Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 do not meet the expectations for alignment. The instructional materials do not meet the expectations for Gateway 1. The instructional materials do not meet the expectations of providing opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions about writing about texts to build strong literacy skills nor of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language supporting foundational reading development and standards alignment. Materials partially meet the expectations of providing texts worthy of students’ time and attention while supporting students’ advancement toward independent reading. The instructional materials were not reviewed for Gateway 2.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
19
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
8
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Does Not Meet Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

Grade 4 Reading Street does not meet the Gateway 1 expectation of providing texts with quality and complexity and alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Materials partially meet the expectation of providing texts worthy of students’ time and attention while supporting students’ advancement toward independent reading. Materials do not meet the expectation of providing opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions about writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Lastly, materials do not meet the expectation of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language supporting foundational reading development and standards alignment.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
10/20
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-
Criterion Rating Details

Reading Street Grade 4 partially meets the expectation of texts being worthy of students’ time and attention. Some main selection texts are of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading. Texts are grouped into thematic units, and no text is designated as an anchor text for the unit. Some reading selections are written by well-known authors and many reading selections would be interesting and engaging for Grade 4 students. Unit main selections and paired selection texts include a mix of informational text and literature and a variety of genres, but do not meet the requirement for text distribution. Teachers may need to supplement materials to include more full-length novels, science fiction, and a memoir. Main reading selections include a variety of complexity levels, but do not increase across the school year to encompass a whole grade level’s worth of growth. Many main selection texts have quantitative complexity levels that fall outside of the Grade 4-5 complexity band or do not have appropriate qualitative complexity or tasks. Explicit rationale explaining complexity and placement of specific texts within the sequence of instruction is not provided. Teachers are provided Lexile levels, qualitative measures, reader and task suggestions (anecdotal information), and a general recommended placement statement with no rationale for main selection texts. Generally, texts are related to the identified theme or topic of the week.There is no reference to research or evidence-based best practices for increasing students’ reading skills through appropriate sequencing of text complexity. Finally, materials provide opportunities for students to build fluency but do not provide explicit and systematic practice in both oral and silent reading throughout the year.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading. There are five texts in each theme and a paired selection to go along with each book, with an optional poem to end the 5-6 week unit. Some reading selections are written by well-known, award-winning authors, and many reading selections would be interesting and engaging for Grade 4 students. Guided practice throughout the week will help support the students advancing toward independent reading.

Following are some texts that represent how these materials partially meet the expectations of indicator 1a. Some expository texts are content-rich and accompanied by quality illustrations and photographs. Some fiction texts include rich language and well-crafted narrative and prose, such as these representative examples:

  • Unit 1 - The Horned Toad Prince, by Jackie Mims Hopkins.
  • Unit 2 - So You Want to Be President? by Judith St. George.
  • Unit 3 - Paul Bunyan, by Mary Pope Osborne.

Other selections included may not support students learning easily and may need extra support from the teacher. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 1 - Because of Winn Dixie, by Kate DiCamillo. Students only get an excerpt of this novel and enter the text after the story’s exposition, which may be challenging to readers. A close read would be difficult since the exposition is missing.
  • Unit 1 - On the Banks of Plum Creek, by Laura Ingalls Wilder. This text is an excerpt of the novel. It is the third book in the series, so students miss the backstories of all the characters. Students do not start reading this text in Chapter 1, thereby missing the exposition of the chapter book.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Unit main selections and paired selections include a mix of informational text and literary text and a variety of genres, but do not meet the standards requirement for text distribution for Grade 4.

Main and paired selections include a mix of informational and literary texts. Each unit has a science or social studies goal built into the unit, along with an optional poetry unit at the end of the unit.

The main reading selections are grouped into six units. All of the units contain at least one informational text and one literary text. There are a total of 15 literary and 15 informational Texts.

  • Unit 1 - 4 literary and 1 informational
  • Unit 2 - 3 literary and 2 informational
  • Unit 3 - 2 literary and 3 informational
  • Unit 4 - 3 literary and 2 informational
  • Unit 5 - 1 literary and 4 informational
  • Unit 6 - 2 literary and 3 informational

The time spent on the informational selections is the same as the time spent on literary selections when reading the main selections. However, when the paired reading selections for the unit's main selections are included, the readings are nearly all informational with 26 informational paired texts and only four literary paired texts. The balance of informational and literary reading selections does not adhere to the recommendations in the Common Core State Standards for Grade 4 students because of the emphasis on informational text in the paired selections as well as the emphasis on literary texts of main selections in the first four units.

There are a variety of different types of selections offered in terms of informational selections. For example, the publisher materials include the following: several biographies, a magazine article, an autobiography, an argument/persuasive essay, online directories, and a movie review.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the expectations for main texts to have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task. Rigor is uneven in the main texts students read. Many texts fall into the appropriate grade level band for quantitative measures, but there is variation in qualitative measures. To fully comprehend some texts and complete the associated tasks, students will need background knowledge as the overall rigor is above grade level for texts over the course of the school year. In some cases, the teacher may need to identify other resources to support students' understanding of the texts. .

