Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet the expectations for alignment. The materials do not meet the expectations for providing texts worthy of students' time and attention while supporting students' advancement toward independent reading. The materials do not meet expectations of reading, writing, and speaking to support rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and tasks to build both strong literacy skills as well as content knowledge and vocabulary. Foundational skills development only partially meets expectations.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
24
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
0
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Does Not Meet Expectations

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Gateway One Details

Grade 1 Reading Street does not meet the Gateway 1 expectation of providing texts with quality and complexity and alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Materials partially meet the expectations of providing texts worthy of students’ time and attention while supporting students’ advancement toward independent reading. Materials do not meet the expectation of providing opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions about writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Materials partially meet the expectation of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language supporting foundational reading development and standards alignment.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
8/20

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests. Texts are grouped into thematic units with a main text as the anchor text. There are six texts in each theme along with a paired selection.

Examples of texts that are content-rich and accompanied by quality illustrations and photographs include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 1, Week 1 Sam, Come Back! by Susan Stevens Crummel, is written by an award-winning author. The simple but bright illustrations are engaging to students.
  • Unit 3, Week 2, Ruby in Her Own Time by Jonathan Emmett is written by an award winning author. The text tells a story to which students will relate about a young duck who does things in her own time.
  • Unit 4, Week 3, A Trip to Washington, D.C., by Elizabeth Fitzgerald Howard, is written by an award-winning author. The text includes colorful photographs and contains historical information about the nation's capitol. The text is written in a first person voice that is engaging to Grade 1 students.
  • Unit 5, Week 6, The Stone Garden by Chieri Uegaki, is written by an award-winning author. The text’s characters represent different cultures and tell a story of a community working together.

Examples of texts that lack rich and engaging language and could not be examined multiple times for multiple purposes include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, the read-aloud text is “Jimmy’s Lesson”. The language of this text is not rich or engaging. This text is simple and would not hold Grade 1 students’ attention.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students read the text Mole and the Baby Bird by Marjorie Newman. This text lacks rich and engaging language.It is written in short dialogue sentences which may be less engaging for Grade 1 students.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Unit main selections and paired selections include a mix of informational text and literary texts with a variety of genres, but do not meet the requirement for text distribution.

The main reading selections are grouped into six units with a total of 30 texts (22 literary and 8 informational). Each unit contains a science or social studies goal. Overall, the units lack balance between literary and informational texts, though three of the units do include a balance of literary and informational text as required by the standards. The other units are predominately literature. For example, Units 1 and 5 contain no informational text, and Unit 3 contains six texts, with only one out of six being an informational text and the balance literary texts. Benchmark readers are also included with the program and are all literature based. The leveled readers are spread across multiple genres but are not balanced (69% literary and 31% informational texts). The standards require first grade students to read prose and poetry, but materials only provide six paired selections in poetry and no main selections featuring poetry.

Therefore, even with the inclusion of the paired readings, benchmark readers, and leveled texts, students will be engaging with literary texts the majority of the time.

Additionally, the units lack variety in their genre types. For example, in Unit 1 all six main texts are realistic fiction.

Examples of text types and genres represented include but are not limited to:

  • Unit 1:
    • Sam, Come Back! (Realistic Fiction)
    • Pig in a Wig (Animal Fantasy)
    • The Big Blue Ox (Animal Fantasy)
    • A Fox and a Kit (Literary Informational)
    • Get the Egg! (Realistic Fiction)
    • Animal Park (Literary Informational)
  • Unit 3:
    • A Place to Play (Realistic Fiction)
    • Ruby in Her Own Time (Animal Fantasy)
    • The Class Pet (Expository Text)
    • Frog and Toad Together (Animal Fantasy)
    • I’m a Caterpillar (Literary Informational)
    • Where Are My Animal Friends? (Drama)
  • Unit 5:
    • Tippy-Toe Chick, Go! (Animal Fantasy)
    • Mole and the Baby Bird (Animal Fantasy)
    • Dot & Jabber (Informational Fiction)
    • Simple Machines (Expository Text)
    • Alexander Graham Bell (Biography)
    • The Stone Garden (Realistic Fiction)

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for text complexity, according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task(s). The materials include quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task information for each main selection on a “Text Based Comprehension” page.

Appropriate rigor is evident in most main texts. However, there are texts with Lexile levels that are not placed appropriately for the timing in the unit and school year. There is also variation in meeting the qualitative measures to fully meet the expectations of text complexity in first grade. To fully comprehend some texts and complete the associated tasks, students may need background knowledge.

Some representative examples of texts that are at the appropriate level of complexity include, but are not limited to:

Unit R, Week 5: Get the Egg (Realistic Fiction)

  • Quantitative: Lexile 210L
  • Qualitative: This text has a very simple and predictable sentence structure, (e.g., “Yes, Brad. It is in its nest.”) This text is placed at the beginning of the year and the conventional language, sight words, and opportunity to practice phonics puts this text at the right qualitative measure for first grade students.
  • Reader and Task: Context clues and illustrations are used for students to understand unfamiliar vocabulary. The illustrations scaffold the text and provide students with support. This story is appropriately placed.

Unit 5, Week 4: Simple Machines (Expository Text)

  • Quantitative: Lexile 500
  • Qualitative: The organization of this text is more complex because it is written as an expository text and includes text features. For example, there are pictures of simple machines with an arrow labeling the machine (axle). The graphics are key because they provide a visual for the complex vocabulary. Vocabulary includes lever, axle, pulley, wedge, plane and inclined. Students may need additional supports to comprehend some of the complex words and topics in this selection.
  • Reader and Task: Students will need to learn about the structure of expository text and using text features to support comprehension. Background knowledge of simple machines would be helpful. This story is appropriately placed.

Some texts have qualitative or quantitative features that do not fully support students' growing literacy skills according to the demands of the standards for Grade 2. Examples include, but are not limited to:

Unit 5, Week 3: Dot and Jabber and the Great Acorn Mystery (Expository Text)

  • Quantitative: Lexile 290 (according to Lexile.com) listed in Reading Street as 660L
  • Qualitative: The organization of this text is chronological. The illustrations support the story and understanding of the text. Language features are moderately complex as the language is mostly familiar with some figurative language. Some of the sentences are more complex and feature multiple voices. Multiple levels of meaning also occur as the the characters solve the mystery but factual content about trees is presented.
  • Reader and Task: Basic knowledge of detectives and trees would be helpful but the concepts presented are not very complex.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
0/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet the expectations for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels). For example, Unit R main selections do not build quantitatively. Many texts do not provide a quantitative measurement. However, each text has a qualitative and reader and task measurement provided. The materials do not support students' ability to read increasingly complex texts across the school year with appropriate support from the teacher according to the quantitative and qualitative measures. Two days of guidance and scaffolded support from the teacher is suggested regardless of the text complexity of the main selection.

For a Grade 1 reader, most of the main selections in Unit 1 have a simple structure. All six of the main selections are realistic fiction and there is no evidence of growing complexity within the unit. In Unit 2, realistic fiction texts continue to be minimally complex for a Grade 1 student. For example, Pig in a Wig is the second selection in Unit 2 The Lexile measurement is 70L and the text is organized in a simple and predictable structure. The next main selection is The Big Blue Ox which also has a Lexile of 70L and similar qualitative measurements.

In Unit 4, two of the six of the main selections are complex, A Southern Ranch and Henry and Mudge, because they contain Lexiles within the 600 range. After hovering in minimally complex texts prior to this unit, students would need more scaffolded support to access these texts beyond two days allotted for reading the text. Finally, the texts in Units 4 and 5, fail to build in complexity, with many main selections falling below the grade band and timing in the year (Cinderella, Mole and the Baby Bird, Alexander Graham Bell).

