Center of the Earth, by Jules Verne. Students read only one entry of Young Harry’s diary from the whole novel. Students follow Harry’s description of their encounter with sea creatures which requires no higher level thinking on the part of the reader. As this excerpt does not provide any resolution, students may be left wondering what happens beyond this particular day of the journey.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Unit main selection and paired selection texts include a mix of informational text and literature. Although there is a balance of informational and literary texts, the selections do not reflect a variety of genres.

Of the 30 anchor texts included for the course of the school year, 16 are literature and 14 are informational texts.The main reading selections are grouped into six units. Each unit contains at least one informational text and one literature text. For example, Unit 6, The Unexpected, contains three expository texts, one myth, and one realistic fiction reading selection.

Of the 30 paired texted included for the course of the school year, 11 are literary and 19 are informational texts. Paired reading selections for the unit’s main selections also include a balance of literature and informational text. For example, Unit 1, week 1, Meeting Challenges, The Red Kayak, a realistic fiction text, is paired with What Will I Do in an Emergency, a how-to-text.

Opportunities for students to read a complete novel or chapter book are needed in this program. The program exposes students to only a few pieces of poetry throughout the year and is lacking opportunities for students to read from the fantasy genre as well as text that expresses the author's opinion. One unit does provide additional poetry, but it is not a required unit.

While there are a variety of genres, the distribution is not equal. Teachers may need to supplement materials to include more poetry, science and drama.

The main reading selections present a variety of text types and genres. Examples include:

    • Technical Text: The Truth About Austin’s Amazing Bats, by Ron Fridell
    • Science: Talk with an Astronaut, by Dr. Ellen Ochoa
    • Social Studies: Ghost Towns of the American West, by Raymond Bial
    • Poetry: The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
    • Drama: The Fabulous Perpetual Motion Machine, by Don Abramson
    • Story: Tripping Over the Lunch Lady, by Angela Johnson

The paired reading selections present a variety of text types and genres. Examples include:

    • Story: Shipwreck Season, by Donna Hill
    • Drama: The Heroic Paul Revere, by Charles Blair
    • Poetry: Perfect Harmony, by Charles R. Smith Jr.
    • Social Studies: "The Mystery of the Hindenburg Disaster"
    • Science: "A Model Scientist," from Owl Magazine
    • Technical Text: "Searching for Animation"

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation of texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task. Some of the texts are outside the quantitative band for Grade 5, but there is variation in qualitative measures and reader and task demands. Rigor is uneven in main texts students read across the school year. To fully comprehend some texts and complete the associated tasks, students will need background knowledge as the overall rigor is outside the grade level.

The quantitative measures of the following texts are outside the grade level band for Grade 5. However the qualitative and reader and task measures bring the level of complexity to an appropriate level for Grade 5 students:

Unit 3, Week 2, Leonardo's Horse

  • Quantitative: Lexile 680
  • Qualitative: This text is slightly complex. The text structure is chronological, the language features are easy to understand, and the purpose is explicit. Some students may find the knowledge demand moderately complex due to specific content knowledge of the Renaissance Period.
  • Reader and Task: Struggling readers may need to understand the elements of a biography, prologues, locations in Italy, and life during the Renaissance Period. Students will be successful during the reading answering text-dependent questions and thinking about using knowledge of Greek and Latin roots to make sense of words. At the end, students write a persuasive speech. This may prove especially challenging for some students who are not experienced with writing opinion pieces, and the ability to self-select a topic removes potential text-based support for evidence gathering.

Unit 4, Week 3, "Exploding Ants"

  • Quantitative: Lexile 1020
  • Qualitative: While the Lexile level of this selection is outside of the Grade 4-5 text complexity band, the clear organization, explicit purpose, helpful text features, and conventional language features make it moderately complex and appropriate for Grade 5 readers. The subject matter is scientific, however the content assumes little prior knowledge beyond basic knowledge of animals. Scientific terms are typically accompanied with easy-to-understand synonyms, and sentence structures are clear and easy to follow.
  • Reader and Task: Students, with teacher support from the TE, will easily be able to analyze graphic sources and their functions, identify important ideas, use context clues and synonyms to define unfamiliar words, and explain main ideas and details. Students will be able to use non-fiction text features to aid comprehension.