The materials include quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task for each main selection on a “Text Based Comprehension” page.

For some texts, the quantitative measures of are "outside" the grade-level band for Grade 4; however, the qualitative measures and reader and task measures bring the level of complexity to an appropriate level for Grade 4 students. Some representative examples include, but are not limited to the following:

Unit 1, Week 2; Lewis and Clark and Me

  • Quantitative: Lexile 480
  • Qualitative: This historical fiction text has a complex structure. It weaves diary entries written by Meriwether Lewis into the fictional story. The conventionality and vocabulary are highly complex with dialects and high-level vocabulary. This text depicts different life experiences from that of a Grade 4 student since it is historical fiction. It also refers to Native American culture which may be unfamiliar to some students.
  • Reader and Task: Students will be engaged by the narration of the book from the point of view of the dog, but may have a difficult time understanding the Lewis and Clark expedition. Students can use the journal entries and the map to guide historical understanding. The students will need support to understand first-hand accounts and chronological events, which are woven into the first person narrative.

Unit 1, Week 3, The Horned Toad Prince

  • Quantitative: Lexile 1000
  • Qualitative: This trickster tale has a slightly complex structure. The organization is chronological. The text is qualitatively complex because it includes challenging elements in conventionality and vocabulary such as personification, jargon, and non-English words.
  • Reader and Task: Students will need background knowledge about trickster tales and how characters interact in trickster tales. Students list the toad’s actions and then describe what the toad is doing in those actions. If they find the language too difficult, then the students can make a list and use the text to figure out what the words/phrases mean.

Unit 6, Week 1: My Brother the Martian

  • Quantitative: Lexile 1060 (Higher than Lexile Band and Stretch Band)
  • Qualitative: The organization of this text is complex because in the story, time progresses quickly as the children grow into adults. The text is chronological with hints of the future. The illustrations support the text, although not all the original illustrations are in this version which may impede student comprehension of the text. Sentence structure and length is varied. Some of the sentences contain figurative language that is more complex such as "These stories were as nourishing as the food that was set before us" (page 339). The vocabulary is complex and academic. Examples of vocabulary in context: "...before the generations of cruelty and injustice that Daddy...had been shielding us from finally broke through." (page 337). The theme is more complex for the reader to interpret. The reader can figure out the overall theme once the text is completed.
  • Reader and Task: Readers would need background knowledge of Martin Luther King Jr., segregation, and civil rights. Knowledge of biographies would help readers understand how the text was written. Readers would need to slow down with the teacher to analyze the deeper figurative language. Readers may need more scaffolding to read the speech.

Some texts have qualitative or quantitative features that do not fully support students' growing literacy skills according to the demands of the standards for Grade 4, as they are less or more rigorous to a degree that may require extensive extra support from the teacher. Examples include, but are not limited to the following:

Unit 3, Week 2, Adeline's Whales

  • Quantitative: Lexile 1080 (publisher); 1110 Lexile.com
  • Qualitative: The anchor text is an expository text with an explicit structure; the purposed for reading this text is to understand expository text and that factual information can be delivered in a variety of formats. Lengthy sentences in the text may add to its complexity. Students would need to identify the main action and then break the sentences down to understandable parts. Therefore, frequent checks for understanding may be necessary by the teacher. Teacher suggestions provided by the publisher are to point out how graphic sources such as diagrams and maps, and text features, such as photos and captions can help readers understand expository text. Teachers are also directed to remind students that they may have to adjust their reading rate to understand the longer sentences in the selection.
  • The qualitative level of difficulty is above the text complexity band for Grade 4; scaffolding is required to ensure students can access the content, but only two readings of the text are planned in the teacher’s edition. Students may struggle with the vocabulary in this selection at the Grade 4 level as well.

Unit 3, Week 4: Eye of the Storm

  • Reader and Task: Students will need background knowledge about whales and migration since many students may have little to no experience with marine animals.
  • Quantitative: Lexile 1060 (publisher); Lexile.com 990
  • Qualitative: The anchor text is an expository text. The purpose for reading this text is to understand Warren’s motivation to chase storms, understand that factual information can be delivered in a variety of forms, and identify realistic situations. The structure is complex, including captions and headings. A basic knowledge of the geography of the United States is necessary. Students may have difficulty with the structure of the text on some pages. Teachers are asked to point out that there is an introductory photo caption, followed by text from the story. The chart and pictures at the bottom of the page will need to be referred to as graphic support for the text. Teachers are encouraged to review skills and strategies for understanding root words to prepare students for the text.
  • Reader and Task: Students will need background knowledge of the geography of the United States in order to understand where and why hurricanes occur. The TE suggests teacher help students gain geography understanding by taking notes about places in the selection and locate on a map. An understanding of text and graphic features is necessary to access the content. Students will need to adjust reading rate as they encounter challenging vocabulary and concepts.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 4 materials partially meet the expectations for the indicator of increasing complexity across the school year. Many of the main selections fall within the “stretch” grade-level band in terms of quantitative measures (740-1010), but not all main selections are within the Lexile grade band. Over the course of the year, students are not supported to grow their literacy skills so that at the end of the school year, they are accessing and comprehending grade level texts independently. Guidance and scaffolded support from the teacher is suggested for two days regardless of the text complexity of the main selection. More explicit directions for the teacher are needed as well as additional time for students to grapple with texts that have very complex demands.