The last unit contains topics students have less background knowledge about such as simple machines and Alexander Graham Bell. Teacher supports also include two days of teacher guidance. The same level of support is suggested in the first unit as the sixth unit. Small group time is suggested for all students with details about how to help those students access the text. Guidance around how to assess each individual student’s learning and understanding based on the scaffolding is not provided during the reading of the text.

Suggestions throughout the materials are present to assist the teacher in supporting students who are struggling with the main selections, however there is minimal specificity within the suggestions. As the complexity level increases, more scaffolding for students is not provided. Explicit directions for the teacher on how to scaffold the text is not provided, and additional days may be needed to provide this scaffolding, which, as suggested above, may extend beyond the two days currently allotted for the main selections.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that anchor texts and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

The main selections have a "Text Based Comprehension" page that covers quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task measures and a general recommended placement statement, though no rationale for the recommendations is provided. However, quantitative measures of text complexity are not provided for Unit R and the main texts Who Works Here? and The Strongest One.

Quantitative metrics are provided for each anchor text in three categories: Lexile level, average sentence length, and Word Frequency. Qualitative measures are provided for each anchor text in four categories: levels of meaning, structure, language of conventionality and clarity, and theme and knowledge demands. Metrics provided for qualitative measures are in narrative form only and do not state the complexity level. A general explanation is provided: “This text is appropriate for placement at this level due to both quantitative and qualitative elements of the selection.” An explicit rationale explaining complexity and placement of specific texts within the sequence of instruction is not provided. For anchor texts falling within the Grade 2-3 text complexity band, no text-specific explanations are provided, such as the one provided for The Stone Garden. The Lexile provided is 560 which puts it in the middle of the Grade 2-3 band and the Teacher Edition states, “This text is appropriate for placement at this level due to both quantitative and qualitative elements of the selection.”

There is no reference to research-based or evidence-based best practices for increasing students’ reading skills through appropriate sequencing of text complexity. An explicit rationale explaining why main selections are paired with the selected pair passaged is not provided. For example, in Unit 4, the theme of the unit is Treasures. Students read Peter’s Chair and a Sleuth paired passage called, Help Yourself and Others. There is no explanation for why these two passages are paired together and how, Help Yourself and Others fits into the Treasures theme. Another example is, in Unit 5, the theme of the unit is, Great Ideas. Students read Dot and Jabber and the Great Acorn Mystery and a Sleuth paired passage called A Monster or a Fake. There is no explanation as to why these two passages are paired together and how A Monster or a Fake fits into the Great Idea theme.

The paired texts (Sleuth) and the teacher read-aloud selections do not include a breakdown of quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task measures as well as a rationale for the paired texts and the teacher read-aloud.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that support materials for the core texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. Materials provide some opportunities for reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency, however teacher materials often lack explicit directions for implementation.

Students read the main selection, paired selection, Sleuth, and leveled readers with teacher guidance. Examples teacher direction from the main selection include:

  • Model: First, have students track the print as you read.
  • Guide Practice: Then have students read along with you.
  • Corrective feedback: Have the class read aloud without you. Monitor progress and provide feedback.

Students have opportunities to reread texts, which exposes students to more opportunities to learn new vocabulary in context as well as practice fluency. For example, in Unit 2, Week 5, Life in the Forest, the Teacher Edition directs the teacher to Model: First have children track the print while the teacher reads. Then have children read along with the teacher. For optimal fluency, children should reread three to four times. Leveled readers also called Concept Based Reading are an optional resource. Titles are listed on the Preview Your Week and Small Group Time pages of the Teacher’s Edition. In small group time in Unit 2 Week 1, on-level and strategic students read two decodable readers, reread the main selections and read Sleuth for two days. Advanced readers read an advanced selection, reread the main selection for two days, and read Sleuth for two days.

There are many opportunities for teachers to read-aloud while students listen from the Read-Aloud Anthology. For example, Unit 2, Day 5: “This week we have read and listened to stories about how plants and animals are important to each other. Today you will listen to a story about communities.”

The Independent Stations provide students opportunities to Listen (match sounds and pictures), Word Work (build and write words), Let’s Write (Write Sentences) and Words to Know (Practice high frequency Words). While these provide students opportunity to practice independently, a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading is not provided. Opportunity for students to read independently is provided in the Small Group Time with the paired decodable texts. More challenging text is suggested through the use of the leveled readers (supplemental resource) as a part of the independent reading station for advanced readers.

The Trade Book Library is available for teacher and student use online, however, the teacher materials lack explicit directions for teachers in implementing this resource.

It is not explicitly stated whether students should be reading texts independently, with partners, orally, or silently. For example, directions for reading a main selection state, “Read for understanding Deepen understanding by reading the selection multiple times. First Read: If students need support, then use the Access Text notes to help them clarify understanding. Second Read: Use the Close Reading notes to help students draw knowledge from the text.” These directions are unclear on who is doing the reading during these multiple reads.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
5/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

Reading Street Grade 1 does not meet the expectation for materials to provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussion and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). Some questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and require students to return to the text and to utilize textual evidence to support both what is explicit and inferential information from the text. Materials reviewed do not meet the expectation for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent and text-specific questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Materials reviewed do not meet the expectations for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. Materials reviewed do not meet the expectation for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence. Speaking and listening skills are encouraged, but the materials offer limited guidance to teachers regarding developing students' speaking and listening skills and referring the students to the text to support responses. Materials reviewed partially meet the expectation that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. While the materials provide some mixture of on-demand and process writing, there are few opportunities for students to revise and edit with explicit instruction. Materials reviewed partially meet the requirement that materials provide opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards. Materials provide experiences in writing across different genres, but a balanced distribution is lacking in the core materials. There is a large discrepancy between the types of writing, with over half being expository/explanatory/informative. Materials reviewed partially meet the expectations that materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and clear information appropriate for the grade level. Materials reviewed partially meet expectations that materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards for the grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). Some questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based and require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text. Students answer questions about key details in text, retell familiar stories, identify the main topic and retell key details, identify story parts, describe connections, ask and answer questions about unknown words, discuss relationships between illustrations and texts, compare and contrast characters, and compare same topic texts. Text-based questions include open-ended questions, recall questions, wh- questions (who, what, when, where, why), inference questions, completion questions, distancing questions, sequence questions, compare and contrast questions. While most questions, task, and assignments are text-based, there are few directions and supports in place to ensure that students will engage with the text.

The following are examples of text-based questions from the main selections that allow for inferences:

  • Unit 1, Pig in a Wig, “Look back at page 57. How does Pig feel? Write about it. Use evidence from the story.”
  • Unit 2, Who Works Here?, “Look at the picture on page 90. What is the police officer doing? What are other ways the people in the picture are being safe?”
  • Unit 3, A Place to Play, “What is the first thing that happens on pages 28-29? What happens next?”
  • Unit 4, Cinderella, “What do we know about the woman who visits Cindy from looking at the picture? What do we know about her from the text?”

Unit 5, The Little Engine That Could, “Why do you think the clown is excited?” “How do you think the author feels about trying to help others?”

Weekly Sleuth passages contain text-based questions and tasks such as:

  • Unit 1, A Caring Father, “What details can help you learn about how father penguins care for their eggs?”
  • Unit 3, A Happy Ending, “How are baby swans different from grown-up swans?”
  • Unit 4, Face to Face, “How did planners choose the four Presidents for Mount Rushmore?”

