Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Reading Street Kindergarten do not meet the expectations for alignment. The materials partially meet the expectations for providing texts worthy of students' time and attention while supporting students' advancement toward independent reading. The materials do not meet expectations of reading, writing, and speaking to support rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and tasks to build both strong literacy skills as well as content knowledge and vocabulary. Foundational skills development only partially meets expectations.

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Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
26
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
0
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Does Not Meet Expectations

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Gateway One Details

Kindergarten Reading Street does not meet the Gateway 1 expectation of providing texts with quality and complexity and alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Materials partially meet the expectations of providing texts worthy of students’ time and attention while supporting students’ advancement toward independent reading. Materials do not meet the expectation of providing opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions about writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Materials partially meet the expectation of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language supporting foundational reading development and standards alignment.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
10/20
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-
Criterion Rating Details

Reading Street Kindergarten does not meet the expectation of texts being worthy of students' time and attention. The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading and consider a range of interests. Materials partially meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Unit main selections and paired selections include a mix of informational text and literary text and a variety of genres, but do not meet the requirement for text distribution. The materials reviewed partially meet criteria for texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently. The materials include quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task information for each main selection. Materials partially meet the expectations for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels). Many of the main selections fall within the stretch grade-level band in terms of quantitative measures, but some main selections fall outside the Lexile grade band. Two days of guidance and scaffolded support from the teacher is suggested, regardless of the text complexity of the main selection. Materials partially meet the expectation that anchor texts and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.The paired texts and the teacher read-aloud selections do not include a breakdown of quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task measures as well as a rationale for the paired texts and the teacher read-aloud.Materials partially meet the expectations that support materials for the core texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. Materials provide some opportunities for reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency, however, teacher materials often lack explicit directions for implementation.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations for anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests. Texts are grouped into thematic units with a main text as the anchor text. There are six texts in each theme along with a paired selection.

Examples of texts that are content-rich and accompanied by quality illustrations and photographs include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 2, Week 1, the text is Flowers by Vijaya Khisty Bodach. This text is engaging for Kindergarten students and is worthy of careful and repeated readings. The text includes several grade-level domain-specific vocabulary words (pollen, buds, stem, seeds) to help students build knowledge. The photographs bolster the text and provide visual support to accompany the vocabulary.
  • Unit 3, Week 5, the text is Then and Now by Tracy Sato. This text is of high interest for Kindergarten students and is worthy of careful and repeated readings. The text includes several grade-level academic vocabulary words (popular, grid, stumbling, structures) that would require repeated readings to support learning. Plus, the illustrations are rich in detail and would support oral language in comparing students’ lives then and now.
  • Unit 4, Week 5, the text is If You Could Go to Antarctica by Fay Robinson. This text is engaging for Kindergarten students and is worthy of careful and repeated readings. This informational main selection has text features, vocabulary, and facts that would warrant multiple readings to build knowledge. Some of the vocabulary for Kindergarten in this main text include blubber, icebergs, ice shelf, and continent.

Examples of texts that lack rich and engaging language and could not be examined multiple times for multiple purposes include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 2, Week 2, the text is Nature Spy by Shelley Rotner and Ken Kreisler. This text is less engaging for Kindergarten students. While the photos are engaging and the close-up photos may hold students’ interests, the book only has short sentences and phrases on each page.
  • Unit 5, Week 5, the text is On the Move by Donna Lantham. This text is very simplistic and would not hold students’ attention. It has a rhyming structure that may make it difficult for students to learn about the different types of transportation mentioned in the text. Photos are generic and do not add to the understanding of the text.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Unit main selections and paired selections include a mix of informational text and literary texts with a variety of genres, but do not meet the requirement for text distribution.

The main reading selections are grouped into six units with a total of 23 literary and 13 informational texts. The units lack variety, as only one unit includes a balance of literary and informational text as required by the standards. The other units are predominately literature. For example, Units 1 and 5 contain only one informational text, with the balance being literary texts. Benchmark readers are also included and are all literature based. The leveled readers are spread across multiple genres but are not balanced (69% literary and 31% informational texts). Therefore, even with the inclusion of the paired readings, benchmark readers, and leveled texts, students will be engaging with literary texts the majority of the time.

Examples of text types and genres represented include but are not limited to:

  • Unit 1:
    • The Little School Bus (Animal Fantasy)
    • We Are So Proud (Realistic Fiction)
    • Plaidypus (Realistic Fiction)
    • Miss Bindergarten Takes a Field Trip with Kindergarten (Animal Fantasy)
    • Smash! Crash! (Fantasy)
    • Dig Dig Digging (Informational)
  • Unit 3:
    • Little Panda (Informational)
    • Little Quack (Animal Fantasy)
      • George Washington Visits (Historical Fiction)
      • Farfallina and Marcel (Animal Fantasy)
      • Then and Now (Informational)
      • The Lion and the Mouse (Classic Fable)
  • Unit 5:
    • Max Takes the Train (Animal Fantasy)
    • Mayday! Mayday! (Informational)
    • Trucks Roll! (Rhyming Informational)
    • The Little Engine That Could (Classic Fantasy)
    • On the Move! (Informational)
    • This is the Way We Go to School (Informational Fiction)

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.

For all Kindergarten main selection texts, the quantitative measures are not included within the materials; however, the qualitative measures and reader and task measures are included. Appropriate rigor is evident in some main texts according to qualitative and reader and task measures for Kindergarten. To fully comprehend some texts and complete the associated tasks, students will need background knowledge, as the overall rigor of many texts and associated task is above grade level.

Some representative examples of texts that are at the appropriate level of complexity include but are not limited to the following:

Unit 2, Week 3: Animal Babies in Grasslands (Expository Text)

  • Quantitative: Not provided
  • Qualitative: Figurative language and personification add to the complexity of this read-aloud text. The text structure includes repeated sentences with predictable structure. Domain specific vocabulary includes calf, joey, pup, foal, and grassland. Students may need help understanding the figurative language and vocabulary in this read-aloud. The photographs are moderately complex and support the text.
  • Reader and Task: While there is not a Lexile level for this book, Kindergarten students will mostly likely be curious to learn about the animals in the text. However, if students have had little experience with expository text, the format will be difficult for them to understand. This text is appropriately placed.

Unit 2, Week 3, Day 1: A Growing Foal (Teacher Read-Aloud – Expository Text)

  • Quantitative: Not provided. The Lexile 550L (Within the Grade 2-3 band) was found using Lexile Analyzer.
  • Qualitative: While the organization may seem simple, the quantity of information and facts in this read-aloud is complex for Kindergarten students. The passage includes several domain specific vocabulary words.
  • Reader and Task: This read-aloud will help to build students’ knowledge within the Animal Babies in Grasslands text. The text complexity is within the grade 2-3 band and teachers may want to provide additional supports for learners.

Unit 4, Week 6: Abuela (Fantasy)

  • Quantitative: Not provided
  • Qualitative: The organization of this text is complex because there are elements of fantasy and symbolism. The events in this text happen in chronological order and include a glossary to support student learning. Language features are moderately complex as the language includes both Spanish and English. There are references to other cultural experience which may be complex for Kindergarten students. The illustrations are rich with detail and warrant time to investigate details.
  • Reader and Task: Students will need to learn about the structure and purpose of a glossary to support reading. Background knowledge of different cultures and languages would be helpful for students. This text is appropriately placed.