Each main selection text contains a description of qualitative measures and reader and task suggestions to scaffold the text for students. These are general, broad suggestions for a group of students in Grade 4.

Three out of five of the main selections in the first unit have a slightly complex structure for Grade 4, while two selections, Lewis and Clark and Me and Letters Home from Yosemite, are very complex with unconventional chronology or unusual structure. In Unit 5, four of the five selections are slightly complex. One main selection has an unusual structure making this text very complex. Students need more scaffolding to access these texts with very complex structure beyond two days of reading the text.

The main selections in the first unit are on topics students may not have background knowledge on and interest to access (Lewis and Clark, pioneer life, Yosemite Park). Teacher guidance will be necessary for students to gain the needed background knowledge. Teacher supports include two days of teacher guidance (guided support) through the text. The last unit also contains topics students may have little background knowledge about such as segregation, Native American reservations, and cultures. Teacher supports, again, include two days of teacher guidance. The same level of support is suggested across most units. A Grade 4 reader may need more time to build background knowledge about the topics in the sixth unit. Small group time is suggested for access for all students with details about how to help those students access the text. Guidance on how to assess each student’s learning during the reading of the text is not provided in the teacher materials.

While suggestions are included to better help all students access the complexities of the each main selection text, teachers could benefit from more specific suggestions beyond, “Provide scaffolded support as needed.” As the complexity level increases, Grade 4 readers need more scaffolding in order to access the text, however, the materials do not adjust the recommended instructional practices to provide students with additional support to tackle the increasingly complex texts.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the expectation that anchor and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

The main selections have a "Text Based Comprehension" page that covers quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task measures and a general recommended placement statement with no rationale for main selections. A rationale for placement is included on the "Text Based Comprehension" pages included for each main selection on the tabbed page at the beginning of each lesson in the Teacher Edition. A general explanation is provided: “Both the qualitative and quantitative measures suggest this text should be placed in the 4-5 text complexity band, which is where both the Common Core State Standards and Scott Foresman Reading Street have placed it.” An explicit rationale explaining complexity and placement of specific texts within the sequence of instruction is not provided beyond reference to being in the 4-5 grade text complexity band. For anchor texts falling outside the Grade 4-5 text complexity band, more text-specific explanations are provided, such as the one provided for My Brother Martin: "Some of the quantitative and qualitative measures suggest this text may be outside the Grade 4-5 text complexity band. Students will benefit from scaffolded support as they work through the biography. Support for students as they work through the quote excerpt will make the content of this selection more accessible."

There is no reference to research or evidence-based best practices for increasing students’ reading skills through appropriate sequencing of text complexity. An explicit rationale explaining why main selections are paired with the selected pair passaged is absent. For example, in Unit 4, the students read Seeker of Knowledge and a paired passage called "Making Mummies" The connection between the passages is not made clear. The emphasis of learning in "Making Mummies" is 21st Century Skills: Search Engines. Additional support to help students make a connection between Seeker of Knowledge and "Making Mummies" is needed.

The paired texts and the teacher read-aloud selections do not include a specific breakdown of quantitative, qualitative, reader and task measures, and rationale for the selection of the paired texts and teacher read-aloud.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the expectations of support materials for the core texts to provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. Materials provide some experiences with independent reading. Students have opportunities to read silently and orally such as reading “The Rosetta Stone” independently as well during choral reading (Unit 4, Week 4, Day 2, page 117). There are few experiences that address independent reading as the teacher materials often lack explicit directions.