Some Weekly Sleuth passages contain non text-based questions and tasks such as:

  • Unit 2, Every Day, “What questions would you ask your mom or dad about the schedule your family follows every day and every week?”
  • Unit 3, A New School Home, “What are the best ways to make a room feel like homeIn Unit 4, Help Yourself and Others, “What would you ask a person who collects used toys and clothes to give to others?”

The following main selection questions are not text-based and can be answered without reading the text:

  • In Unit 1, Get the Egg! “In Get the Egg!, Brad and Kim have an adventure. Find and read one part of the story that reminds you of something exciting that has happened to you.”
  • In Unit 1, Animal Park, “The author says that this is a big, big park. Why do you think the park is so big?”
  • In Unit 3, I’m a Caterpillar, “What other animals have you read about that change?”
  • In Unit 5, Mole and the Baby Bird, “Have you ever taken care of an animal? Did you do what Mole did?”
  • In Unit 6, The Stone Garden, “Pretend you have a garden. What would you plant in it? Why?”

Students are provided with opportunities to engage and draw on evidence and inferences from the text in a variety of writing tasks. For example, in Unit 3, I am a Caterpillar, “Why aren’t the butterflies in this selection afraid of birds? Look back at page 170 and take notes. Then use your notes to write about why they aren’t afraid of birds.”Unit 4, A Southern Ranch, “Look back at pages 136-137. How do ranch hands keep the herd together? Write about it.”

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
0/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet the expectation for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Some culminating tasks can be completed without reading or understanding the text.

Throughout the units, students are engaged in answering text-based questions and completing text-based tasks about their reading. However, weekly culminating writing tasks are based on the unit’s theme rather than the unit’s texts. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students read The Farmer and the Hat. The Research and Inquiry task for the week directs students to conduct an interview with a teacher, principal, or community member with the goal of finding out what activities the school and community can do together. Text-based questions from the main selection do not support this culminating task. Weekly culminating tasks are research tasks, and instructional materials do not suggest the students use the main selection or supporting text as reference.
  • The theme of Unit 6 is Treasures. In Week 5, after reading the text Cinderella, the Research and Inquiry topic of the week culminating task is to have students poll their classmates to learn which fairy tales their classmates like best. While most questions during the teacher-supported reading of the main selection are text-based, one question asks the students a non-text-based question: “Describe Cinderella and the ball at the castle as you see them in your mind.” The sequenced questions do not build to support a connected culminating task.

Each main selection has a Look Back and Write task at the end of the text selection. Four scaffolded, text-dependent questions precede the Look Back and Write task. While these tasks have students use the main selection, questions and tasks during the week’s lessons do not build knowledge toward students being about to complete the culminating task. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Week 6, Animal Park, the Look Back and Write task states, “Look back at the photographs in the selection. Choose an animal that was in the big park. Use facts from the selection to write about the animal you choose.”
  • Unit 2, Week 4,The Big Circle, the Look Back and Write task states, “Look back at page 125. Write about how this animal community helped each other. Give evidence from the story to support your answer. Discuss what you wrote with a partner.”

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
0/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet the expectations for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Front matter and small group planning pages do not mention listening and speaking standards or activities. Planning pages for the main selection have a weekly listening and speaking focus, such as, share information and ideas in Unit 2, Week 2. Two of the weekly independent stations include practice listening and using vocabulary in the Listen Up and Words to Know sections.

While there are many opportunities for students to engage in collaborative conversations, the opportunities lack information on how teachers can provide support and scaffolds with collaborative conversations, such as through the use of sentence stems or sentence frames. The materials provide very few protocols for discussions that encourage modeling and the use of academic vocabulary and syntax. For example, the students are frequently asked to turn and talk to their neighbor to discuss new content. The directions do not provide direct instruction in speaking and listening in order for students to learn to engage in quality, rich conversations in an academic setting.

The teacher materials provide instructions for teaching listening and speaking on Day 5 of each main selection. The instructions are divided into: Teach, Analyze, Model, and Introduce Prompt. For example, in Unit 2, Week 1, Day 5, A Big Fish for Max, the students will Relate an Experience in Sequence. The listening and speaking content does not connect to the unit theme or main selection and is taught as an independent skill. In the first week of Unit R, the focus is Participate in a Discussion. On Day 3 of this week the lesson is detailed about speaking and listening, however, these topics are not modeled, reviewed, or concentrated on in any other unit throughout the year. In Unit 3, Week 4, Day 5, of Frog and Toad Together, students read a poem aloud and then to a partner. The teacher materials provide the prompt, but offer limited guidance for the teacher as to groupings (partners, small groups), directions for how students are to share the poems they have selected, and how the teacher should monitor the discussion. When reading Sleuth in Unit 4, Week 5, Small Group Time the teacher directions state, “Ask them (students) to state the writer’s idea along with the details that support the idea.” This could lead to a robust evidence-based discussion, however, there are no explicit instructions provided about modeling this skill.

In the Routine Quick Write for Fluency, students are encouraged to talk, write, and share. For example, in Unit 4, Week 4, Day 5, A Southern Ranch, students discuss what they have learned about using a rubric to evaluate their writing. Each student writes a sentence about what they have learned. The partners then trade sentences and read them aloud. Neither a protocol nor a rubric is suggested to support students to use correct syntax. Students are not encouraged to use and apply academic vocabulary learned in the main selection.

The academic vocabulary and syntax used in the materials are termed, “Amazing Words” and selection vocabulary. Amazing words are introduced a few a day for four days. The Teacher Edition suggests the following steps: introduce, demonstrate, apply, and display the word to teach the students these words. There is a section provided for students to apply the amazing words by orally completing sentences. The Amazing Words are not shown to the student in the Student Edition. The Amazing Words do not actively and regularly encouraging students to utilize academic vocabulary in their own speaking and writing. The selection vocabulary from the main reading selection are discussed as the students read the Main selection and are assessed at the end of the week.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
0/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet the expectation for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence. Speaking and listening skills are encouraged, but the materials offer limited guidance to teachers regarding developing students' speaking and listening skills and referring the students to the text to support responses. While questions and tasks posed in reading comprehension often provide instructions for teachers to tell students to use details from the text in their answer, materials lack instruction on how to direct students to find details in the text. The teacher is instructed to lead students through research throughout the course of the week, however instructions are minimal in supporting teachers and students through the Research and Inquiry Projects.

The Teacher's Edition lacks tools for explicitly teaching speaking and listening skills. In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 3 in Team Talk the directions suggest having children work with a partner to say a sentence that tells about Digby being furious and exhausted. Instructional materials do not provide teacher modeling of speaking and listening skills that support evidence-based discussions such as anchor charts, sentence stems, question stems, and techniques for practicing a skill.

Discussion questions are provided in the “Let’s Talk About It” sections but do not increase in rigor over the course of the school year. The Teacher's Edition has two questions to be used for discussion, but lack guidelines for creating supports to ensure students can speak about and listen to others talk about what they are reading and researching. For example, in Unit 5, Week 5, Day 1, in the “Let’s Talk About it” the prompt asks students to share ideas about what it means to share a treasure. No further guide is given to support students’ listening and speaking.