Other texts fall outside the appropriate level of complexity for Grade 5, and students may need additional external support from the teacher to fully comprehend the content and/or engage with the associated tasks. Some examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

Unit 5, Week 5, Ghost Towns of the American West

  • Quantitative: Lexile 1170
  • Qualitative: This Lexile level is above the Grade 5 band, so the readability of this text will be challenging. The text is organized in logical progression, explaining the overall topic and why towns grew quickly, and reasons for their decline. Language demands are more complex. Vocabulary within this text is sophisticated and could be challenging. Some use of figurative language could be problematic ("pull up stakes," or "strike it rich"). The text also includes primary source information through the use of numerous embedded quotes often containing colloquial words or phrasing. Compound and complex sentence structures are used and grammatical features such as ellipses or dashes are used. Background knowledge may be required to fully engage with the material. Photos and illustrations, if utilized, would assist students greatly. While the topic would be engaging, language and knowledge demands would make this a complex text for students in Grade 5.
  • Reader and the Task: Understanding the geography or development of the American West would be crucial. Understanding of economic “push and pull” factors might also be problematic when the texts reference “economic failure” due to loss of resources (cattle and minerals). Reading the text should help students gain knowledge of the adventurers who helped drive Westward Expansion. After reading, students write a summary including the most important facts and details. Readers are also asked to consider the purpose of an expository text and use its feature, photos, illustrations, and captions to learn about the topic.

Unit 6, Week 4: The Hindenburg

  • Quantitative: Lexile 1000
  • Qualitative: The text structure is chronological, the language features are easy to understand, and the purpose is explicit. Some students may find the knowledge demands moderately complex due to specific content knowledge of the 1930’s.
  • Reader and the Task: Students may struggle with the structure of nonfiction text, aeronautical vocabulary and international events of the 1930s and may need more explicit reading support. . During reading, students will be successful identifying facts/opinions. Following the reading, students write a critique about a nonfiction book or story they have recently read using examples from the text and their own opinion. This task will be difficult for students who do not independently read non-fiction text.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations for the indicator of increasing complexity across the school year. While many of the main selections (19/30) fall within the “stretch” grade-level band (740-1010), over the course of the year, students are not supported to grow their literacy skills so that at the end of the school year, they are accessing and comprehending Grade 5 level texts. Guidance and scaffolded support from the teacher is suggested for regardless of the text complexity of the main selection. There is minimal support for the teacher to implement explicit instructions and time on texts that have very complex elements and demands.

Each main selection text contains a description of qualitative measures. Each main selection text contains reader and task suggestions to scaffold the text for students. These are general, broad suggestions for students in Grade 5.

For a Grade 5 reader, the main selections in the first unit all have a slightly complex structure. In Unit 5, four of the five selections are slightly complex. One main selection, The Hindenburg, has an unconventional structure making this text very complex. Students need more scaffolded support to access these texts with very complex structure besides two days of reading the text. Yet, all texts are read closely for two days. Furthermore, the majority of the texts in the final unit are only slightly complex in structure.

Suggestions are present to assist the teacher in supporting students who are struggling with the main selections, however there is minimal specificity within the suggestions. As the complexity level increases, more scaffolding for students is needed to access the text. Additional days may be needed to provide this scaffolding, which may extend beyond the two days currently allotted for the main selections.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation that anchor and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level. Main selections have this explanation included, but a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level is not provided for paired selections, teacher read-aloud, vocabulary skill selection, comprehension selection, or assessments.

A “Text Complexity Measures” rubric is provided for each main selection on the back of the week planning tab in the teacher edition. Quantitative metrics are provided for each anchor text in three categories: Lexile Level, Average Sentence Length, and Word Frequency. Qualitative measures are provided for each anchor text in four categories: levels of meaning, structure, language of conventionality and clarity, and theme and knowledge demands. Metrics provided for qualitative measures are in narrative form only and do not state the complexity level. For example, one narrative reads “Both the qualitative and quantitative measures suggest this text should be placed in the Grade 4-5 text complexity band, which is where both the Common Core State Standards and Scott Foresman Reading Street have placed it.” (TE, 5.5 week 3 tab) These explanations do not provide complete information for teacher planning.

An explicit rationale explaining complexity and placement of specific texts within the sequence of instruction is not provided. References to research-based or evidence-based best practices for increasing students’ reading skills through appropriate sequencing of text complexity are not included. For example, in Unit 1, the students read Red Kayak and a paired passage called, "What Will I Do in an Emergency". There connection between the two passages is not explained. In the Reading and Writing Across Tasks there is guidance for the teacher to ask questions about the two passages.