  • The addition of an opportunity to read a full novel/chapter book with teacher guidance and scaffolding is needed.
  • Students read the main selection, paired selection, Sleuth, and leveled readers with teacher guidance. The Trade Book Library is available for teacher and student use online, however, the teacher materials often lack explicit directions.
  • The “Research and Inquiry” portion of each daily lesson has potential to provide independent reading time, but it is never explicitly stated that students should work independently.
  • Throughout every lesson, every day, directions in the teacher edition begin with the words “Have students read...” followed by a particular paragraph, page, or passage. The majority of the time it is not explicitly stated whether students should be reading independently, with partners, orally, or silently. These instructions accompany the anchor text as well as the support texts. They cover a wide range of content, themes, and topics.
  • Independent station directions at the beginning of each week in the teacher edition, provide guidance for the types of independent reading texts students should be choosing, but specific titles are rarely offered. One station is focused on practicing reading orally to a partner.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
7/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

Reading Street Grade 4 does not meet the expectation for materials that provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. The questions throughout the Teacher Edition are included throughout the course of the school year to check comprehension, and most of the questions are text-dependent. Each theme has a writing and a speaking and listening culminating task. The teacher materials do not provide complete support for planning and implementing text dependent writing, speaking, and tasks. Additionally, many culminating tasks can be completed without understanding of the text. Materials lead to understanding of a theme rather than supporting deep learning on a topic. Teacher materials lack the needed support for implementation. Some opportunities for students to engage in text-based discussions integrating vocabulary and syntax are provided in the materials, but there are limited teacher recommendations, instructional supports, and protocols provided. Materials support speaking and listening standards, but are lacking teacher directions and support for implementation in the classroom and expectations do not increase in rigor over the course of the year. Materials provide a mix of process and on-demand writing, though not all writing tasks are aligned to grade level standards. Materials provide opportunities to write across different genres, but fall short of the distribution required by the standards and do not consistently connect writing tasks to texts read. In addition, materials do not consistently provide opportunities for text based writing. Some tasks are disconnected from main selection texts and they do not build over the course of the year. Teacher resources on how to implement evidence-based writing are not provided. Finally, materials include some explicit instruction of grammar and convention standards, but are not taught to the full intent of the standard and opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills in context are limited.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the expectations of questions, tasks, and assignments as text-specific and require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text. Teacher materials do not provide complete support for planning and implementing text-dependent writing and tasks.

The questions in the instructional materials are labeled as synthesis, inference, evaluation, and analysis. Questions (text-dependent/text-specific and non text-dependent/text-specific) are included throughout the course of the school year to check comprehension.

The following are examples of text-dependent questions that allow for inferences:

  • Unit 1, Lewis and Clark and Me, “Why does the author show an excerpt from one of the Captain Lewis’s journals at the bottom of page 56?”
  • Unit 4, Navajo Code Talkers, “How did the code talkers affect the outcome of the Battle of Iwo Jima?”
  • Unit 5, Antarctica Journal, "What details in her letter on page 268 support this opinion?
  • Unit 3, Hurricane Andrew, "What other jobs do you know of that are dangerous? Why do you think someone might choose to do one of these jobs?
  • Unit 2, So You Want to Be President, “The author says that Lincoln wore a stovepipe hat. Use the meaning of stovepipe to describe a stovepipe hat.”
  • Unit 6, How Tia Lola Came to (Visit) Stay, "This story is set in a small farm town, but the family had moved there from a big city. What would be different about living in a small town and living in a large city? Which would you prefer? Why?"
  • Unit 1: Look back and write about how you think the story Miss Franny tells Opal about her encounter with a bear is factual or fanciful. Provide evidence from the text to support your answer.
  • Unit 3: Write a compare-contrast essay about how the different types of weather affect the lives of people and animals. Use facts, details, and examples from the texts to support your ideas.
  • Unit 5: Use evidence from the text to support your answer in finding out if Axel is a hero.
  • Unit 2: Write an argument/persuasive essay to convince others that teamwork is important in everyday life.
  • Unit 2: Write an expository composition about an animal that has done something remarkable.

These are examples of a non-text-dependent questions, meaning it can be answered without reading the text:

  • Unit 3, Hurricane Andrew, "What other jobs do you know of that are dangerous? Why do you think someone might choose to do one of these jobs?
  • Unit 2, So You Want tTo Be President, “The author says that Lincoln wore a stovepipe hat. Use the meaning of stovepipe to describe a stovepipe hat.”
  • Unit 6, How Tia Lola Came to (Visit) Stay, "This story is set in a small farm town, but the family had moved there from a big city. What would be different about living in a small town and living in a large city? Which would you prefer? Why?"

Students are provided with opportunities to engage and draw on evidence and inferences from the text in a variety of writing tasks.

  • Unit 1: Look back and write about how you think the story Miss Franny tells Opal about her encounter with a bear is factual or fanciful. Provide evidence from the text to support your answer.
  • Unit 3: Write a compare-contrast essay about how the different types of weather affect the lives of people and animals. Use facts, details, and examples from the texts to support your ideas.
  • Unit 5: Use evidence from the text to support your answer in finding out if Axel is a hero.

Students do not need to read the story in order to write about the following:

  • Unit 2: Write an argument/persuasive essay to convince others that teamwork is important in everyday life.
  • Unit 2: Write an expository composition about an animal that has done something remarkable.