The directions and support for implementing Research and Inquiry projects are minimal. For example, in Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, during research and Inquiry, students are asked to think about interview questions that, when answered, would help them learn more about changes in their neighborhood. Teacher instructions are limited to: "Record children’s questions in a chart”, without further instructions for the teacher, including time needed to ensure students have opportunities to gather their ideas or build on one another’s ideas. Also in Unit 5, Week 1, Day 3 students are asked to gather and record information. The directions state, “ Tell children that today they will look through reference sources to find information about using materials in new ways. They will take notes about the information they find.” These directions would not be adequate in ensuring that students could gather and record the needed information to promote students' ability to listen and speak about what they are reading and researching.

Research and Inquiry activities in Grade 1 have a focus that is loosely connected to the main selection and worked on throughout the week. On Day 5 students share their work with the class. The teacher directions usually suggest students work with a partner to get the work ready to share with the whole class or in small groups. Teacher instructions include reminders for what good speakers and listeners do, but no modeling is included. In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 5, “Have children share their posters in small groups.” The Listening and Speaking lesson on Day 3 of this week has students practicing retell and using sequencing words, first, next, and last. The Listening and Speaking lesson for the week does not support students in presenting their inquiry project as it is about asking and answering questions. The Team Talk on p.28-29 of this week has students talking about why they think community centers are important, which does not explicitly relate to the main selection.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g., grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. While the materials provide some mixture of on-demand and process writing, there are few opportunities for students to revise and edit with explicit instruction. Incorporating digital resources to support writing is minimal. Teachers would need additional supplemental materials to meet the grade level standards.

Each week, students participate in process writing. The prompt sometimes connects to the theme, setting, or genre of the main selection, but a direct reference to the text is rarely made. A typical weekly routine in the materials includes: Day 1, “Read Like a Writer”, Day 2, “Writer’s Craft”, Day 3, “Let’s Write It!”, Day 4, “Mini-Lesson”, and Day 5, “Revising and Presenting”.

Frequently, the Writing to Sources materials are recommended for use to guide students in writing text-based responses within various forms and modes.

In the Independent Stations, students can participate in "Let's Write!" On Day 3, students can Look Back and Write, which is most frequently a narrative piece on a theme related to the main selection. In some units, students can write in, "Let's Write It!" For example, students can write a friendly letter in Unit 2, Week 1, Day 3. In the Teacher’s Edition it says, “Think about things your family does together. Write a letter to persuade someone in your family to do something with you. “ During the Quick Write, students write a piece of their own choice based on the writing skill of the week. For example, in Unit 3, Week 4, Day 1 the Quick Write for Fluency prompts, “Read the question aloud, and have students list two details in response. ‘What are two things we did this morning?’”.

On-demand writing prompts in “Write to Sources” incorporate reading and writing using text evidence. For example, in Unit 4, Week 6 of Writing to Sources, “Reread pages 212-216 of Henry and Mudge and Mrs. Hopper’s House. Write a short paragraph that tells about the different costumes that Henry and Mudge try on. Use evidence from the text and illustrations as you write” There are no directions for modeling, drafting, review, revision or presentation of these pieces.

The Teacher's Edition does not provide clear directions to support instruction in reading for relevant facts and then turning the facts into complete sentences. For example, (Unit 3, Week 2, Day 3,) the Teacher's Edition states: “Read aloud the Key Features of Comments About a Story and the paragraph explaining comments about a story. Read aloud the Writing Prompt and discuss the Writer’s Checklist.”

Research and Inquiry tasks that include writing are only present for half the school year. For example, in Unit 1, Week 6, Day 5, the Research and Inquiry materials instruct students to write notes about the animals they have observed in their neighborhood. In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 5, students will write and present an oral report about the topic they have researched that week.

There is evidence of minimal teacher directions for the use of a digital resource by students to type writing pieces. Students hand write most final drafts with their revisions and proofreading corrections. For example, in Unit 4, Week 1, Day 5, the Teacher's Edition states: “Have the students use a computer or write a final draft of their friendly letters, with their revisions and proofreading corrections. Help as appropriate.” First grade students will need explicit directions from the teacher as to how to use a word processing program.

There are some opportunities to revise or edit, however, students engage primarily in self-editing and have some opportunities to peer edit or revise during daily writing or prior to the presentation on Day 5. In cases where students do engage in peer conferencing or peer revision, the materials lack explicit directions. For example, Unit 2, Week 1, Day 5, the directions state, “Choose an option for students to present their advertisements. They might trade with partners, or they might post them on a bulletin board.” There is no additional information to guide the teacher as to what students are to do when trading with partners that might involve feedback, editing, and revision.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the requirement for materials to provide opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards. Materials provide experiences in writing across different genres, but a balanced distribution is lacking in the core materials.

Each week consists of a writing component for Days 1-5 and practice in a mode of writing. Each day offers practice in process and distribution on a writing prompt assigned on Day 2. The focus changes each week. Opportunities to practice opinion style writing are minimal. Few of the writing prompts are opinion which does not reflect a balance across the three genres. The distribution of the writing tasks are:

  • Some prompts are informative/explanatory, such as in Unit 3, Week 5, Day 1, “This week you will write captions to go with the pictures you draw. Captions are usually below pictures. They tell about the pictures they are with. Many captions are sentences. Prompt: Think of changes in nature. Plants and animals grow. Seasons change. Draw two pictures to show one way a plant of animal changes. Write captions about your pictures.”
  • Only a few prompts are opinion, such as Unit 5, Week 4, Day 1, “This week you will write an advertisement. An advertisement, or ad, is written to make readers want to buy or use a product. You might see an advertisement in a newspaper or magazine. Prompt: Think about kinds of machines and why people use them. Write an advertisement to get people to use one kind of machine.”
  • About half of the prompts are narrative, such as Unit 2, Week 4, Day 1, “This week you will write a personal narrative. A personal narrative is a kind of story. It tells about an event in your life. Prompt: Think about a time you watched some animals. Write a narrative about it.
  • Some prompts are a combination of genres such as Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, “This week you will write a friendly letter. A friendly letter begins with a greeting, such as Dear Josh, and ends with a closing, such as Your friend. A friendly letter often tells how the writer feels or gives the writer’s opinion. Prompt: Think about things your family does together. Write a letter to persuade someone in your family to do something with you.”

“Writing to Sources”, a Common Core Teacher Resource, contains writing prompts for students to write to the CCSS using text evidence. This supplemental resource provides a balance of writing, but is not included in the Teacher Edition’s weekly planning. Each unit has a focus:

  • Unit R Focus: Narrative
  • Unit 1 Focus: Argument
  • Unit 2 Focus: Informative/Explanatory
  • Unit 3 Focus: Narrative
  • Unit 4 Focus: Argument
  • Unit 5 Focus: Informative/Explanatory

Each week’s main reading selection has two writing options in “Writing to Sources.” The materials do not provide instructional guidance for "Writing to Sources" or address the amount of time that should be spent on each writing task. Teachers can have students “Write like a Reporter” or write to “Connect Texts,” which are suggested in the Teacher Edition, but as with "Writing to Sources," few directions are provided for implementation of the supplemental resources. Examples of writing prompts in the “Writing to Sources” materials include:

  • Argument Prompt: Writing to Sources, page 114, “Look at the story A Place to Play. Reread what Benny says on page 33. Do you agree that the place in the story is a good place for everyone? Write a short paragraph that tells your opinion. Write reasons that support your opinion. Use evidence from the text.”
  • Narrative Prompt: Writing to Sources, page 6, “Reread Sam. Then look at page 21. Where is Tam? Write about things you see.”
  • Informative/Explanatory Prompt: Writing to Sources, page 46, “Review Cinderella. Write a short descriptive paragraph about Cinderella. Tell about her and her feelings. Write a factual report based on the information in this selection.”