For anchor texts falling outside the grade 4-5 text complexity band, more text-specific explanations are provided, such as the one for Mahalia Jackson: “Several of the quantitative measures suggest this text may be challenging for some students at this level. Provide scaffolded support to help students get meaning from the longer sentences. The conversational writing style and less rigorous vocabulary should help students stretch to successfully access the content of this selection.”

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation for support materials providing opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading. Materials provide some opportunities for independent reading. There are many missed opportunities to address independent reading, and teacher materials often lack explicit directions.

  • Students miss an opportunity to read a full novel/chapter book with teacher guidance and scaffolding if the teacher is following the Teacher's Manual.
  • Students read the main selection, paired selection, Sleuth, and leveled readers with teacher guidance. The Trade Book Library is available for teacher and student use online; however, the teacher materials often lack explicit directions.
  • Teacher directions for the oral rereading strategy are vague, and implementation is unclear when considering time management and classroom management.
  • Opportunities for independent reading are explicitly identified as one of the small group stations students are supposed to complete every day, but length of time devoted to this activity per student is not identified.
  • The “Research and Inquiry” portion of each daily lesson has potential to provide independent reading time, but it was never explicitly stated that students should work independently.
  • Throughout every lesson, every day, directions in the teacher edition begin with the words “Have students read...” followed by a particular paragraph, page, or passage. The majority of the time it is not explicitly stated whether students should be reading independently, with partners, orally, or silently. These instructions accompany the anchor text as well as the support texts. They cover a wide range of content, themes, and topics.
  • More challenging text is suggested through the use of the leveled readers (supplemental resource) as a part of the independent reading station for advanced readers.
  • Independent station directions at the beginning of each week in the teacher edition, provide guidance for the types of independent reading texts students should be choosing, but specific titles are rarely offered.
  • The assessment handbook also provides a reading log template so that students can track their independent reading (page 143).

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
6/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

Reading Street Grade 5 does not meet the expectation for materials providing opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Consistent opportunities for students to answer text-dependent questions and complete text-dependent tasks and assignments are needed. Teacher materials do not provide complete support for planning and implementing text dependent writing, speaking, and tasks. Additionally, some culminating tasks can be completed without understanding of the text. Teacher materials lack the needed support for implementation. Some opportunities for students to engage in text-based discussions integrating vocabulary and syntax are provided in the materials, but there are limited teacher recommendations, instructional supports, and protocols provided. Materials support speaking and listening standards but are lacking teacher directions and support for implementation in the classroom and do not increase in rigor over the course of the year. Materials provide a mix of process and on-demand writing, but some writing tasks lack alignment to grade-level standards. Materials provide opportunities to write across different genres, but do not met the distribution required by the standards and do not consistently connect writing tasks to texts read. Materials do not consistently provide opportunities for text based writing. Some tasks are disconnected from main selection texts, and they do not build over the course of the year. Teacher resources on how to implement evidence-based writing are needed. materials include limited explicit instruction of some grammar and convention standards but are not presented in a sequence of increasingly sophisticated contexts over the course of the year. Additional opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills in context are needed.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation for most questions, tasks, and assignments being text-specific and requiring students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both explicit as well as valid inferences from the text. Teacher materials lack complete support for planning and implementing text dependent writing and tasks.

The questions in the instructional materials are labeled synthesis, inference, evaluation, and analysis. Questions (text-dependent/text-specific and non text-dependent/text-specific) are included throughout the course of the school year to check comprehension.

The following contain text-dependent questions, which allow students to draw inferences:

  • Weekly main selection reading passages contain text-dependent questions and tasks (e.g., TE book 5.6, pages 328-329, “What opinion did the bridge designers have of the bats?)How do you know? TE book 5.6, pages 336-337, “Reread the saying on page 331. . .What does this saying mean? Do you agree with this saying when it’s applied to bats? Provide evidence form the article to support your answer.”)
  • Weekly text-based comprehension passages have text-specific tasks (e.g., TE book 5.6, pages 320-321, “Draw a conclusion about why butterflies migrate to Mexico . . . What information does this paragraph tell you?”)
  • Weekly Assessment passages contain text-dependent questions (e.g., TE book 5.6, page 343l, “What opinion do you think Mr. Bleeker has of graffiti?" What makes you draw this conclusion?”)
  • Weekly “Sleuth” passages contain text-dependent tasks (e.g., TE book 5.6, page SG-2, “List three details from the story that show why Aubrey became motivated to fix up the playground.”)
  • Leveled readers used during weekly small group time (optional) contain text-dependent questions/task (e.g., leveled reader online teacher guide, page 59, “What situation resulting in Austin’s massive population of Mexican free-tail bats?” and filing out a cause/effect graphic organizer using text evidence).
  • The weekly “Research and Inquiry” project is a text-dependent assignment, but students must find the text because it is not provided. TE directions provide general guidance on research, note taking, and synthesis of information, but explicit instructions, lessons, and models are not included.
  • In Unit 1, Red Kayak: "What do you think makes people act to save others?"
  • In Unit 3, The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins: "What modern-day artistic or scientific achievement might be considered remarkable?"
  • In Unit 5, The Skunk Ladder: "Have you ever had a solution to a problem that didn't work out the way you had wanted? What did you learn from that experience?"