While questions and tasks posed in reading comprehension often provide instructions for teachers to tell students to use details from the text in their answer, there is no explicit instruction on how to select significant evidence, appropriately paraphrase, quote, transition, or further explain when providing text-dependent written or spoken answers.

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the expectation for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text dependent questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Some culminating tasks can be completed without reading or understanding of the text.

Throughout each week’s unit, students are engaged in answering text-dependent questions and completing text-dependent tasks about their reading. Students could complete the task without necessarily completing the questions, and often the questions may not probe deeply enough to gauge student progress and probable success with the culminating task.

Some representative examples that illustrate how the materials work with questions and culminating tasks include (but are not limited to) these examples:

  • For Unit 2, Week 4, students are reading about horses. The Research and Inquiry culminating task for the week asks students to research the following question: “How can people and animals work as a team?” This is on Day 1 before reading the main selection, Horse Heroes. The teacher models an example about horses. Students research the question each day and present their findings using a word processing program or poster board. One of the text-dependent questions on Day 3 could help the student with the culminating task: “Using what you learned in this selection, tell how people and animals can work as a team.” However, weekly culminating tasks are research tasks, and instructional materials do not instruct the students to use the main selection or supporting text as a reference.
  • Students are asked to write at the end of each selection in the “Think Critically” section following the end of the anchor text in “Think Back and Write.” In this activity students are asked to respond to a prompt and use evidence. In each of these tasks, students are working from Key Ideas and Details standards 1-3. Scaffolding or conversation points are not included in the materials.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 do not meet the expectations for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

While there were many instances where students are engaged in collaborative conversations, the directions lacked information on how teachers can provide support and scaffolds with collaborative conversations, such as providing students with sentence stems or sentence frames. Students often need supports in how to speak and listen. Teachers would need to seek additional resources in order to teach students how to participate in evidence-based discussions while using academic language and appropriate syntax.

For example, in Unit 4 the students are to engage in a collaborative discussion about vocabulary. The teacher instructions included in the Teacher Edition have no other guidance than to lead the class discussion.

The Common Core 101 resource suggests that Book Talks help to build oral language and are structured with guidance for Book Talk Listeners (students listening to the Book Talks) and Book Talk Presenters (students presenting the Book Talk). Students are taught that a Book Talk is like a movie preview, and it is meant to motivate students to read increasingly complex texts on subject and in genres with which they are not familiar. A list of suggestions is provided about what a Book Talk should be. While one suggestion is to look at the audience while speaking, there are few suggestions about using academic language or correct syntax.

In the Routine Quick Write for Fluency, students are encouraged to talk, write, and share. In TE 4.6, page 325f, students talk in pairs for two to three minutes to discuss features of a cause-and-effect essay. Each student writes a few sentences that describe a cause-and-effect essay. Then students read their own sentences to their partner. Neither a protocol nor rubric is suggested in order for students to use correct syntax.

The academic vocabulary and syntax used in the materials are Amazing Words and selection vocabulary. The Amazing words are introduced a few a day for 4 days. The Teacher's Edition suggests the following: Introduce, Demonstrate, Apply, Display the Word in order to teach the students these words. There is also a graphic organizer the students can use to put the words into as an activity. The Question of the Week suggests writing using a few of the Amazing Words. While the vocabulary from the mai selection is included in the Student Edition, the Amazing Words are not included, nor do they carry over from week to week or from unit to unit to encourage ongoing student use of academic vocabulary. The selection vocabulary from the main reading selection is tested at the end of the week, and the words are discussed as the students read the Main selection.

In order to effectively meet the indicator, the teacher would need to spend more time exploring options outside of this program, in addition to utilizing the materials provided.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the expectation for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence. Speaking and listening skills are encouraged and help with engagement, but the materials offer minimal guidance to teachers regarding students' speaking and listening skills and referring students to the text to obtain and support responses. Explicit instructions on how to select significant evidence, appropriately paraphrase, quote, transition, cite sources, or further explain when providing text-dependent written or spoken answers are absent from the materials for both students and teachers.

The Teacher Edition lacks tools for explicitly teaching Speaking and Listening skills. In Unit 6, Week 4, Day 5: "Have students share their inquiry results by presenting their information and giving a brief talk on their research." Grade 4 students would need modeling from the teacher about speaking and listening skills that support evidence-based discussions such as anchor charts, sentence stems, question stems, and techniques for practicing a skill.

Discussion questions are provided in the “Let’s Talk About It” sections but do not increase in rigor. The Teacher Edition has 3-4 questions to be used for discussion but lack guidelines for creating supports so that students can speak about and listen to others engage in dialogue about what they are reading and researching. Specific tips for developing follow-up questions and evidence would be beneficial.