Some texts have qualitative or quantitative features that do not fully support students' growing literacy skills according to the demands of the standards for Kindergarten. Examples include, but are not limited to the following:

Unit 3, Week 1: Little Panda (Nonfiction)

  • Quantitative: Not provided, Lexile 900 (according to Lexile.com)
  • Qualitative: Students may have trouble understanding the complex sentence structures, including many commas in a series and ellipses. Factual presentation of the panda’s story along with lengthy captions for the pictures may make it difficult for students to understand the story. The illustrations are moderately complex and support the text.
  • Reader and Task: The Lexile level of this text is very high for the Kindergarten grade band. Students may relate to the baby panda growing up, but the structure will be difficult, even as a read-aloud.

Unit 6, Week 5: The House That Tony Lives In (Informational Fiction)

  • Quantitative: Not provided
  • Qualitative: While this text has a predictable structure, it may not hold students’ interest, at this point in the school year. The predictable structure of the text is a low qualitative quality. The illustrations are moderately complex and support the text.
  • Reader and Task: Students who are not familiar with construction may have trouble with pages that describe building sequence such as, “These are the electricians who install the wire…” This would be a difficult passage for Kindergarten students to read independently and is not worthy of spending time on for a read-aloud.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels). The main selections in the Kindergarten materials are not accompanied by a qualitative measurement. The Kindergarten materials do not fully support students' ability to read and listen to increasingly complex texts across the school year, due to a lack of instructions for the teacher. Two days of guidance and scaffolded support from the teacher is suggested regardless of the text complexity of the main selection. Teacher directions lack explicit instructions and amount of time that should be spent on texts that have very complex elements and demands.

For a Kindergarten reader, most of the main selections in the Unit 1 have a slightly complex structure while one selection, Dig Dig Digging, in Unit 1, Week 6, is moderately complex with expository text that includes complex sentence structure.

Unit 2 includes all moderately complex texts. For example, A Bed for Winter, builds on students’ experience with expository text by including text features, complex photographs, and detailed sentence structure. Detailed sentences include, “A queen wasp sleeps under an oak stump,” and “She has squeezed through a crack in the rotten wood.”

By Unit 5, the materials partially build knowledge through the theme of “Going Places.” The quantity of text increases with longer and more sentences on each page. The informational text Mayday! Mayday! includes diagrams with labels, academic language, and factual information. However, students would need more scaffolded support to access these texts beyond the two days allotted for reading the text.

Suggestions throughout the materials are present to assist the teacher in supporting students who are struggling with the main selections, however there is minimal specificity within the suggestions. As the complexity level increases, more scaffolding for students is not provided. Explicit directions for the teacher on how to scaffold the text is not provided, and additional days may be needed to provide this scaffolding, which, as suggested above, may extend beyond the two days currently allotted for the main selections.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that anchor texts and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

The main selections include a "Text Based Comprehension" page that covers qualitative and reader and task measures and a general recommended placement statement, though no rationale for the recommendations is provided. There is no quantitative measurement provided for any of the Kindergarten main texts.

Qualitative measures are provided for each main selection text in four categories: levels of meaning, structure, language of conventionality and clarity, theme, and knowledge demands. Metrics provided for qualitative measures are in narrative form only and do not state the complexity level. A general explanation is provided: “This text is appropriate for placement as a read-aloud at this level due to the qualitative elements of the selection.”

There is no reference to research-based or evidence-based best practices for increasing students’ reading skills through appropriate sequencing of text complexity. The materials do not include a rationale to support why each text was specifically chosen in the unit as well as a reason why each of the reading selections were paired together within the unit. For example, Look at Us! is the theme of the unit. Students listen to and read Bear Snores On and Jack and the Beanstalk. There is not an explanation as to why these two passages are paired together in this unit and how they relate to the Look at Us! theme. Another example-- the theme of Unit 4 is Let’s Go Exploring. Students listen to and read Goldilocks and the Three Bears and One Little Mouse. There is not an explanation as to why these two passages are paired together in this unit or how they relate to the Let’s Go Exploring theme.

The teacher read-aloud selections do not include a breakdown of quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task measures as well as a rationale for the paired texts and the teacher read-aloud.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations that support materials for the core texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. Materials provide some opportunities for reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency, however, teacher materials often lack explicit directions for implementation.

The main selections, in the form of big books, are read aloud to students. After the main selection, there is a short teacher read-aloud. Instructional time is not listed for activities such as reading of the main selection, small group reading, reading of decodable texts, or time to be spent in the Read-Aloud Anthology.

There are decodable texts and optional readers available with each main selection for students to engage in a range and volume of reading. Independent reading is suggested during the use of stations. For example, in Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1: Independent Reading the materials direct the teacher to help students choose complex texts, so that they can engage in paired and group reading and writing activities every day before, during, and after school. Suggestions for this week’s independent reading: Fran’s Flower and One Little Seed.

Materials provide decodable books with routines for students to engage in. The routine includes:

  • Read Silently: Have children whisper read the story page by page as you listen in.
  • Model Fluent Reading: Have children finger point as you read a page.
  • Read Chorally: Have children finger point as they chorally read a page.
  • Read Individually: Have children take turns reading a page aloud.
  • Reread and monitor progress.
  • Reread with a partner.

Students have opportunities to reread texts which exposes students to more new vocabulary in context. There are many opportunities for students to listen to the teacher read from the Read-Aloud Anthology. For example, on Day 2, the Teacher Edition states, “Read aloud the story and have students listen for the words seeds and fruits,” and on Day 3 it states, “Read aloud the story and have students listen for the Amazing Word, ingenious.” Opportunity for students to read independently is provided in the Small Group Time with the paired decodable texts.

More challenging text is suggested through the use of the leveled readers (supplemental resource) as a part of the independent reading station for advanced readers. The Teacher’s Edition does not always explicitly state whether students should be reading texts independently, with partners, orally, or silently.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
5/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

Reading Street Kindergarten does not meet the expectation for materials to provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussion and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). Some questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and require students to return to the text and to utilize textual evidence to support both what is explicit and inferential information from the text. Materials reviewed do not meet the expectation for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent and text-specific questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Materials reviewed do not meet the expectations for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. Materials reviewed do not meet the expectation for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence. Speaking and listening skills are encouraged, but the materials offer limited guidance to teachers regarding developing students' speaking and listening skills and referring the students to the text to support responses. Materials reviewed partially meet the expectation that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. While the materials provide some mixture of on-demand and process writing, there are few opportunities for students to revise and edit with explicit instruction.Materials reviewed partially meet the requirement that materials provide opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards. Materials provide experiences in writing across different genres, but a balanced distribution is lacking in the core materials. There is a large discrepancy between the types of writing, with over half being expository/explanatory/informative. Materials reviewed partially meet the expectations that materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and clear information appropriate for the grade level. Materials reviewed partially meet expectations that materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards for the grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). Some questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based and require students to return to the text and to utilize textual evidence to support both what is explicit and inferential information from the text. Students answer questions about key details in text, retell familiar stories, identify the main topic and retell key details, identify story parts, describe connections, ask and answer questions about unknown words, discuss relationships between illustrations and texts, compare and contrast characters, and compare same topic texts. Text-based questions include open-ended questions, recall questions, wh- questions (who, what, when, where, why), inference questions, completion questions, distancing questions, sequence questions, compare and contrast questions. While most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, there are few directions and supports in place to ensure that students will engage with the text.