Opportunities for assessment are provided in the “Writing to Sources” materials along with rubrics accompanying the weekly process-writing task. After Week 6, a Unit Writing Task is provided. However, there are not explicit instructions or a rubric to assess student writing. For example, in Unit 5, the Writing to Sources Writing Task on pages 214-218 states, “Tell about the different machines and inventions in the selections. What do they do? How can machines and inventions make our lives better? Give examples from the texts that show how machines and inventions can help people. Write a paragraph telling which of the machines or inventions you like best. State an opinion and support it with reasons. Use examples from the two selections to defend your choice.” There are no detailed directions or supports for teachers and a rubric is not provided.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and clear information appropriate for the grade level. Teacher resources on how to implement or teach evidence-based writing are not evident in the core materials. Additional instructional supports are needed for teachers to guide students’ understanding of developing ideas and recalling evidence from texts and/or other sources.

Students have few opportunities to practice writing using recall and evidence from text. The directions to the teacher are minimal. Although writing prompts allow students to recall from experience, many writing opportunities do not provide students the opportunity to recall information from sources. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Week 5: Get the Egg, students are provided the prompt, “Think about animals in neighborhoods. Write a realistic story about two friends seeing an animal.”
  • Unit 2, Week 3: Who Works Here?, students are provided the prompt, “Think about the kinds of jobs people do. Now think about what teachers do. Write an explanation of a teacher’s job.”
  • Unit 3, Week 6, Where are My Animal Friends, students are provided the prompt, “Think about Raccoon and Squirrel in Where Are My Animal Friends? What would they say if they could call Goose on a phone? Write a play scene showing what they would say.”
  • Unit 6, Week 1, Tippy Toe Chick, students are provided the prompt, “Think of a problem that needs a solution. Now write an animal fantasy that tells how the animals solve the problem.”

Students have few opportunities to recall information from texts in order to develop opinions based on textual information. Throughout the year, students refine their reasoning about their feelings and do not need information from a provided resources to answer the prompt. For example:

  • Unit 2,Week 1, students write a friendly letter. “A friendly letter often tells how the writer feels or give the writer’s opinion. Think about things your family does together. Write a letter to persuade someone in your family to do something with you.”
  • Unit 4, Week 5, students write a thank-you note in order to express their feelings to someone for sharing something.

The Writing to Sources workbook allows students to complete writing tasks in response to multiple texts and to cite text-based sources. Students are able to practice and apply writing using evidence. For example, in Unit 3, Week 1, the Writing to Sources prompt is, “Look at the story A Place to Play. Reread what Benny says on page 33. Do you agree that the place in the story is a good place for everyone? Write a short paragraph that tells your opinion. Write reasons that support your opinion. Use evidence from the text.” However, there is not time allotted in the regular teacher day/materials to include the Writing to Sources writing tasks.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet expectations that materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards for the grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Grammar and Conventions lessons aligned to the standards include the following:

  • Unit R: Nouns, Verbs
  • Unit 1: Types of Sentences
  • Unit 2: Proper Nouns, Singular and Plural Nouns
  • Unit 3: Action Verbs
  • Unit 4: Adjectives (Week 2: Colors and Shapes, Week 3: Size, Week 4: What Kind, Week 5: How many and Articles, Week 6: Adjectives that compare)
  • Unit 5: Pronouns, Adverbs, Prepositions

Some standards covered fall outside of the Grade 1 level. Examples include:

  • Unit 2, Week 4, the entire week’s conventions lessons focus on proper nouns. Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names is taught in Grade 2 (L.2.2a)
  • Unit 2, Week 2, the entire week’s conventions lessons focus on nouns. Day 1 explicitly teaches what a noun is and provides guided practice. (L.K.1.b)
  • In Unit 3, Week 6 there is a lesson on contractions. Contractions are taught in Grade 2 (L.2.2.c).
  • Unit 4, Week 2, the entire week’s convention lessons focus on Adjectives for Colors and Shapes. Sorting common objects into categories (shapes, foods, etc.) to gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent is a standard in Kindergarten. (L.K.5.a)

Grammar and convention standards for the grade level are not applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts. For example, the L.1.1. grammar and usage standards for Grade 1 require students to ‘use’ the parts of speech. Many of the materials do not provide opportunities for students to apply grammar within context. Also, L.1.1.g (use frequently occurring conjunctions) and L.1.1.h (use determiners) standards are not taught in the grade 1 materials.

Each unit has a daily direct instruction lesson on “Conventions.” Each week focuses on specific grammar skills and conventions. Each day, explicit instruction takes place, and students practice the skill with worksheets from Grammar Transparencies, Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook, and Let’s Practice It! The skills for the week are shown in the Skills Overview for the unit. Some standards are taught only briefly or late in the year as indicated below. Teachers will need to create additional materials to be able to teach the full intent of the standard. For example, grammar instruction worksheets often have words and sentences that connect to the week’s main reading selection, but the application is primarily out of context.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
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Criterion Rating Details

Reading Street Grade 1 partially meets the expectations for materials in reading, writing, speaking, and listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards. instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials reviewed partially meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts for including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).Materials reviewed partially meet expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity, sight-based recognition of high-frequency words, and reading fluency in oral reading once phonics instruction begins. There are missed opportunities to help students gain fluency skills since many teacher directions lack specifics as to how to inform and explain fluency skills to students. Materials reviewed partially meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected and isolated text. There are missed opportunities for explicit directions to the teacher as well as modeling for the students in the reading and writing of words in connected and isolated texts.Materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported. There are many assessments, but teacher guidance or direct instructions are limited.Materials reviewed partially meet the expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills. Students have limited opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Unit R and Unit 1 contain phonics lessons which review Kindergarten standards, which means 12 weeks are spent on previous grade-level phonics and word recognition standards.

Students have daily opportunities to learn and understand phonemes. Phonemic awareness lessons occur daily, sometimes with an image for students to view. Some phonemic lessons only contain introduce and model which limits student practice opportunities. Examples include:

  • Unit R, Week 3, students relearn short i and In Unit 2, Week 3, students learn long i.
  • Unit 1, Week 1, students hear the teacher pronouncing /a/ as a medial vowel and an initial vowel.
  • Unit 1, Week 6, students look at an image to find words that rhyme with trust in order to blend consonant blends.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, on Day 2, Segment and Blend Phonemes the lesson is as follows: MODEL “Look at the picture, I see sunflowers. Sunflower is a compound word that is made of the two shorter words, sun and flower. I hear three sounds in sun: /s/ /u/ /n/. GROUP PRACTICE Guide children as they segment and blend these words from the picture: strawberries, watermelon, shoelace, blue, bluebird, blueberry. ON THEIR OWN Have children segment and blend the following words. bedtime, sandbox.” While the standards call for students to segment and blend words, the Grade 1 standard RF.1.2.d requires students to, “Segment spoken single-syllable words into their complete sequence of individual sounds (phonemes).” Therefore, this activity is beyond Grade 1 standards.

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills, although Unit R contains six weeks of review phonics lessons from Kindergarten and some of Unit 1 contains review phonic skills from Kindergarten, which compresses Grade 1 standards the remaining units. The Teacher Edition contains daily phonics activities. Examples include:

  • Unit R, Week 1, there are lessons to the sounds for the letters m, s, t, and short a. The teacher focuses on what students hear: “Listen: /m/, m/, /m/.
  • Unit 1, Week 4, students are taught how to read words with inflectional endings.
  • Unit 1, Week 5, the short e is reviewed from Kindergarten.
  • Unit 2, Week 3, long vowel spelling patterns a_e and i_e are taught.
  • Unit 4, Week 4, students learn the common consonant digraph of kn and wr.
  • Unit 5, Week 2, students practice decoding two syllable words which contain V/CV and VC/V.