The following are non text-dependent questions that can be answered without reading the text:

  • In Unit 1, Red Kayak: "What do you think makes people act to save others?"
  • In Unit 3, The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins: "What modern-day artistic or scientific achievement might be considered remarkable?"
  • In Unit 5, The Skunk Ladder: "Have you ever had a solution to a problem that didn't work out the way you had wanted? What did you learn from that experience?"

Additional instructions are needed for teachers to assist students in using details from the text in their answer, selecting significant evidence, appropriately paraphrasing, quoting, transitioning between paragraphs, citing sources, or further explaining when providing text-dependent written or spoken answers.

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
0/2
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the expectation for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Some culminating tasks can be completed without reading or understanding of the text.

Throughout the week’s unit, students are engaged in answering text-dependent questions and completing text-dependent tasks about their reading. However, weekly culminating writing tasks are based on the unit’s theme rather than the unit texts. The theme of Unit 1 is “Meeting Challenges.” The Unit 1, week 1 “Research and Inquiry” question of the week is "What inspires people to act courageously?" The students are asked to research a courageous person and create a multimedia presentation about their person on Day 5. On Week 5 of that same unit, the question of the week is "What challenges do immigrants encounter?" The students are asked to research challenges that immigrants face and present their findings on Day 5.

Each unit contains a review week that is optional, during which students encounter activities that review each main selection previously read, answer questions, and complete tasks that relate back to the theme of the unit rather than deepening content knowldge by learning from the text. For example, the TE page UR1 asks, “What can we learn from encounters with the unexpected?”

Main Selections are broken into two parts if the teacher wishes to read only a portion at a time. There is a suggested writing task included in this break, but it is not tied to the reading. For example, the writing task between the two sections of Island of the Blue Dolphins (Unit 1, week 3) is to write an invitation, however this task is not connected to the reading. Some selections ask the students to write in the genre of the text being read. For example, A Summer’s Trade (Unit 2, week 4) has students write a personal narrative, but does not specifically ask students about the text selection.

Students are asked to write at the end of each selection in the “Think Critically” section following the end of the anchor text in, “Think Back and Write.” In this activity students are asked to respond to a prompt and use evidence. In each of these tasks, students are working from Key Ideas and Details standards 1-3 though no scaffolding or conversation is included. The TE explains that this writing task is to build fluency. A Scoring Rubric is included in the TE and highlights the details the student should include in the writing.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
0/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the expectation for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. Some opportunities for students to engage in text-based discussions integrating vocabulary and syntax are provided in the materials, but there are limited teacher recommendations, instructional supports, and protocols.

Neither the teacher edition nor the online “First Stop” contains protocols for evidence-based discussions in the classroom. While numerous evidence-based questions/tasks are posed in the teacher script, very few include explicit instructions for partner or small group discussion. With no clear instructions, it is possible that teachers will pose the questions/tasks in a whole group format, providing only a few students with opportunities to speak.

Each weekly unit contains a set of “Amazing Words” which are the academic and oral vocabulary words for the week. The teacher goes through a series of steps to introduce the words, demonstrate understanding, apply understanding and then display the word in the classroom on Day 3 of the week. Students are sometimes asked questions that relate the academic vocabulary to the text, but they are not associated with listening and speaking activities (e.g., Unit 6, week 2, TE, page 356b, “Stocking the island with reindeer could be considered a grandiose plan. Think about what it means to be grandiose. What are some ways people can be grandiose?”) The Listening and Speaking segment is usually on Day 4 of each week (e.g., Unit 4, week 1, Listening and Speaking is a "how-to demonstration") and provides guidance for a variety of speaking and listening skills, but no instruction for use of academic vocabulary and syntax exists. “Build Oral Vocabulary” on Day 5 provides some instructions for evidence-based partner discussions but no instruction for use of academic vocabulary and syntax. “Research and Inquiry” on Day 5 provides guidance for speaking and listening skills but lacks instruction for use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Some oral language development around vocabulary occurs in the “Content Knowledge” section at the beginning of each day when students work on “Amazing Words.” However, it does not support evidence-based discussions to the required depth. In the first question, students relate a vocabulary word to one of the supporting texts they read by looking for context clues to define the word. The second question asks students a text-dependent question about the word. Two of the other questions/tasks focus on decoding, root words or require students to use their prior knowledge. For example in Unit 3 (page 325a) students learn about the word "experiment." They say it with the teacher, talk about a time they did an experiment, or practice segmenting the syllables. Syntax is not emphasized.