The questions in the instructional materials for the main selection are labeled "Develop Vocabulary” and "Develop Comprehension”. Example text-based questions include:

  • In Unit 2, Flowers, “What is the hummingbird sipping nectar from?”
  • In Unit 3, Little Panda, “Why do baby pandas call very loudly?”
  • In Unit 5, Mayday! Mayday! “What type of vehicle will the Coast Guard use for the rescue mission?”

Weekly leveled readers, located in Small Group Time, contain text-based tasks:

  • In Unit 2, Nature Spy, and Our Snowy Discovery, “How are the bird tracks Mom, Dad, and Mallory describe different? How are the tracks the same?
  • In Unit 3, Farfallina and Marcel, and Egg to Frog and Back, “What is the sequence of events in a frog’s life?”
  • In Unit 5, On the Move!, and Our Travels in Thailand, “What forms of transportation does the writer tell about?”

The following are not text-based questions and can be answered by students without reading the text:

  • In Unit 1, We Are So Proud! “The school and all the classes will have a parade. Have you ever been to a parade? What was the parade like?”
  • In Unit 1, Read-Aloud, Miss Bindergarten Takes a Field Trip with Kindergarten “Today we listened to a story about Grandma and Tommy who dug holes and planted tomato plants in a garden. What are some things you like to do outside?”
  • In Unit 4, Rooster’s Off to See the World, “When you travel, you set out to go somewhere new. What new places have you traveled to?”

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet the expectation for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Some culminating tasks can be completed without reading or understanding the text.

Throughout the units, students are engaged in answering text-based questions and completing text-based tasks about their reading. However, a culminating task or activity is not included.

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Bear Snores On, students listen to the big book and answer several text-based questions. Upon completion of the text, the teacher materials transition into lessons on conventions and writing. The writing prompt asks students to share the kinds of things about which poems can be written.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, George Washington Visits, students listen to the big book and answer several text-based questions. Upon completion of the text, the teacher materials transition into lessons on conventions and writing. The writing prompt teaches persuasive writing by asking students to persuade someone that life today is easier than life hundreds of years ago. The instructional materials do not include how to use the writing prompt in connection with the unit theme, Changes All Around Us, or with the main selection.
  • The theme of Unit 5 is Let’s Go Exploring. In Week 5, the read-aloud is an informational text about Antarctica. The Writing to Extend the Concept task for the week reads: “Have students write or dictate their own sentence about where they would like to have an adventure, or they may copy a sentence from the board.” The writing task and instructional materials do not suggest the students use the main selection as reference.

There are no culminating tasks following whole group instruction. Small group reading has a “Prove it! Performance Task” after reading the Sleuth on day 5. Culminating tasks are not related to coherent sequences of text-based questions.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
0/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet the expectations for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Front matter and small-group planning pages do not mention listening and speaking standards or activities. Planning pages for the main selection have a weekly listening and speaking focus, such as, following directions in Unit 1, Week 1. Two of the weekly independent stations include practice listening and using vocabulary in the Listen Up and Words to Know sections.

While there are many opportunities for students to engage in collaborative conversations, there is a lack information on how teachers can provide support and scaffold collaborative conversations, such as through the use of sentence stems or sentence frames. The materials provide very few protocols for discussions that encourage modeling and the use of academic vocabulary and syntax. For example, during the main selection reading-based comprehension, questions are directed at the whole group. The directions do not provide direct instruction in speaking and listening in order for students to learn to engage in quality, rich conversations in an academic setting.

The teacher materials provide instructions for teaching listening and speaking on day 1 of each main selection. The instructions are divided into Teach, Model, and Guide Practice. For example, in Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, Little Panda, the students will Respond to Literature. The listening and speaking content does not connect to the unit theme or main selection and is taught as an independent skill. Also, in Unit 1, Week 4, Day 3, students are to discuss what their favorite color is. The teacher materials provide some guidance for the student to speak clearly and loudly enough for the class to hear them. They must follow the agreed upon speaking rules, as listed in pages 1-2 of the students’ Reader’s and Writer’s notebook.

In Small Group Time, there are some opportunities for students to talk with a partner and use academic vocabulary, for example, in Unit 1, Team Talk has students “... work with a partner to use location words in sentences.” And when rereading the student reader, Cat and Dog Ride to Town, students take turns retelling the story to a partner. Also, in Unit 4, Week 1, Day 1 of Rooster’s Off to See the World: students learn how to follow directions. The teacher materials provide the prompt, but offer limited guidance for the teacher as to how to create appropriate groupings (partners, small groups), directions on how students can respond orally, and how the teacher should monitor discussion.

The academic vocabulary and syntax used in the materials are termed “Amazing Words” and selection vocabulary. Amazing Words are introduced a few a day for four days. The Teacher’s Edition suggests the following steps: introduce, demonstrate, apply, and display the word to teach the students these words. There is a section provided for students to apply the Amazing Words by orally completing sentences. The Amazing Words are not shown to the student in the Student Edition. The Amazing Words do not actively and regularly encourage students to utilize academic vocabulary in their own speaking and writing. The selection vocabulary from the main reading selection are discussed as the students read the main selection and are assessed at the end of the week.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
0/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet the expectation for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence. Speaking and listening skills are encouraged, but the materials offer limited guidance to teachers regarding developing students' speaking and listening skills, and referring the students to the text to support responses. While the questions and tasks posed in reading comprehension often provide instructions for teachers to tell students to use details from the text in their answer, materials lack instruction on how to direct students to find details in the text. The teacher is instructed to lead students through research throughout the course of the week, however instructions are minimal in supporting teachers and students through the Research and Inquiry Projects.

The Teacher Edition provides some tools for explicitly teaching speaking and listening skills. In Unit 2, Week 4, Day 3, in Listening and Speaking, the teacher is given directions to teach students how to have an informal conversation. However, instructional materials do not provide support for Kindergarten students needing additional teacher modeling of speaking and listening skills that support evidence-based discussions such as anchor charts, sentence stems, question stems, and techniques for practicing a skill.

The directions and support for implementing Research and Inquiry projects are minimal. For example, in Unit 3, Week 3, Day 4, during Research and Inquiry, students are asked to look at the information they gathered during Day 3. They are then instructed to work with a partner to choose the most interesting fact about their animal. Teacher instructions are limited to: "If necessary, students can conduct more research to collect additional facts”, without further instructions for the teacher, including time needed to ensure students have opportunities to gather their ideas or build on one another’s ideas.

Discussion questions are provided in the “Let’s Talk About It” sections but they do not increase in rigor over the course of the school year. The Teacher’s Edition has two questions to be used for discussion but lack guidelines for creating supports to ensure students can speak about and listen to others talk about what they are reading and researching. For example, in Unit 1, Week 2, Day 1, in the “Let’s Talk About it” the prompt asks students to share ideas how people help animals. No further guidance is given to support students’ listening and speaking.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. While the materials provide some mixture of on-demand and process writing, there are few opportunities for students to revise and edit with explicit instruction. Incorporating digital resources to support writing is minimal.