The phonics sequence starts with Kindergarten standards of one-to-one letter sound correspondence. In Unit 1, short vowels are reviewed from Kindergarten. In Unit 2, digraphs (sh, th, wh, ch, tch, ph) and long vowels are taught. In Unit 3, y vowel sounds, ng, nk, -es, and r-controlled vowels are taught. In Unit 4, vowel digraphs (ai, ay, ea, oa, ow, ie, igh, ue, ew, ui) are taught over five weeks. In Unit 5, diphthongs (ow, ou, oi, oy) and vowel sounds (oo, aw, au) are taught.

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

Materials include frequent and adequate lessons and multimodal tasks and questions about the organization of print concepts. Examples include:

  • Print awareness lessons in Unit R, Week 2 cover reading directionality. These are Kindergarten standards.
  • Unit R, Week 2 has a lesson about comparing and contrasting a letter to a word. This is a Kindergarten standard.
  • Unit R, Week 6, on Day 2 students are taught about a sentence. Students locate the period in the sentence.
  • Unit 1, Week 1, on Day 1, “Explain that a sentence is a group of words that tells a complete idea. The cat hid under the bed is a sentence. Every sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with a punctuation mark. Remind children that a capital letter is the uppercase form of a letter and that many sentences end with a period, a punctuation mark that looks like a dot.”
  • Some reminders appear in the Daily Fix-It under the conventions tab. In Unit 2, Week 5, on Day 2 sidebar, “Review capitalization of proper nouns, punctuation, and the - ‘ll contractions.” and Unit 3, Week 4, on Day 5 sidebar, “Review capitalization and punctuation of sentences.”

Materials include frequent and adequate lesson and activities about text structures. Examples include:

    • Unit 1, Week 1, on Day 3: PLOT “Remind children that the plot in a story includes the problem the characters have and how they try to solve it. Thinking about the problem in a story and its solution can help us better understand story events. Have children turn to page 23 in their Student Edition. What problem do the characters in Sam, Come Back! Have? (Sam the cat takes the woman’s yarn and runs away.) Now have children turn to page 24. How do the characters try to solve their problem? (They chase Same and try to get him to come back.)”
    • Unit 2, Week 1, on Day 4: MAIN IDEA AND DETAILS “Remind children that the main idea is what the selection is mostly about. The details are small bits of information that tell about the main idea. Paying attention to the main idea and details helps us understand what the text is about. Have children turn to page 86 of their Student Edition. What is the main idea in Who Works Here? (Many people work in a neighborhood.) What are some details that tell about the main idea? Tell the pages where you found the details. (on page 90, it says that police officers work in a neighborhood.)”
    • Unit 3, Week 5, on Day 3: “Remind children that the order in which things happen is their sequence. As we read, paying attention to the sequence of events helps us understand and remember what we are learning. Have children turn to pages 160-165 in their Student Edition. What is the first thing the caterpillar does? (It eats leaves.) What happens next? (It grows bigger, it makes a chrysalis.) Have children continue to identify the sequence of a butterfly’s life cycle.”
  • Unit 4, Week 6, on Day 5: “Remember that good readers look for causes and effects as they read. They ask themselves ‘What happened’ and ‘Why did it happen?’ When you ask ‘Why?’ what are you asking about? (the cause) When you ask ‘What happened?’ what are you asking about? (the effect).
  • Unit 5, Week 3, on Day 1: “Compare means telling how things are the same. Contrast means telling how things are not the same… GUIDE PRACTICE After rereading ‘What’s So Special About Squirrels?’ have children choose one detail from the web and draw it. Then have children share their drawings with the class, using alike and different to describe their pictures.”

Materials include frequent and adequate lesson and activities about text features. Examples include:

  • Unit 2, Week 3, on Day 2, the teacher shows students several nonfiction books with headings. Then models, “Reading chapter headings helps us know what a book is about. My topic is Meeting People’s Need for Bread. If I find a heading such as Growing Grains for Bread, I will be sure to read the whole chapter.” Students use a page in the Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook to practice headings.
  • Unit 3, Week 2, on Day 2, The teacher shows students a newspaper and a magazine. Teacher then displays a transparency with a newspaper table of contents and guides children to find information on a baseball game. Teacher then guides the completion of the rest of the worksheet. There is no independent practice of this skill in this lesson.
  • Unit 3, Week 2, on Day 2, Research Skill: Glossary “TEACH Tell children that a glossary is an alphabetical list of words and their definitions. Have children turn to the glossary at the end of their Student Edition. Explain that a glossary is often helpful when you are reading facts about a topic. If you do not understand a word you have read, you may be able to look it up in the glossary.” Teacher then models finding a word from the main selection then guides students to practice finding another word on their own.
  • Unit 5, Week 3, on Day 2, Research Skill: Text Structures “TEACH Tell children that books have different ways to help readers find important information. These are called text features. Text features also help to organize information so that readers can find it quickly. Display reference books and identify these text features: headings, illustrations with captions, alphabetized index.”

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2. There are missed opportunities to help students gain fluency skills since many teacher directions lack specifics as to how to inform and explain fluency skills to students.

Students have some opportunities to purposefully read on-level text in core materials over the course of a year. The directions do not always state the purpose of the reading of the text. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Week 4, on Day 2, students read the main selection for the first time. Before students read, they preview the pictures, predict what the story is about and the teacher tells students, “Good readers read for a purpose. Setting a purpose helps us to think and understand more as we read. We will read this story to find out about the foxes in a zoo.”
  • Unit 4, Week 5, on Day 3, students read the main selection for the second time. The teacher reviews with a drawing conclusions question and then reminds children that realistic fiction is a made up story. Children recall parts of Peter’s Chair that could happen in real life. Children then reread the main selection. No purpose for reading is set.
  • Unit 5, Week 5 during small group reading, the Teacher Edition states, “Have children read the decodable reader. Then have them reread the text to develop automaticity.”

Materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and decodable words. Examples include:

  • After Unit R, starting in Unit 1, on Days 3 and 4, have Fluency lessons. During Day 4, the teacher monitors and records student’s fluency.
  • Unit 1, Week 6, on Day 3, Fluency, Appropriate Phrasing: Teacher has students identify an exclamation mark. “It tells me that I should read this sentence with excitement. Have children read the page with you. Then have them reread the page as a group until they read with appropriate phrasing, paying attention to the exclamation marks. Point out how your voice changes when you read the exclamation. If children have difficulty reading with appropriate phrasing, then prompt: Did you look at the end marks? How should your voice sound what you read a sentence that ends with an exclamation mark? Read the sentence as if you are very excited.” Then students follow the Choral Reading routine: Select a Passage, Model, Guided Practice, Feedback. “For optimal fluency, children should reread three to four times.”
  • Unit 4, Week 4, on Day 4, “Have children follow along as you read the pages accurately and at an appropriate rate with expression. Have the class read the pages with you and then reread the pages as a group without you until they read with accuracy at an appropriate rate with expression.”
  • Unit 5, Week 1, on Day 4, Fluency Accuracy, Rate, and Expression: “Have children follow along as you read the pages at a natural pace with accuracy and expression. Have the class read the pages with you and then reread the pages as a group without you until they read at a natural pace with accuracy and expression. To provide additional fluency practice, pair non-fluent readers with fluent readers.”