Some partner discussions are identified in the TE with a small blue “Team Talk” rectangle and are focused on evidence-based questions.

At the end of each anchor text, students are asked to retell and use evidence. A rubric is provided for the teacher that includes three details the students should include. Students are not required, nor does the rubric include, use of amazing words (academic vocabulary). The use of correct syntax is not included in the rubric.

Selection vocabulary discussions fall short of explicitly encouraging the use of academic vocabulary and syntax. The partner discussions that include use of academic vocabulary and syntax are sometimes found in the daily writing fluency routine partner talks.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence. Materials support speaking and listening standards but do not increase in rigor over the course of the year. There is an absence of teacher directions and support for implementation in the classroom. Weekly speaking and listening instruction is provided explicitly over the course of the school year in the following sections:

  • Some weekly units do not provide opportunities for students to practice speaking and listening (e.g., Unit 6, week 4).
  • Follow-up questions to ask students during listening and speaking activities would help provide additional support for the teacher. For example, in Unit 6, week 3, students read King Midas and the Golden Touch. The writing prompt for the week is “In King Midas and the Golden Touch, a greedy king wishes that everything he touches would turn into gold. Imagine if the king’s touch had turned things into something other than gold. What would it be? Write a parody, telling this story.” The speaking and listening activity for the week is for “students to present their stories to the class” (TE, page, 401a).
  • Within the “Research and Inquiry” project, the topics provide some opportunities for students to listen and speak. In the Guided Practice activity, students consult with others as they decide or create questions on that topic. However, minimal guidance is provided to help students build on one another’s ideas, clarify, or ask questions. The research activities on other days of the week do not require students to participate in specific listening and speaking skills. They may work on word processing (Unit 5, week 3, page 353b) or review and print online sources (Unit 5, week 3, page 337b). On Day 5, students communicate their research through a brief presentation. The TE asks teachers to remind students about good speaking skills: volume, gestures, eye contact, language that shares thoughts clearly, and the use of details. It also reminds the students about listening skills, such as being polite, even if the listener disagrees, but does not indicate how a listener might disagree respectfully.
  • Instructional supports for listening and speaking are provided, however, facilitation supports (how to effectively manage time for all students to present on Day 4 and Day 5) and monitoring supports and clear methods for monitoring/assessing are not provided.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation of materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects incorporating digital resources where necessary.

Each week, students participate in process writing. The prompt sometimes connects to the theme, setting, or genre of the main selection. A typical routine has students “Read Like a Writer” on Day 1, brainstorm on Day 2, write a draft on Day 3, revise on Day 4 and proofread and present their project on Day 5. A two-week plan is available and prescribes four days to plan and prewrite, three days to draft, one day to revise, one day to edit, and one day to publish and present. Additional time is not allotted for revising, editing, and rewriting multiple drafts of process writing tasks. Weekly process writing projects encourage use of technology for presentations.

On-demand writing prompts in “Write to Source” incorporate reading and writing using text evidence. (e.g., Unit 3, week 1: students write an argumentative response to a prompt between two texts The Fabulous Perpetual Motion Machine and The Toy Space Shuttle is Here).

Weekly writing tasks incorporate what is being learned with the writing task for each day (e.g., Unit 3,, week 3: students incorporate irregular verbs in their writing and focus on this when proofreading for errors.) On demand “Let’s Write” tasks are part of the daily independent stations.

On demand, “Quick Write for Fluency” tasks are part of the daily writing instruction provided in the teacher edition. It should be noted that the prompts are academic in nature and, therefore, may not provide student engagement for easy, fluent writing.

On demand, “Look Back and Write” tasks are the final evidence-based question (provided in the student edition and teacher edition) at the end of each main selection.