The materials explicitly inform the teacher to discuss, model, guide practice, concluded with independent writing. Daily Handwriting is built into each day to allow for on-demand writing. For example, in Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, the teacher is to direct students to write independently: “Now you are going to share something you like and something you dislike. Close your eyes and think about wonderful, marvelous you. What makes you special? Remember, there are many things you like and dislike, but today, pick just one of each kind.” The teacher is then directed to have the students write or dictate their ideas and illustrate them. Next, students will review correct letter formation of upper and lowercase n in the Daily Handwriting component.

Frequently, the Writing to Sources materials are recommended for use to guide students in writing text-based responses within various forms and modes. However, there is no time allotted for the implementation of the Writing to Sources materials in the schedule.

Writing prompts sometimes connect to the theme, setting, or genre of the main selection, but a direct reference to the text is rarely made. For example, during Unit 1, Week 1:

  • Day 1- students dictate what makes them special and then illustrates after the teacher models.
  • Day 2- students dictate sentences about animals from the main selection after the teacher models.
  • Day 3- students draw a picture of what makes them happy in Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook after the teacher models.
  • Day 4- students draw a picture to show how they get to school, then read using sentence frames after the teacher models.
  • Day 5- students dictate/copy from the board the name of their pet, then draw a picture after the teacher models.

Students do not participate in process writing until the sixth week of the unit. The one-week writing process plan includes a day to plan, draft, revise, edit, and share.

There are minimal teacher directions for the use of a digital resource by students to type writing pieces. Students hand-write most final drafts with their revisions and proofreading corrections. For example, Unit 4, Week 1, Day 5, the Teacher’s Edition states, “Have the students use a computer or write a final draft of their friendly letters, with their revisions and proofreading corrections. Help as appropriate.” Kindergarten students will need explicit directions from the teacher as to how to use a word processing program and how to add visuals with captions in a digital resource. These directions are not present in the student or teacher materials.

While the materials provide some mixture of on-demand and process writing, there are few opportunities for students to revise and edit with explicit instruction. Incorporating digital resources to support writing is minimal.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the requirement that materials provide opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards. Materials provide experiences in writing across different genres, but a balanced distribution is lacking in the core materials. There is a large discrepancy between the types of writing, with over half being expository/explanatory/informative.

During the week, writing focuses on different genres/modes of writing. During Week 6 of each unit, students focus on the process of writing. Each day offers practice in process and distribution on a writing prompt assigned on Day 2. Weekly focus changes each week. Opportunities to practice opinion and informative/explanatory style writing are minimal. The different modes of writing do not reflect a balance across the three genres.

  • The majority of writing prompts are informative/explanatory/expository such as in Unit 2, Week 4, Day 4, “Have students write or dictate their own sentences about what they do before they go to sleep, or copy one of the sentences from the board.”
  • Few prompts are opinion, such as in Unit 5, Week 2, Day 1, the teacher is directed to tell the students, “Now you are going to share your opinion about how you feel today. Close your eyes and looking inside at your wonderful, marvelous feelings. How do you feel? Review the list of emotions with students. Why do you feel that way?” The teacher is then instructed to have students write or dictate their ideas and opinions in complete sentences.
  • Less than half of the prompts are are narrative such as in Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, “Now you are going to share something special about yourself. Close your eyes and think about the wonderful, marvelous things you can do. Remember, you can do many special things, but choose just one.” Again, students are to write or dictate their idea and illustrate it.
  • Some prompts are a combination of writing genres such as Unit 4, Week 1, Day 5, Writing a List, “Today we will write a list of the adventures we took through our songs and stories this week.”

“Writing to Sources”, a Common Core Teacher Resource, contains writing prompts for students to write to the CCSS using text evidence. This supplemental resource provides a balance of writing, but is not included in the Teacher Edition’s weekly planning. Each unit has a focus:

  • Unit 1 Focus: Narrative
  • Unit 2 Focus: Informative/Explanatory
  • Unit 3 Focus: Argument
  • Unit 4 Focus: Informative/Explanatory
  • Unit 5 Focus: Argument
  • Unit 6 Focus: Narrative

Each week’s main reading selection has two writing options in “Writing to Sources.” The materials do not provide instructional guidance for "Writing to Sources" or address the amount of time that should be spent on each writing task. Teachers can have students “Write like a Reporter” or write to “Connect Texts,” which are suggested in the Teacher Edition, but as with "Writing to Sources," there are no teacher directions included with the writing prompts.

Examples of writing prompts in the “Writing to Sources” materials include:

  • Argument Prompt: Writing to Sources, page 158, “Look at pages 14 and 15 in Trucks Roll! The dispatcher tells the truck drivers where to take the things they are carrying. Would you rather be a dispatcher or a truck driver? Why?”
  • Narrative Prompt: Writing to Sources, page 14, “Look at pages 20-21 in Plaidypus Lost. What words tell where the girl looks? Write about where she looks.”
  • Informative/Explanatory Prompt: Writing to Sources, page 58, “Look at pages 16-17 in A Bed for the Winter. Tell why the dormouse does not want to sleep in the burrow with the rabbits. Write about one of the reasons.”

Opportunities for assessment are provided in the “Writing to Sources” materials. After Week 6, a Unit Writing Task is provided. However, there are not explicit instructions or a rubric to assess student writing. For example, in Unit 4, Writing to Sources Writing Task, the directions state, “Draw a picture of something you can see in Antarctica. Write a sentence that tells about your picture. Draw a picture of three things that you can see in Antarctica. Write a paragraph that tells about your picture. Your report should tell facts about the three things.” There are no detailed directions or supports for teachers and a rubric is not provided.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations that materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and clear information appropriate for the grade level. Teacher resources on how to implement or teach evidence-based writing are not evident in the core materials. Additional instructional supports are needed for teachers to guide students’ understanding of developing ideas and recalling evidence from texts and/or other sources.

Students have opportunities to practice writing using recall and evidence from text, although the directions to the teacher are minimal. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Day 2, after reading Miss Bindergarten Goes to Kindergarten, students are provided the opportunity to help the teacher list the community members from the story. The teacher models how to select a place the main character took her class and demonstrates writing a sentence about the community worker. During guided practice, the students help the teacher write more sentences about the community helpers. For independent practice, students dictate ideas about community helpers or copy one of the sentences and then students illustrate their sentences.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Day 2, after reading Farfallina and Marcel, students are provided the opportunity to help the teacher write sentences about what the friends in the story do together. For independent writing, students write about/or draw Farfallina and Marcel. There is a sentence frame for students: Farfallina and Marcel ____.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, One Little Mouse, the Teacher Edition states: Encourage students to help you come up with possible reasons why beavers build dams. Write their ideas on the board and draw pictures when appropriate. Then read from a reference source about why beavers build dams. (Beavers build dams to create a relatively safe body of water in which to swim and build their homes. They often build their homes, called lodges, near the dams.). The Teacher Edition mentions “a reference source”, but does not indicate what reference source to use.

Students have few opportunities to recall information from texts in order to develop opinions based on textual information. Throughout the year, students refine their reasoning about why they are special and do not need information from a provided resources to answer the question. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 1, students learn to write an opinion with “Wonderful, Marvelous Me! Today I Feel…” Students use the sentence frame: Today I feel ___.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, students write about other things that make them special. Students share about something they like and something they dislike. “Have students write or dictate their ideas and then illustrate them.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 1, students write about something that makes them special. “Have students write or dictate their ideas and then illustrate them.”