The Teacher Edition does not include a balance of speaking and listening activities throughout each unit. The directions and support for implementation are minimal. For example, in Unit 4, Week 2, during a Team Talk, students are asked to discuss the photos and use the prompts to create a concept map. There are no further instructions for the teacher, and no time is indicated to ensure that adequate time is allowed for students to gather their ideas or build on one another’s ideas for a quality discussion.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the expectation of materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects incorporating digital resources where necessary. While there are some on-demand and process activities, there is not a consistency to practicing process writing over the course of a school year. There are routine on-demand activities.

Each week students participate in process writing. The prompt sometimes connects to the theme, setting, or genre of the main selection, but a direct reference to the text is rarely made. A typical routine has students “Read Like a Writer” on Day 1, brainstorm on Day 2, write a draft on Day 3, revise on Day 4 and proofread and present their project on Day 5. A two-week plan is available and prescribes four days to plan and prewrite, three days to draft, one day to revise, one day to edit, and one day to publish and present. Each unit also has a separate Writing Process prompt. Weekly process writing projects encourage use of technology for presentations.

In the Independent Stations, students can participate in "Let's Write!" In Day 3, students can “Look Back and Write”, which is a narrative retelling of the main selection. In some units, students can do writing based on paired social studies passage. In Unit 6, Week 4, students can write an argument/persuasive essay based on the passage. On demand writing prompts in “Write to Source” incorporate reading and writing using text evidence.

There are some opportunities to revise or edit, however, the instructional materials do not cover standards W.4 and W.5 in the Daily Writing Focus or the Research and Inquiry as students are engaged in self-editing, but rarely are engaged in in peer editing or revision during daily writing or prior to the research presentation on Day 5. In the writing focus of the week, students have the opportunity to participate in Peer Conferencing/Peer Revision on Day 4.

There is minimal support in the Teacher's Edition to support teachers as guide students in reading for relevant facts and then turn the facts into helpful notes and complete sentences. For example on page 61b in Unit 1, Week 2, Day 2 Research and Inquiry, "Have students search the internet using their inquiry question and keywords from Day 1." Teacher directions lack specificity when students are using a digital resource to type their research and inquiry response. For example, in Unit 1, Week 2, Day 4 of Research and Inquiry, the teacher is directed to, "Have students use a word processing program to write their reports and create their Works Cited page," but falls short of explicitly teaching students how to use a word processing program to create final drafts.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards. Materials provide experiences in writing across different genres, but a balanced distribution is lacking in the core materials.

Each week consists of a writing component for Days 1-5 and practice in a mode of writing. Each day offers practice in process and distribution on a writing prompt assigned on Day 2. Weekly focus changes each week. Opportunities to practice opinion style writing are limited to only 8 percent, short of the suggested 30 percent. The distribution of the writing tasks are:

  • Informative/explanatory: 9/36
  • Opinion: 3/36
  • Narrative: 13/36
  • Other: 11/36

Each unit focuses on a style of writing in the Writing Process: Unit 1-Personal Narrative, Unit 2-Expository Composition, Unit 3-Compare and Contrast Essay, Unit 4-Story, Unit 5-Argument/Persuasive Essay, Unit 6-Research Report. Students have choice in the Writing Process Units.

In “Writing to Sources” and “Write Like a Reporter”, Units 1 and 4 focus on narrative, Unit 2 and 5 focus on argumentative, Units 3 and 6 focus on informative/explanatory. There are additional writing forms for argumentative and informative/explanatory.

“Writing to Sources” (a Common Core Teacher Resource) contains writing prompts for students to write at the demand associated with the grade level CCSS writing standard using text evidence. This is a supplemental resource and is not part of the Teacher Edition’s weekly planning. Each unit has a focus: Unit 1 Focus: Narrative; Unit 2 Focus: Argument; Unit 3 Focus: Informative/Explanatory; Unit 4 Focus: Narrative; Unit 5 Focus: Argument; Unit 6 Focus: Informative/Explanatory. Each week’s main reading selection has two writing options in “Writing to Sources.” though the materials lack support for "Writing to Sources" in the,teacher directions.

More instructional guidance needs be provided to the teacher for the time spent on each writing task. Teachers can have students “Write like a Reporter” or write to “Connect Texts,” which are suggested in the Teacher Edition, but as with "Writing to Sources," directions for implementation of the supplemental resources are limited.

Exemplars for students and teachers would provide support for Writing to Sources for explicit teacher direction to support students’ growth in writing.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meets the expectations of materials, providing frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. Some tasks are not clearly tied to the main selection texts, and do not build over the course of the year. Teacher resources on how to implement or teach evidence-based writing are needed.

The Writing to Sources workbook allows students to complete writing tasks in response to multiple texts and to cite text-based sources. Students are able to practice and apply writing using evidence.

Writing opportunities support students’ work in developing claims connected to the texts. There are opportunities to practice argument/opinion, informative/explanatory, and narrative writing, however, the writing tasks do not substantially increase in rigor throughout the course of the year, and the materials have some repetition in the writing opportunities.