There are some opportunities to revise or edit, however, the instructional materials do not cover standards W.4 and W.5 in the Daily Writing Focus or the Research and Inquiry as students are given infrequent opportunities to peer edit or revise during daily writing or prior to the research presentation on Day 5; the only edits/revising the students complete is self-editing. In the Writing focus of the week, students have the opportunity to participate in Peer Conferencing/Peer Revision on Day 4.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation of materials providing opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Materials provide opportunities to write across different genres, but do not meet the distribution required by the standards.

The materials do not reflect the distribution required by the standards throughout the main writing tasks provided in the teacher edition. There are five weekly writing tasks per unit and 1 optional unit process writing task. Opportunities to practice opinion style (argument/persuasive) writing are minimal. Eleven percent of the writing tasks in the Teacher's Edition are opinion tasks. The three writing genres in Grade 5 are not evenly balanced. The distribution for these tasks are:

  • Informative/explanatory: 7/36
  • Opinion: 4/36 (Unit 5 Writing Process; Unit 3, Week 2-Persuasive Speech; Unit 3, Week 3-Advertising Brochure; Unit 5, Week 3-Letter to the Editor)
  • Narrative: 13/36
  • Other: 12/36

“Writing to Sources” (a Common Core Teacher Resource) contains writing prompts for students to write to the CCSS using text evidence. Note: this is a supplemental resource and is not part of the Teacher Edition’s weekly planning. Each unit has a focus: Unit 1 focus: Informative/Explanatory; Unit 2 writing focus: Narrative; Unit 3 writing focus: Argumentative; Unit 4 writing focus: Informative/Explanatory; Unit 5 writing focus: Argumentative; Unit 6 writing focus: Narrative. Each week’s main reading selection has two writing options in “Writing to Sources.” The materials do not provide support for "Writing to Sources" in the teacher directions. More instructional guidance needs be provided to the teacher for the time spent on each writing task. Teachers can have students “Write like a Reporter” or write to “Connect Texts,” which are suggested in the Teacher's Edition, but like "Writing to Sources," directions are minimal for implementation of the supplemental resources.

Opportunities for assessment and progress monitoring are provided by rubrics accompanying the weekly process writing task and for the “Writing to Sources” assignments.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation of materials providing frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. Some tasks are disconnected from main selection texts, and they do not build over the course of the year. Teacher resources on how to implement evidence-based writing are not provided.

“Writing to Sources,” a supplemental resource, provides opportunities for students to write using evidence. Writing to Sources does not provide explicit teacher directions on how to teach students to write opinion, narrative, or informative/explanatory texts. This resource contains writing prompts. When students “Write Like a Reporter” teachers are provided a checklist on what student writing should include. When students write to “Connect the Texts,” teachers are provided a writing rubric. Brief directions for student discussion and planning are included, along with basic statements such as “Remind students to reread the text carefully and base their responses on details from the original story” (page 7) and “Remind students to use descriptive details and sensory language from both texts to develop their narratives” (page 49).

Weekly Teacher Edition materials do not include complete support for planning and implementation of evidence-based writing. Questions and tasks posed during reading comprehension often provide instructions for teachers to tell students to use details from the text in their answer, but there is no explicit instruction on how to select significant evidence, appropriately paraphrase, quote, transition, cite sources, or further explain when providing evidence-based written answers.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation of materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and convention standards for the grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of the context. Materials include some explicit instruction of some grammar and convention standards but are not presented in a sequence of increasingly sophisticated contexts over the course of the year. Opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills in context are limited.

Some standards covered are not provided at the appropriate grade level. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1 included is a lesson about types of sentences and punctuating those sentences (TE, page 50o). The use of end punctuation is taught in Grade 1 (L.1.2.b)
  • In Unit 1, Week 5, there is a lesson on common and proper nouns (TE, page 161e). Common and proper nouns are taught in Grade 1 (L.1.1.b).
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, there is a lesson on possessive nouns (TE, page 213c). Possessive nouns are taught in Grade 2 (L.2.2.c).
  • In Unit 6, Week 2 (TE, page 369o), there is a lesson on conjunctions. Conjunctions are taught in Grade 1 (L.1.1.g).

Many convention and grammar skills are taught in Grade 3, Grade, 4, Grade 5, and Grade 6 such as the four kinds of sentences.

Each unit has a daily direct instruction lesson on “Conventions.” Each week focuses on specific grammar skill and convention. Each day explicit instruction takes place, and students practice the skill with worksheets from Grammar Transparencies, Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook, and Let’s Practice It!