The Writing to Sources workbook is an optional resource that allows students to complete writing tasks in response to multiple texts. Students are able to practice and apply writing using evidence. For example, in Unit 4, Week 4, the student prompt is, “Look at pages 30-31 in Bear Snores On. Name ways that Bear acts like a make-believe bear when he wakes up. Write ways that Bear acts like a real bear.” However, there is not time allotted in the materials to include the Writing to Sources writing tasks in daily lessons.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet expectations that materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards for the grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context

Grammar and Conventions lessons aligned to the standards include the following:

  • Unit 1: Say/Write Names, What We Look Like, Nouns
  • Unit 2: Plural Nouns, Proper Nouns, Adjectives
  • Unit 3: Verbs (past/present, add –s,) Word Groups, Sentences
  • Unit 4: Naming Parts, Action parts, Complete Sentences, Capitals and Periods, Pronouns (I and Me)
  • Unit 5: Questions, Question marks and upper case letters, prepositions, nouns, verbs
  • Unit 6: Pronouns (I and Me), Prepositional phrases, Telling sentences,

Some standards covered fall outside of the Kindergarten grade level. Examples include the following:

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, the entire week’s conventions lessons focus on proper nouns. Capitalization of holidays, product names, and geographic names is taught in Grade 2. (L.2.2a)
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, the lesson focus is on verb tense. Verb tense is taught in Grade 1 (L.1.1.e).
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, the lesson focus is arranging words in a meaningful order. This activity is not aligned to the kindergarten standards. The Teacher Edition links the activities to (L.K.1).

Each unit has a daily direct instruction lesson on “Conventions.” Each week focuses on specific grammar skills and conventions. Each day, explicit instruction takes place, and students practice the skill with worksheets from Grammar Transparencies, Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook, and Let’s Practice It! The skills for the week are shown in the Skills Overview for the unit. All of the language standards are embedded in the curriculum, though some standards are taught only briefly or late in the year as indicated below. Teachers will need to supplement with additional materials to be able to teach the full intent of the standard. For example, grammar instruction worksheets often have words and sentences that connect to the week’s main reading selection, but the application is primarily out of context.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
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Criterion Rating Details

Kindergarten Reading Street partially meets the expectations for materials in reading, writing, speaking, and listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards. The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials reviewed partially meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts for including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2). Materials reviewed partially meet expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity, sight-based recognition of high-frequency words, and reading fluency in oral reading once phonics instruction begins. Materials do not contain multiple opportunities over the course of the year in core materials to purposefully read emergent-reader texts. Materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected and isolated text. There are missed opportunities for explicit directions to the teacher as well as modeling for the students in the reading and writing of words in connected and isolated texts. Materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported. There are many assessments, but teacher guidance or direct instructions are limited. Materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills. Students have limited opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery. Materials partially provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills. Lessons do not always provide differentiation opportunities.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Students have frequent opportunities to learn and understand phonemes. In each unit, there are phonemic awareness activities provided everyday. However, no time allocation is listed for the lessons. Practice beyond the whole-group lesson is not provided.

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, the lesson structure for each day are as follows:
    • Day 1- Initial /s/, on Day 2- Final /s/, on Day 3- Initial and Final /s/, on Day 4- Initial and medial /a/, on Day 5- Review /s/.
    • Teacher directions from Unit 2, Week 2, on Day 4- Initial and medial /a/: “PRACTICE: Display the apple Picture Card. This is an apple. Apple begins with /a/. What sound does apple begin with? Continue the routine with astronaut, alligator, and ant Picture Cards. Then display the bat Picture Card. This is a bat Where do you hear /a/ in the word bat? Continue the routine with the jam and man Picture Cards. I am going to say two words. Tell me which word has /a/ in the middle. Let’s listen for the first one together: cap, cup. Let’s say the sounds in each word: /k/ /a/ /p/, cap; /k/ /u/ /p/, cup. Which word has /a/ in the middle? Cap has /a/ in the middle. Continue the routine with these word pairs: fan, fun; men, man; sat, set; hot, hat; map, mop; bag, bug; cab, cub.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, at the end of the phonemic awareness section, the Teacher Edition states: “Listen to this word: bin, /b/ /i/ /n/. Say it with me: /b/ /i/ /n/, bin. I can make a new word by changing the last sound in bin to /b/. Listen: /b/ /i/ /b/, bib. Say it with me as I blend the new sounds: /b/ /i/ /b/, bib. Continue substituting final sounds with these words: can, cab; tab, ten.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, at the end of the phonemic awareness section, there is a lesson to review sound substitution: Listen to the sounds in the word fun : /f/ /u/ /n/. Say them with me : /f/ /u/ /n/ , fun. Now change the middle sound to /a/: /f/ /a/ /n/. What new word did we make? The new word is fan. Continue the activity, changing fan to fin. Then repeat the routine with the following sets of words: big, bug, bag, beg; bud, bed, bad, bid.

Lessons and activities provide students adequate opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills.

Examples include:

  • The Foundational Skills section of the Teacher Edition contains phonics activities for each day of each week and decoding activities for the Day 2 and Day 4 of each week.
  • In Unit 1, Week 5, on Day 1, the phonics lesson is: Teach/Model /m/ Spelled Mm INTRODUCE Display the Mm Alphabet card. Motorcycle begins with /m/ spelled m. Now point to the letters Mm on the card. The sound for this letter is /m/. The names of these letters are uppercase m and lowercase m. What is the sound for this letter? What are the names of these letters? Explain that the letter m is a consonant. MODEL Write Mr. Malcolm Monkey on the board. Point to the first M. When I see this letter, I think of the sound /m/. The first word is Mr. - /m/, Mr. Point to Malcolm. The next word begins with M too. I know that when I see an m, the sound will be /m/. The second word is Malcolm. Repeat with the word Monkey. The song we will sing is ‘Mr. Malcolm Monkey.’ GROUP PRACTICE Display Phonics Songs and Rhymes Chart 5. Teach children the song ‘Mr. Malcolm Monkey’ sung to the tune of ‘I’m a Little Teapot.’ Play the CD and sing the song several times. I hear many words that begin with/m/. When you hear a word that begins with /m/ clap your hands. As you sing the song, point to the words that begin with m. ON THEIR OWN Play ‘I Spy.’ Model the game for students. I spy an uppercase M on the calendar. I say /m/. Point to the M. Have students take turns spying and pointing out examples of uppercase M and lowercase m that they find in the classroom. When they point to M or m, have them say /m/.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 6, the phonics section has a guided lesson on short and long “e”.The Teacher Edition states: “Write met on the board. Have students read the word with you. The letter e stands for /e/, or the short e sound, in met. Circle e. Then write meet and have students read the word with you. Point out that the middle sound in meet is /e/. The letters ee stand for /e/, or the long e sound, in meet. Circle ee. Have students say met and meet several times, emphasizing and comparing the middle sounds. Continue the routine with bet / beat, fed / feed, and ben / bean.”