Materials support reading of texts with attention to reading strategies such as rereading, self-correction, and the use of context clues. Examples include:

  • Unit 3, Week 6, on Day 5, Vocabulary Context Clues “Write these sentences: Turn right at the corner. Josh was right about the math test. Read the sentence aloud. Right can mean ‘opposite of left’ or ‘correct.’ What clues tell you which meaning is used in the first sentence?” This lesson discusses using context clues to understand words that have more than one meaning. All sentence examples are in isolation and have no relation to the main selection about animal friends.

The Teacher Edition lists self-correct as Foundational Skills 4.c in the margins of several pages, but does not prompt the teacher to discuss self-correcting with the students. The Teacher Edition recommends that the teacher have students reread for understanding but does not have the teacher explain to students that it is a reading strategy. Unit 3, Week 3, on Day 3 “Routine Read for Understanding Deepen understanding by reading the selection multiple times.”

Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words. Examples include:

  • Unit 2, Week 1, on Day 2, the Phonics lesson focuses on a in ball and al in chalk by introducing the sound-spelling cards. They practice reading words with both sounds in isolation then in sentences in the book. Then students read Decodable Reader 7B Get the Ball.
  • Unit 3, Week 1,students read high-frequency words in the context of sentences such as “This past fall, nothing ___ on my tall peach tree (grew).”
  • Unit 4, Week 6, students read high-frequency words in the context of sentences such as “I like this cake because it is in the shape of a ___. (heart).
  • Unit 5, Week 6, during Independent Stations, in Words to Know, students identify and write the following high-frequency words: early, learn, science, built, through.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected and tasks. There are missed opportunities for explicit directions to the teacher as well as modeling for the students in the reading and writing of words in connected and tasks.

Materials partially support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills in connected text and tasks. Examples include:

  • Unit R, Week 4, students use the student edition to decode one syllable words with the consonants d and l.
  • Unit 1, Week 4, on Day 3, the teacher and students refer to a picture in the Student Edition. The Teacher Edition states, “MODEL COUNTING SYLLABLES: Look at the picture. Today we are going to count syllables. Remember that syllable is a word part that has a single vowel sound. I see children bending and feeding the ducks. Bending has two syllables: bend, ing. Feeding also has two syllables: feed, ing. GUIDE PRACTICE: Guide children to use the picture and say words that have two syllables. (dumping, picking) ON THEIR OWN: Have children change each of these single-syllable words into two-syllable words by adding -ing. Eat, look, jump, stand, mend, hand. Have children say other two-syllable words with a partner.”
  • Unit 2, Week 1, students learn the consonant digraphs sh and th. Students read Decodable Reader: A Plan for Trash and the main selection: A Big Fish for Max. The main selection includes (wish, fish, path, this, then, ship, shell, dish) and provides the opportunity for students to apply word recognition and analysis skills with a connected text.
  • Unit 5, Week 1, students learn suffixes -er, -or and practice those suffixes in Decodable Reader: Teacher, Actor, or Sailor and the main selection: Simple Machines. The main selection includes (mower, cleaner, lever) and provides students the opportunity to apply word recognition and analysis skills with a connected text.
  • Unit 5, Week 5, on Day 2, the Teacher Edition states, “CONNECT: Write the word joy and have children say it. Remind them that they already know that the letters oy stand for the sound /oi/. Explain that today they will learn how to read and spell two-syllable words that have vowel sounds like/oi/ USE SOUND SPELLING CARD The word oatmeal has two syllables. It is a compound word made up of the smaller words oat and meal. The letters oa stand for the first syllable. Have children say /o/ several times as you point to oa. The letters ea stand for the sound /e/ in the last syllable. Have children say /e/ several times as you point to ea. Then have children say oatmeal.” Teacher continues to model with the word boyhood. Then guide children to practice with words like: toybox, sailboat, snowball.”

Materials provide frequent opportunities to read and write irregularly spelled words in connected text and tasks. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Week 3, students read high-frequency words and selection words in isolation and then in the context of sentences.
  • Unit 2, Week 3 of Independent Work Stations, students write high-frequency on their papers and write a sentence using at least one word.

There is limited explicit instruction provided for students to practice grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and tasks. Most phonics lessons have word recognition and word analysis skills worksheets for students to practice writing the phonics skill. Few opportunities exist for students to practice writing phonics skills in connected text.

  • Every day during the week there is spelling practice that corresponds with the phonics skill being taught. This writing is done out of context. For example:
    • In Unit 3, Week 3 students write words with -es
    • In Unit 4, Week 6 students write words with the suffix -ly and -ful
  • Day 4 of phonics lessons, students write words with the weekly phonics skill on a worksheet. For example, in Unit 2, Week 2, students complete a worksheet that lets students practice the phonics of sh and th.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported. There are many assessments, but teacher guidance or direct instructions are limited.

Multiple assessment documents are available in core materials allowing students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills. Examples include:

  • On the Assessment page of the Unit Overview of each unit, the Teacher Edition mentions:
    • Begin the year
      • A Baseline Group Test that will help with “... initial grouping decisions and to differentiate instruction based no ability levels.”
      • Online Assessment
    • Every day corrective feedback and monitor progress
      • In Unit 1, Week 4, teachers are directed to monitor progress each day. On Monday: Check Word Reading, Tuesday: Check Word Reading, Wednesday: Check High-Frequency Words, Thursday: Fluency Check, Friday: Check Oral Vocabulary.
      • Example: Fluency Check “As children reread, monitor their progress toward their individual fluency goals. Mid-Year Goal: 20-30 words correct per minute. End-of-Year Goal: 60 words correct per minute…” “If children are not on track to meet benchmark goals, then have children practice with text at their independent level.” There is no explicit instructions for the teacher as to how to monitor “progress toward their individual fluency goals” or what texts a child should read if they need more practice at their independent level.
  • Every week
    • “Weekly Assessments on Day 5 to check phonics, high-frequency words, and comprehension.”
      • Unit 3, Week 2, Day 5, Example: Many assessments are listed. There are no directions for teacher whether all or some of the assessments should be completed. A written assessment for plural endings, high-frequency words; and fact and opinion can be found in Weekly Test 15 pages 121-126. SENTENCE READING; Using a reproducible page children are asked to read words in context. “Call on children to read two sentences aloud. Start over with sentence one if necessary.” No instructions are given whether this should be done individually or not. FLUENCY “Take a one-minute sample of children’s oral reading. Have children read the fluency passage on page 117f.” There is also a comprehension assessment that appears to be done one-on-one. All scores should be recorded using the Sentence Reading Chart and the Fluency Progress Chart in First Stop.
    • “Weekly tests assess target skills for the week.”
    • A Fluency Assessment Plan is included in the materials and instructs teachers to formally assess fluency with 8-10 children every week. Assess 4 to 5 children on Day 4 and 4 to 5 children on Day 5.
  • End of year
    • “End-of-Year Assessments measure student mastery of skills covered in all six units with options for performance-based assessment.”