The following language skills are taught: Unit 1: four kinds of sentences, subjects and predicates, independent and dependent clauses, compound and complex sentences, and common, proper, and collective nouns; Unit 2: regular and irregular plural nouns, possessive nouns, action and linking verbs, main and helping verbs, and subject-verb agreement; Unit 3: past, present, and future tenses, principal parts of regular verbs, principle parts of irregular verbs, troublesome verbs, prepositions and prepositional phrases; Unit 4: subject and object pronouns, pronouns and antecedents, possessive pronouns, indefinite and reflexive pronouns, and using who and whom; Unit 5: contractions and negatives, adjectives and articles, this/that/these/those, comparative and superlative adjectives, and adverbs; and Unit 6: modifiers, conjunctions, commas, quotations and quotation marks, and punctuation.

Grammar instruction does not cover some Grade 5 Standards (conjunctions, interjections, perfect verb tenses, correlative conjunctions, and indicating titles of works).

Teacher instructions occasionally call for students to search for and identify the grammar or convention trait within the main selection.

On the “Let’s Write It!” page in the student edition, the weekly writing task is described, along with a “Conventions” callout at the bottom of the page where the student is reminded how to properly apply that week’s skill in his/her writing.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
3/6
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Grade 5 Reading Street partially meets the expectation of materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language supporting foundational reading development and aligning to standards. Materials sometimes include common prefixes and derivational suffixes, multi syllable words, and grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words. However, materials do not provide a cohesive sequence that builds toward application. Additionally, materials do not provide students opportunity to demonstrate that they have made meaning of the grade texts. Finally, materials provide opportunities for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy and fluency in oral and silent reading, but directions for students to apply reading skills independently are not given. Materials do not support an increase in students’ reading ability across the grade level band over the course of the year.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation of materials, questions, and tasks addressing CCSS foundational skills and reading fluency. Materials sometimes include common prefixes and derivational suffixes, multi syllable words, and grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words. Materials do not provide a cohesive sequence that builds toward application.

The materials contain weekly spelling units of 20 spelling words with some explicit instruction. Instruction and practice often occurs in isolation and may be more effective if done in context. . Minimalemphasis is placed on meanings of words or word parts, and tasks do not build to application of skills other than spelling. On Day 1, students take the spelling pretest. On Day 2, students receive a mini-lesson on a spelling rule and practice the rule with their spelling words. On Day 3, students work with frequently misspelled words. On Day 4, students practice a spelling strategy, and on Day 5, students take the spelling test. These weekly activities lack a cohesive sequence that builds toward application.

Spelling instruction includes: Unit 1: short vowels, long vowels, digraphs, suffixes, and contractions; Unit 2: digraphs, irregular plurals, vowels with r, final syllables, and final syllables; Unit 3: schwa, compound words, consonants, consonants, and prefixes; Unit 4: cultural words, prefixes, homophones, suffixes, and negative prefixes; Unit 5: multisyllabic words, related words, Greek words, Latin roots, and Greek word parts; Unit 6: suffixes, final syllables, Latin roots, related words, and confusing words.

Visual aids for spelling are not included in the materials. The materials direct the teacher to write a list on chart paper or on the board, orally define the word parts, then have students copy down the chart or list, circle or underline word parts, then define and/or discuss. Though it is not included in the materials, continuous instruction and skill reinforcement throughout the week, supported by visual aids, would support students in their acquisition of word structure knowledge.

Amazing Word (TE Only) activities develop student vocabulary connected to the anchor text that students read in the unit. 10 above grade level words are presented each week. Word Analysis on Day 2 and Day 5 also focus on roots and affixes.

Selection Vocabulary is present in Teacher Edition and Student Edition. Anywhere from five to nine words are introduced each week. Word lists follow a theme every week, categorized by context clues (homographs, homonyms, antonyms, multiple-meaning words, and unfamiliar words), word structure (Greek and Latin roots, word endings, prefixes, and suffixes), and dictionary/glossary skills (unknown words). On Day 1 students are introduced to vocabulary, though it is not supported by context.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks guide students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading. Materials do not provide students opportunity to demonstrate that they have made meaning of the grade texts.

Students are provided opportunities to practice oral vocabulary on Days 1-4 with assessment on Day 5.