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application. Examples include:

  • Unit 1: Letter sounds m and t
  • Unit 2: Letter sounds a, s, p, k, i
  • Unit 3: Letter sounds b, n, i, r, d, k, f, o
  • Unit 4, Letter sounds h, i, g, e
  • Unit 5, Letter sounds j, w, x, u, v, z, y, q
  • Unit 6, Review short vowels

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

Materials include lessons for students to learn how to identify and produce letters. Lessons are limited to Unit 1 and lessons do not include multimodal aspects. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Weeks 1-4, there are daily lessons on letter recognition. Letter practice is presented the same way each day and no additional practice is indicated for remediation.
  • The first lesson in Unit 1 introduces the letter Aa. The introduction of the lesson states, “Display the Aa alphabet card. Point to uppercase A. ‘This is uppercase A. What is this letter?’ Point to lowercase a. ‘This is lowercase letter a. What is this letter?’ Explain that the letter a is the first letter of the alphabet.” When students are on their own the Teacher Edition states, “Have students look around the room and find examples of uppercase A and lowercase a. As each letter is found, have the group say the name of the letter.”

Materials include tasks and questions about the organization of print concepts. The lessons on print concepts become less explicit. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, on Day 1, Teacher Instructions are included. Some of the directions to students are, “Pick up your copy of the book and hold it right side up. Make sure you are holding it correctly. Is the word Mouse right side up?” and “These are the pages of our story. We turn the pages from right to left...now turn the pages from right to left.”
  • Daily Handwriting provides practice with writing uppercase and lowercase letters and discusses letter spacing. Handwriting is always presented the same way and no additional practice is provided.
  • Unit 1, Week 6, on Day 2, “This is the word Tom. I use an uppercase T for the first letter in Tom because it is a name. Watch me make an uppercase T.”
  • Unit 2, Week 1, on Day 2, “Have students write Ava and am on their Write-On Boards. Remind them to use proper left-to-right and top-to-bottom progression and proper spacing between letters when writing A and a.”
  • Unit 4, Week 5: During small group reading there is a section titled “Concepts of Print”. The Teacher Edition states: “Display Decodable Reader 23 in My Skills Buddy. Show students the illustrations and read aloud the title. What do you think the story is about?

After Unit 1, Week 5, there are not consistent instructions on print concepts during decodable reading time. The lessons are less frequent, and these questions are labeled CONCEPTS OF PRINT. For example, Unit 3, Week 2, on Day 2, “The title of the story is Rip with Rap. What is the title? … What does the author do? … How does the illustrator help tell the story?”

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2. Materials do not contain multiple opportunities over the course of the year in core materials to purposefully read emergent-reader texts. The materials are not of quality and do not provide sufficient practice for students.

Students have the opportunity to read and practice 40 high-frequency words. Each week there is a set of high-frequency words. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Weeks 1 and 2, the high-frequency words are: I, am. In Weeks 3 and 4, the high-frequency words are: the, little. In Weeks 5 and 6, the high-frequency words are: a, to.
    • In Unit 1, Week 2, on Day 1, the Teacher Edition states, “INTRODUCE: Use the routine below to review high-frequency words I and am. Routine Non Decodable Words: 1. Say and Spell: Some words we must learn by remembering the letters rather than saying the sounds. We will say and spell the words to help learn them. Write am on the board. This is the word am. It has two letter. The letters in am are a and m. Have students say and spell the word, first with you and then without you. 2. Demonstrate Meaning: I can use the word am in lots of sentences Here is one sentence: I am at school. Now you use the word in a sentence. Repeat the routine with the word I.”
    • In Unit 1, Week 1, The class reads Decodable Reader 1. The Teacher Edition begins the lesson with a Review: “Review this week's high frequency words. Have students read each word as you point to it on the word wall: I, am.”
  • In Unit 2, Weeks 1 and 2, the high-frequency words are: have, is. In Weeks 3 and 4, the high-frequency words are: we, my, like. In Weeks 5 and 6, the high-frequency words are: he, for.
  • In Unit 3, Weeks 1 and 2, the high-frequency words are: me, with, she. In Weeks 3 and 4, the high-frequency words are: see, look. In Weeks 5 and 6, the high-frequency words are: they, you, of.
    • In Unit 3, Week 3, the Teacher Edition states, “Have children turn to p. 57. Read the high-frequency words see and look together. Then have children point to each word and read it.”
  • In Unit 4, Weeks 1 and 2, the high-frequency words are: are, that, do. In Weeks 3 and 4, the high-frequency words are: one, two, three, four, five. In Weeks 5 and 6, the high-frequency words are: here, go from.
  • In Unit 5, Weeks 1 and 2, the high-frequency words are: yellow, blue, green. In Weeks 3 and 4, the high-frequency words are: what, said, was. In Weeks 5 and 6, the high-frequency words are: where, come.
    • Unit 5, Week 4, on Day 2, the Teacher Edition states, “READ WORDS: Have children turn to p. 77 of My Skills Buddy. Read the high-frequency words, what, said, and was together. Then have children point to each word and read it themselves. READ SENTENCES: Read the sentences on the My Skills Buddy page together to read the new high-frequency words in context. Pair children and have them take turns reading each of the sentences aloud. ON THEIR OWN: Use Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook p. 361, for additional practice with this week’s high-frequency words.” This practice page has children write the words into a cloze sentence.
  • In Unit 6, previously learned high-frequency words are reviewed.

Materials support the development of students’ automaticity and accuracy of grade-level decodable words over the course of the year. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, on Day 3, students read Tam in the Garden. “TEACH REBUS WORDS: Write the word hat on the board. This is the word hat. Name the letters with me: h, a, t. Look for the word hat in the story we read today. A picture above the word will help you read it. Continue with the words red and garden.” The teacher displays the book and tells the title, author and illustrator. Using the routine for Decodable books, children begin whisper reading. The second step of the routine states, “Model Fluent Reading Have children point as you read a page. Then have them reread the page with you.” The phonemic awareness and phonics for the week focus on initial /a/ however this book includes the word hat with a medial /a/. With rebus text the students are not using their decoding skills as much as practicing high-frequency words and naming the pictures.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, on Day 1, the phonics lesson provides practice for decoding CVC words such as nap, Nan, Nat, can, sat, am, nip, cat.
  • Unit 4, Week 4: During guided practice, students are asked to open My Skills Buddy to p. 76. Put your finger on the red arrow below the g in got. Say the sound that g stands for. Continue with o and t. Trace the blue arrow as you blend the sounds and read the word. Have partners blend the other words.
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, Lesson 6, students practice decoding words. The teacher writes sun on the board. “Point to each letter. What is this letter? What is the sound for this letter? Now help me blend this word. Say the sound as I point to each letter: /s/ /u/ /n/. What is the word? Continue the decoding routine with Jen, kick, lug, wig, not, and sat.

Students have opportunities to purposefully read emergent-reader texts over the course of a year. Examples include:

  • Decodables are located in the students’ Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook. Unit 1, Week 5, on Day 1: The teacher instructions say, “Tear out Decodable Story Little Mouse on pp. 51-52… Then fold the pages to form a book. Repeat this process with each child’s....” The words in the decodable that the teacher is supposed to go over are mouse, walk, school, and moose. While two of these words begin with /m/ which is the focus, none of the words are decodable for a beginning reader. Teachers would need to supplement with other materials that are decodable.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, during small group reading, students are asked to read a decodable reader “quietly as you listen to them. Then have them take turns reading aloud one page at a time.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, on Day 3, of the Student Reader students read Max and Jane: A Busy Day. The teacher reviews high-frequency words and teaches the rebus words racoon, owls, and baker. Teacher goes over the title, author, and illustrator of the book then starts the routine to read decodable books.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected texts and tasks. There are missed opportunities for explicit directions to the teacher as well as modeling for the students in the reading and writing of words in connected texts and tasks.