  • For example in Unit 2, Week 1 students are asked to reread the story and “write a one-paragraph argument telling whether you agree or disagree with Jo’s decision using evidence from the story to state your opinion and to support your argument.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1 the prompt is similar. The students are to reread the selection, and “write a paragraph clearly stating your opinion and giving reasons for it that you support with evidence from the text.”

Additional instructional supports are needed for teachers to guide students’ understanding of developing ideas, building components of structured writing (for example paragraphs, introductions, conclusions, etc.), and integrating evidence from texts and other sources.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet expectations for explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of the context.

Some standards covered are not at the appropriate grade level. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1 and Week 2, there are lessons about types of sentences and punctuating those sentences (TE, page 31c, and TE, page 45o). The use of end punctuation is taught in Grade 1 (L.1.2.b)
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, there is a lesson on common and proper nouns (TE, page 175d). Common and proper nouns are taught in Grade 1 (L.1.1.b).
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, there is a lesson on possessive nouns (TE, page 283o). Possessive nouns are taught in Grade 2 (L.2.2.c).
  • L.4.1a- relative pronouns, are taught in Unit 4.
  • L.4.1e- prepositional phrases are taught in Unit 5.
  • L.4.1g- homographs are taught in Unit 4.
  • L.4.2b- quotation marks are taught Unit 4, but not in the context of writing a narrative.
  • L.4.2c- using commas in a coordinating conjunction, is taught in Unit 4
  • L.4.4c- students practiveusing a dictionary, but they are not exposed to the dictionary in both print and digital formats
  • L.4.5b- personification is only covered in 3 lessons in Unit 4

Many of the convention and grammar skills are taught in Grade 3, Grade, 4, Grade 5, and Grade 6 such as the four kinds of sentences.

Each unit has a daily direct instruction lesson on “Conventions.” Each week focuses on specific grammar skills and conventions. Each day explicit instruction takes place, and students practice the skill with worksheets from Grammar Transparencies, Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook, and Let’s Practice It!

The skills for the week are shown in the Skills Overview for the unit. All of the Language Standards are embedded in the curriculum, but some standards are taught in only one unit as indicated below. Teachers will need to create additional materials to be able to teach the full intent of the standard. For example:

Grammar instruction worksheets often have words and sentences that connect to the week’s main reading selection, but the application is primarily out of context.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
2/6
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Grade 4 Reading Street partially meets the expectation of materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language supporting foundational reading development and aligning to standards. Materials sometimes include decoding multisyllabic words, Greek and Latin roots, base words and affixes, possessives, contractions, and compound words. However, materials do not provide a cohesive sequence that builds toward application. Additionally, materials address the foundational skills through fluency activities, phonics and spelling each week, with the tasks being the same each week throughout the year. Finally, materials provide fluency practice for students throughout this program, however, the materials do not have students practice on-level prose and poetry.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, syntax, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression. Materials lack a cohesive sequence which builds toward application.

Students are expected to read aloud grade-level text fluently with accuracy, comprehension, appropriate pace/rate, with expression/intonation, with attention to punctuation and appropriate phrasing. These skills are tested weekly. There are opportunities for instruction regarding high frequency, irregular words, however, assessment guidance is not present in the teacher materials. Optional unit reviews offer an opportunity to revisit foundational skills. The unit and end-of-year benchmark tests provide teachers the materials to assess phonics, vocabulary skills, and fluency.

Instructional opportunities are present for decoding multisyllabic words with common word parts and spelling patterns. However, Greek and Latin roots are not tested. Base words and affixes, possessives, contractions, and compound words are tested. The focus on multisyllabic words across the entire grade level is uneven.

Examples of RF.4.3 included in the publisher materials are:

  • Turning Points Unit 1, Week 1 when students are taught that many verbs have an ending that helps readers figure out when the action happened and sometimes words change their spelling when the ending is added. Students are asked to brainstorm more examples of words that follow each pattern of adding -ed. The teacher is reminded to “Follow the Strategy for Meaningful Word Parts to teach jumped.”
  • Puzzles and Mysteries Unit 4, Week 4 when students are taught that the prefix tele- means “over a long distance” and the prefix trans- means “across or beyond.” Students are asked to circle the prefix in each word in the chart and use its meaning, along with the meaning of the root, to determine a definition for the word.
  • Adventures by Land, Air, and Water Unit 5, Week 1 when students are asked to break words into syllables. Students are reminded to “break multisyllabic words into syllables before they begin to spell the word. Students are asked to write spelling words and draw a line between the syllables. Students are reminded to “refer to the dictionary if they are unsure how to divide the word.” Additional practice is available in the Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook, page 320.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the requirement to include materials, questions, and tasks to guide students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading.

Students are provided opportunities to practice oral vocabulary on Days 1-4 with assessment on Day 5.