  • On Day 1 during “Build Oral Vocabulary”, students are asked to listen for Amazing Words (academic vocabulary) as the teacher reads aloud the selection. Following the read aloud, students are asked several questions about the Amazing Words, but students do not need to attack unfamiliar words because the teacher is reading the selection.
  • On Day 5 during “Build Oral Vocabulary”, students are told to work with a partner and discuss the theme question, though they are not required to apply their foundational reading skills to attack unfamiliar words.

Amazing Words provides some vocabulary instruction with the intent of supporting students in making meaning. For example, in Unit 2, week 5, questions in the TE asks students to look for context clues to make meaning of the word battlefield. It also asks students to look at the word as a compound word and to work with the syllabication of this word. In some Word Analysis sections, students are asked to break words apart to see if they can use word parts to make meaning. Most of these words are included in the text. However, most of these activities take place outside of the actual reading of the text.

Selection Vocabulary activities do not provide ongoing opportunities for students to demonstrate mastery of application of word analysis skills to grade-level text. Opportunities that are provided are typically decontextualized. As words are introduced, students are encouraged to use them correctly and provide examples in partner and class discussions. Students are also encouraged to define vocabulary using context clues and other strategies as they are presented in context in the “Vocabulary Strategy” passage on Day 2. Directions do not specify whether students are to perform these tasks independently, in partners, or as part of the whole group.

Word Analysis structures taught are rarely used in context during instruction and practice. Words and word parts are typically isolated, and students build, deconstruct, and define words and word parts.

Students are are assessed over the Word Analysis words on a Weekly Test. Roughly a quarter of the questions are isolated sentences where students are asked to fill in the blank with the best word to complete the sentence or find a word with the same meaning as the underlined word. Four possible responses are provided for the students

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation of instructional opportunities for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading. Materials provide opportunities for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy and fluency in oral and silent reading, but directions for students to apply reading skills independently are not given. Materials do not allow an increase in students’ reading ability across the grade level band over the course of the year.

Each week, days 1-4 have an activity focused on fluency. On day 5, some students are assessed on their oral fluency.

Lexile levels are provided only for main selections. It is not stated whether assessments and other reading passages used for fluency activities are within the fifth grade level band as Lexile levels are not provided.

Teacher directions for the implementation of the oral rereading strategy need greater specificity with regards to timeand classroom management.

The fourth day of each week includes instructions in the student edition for fluency practice, using either a page from the anchor text or one of the support texts. In the teacher edition, teachers are instructed to use this fluency practice piece for progress monitoring, measuring students’ words correct per minute (WCPM). Current and End-of-Year Goals for WCPM are provided, but a tracking sheet (for teacher’s marks/records and words per line) is not provided. Instructions for time management and classroom management are not provided (i.e., How many students should the teacher assess? What are other students doing during this time?)

Goals for WCPM do not take text complexity into account. This is an important consideration as the Lexile levels of some anchor texts reach well beyond Grade 5 expectations, and Lexile levels of the support texts are not provided.

The fifth day of each week includes a fluency passage and directions for progress monitoring. A reproducible page/tracking sheet and Current and End-of-Year Goals are provided. A plan for which students to assess (advanced, on level, or strategic intervention) is provided. Throughout every lesson, directions in the teacher edition begin with the words, “Have students read...” followed by a particular paragraph, page, or passage. Often, the directions do not specify whether students should be reading independently, with partners, orally, or silently.

The assessment handbook (accessed online) provides a Fluency Progress Chart (page 281), the “Monitor Progress” passages referenced in the teacher edition, an assessment chart (page 383), and benchmark goals for fluency. These tools will be used by students for the purpose of monitoring their own progress, however, this is not stated in the handbook. The assessment handbook also provides a reading log template so students can track their independent reading (page 143), as well as an “About My Reading” self-reflection page (page 144).

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Not Rated

Criterion 2a - 2h

0/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
0/4

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
0/4

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
0/4

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
0/4

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
0/4

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
0/4

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
0/4

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
0/4

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Thu Apr 06 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2013

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
978-0-328-72455-0 Copyright: 2013 0
978-0-328-72456-7 Copyright: 2013 0
978-0-328-72539-7 Copyright: 2013 0
978-0-328-72540-3 Copyright: 2013 0
978-0-328-72541-0 Copyright: 2013 0
978-0-328-72542-7 Copyright: 2013 0
978-0-328-72543-4 Copyright: 2013 0
978-0-328-72544-1 Copyright: 2013 0
978-0-328-7317-7 Copyright: 2013 0
978-0-328-73367-5 Copyright: 2013 0
978-0-328-76859-2 Copyright: 2013 0

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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