Materials partially support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills in connected text and tasks. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, the Teacher Edition has students practice syllable blending outside of texts. Connect: Say the word robot. “Robot has two sound parts, or syllables: ro-bot. When we blend these syllables together, we say the word robot. Today we are going to learn how to blend syllables together to make words. Model: Tell children you are going to say a word with two syllables. “The first syllable is pud-.” Children echo you. “The next syllable is -dle.” Children echo again. Tell children you are going to blend the two syllable together to say the word. “When I put the two syllables pud-dle together, I say puddle. We blend the syllables pud-dle to make the word puddle. Guided practice: “We are going to practice more words. Remember, I will say each syllable and you will repeat it. Then you will put the syllables together to say the word.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, on Day 5, student review Phonics Review /f/ Spelled Ff . The teacher shows the Ff alphabet card, reviews high-frequency words see and look. “APPLY PHONICS: Have children reread one of the books specific to the target letter sound. You may wish to review the decodable words and high-frequency words that appear in each book prior to rereading” No modeling or direction for teacher or students is given beyond what is written above.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, on Day 1, during Small Group On-Level the Teacher Edition states,“LISTEN FOR /l/: I am going to tell you story that begins with /l/, clap your hand and say the word. Tell the following story, emphasizing and pausing after each /l/ word. Lucy likes lemons. She loves to lick lots of lemons by the lake. With a little luck, she can lick lemons her entire life. Lucy really likes lemons! MATCH /L/ TO Ll. Give children each a note card and ask them to write the letter l on it. Retell the story and have children raise their l card when they hear a word that begins with /l/.”
  • After learning /y/ with Picture Cards the teacher leads, “SEGMENT: Listen to the sounds in yet: /y/, /e/, /t/. Say them with me: /y/, /e/, /t/. How many sounds do you hear? There are three sounds in yet. Let’s try some more words. Continue the routine with yarn, yes, yum, and yip…” “BLEND: Remind children that they know how to blend sounds together to say a word. I am going to say some sounds, and I want you to blend them to say a word. Listen carefully: /y/, /e/, /s/. Now say the sounds with me: /y/, /e/, /s/. The word is yes. Continue practice with yet, yam, quit, and Quinn.”

Materials partially provide frequent opportunities to read high-frequency words in connected text and tasks. Examples include:

  • Practice words that are not connected to text include in Unit 2, Week 2, on Day 1, during the High-Frequency Words, Routine for Non Decodable Words the Teacher Edition states,“1. Say and Spell Some words we must learn by remembering the letters rather than saying the sounds. We will say and spell the words to help learn them. Write have on the board. This is the word have. It has four letters. The letters in have are h, a, v, e. Have children say and spell the word, first with you and then without you. 2. Demonstrate Meaning: I can use the word have in lots of sentences. Here is one sentence: I have a red wagon. Now you use the word in a sentence.”
  • Practice words connected to text include when students read Decodable Story 8 which contains the word have. The text reads, “I have a sock, I have a sack”
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, before students read the decodable reader, the Teacher Edition states, “Review the previously taught high-frequency words. Have children read each word as you point to it on the word wall.”
  • Practice words not connected to text in Unit 4, Week 2, on Day 2, include My Skills Buddy p. 37. Students read the words are, that, and do chorally then point to each word and read it themselves. Students then read sentences together and then in pairs. “1. That man is my dad. 2. We are on the hill. 3 Do you hop a lot?”
  • Practice words connected to text include when students then read Decodable Reader 20 which contains the words are, that, and do. The text reads, “ Tab sat on a lap. Kit did not. Lil lit it. Do you see tab? Lil had a doll. Kit can bat it...”
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, before students read the decodable reader, the Teacher Edition states, “Review the previously taught high-frequency words. Have children read each word as you point to it on the word wall.”

Lessons and activities partially provide students many opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing). Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students are asked to segment words and then spell them on a piece of paper. The Teacher Edition states, “This time I am going to say a word. I want you to write it on your paper. Remember, first say the word slowly in your head, and then write the letter for each sound. Listen carefully. Write the word fit.” This is done out of context.In Unit 4, Week 3, the lesson has the teacher explain the difference between numerals and number words. During guided practice students “write” numerals in the air. During independent practice, students “use
  • Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook p. 265, for additional practice with numerals and number words.” This is done out of context.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations that materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported. There are many assessments, but teacher guidance or direct instructions are limited.

Multiple assessment documents are available in core materials allowing students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills. Examples include:

  • On the Assessment page of the Unit Overview of each unit, the Teacher Edition mentions:
    • A baseline test that will help with “...initial grouping decisions and to differentiate instruction based no ability levels.”
  • Every day corrective feedback and monitor progress:
    • Unit 3, Week 2, Monitor Progress all days, Monday: Phonemic Awareness, Tuesday: Check Sound-Spelling, Wednesday: Check Word Reading High-Frequency Words, Thursday: Check Phonological or Phonemic Awareness, Friday: Check Oral Vocabulary and Check Word and Sentence Reading
  • During the Check Phonemic Awareness Words with Initial /r/, Formative Assessment the Teacher Edition states, “Say rug and man. Have children identify the word that begins with /r/. Continue with rain, snow; rice, cheese; real, fake; rich, money; and ring, sound. If children cannot discriminate initial /r/ words, then use the small-group Strategic Intervention lesson, p. SG.25, to reteach /r/.” No plan for recording or monitoring a whole class of students is provided.
  • Every Week
    • The Teacher Edition states,“Weekly Assessments on Day 5 to check phonics, high-frequency words, and comprehension.”
      • For example, during the: Review /u/ Spelled Uu, the Teacher Edition states,“WHOLE CLASS: Give children a sheet of paper folded in fourths. Have them draw a picture of something that begins with /u/ or something that has a medial /u/ in each section. Have them label the pictures with the word or the letter u.” Suggestions follow for reteaching, if necessary. Such as, ONE-ON-ONE, “To facilitate individual progress monitoring, assess some children on Day 4 and the rest on Day 5. While individual children are being assessed, the rest of the class can reread this week’s books and look for words with /u/” There are also word and sentence reading assessments that need to be administered one-on-one. It is suggested that the scores be recorded in First Stop.
  • Every Unit
    • The Teacher Edition States, “Unit Benchmark Assessments assess mastery of unit skills: phonemic awareness, phonics, comprehension, high-frequency words, and writing.”
  • End of Year
    • The Teacher Edition States, “End-of-Year Assessments measure student mastery of skills covered in all six units with options for performance-based assessment.”