Assessment materials partially provide teachers and students with information on students’ current skills/level of understanding and support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward foundational skills. The assessments and progress checks are very generic. The assessments lack explicit instructions/guidance on how to address the skills students are missing in order to demonstrate mastery in foundational skills. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, students read the decodable reader and practice in their Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook. Monitor Progress Vowel Sounds of y “Write the following words and have the class read them. Notice which words children miss during the group reading. Call on individuals to read some of the words. By, dry, sky, buddy, happy…” “If children cannot blend words with the vowel sounds of y at this point, then use the Small Group Time Strategic Intervention lesson, p. SG.7, to reteach vowel sounds of y. Continue to monitor children’s progress using other instructional opportunities during the week.” No instructions are provided to the teacher about how to collect data and monitor students. “Other instructional opportunities’ is not defined in the teacher’s edition.
  • Each week on Day 5 there is an Assessment Checklist for the week that includes a weekly assessment and a differentiated assessment.
    • Unit 2, Week 5, Under the Weekly Assessment heading, the Teacher Edition states: “Use pp.97-102 of Weekly Tests to check: Phonics Long u: u_e; Long e: e_e, Phonics Inflected Ending -ed, Comprehension Author’s Purpose, High-Frequency Words around, grow, find, under, food water.” Differentiated Assessment states: “Use pp. 97-102 of Fresh Reads for Fluency and Comprehension to check: Comprehension Author’s Purpose, Review Comprehension Cause and Effect.”
  • Throughout the Teacher Edition, there are sections labeled “Monitor Progress” that provide formative assessment on the current skills being taught. For example:
    • Unit 2, Week 6, during Monitor Progress: Long e: e, ee “Write the following words and have the class read them. Notice which words children miss during the group reading. Call on individuals to read some of the words. We, sweet, he, tree, week, feel, Pete, keep, she, Steve, these, step, weed, ten, me. If children cannot blend long e words at this point, then use the Small Group Time Strategic Intervention lesson, p. SG 92, to reteach /e/ spelled e and ee. Continue to monitor children’s progress using other instructional opportunities during the week. See the Skills Trace on p.172-173.”

There are many assessments, but little direction for teachers. Teachers may not be able to determine how many assessments to do each week and what to do with the data once it has been collected.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills. Students have limited opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery.

Materials partially provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills. Opportunities for differentiation are not always present. Examples include:

  • Unit 2, Week 3, Day 2, students read the Decodable Reader 9B:
    • Read Catch the Bus
      • DECODE WORDS IN ISOLATION: Have children turn to page 57. Have children decode each word.
      • REVIEW HIGH-FREQUENCY WORDS: Review the previously taught words go, I, put, a, the, for, and to. Have children read each word as you point to it on the Word Wall
      • PREVIEW: Have children read the title and preview the story. Tell them they will read words that have the sounds /ch/ spelled ch or tch, /hw/ spelled wh, and /f/ spelled ph.
      • DECODE WORDS IN CONTEXT: Pair children for reading and listen sas they decode. One child begins. Children read the entire story, switching readers after each page.
      • All students read the same decodable.
  • Unit 5, Week 5, Day 4, students complete a Phonics Review: Vowel Diphthongs oi, oy; Suffixes -er, -or
    • Review Diphthongs oi, oy: To review last week’s first phonics skill, write boil and toy. You studied words like these last week. What do you know about the vowel sounds in these words?
      • Corrective feedback: If children are unable to answer your questions about the vowel sounds in the words you wrote, refer them to Sound-Spelling Cards 88 and 100.
    • Review Suffixes -er, -or: To review last week’s second phonics skill write swimmer. You can read this word because you know -er is a suffix. What is the base word?
    • Guide Practice: Write the following list of words and the sentence frames. Point to each word in the list and have children decode each one.
    • While students have the opportunity to practice through guided practice and independent practice, no differentiation is suggested besides the corrective feedback in the earlier part of the lesson.

Materials partially provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. Examples include:

  • The Table of Contents and the Access for All tab of each Unit show Teacher-Led Small Group Lesson Plans for each day of the week at On Level, Strategic Intervention, Advanced, and English Language Learners (ELL) levels. However, there are no specific lesson plans for ELL as there are for the other three groups. The program recommends placing ELLs in a group that “corresponds to their reading ability.” Very brief recommendations are made to support ELLs.
  • Small Groups are set up to Day 1 Differentiate Phonics, Differentiate Comprehension, Differentiate Close Reading, Differentiate Vocabulary, Differentiate Reteaching.
  • Unit 1, Week 6, Day 1 Access for All (Small Group Time) Advanced, Extend Phonics “SHORT u: Have children practice with more complex words. Have children use several words in sentences: uncle, number, funny, under, summer…” Students then read a passage from a reproducible. Teacher instructions recommend students take turns reading aloud. After reading, students are asked to recall two most important ideas of the story using details from the text. No modeling or possible student answers are provided in the teacher directions.
  • Unit 4, Week 3, Day 4 Decodable Reader 21C Recommendations for ELLs are made for Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced readers. “Beginning: Before children read, display a scrap of paper and demonstrate the meanings of sprang up and sprinted. Have children repeat each word as you display the scrap and demonstrate the actions once more. Point to the words in the book. Intermediate: Have children locate words with three-letter consonant blends and read them aloud. Then have them make up sentences using each word. Advanced: After reading, explain that the word spring has two meanings: the season after winter and to jump up. Sprang means jumped up. Have children locate the word spring in the story. Have them use context clues to determine its meaning.” All the recommendations for ELLs are to give oral instruction or use another resource from SuccessNet.

Students have limited practice opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery. Examples include:

  • Using the review of phonemic awareness and phonics sounds and letters week to week, there is an attempt to teach to mastery.
    • In Unit 2, Week 1, Days 1-2: Teach phonics, spelling, and decodable reader of sh and th. The same sounds are reviewed in phonemic awareness and spelling on Days 3-5. They are also reviewed in phonics Week 2, Day 4. General recommendations for reteaching the above are given for each concept such as “If...children have difficulty blending a word, then...model blending the word, and ask children to blend it with you.” An attempt is made at teaching to mastery, however, there are no additional materials or explicit instructions provided for teacher if students have not mastered the sounds by this week.
    • In Unit 4, Week 5, Day 2 is a lesson on digraphs wh, ch, tch, ph. The lesson contains Teach/Model where the teacher: displays Sound-Spelling Cards, model blending words with digraphs, guides students to blend words with the teacher, and reviews digraph sounds. In Guide Practice, students blend words from the Student Edition and practice as a group. “If...children have difficulty blending a word, then...model blending, and ask children to blend with you.” In Apply, students decode words in isolation and in context. Independently, students do p. 253 of Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook. After Monitor Progress, if...children cannot blend words with wh, ch, tch, and ph, then...use the Small Group Time Strategic Intervention lesson, p. SG 42, to reteach consonant digraphs. Continue to monitor children’s progressing using other instructional opportunities during the week. See Skills Trace on p. 84c.” The Skills Trace refers the teacher back to where the skill is taught previously.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Not Rated

Criterion 2a - 2h

0/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
0/4

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
0/4

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
0/4

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
0/4

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
0/4

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
0/4

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
0/4

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
0/4

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Thu Apr 06 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2013

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Student's Edition Unit R 978-0-3287-2443-7 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Student's Edition Unit 1 978-0-3287-2444-4 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Student's Edition Unit 2 978-0-3287-2445-1 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Student's Edition Unit 3 978-0-3287-2446-8 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Student's Edition Unit 4 978-0-3287-2447-5 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Student's Edition Unit 5 978-0-3287-2448-2 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Teacher's Edition Unit R 978-0-3287-2515-1 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Teacher's Edition Unit 1 978-0-3287-2516-8 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Teacher's Edition Unit 2 978-0-3287-2517-5 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common CoreTeacher's Edition Unit 3 978-0-3287-2518-2 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Teacher's Edition Unit 4 978-0-3287-2519-9 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Teacher's Edition Unit 5 978-0-3287-2520-5 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013

About Publishers Responses

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Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

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After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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