  • On Day 1 during “Build Oral Vocabulary,” students are asked to listen for Amazing Words (academic vocabulary) as the teacher reads the selection aloud. Following the read aloud, students are asked several questions about the Amazing Words, but students do not need to attack unfamiliar words because the teacher is reading the selection.
  • On Day 5 during “Build Oral Vocabulary,” students are told to work with a partner and discuss the theme question and are not required to apply their foundational reading skills to attack unfamiliar words.

Amazing Words provide some practice for making meaning based on the vocabulary. For example, in Unit 4, week 1, questions in the TE asks students to look for context clues to determine the meaning of invisible. The teacher is also directed to work on syllabication of the word invisible. This practice is done with the teacher read aloud. The Amazing Words are introduced, a few a day, over four days. The Teacher Edition suggests following: Introduce, Demonstrate, Apply, Display the Word to teach the students these words. There is also a graphic organizer the students can use to put the words into to connect concept-related words. The Question of the Week suggests writing using a few of the Amazing Words, but this is optional for the students.

Selection vocabulary from the main selection is emphasized and is tested at the end of the week. There are multiple opportunities provided over the course of the year in the core materials for students to demonstrate mastery of the vocabulary. Students will use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. The students learn the selection vocabulary before reading the main selection on Day 1. The TE directions ask the teacher to help students practice syllabication and figure out the word using context clues from a sentence. They discuss the words during the week, and test on them at the end of the week, but the words are not reviewed at a later time in the curriculum. If students are having difficulty understand the selection vocabulary, there is an “if…then..” section for the teacher. For example, In Unit 1, Week 4 after going over the selection vocabulary with the students and there are students who still do not understand then the teacher can follow the “If…then…” suggestions. “If… students are having difficulty understanding, then…review the definitions in small groups.”

Students have some opportunities to demonstrate word analysis skills. In Unit 5, students must figure out the meaning of the word carabiner in Cliff Hanger using context clues. Students also complete a worksheet about unfamiliar words.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 do not meet expectations for indicator 1q in that frequent instructional opportunities for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading (i.e., to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression) are not built into the materials.

Students are able to demonstrate and develop fluency daily. For example, in the Five-Day Planner, students work on fluency daily: reread for fluency, fluent word reading, and appropriate phrasing. In order for the students to achieve optimal fluency, students should reread the text three to four times according to the Teacher Edition.

Fluency Materials included:

  • Teacher models fluency with the teacher read aloud at the beginning of each week
  • Fluent Word Reading; reading words in context, reread for fluency
  • Routine-choral reading, choral flip chart
  • Reminder to teacher is provided: “Don’t Wait Until Friday” Check Fluency
  • Quick Write for Fluency: Routine, reminders provided of this routine for the teacher each day
  • “It’s Friday”: Check Oral Vocabulary

The Teacher Edition has added a “Bridge to Common Core” section with suggestions to increase Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity. For example, in Unit 4, Week 3, it says, “To increase students’ capacity for reading and comprehending complex texts independently and proficiently, have them (the students) read other informational texts by Andrew Santella or about the social studies topic, why secret codes are necessary.”

The fluency activities included in the text are clearly identified and are routine. The materials support oral and silent reading, however, oral reading is dominant. The routines are the same through each unit and each theme. Teachers are provided with passages used for assessment and are included in the Teacher Edition.

There is not a tool or support for students to self-track their own growth in reading fluency, however, there is a recording document for teachers to progress monitor fluency weekly and by unit.

Unit 2, Week 3 includes a poem as the paired selection; at the beginning of each week the teacher reads aloud “Street Rhymes!” However, there are no questions that correspond with this poem. The brevity of the poems included by the publisher (typically one stanza) provide only limited opportunities for students to practice fluency while listening to the Street Rhymes.

A poetry week is included during the theme, but it is optional. Therefore, teachers may not complete this activity each week. During the poetry week, the teacher reads the poem, the students recite the poem to a partner, and then student recites the poem aloud. The materials do not support reading poetry or prose with attention to rate, accuracy, and expression.

Many of the materials used for each student’s independent instructional level has “suggestions for this week's materials are found online.” If internet is not available or teachers do not have online access, teachers would not be able to use this resource and the students would not be able to independently and fluently read leveled readers, Sleuth, etc.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Not Rated

Criterion 2a - 2h

8/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
0/4

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
0/4

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
0/4

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
2/4

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
0/4

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
2/4

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Thu Apr 06 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2013

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
9780328724536 Copyright: 2013 0
9780328724543 Copyright: 2013 0
9780328725335 Copyright: 2013 0
9780328725342 Copyright: 2013 0
9780328725359 Copyright: 2013 0
9780328725366 Copyright: 2013 0
9780328725373 Copyright: 2013 0
9780328725380 Copyright: 2013 0
9780328733668 Copyright: 2013 0
9780328734160 Copyright: 2013 0
9780328768585 Copyright: 2013 0

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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