Assessment materials partially provide teachers and students with information on students’ current skills/level of understanding and support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward foundational skills. The assessments and progress checks are generic. Assessments lack explicit instructions/guidance on how to address the skills students are missing in order to demonstrate mastery in foundational skills. Examples include:

  • Unit 1, Week 4, At the end of the phonemic awareness section, teachers have the opportunity to give a formative assessment. The Teacher Edition suggests the teacher say a set of three words, then have the student identify the word that begins with a different initial sound. Ex: “Say fox, fan, and cat. Have children identify the word that begins with a different initial sound. Continue with paint, neck, purse; five, six, seven; bear, moose, boat.” The Teacher Edition does not explicitly say if this should be done whole group or one on one.
  • Unit 3, Week 5, on Day 4, during Check Phonemic Awareness, the Teacher Edition states, “After I say a word, I want you to say the word slowly and then tell me each sound in the word: can, mop, top, tip...” No model is provided for students. The Teacher Edition aslo states,“If children cannot segment the sounds in words, then provide practice segmenting the words in chunks, /m/ op. Continue to monitor children’s progress during the week so that children can be successful with the Day 5 Assessment. See the Skills Trace on p. 418.” No specific guidance is given to the teacher for remediation or reteaching beyond more practice with the same skill. The Skills Trace simply tells where the skill is practiced throughout the unit.
  • Unit 4, Week 2, At the end of the phonics section, teachers have the opportunity to give a formative assessment. The Teacher Edition directs teachers to give each child a blank card and have children write Ll on the card. The Teacher Edition states, “I will read some words. When you hear a word that begins with /l/, Hold up your Ll card. Say: lady, man, back, lucky, lamb, road, mom, large, lost, coat, foot.”

There are many assessments, but little direction for teachers. Teachers may not be able to determine how many assessments to do each week and what to do with the data once it has been collected.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills. Students have limited opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery.

Materials partially provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills. Lessons do not always provide differentiation opportunities. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 2, students read the Decodable Reader 14:
    • Read Rip with Rap
      • REVIEW: Review the previously taught high-frequency words. Have children read each word as you point to it on the Word Wall: the, a, she, with, me, is.
      • CONCEPTS OF PRINT: Have children turn to Decodable Reader 14, Rip with Rap, on p. 38 of My Skills Buddy. Today we will read a story about a rat named Rip. Point to the title of the story. The title of the story is Rip with Rap. What is the title? Point to the name of the author. The author’s name is Peggy Lee. What does the author do? The illustrator is Lucy Smythe. How does the illustrator help the tell the story? Whe will read many /r/ words in this book.
      • READ: Use the routine for reading decodable books to read Decodable Reader 14.”
      • All students read the same decodable.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 4, Phonics, Review /a/ Spelled Aa, /i/ Spelled Ii “PRACTICE: Display the Aa Alphabet Car. This is an astronaut, Astronaut begins with /a/. What letter spells the sound /a/? Yes, the letter a. Repeat the routine with the Ii Alphabet Card. Write the word pat on the board. Help me blend this word .Listen as I say each sound: /p/ /a/ /t/. Now let’s blend the sounds together to read the word: /p/ /a/ /t/, pat. What is the word? (pat) Let’s try more. Repeat the routine with pit, tap, and tip.” No additional practice materials are included in this lesson. No differentiation is suggested.

Materials partially provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. Examples include:

  • The Table of Contents and the Access for All tab of each unit show Teacher-Led Small Group Lesson Plans for each day of the week at On Level, Strategic Intervention, Advanced, and English Language Learners (ELL) levels. However, there are no specific lesson plans for ELL as there are for the other three groups. There are notes on the Strategic Intervention in the margins for ELL support.
    • In Unit 1, Week 3, Day 1, Small Group Time, Strategic Intervention, the lesson has sections that include:
      • LISTEN FOR INITIAL SOUNDS
      • RECOGNIZE LETTERS: Teacher writes the Oo and points out that it is the shape of a circle and says “This is an uppercase O. This is a lowercase o.”
      • A decodable story 3 Little Me which includes review of high-frequency words the and little and review the words I and am.
      • Reread for Fluency, Reread the decodable story for fluency, children reread the story chorally then several times individually.
    • The note for ELL in the margins is “If children need more scaffolding and practice with phonemic awareness and letter recognition, then use the Phonics Transition lessons beginning on p. 447 in the ELL Handbook.” There are no explicit directions about how to assess students or what materials in the ELL Handbook to use.
    • Opportunities for students to practice are limited. The materials often suggest orally reteaching skills.

Students have limited practice opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery. Examples include:

  • Using review of phonemic awareness and phonics sounds and letters week to week, there is a start to teach the foundational skills to mastery.
    • In Unit 3, Week 1, Days 1-3, teach phonemic awareness, phonics, and handwriting of /n/ and /b/. The same sounds are taught in Spelling on Day 4 and reviewed in phonemic awareness and phonics Day 5. The sounds are also reviewed in phonemic awareness and phonics in Week 2, on Day 4.
      • General recommendations for reteaching the above are given for each concept. Example: “If children cannot discriminate /b/ then have them say /b/ several times. When you say /b/ you put your lips together, and then push air the sound as you open your lips. Have children practice saying /b/” The same type of directions are given for /n/. An attempt is made at teaching to mastery, however, there are no additional materials or explicit instructions provided for teacher if students have not mastered the sounds by this week.
    • During Unit 4, Week 5, Day 2, is the first introduction to Medial /e/. Phonemic Awareness Lesson after reviewing initial /e/ with the elephant card, “MODEL MEDIAL /e/ The sound /e/ can be in the middle of a word too. Display the jet Picture Card. This is a jet. Listen as I say the sounds: /j/ /e/ /t/, jet. I hear /e/ in the middle of the word: /j/ /e/ /t/. Say it with me: /j/ /e/ /t/, jet. Let’s try some more. Continue with the following words: ten, pet, Ben, wet, Ted, den, shed, set.”
      • After practice in My Skills Buddy p. 92 & 93, “If children cannot discriminate medial /e/, then have them enunciate /e/ as they segment words with medial /e/. Listen as I segment a word: /g/ /e/ /t/. Say it with me /g/ /e/ /t/. What sound do you hear in the middle? I hear /e/ in the middle. Continue with the following words: bet, pen, tell.” These directions are identical to the directions from the lesson above. There are not additional materials or activities suggested.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Not Rated

Criterion 2a - 2h

0/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
0/4

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
0/4

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
0/4

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
0/4

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
0/4

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
0/4

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
0/4

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
0/4

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Thu Apr 06 00:00:00 UTC 2017

Report Edition: 2013

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core My Skills Buddy Unit 1 (Student) 978-0-3287-2437-6 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core My Skills Buddy Unit 2 (Student) 978-0-3287-2438-3 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core My Skills Buddy Unit 3 (Student) 978-0-3287-2439-0 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core My Skills Buddy Unit 4 (Student) 978-0-3287-2440-6 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core My Skills Buddy Unit 5 (Student) 978-0-3287-2441-3 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core My Skills Buddy Unit 6 (Student) 978-0-3287-2442-0 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Teacher's Edition Unit 1 978-0-3287-2509-0 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Teacher's Edition Unit 2 978-0-3287-2510-6 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common CoreTeacher's Edition Unit 3 978-0-3287-2511-3 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common CoreTeacher's Edition Unit 4 978-0-3287-2512-0 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Teacher's Edition Unit 5 978-0-3287-2513-7 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013
Scott Foresman Reading Street Common Core Teacher's Edition Unit 6 978-0-3287-2514-4 Copyright: 2013 Pearson 2013

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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