Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 do not meet the criteria for alignment. While texts partially meet some expectations, the majority of work done in reading, writing, speaking, and listening do not meet the expectations of the indicators. The materials do not include support for building students' knowledge and academic vocabulary.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
32
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
4
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Partially Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

Grade 2 instructional materials partially meet the expectations for text quality for complexity, and do not meet the criteria for alignment to the standards. Most tasks and questions are not text based and are not grounded in evidence. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous, evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning during reading. Materials provide opportunities to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
15/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials partially meet the criteria for including anchor texts that are of publishable quality, are worthy of especially careful reading and/or listening, and consider a range of student interests. Texts meet the text complexity criteria for each grade. The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels). Materials are not accompanied by a text complexity analysis. Students engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.

Texts are high quality, including rich language and engaging content. Accompanying illustrations are high quality, as well, supporting students' understanding and comprehension of the associated text.

Examples of central texts that are worthy of careful reading include, but are not limited to:

  • In Theme 1, Arthur’s Reading Race by Marc Brown is an engaging text and contains rich vocabulary. It is of high interest for students at this grade level.
  • In Theme 2, Click, Clack, Moo Cows that Type by Doreen Cronin is an engaging, predictable text, which contains grade-level appropriate vocabulary.
  • In Theme 3, Rainforest Babies by Kathy Darling is an engaging text with high interest material and brilliant photographs.
  • In Theme 4, Mr. Putter and Tabby Write the Book by Cynthia Rylant is an engaging text and contains academic vocabulary.
  • In Theme 5, A Chair for my Mother by Vera B. Williams is a high interest text that contains strong academic vocabulary and engaging illustrations.
  • In Theme 6, Let’s Go Rock Collecting by Roma Gans is an engaging, modern text that students can identify with.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.



Anchor and paired texts include a mix of informational and literary texts. Each of the six Themes for the year integrates various genres to support student’s understanding of the Theme. Additional self-selected reading selections are suggested as part of the classroom library to support the Themes. Text types include: fantasy, nonfiction, realistic fiction, travel journal, informational narrative, science fiction, fairy tale, play, historical fiction, folktale, interview, advice column, photo essay, mystery, biography, and news script.

The following are examples of literary texts found within the instructional materials:

  • Theme 1: Arthur’s Reading Race by Marc Brown
  • Theme 1: Henry and Mudge by Cynthia Rylant
  • Theme 2: Two Races by Eric Kimmel
  • Theme 2: The Great Ball Game by Joseph Bruchac
  • Theme 3: A Lazy Thought by Eve Merriam
  • Theme 3: A Birthday Mystery
  • Theme 4: Annie’s Gifts by Angela Shelf Medearis
  • Theme 4: Come, My Little Children, Here are Songs for You by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Theme 5: Serious Farm by Tim Egan
  • Theme 5: A Time for Patience from Fables from Aesop retold by Tom Lynch
  • Theme 6: The Lizard and the Sun by Alma Flor Ada
  • Theme 6: Cross-Country Vacation

The following are examples of informational text found within the instructional materials:

  • Theme 1 : “Reading with your Fingers” a magazine article from Click
  • Theme 1 : Dogs by Jennifer Blizin Gillis
  • Theme 2: Winners Never Quit by Mia Hamm
  • Theme 2: A Trip to the Fire Station
  • Theme 3: At Play: Long Ago and Today by Lynnette Brent
  • Theme 3: Baby Tapir is Born
  • Theme 4: George Washington Carver by Joli K. Stevens
  • Theme 4: “Nutty facts about Peanuts” from Ranger Rick by Gail Skroback Hennessey
  • Theme 5: The Bee by Sabrina Crewe
  • Theme 5: “Chip Computer Whiz”, a magazine article from Ask
  • Theme 6, Gabriela Mistral: A Poet’s Life in Photos by Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy
  • Theme 6: “Summer Safety” from Weekly Reader

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.

The majority of texts are at the appropriate quantitative level. Qualitatively, the texts present complex ideas, vocabulary, and themes that allow students to acquire knowledge and conduct analysis of complex texts and how they relate to each thematic unit. Books identified for small group instruction are noted as below level, on level, advanced, and intended for ELL students. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.

Texts that are above or below grade level quantitative bands have qualitative features and/or tasks that bring it to the appropriate level for students to access the text. Examples of text that are at appropriate level of complexity according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task include:

  • Theme 1: Dogs by Jennifer Blizen IG with a quantitative measure of 470L
  • Theme 2: Click, Clack, Moo by Doreen Cronin with a quantitative measure of AD 470L
  • Theme 3: Rain Forest Babies by Kathy Darling with a quantitative measure of 630L
  • Theme 4: “Annie’s Gifts” by Angela Shelf Medearis with a quantitative measure of AD 510L
  • Theme 5: Watching in the Wild by Charnan Simon
  • Theme 6: The Lizard and the Sun by Alma Flor Ada with a quantitative measure of AD 580L

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the expectations for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

Each Theme has a separate skills focus. In Theme 1 the text complexity of student texts are appropriate for the beginning of the school year. Students focus on the skills of character, main idea, and finding details. Students hear a Read Aloud connected to the theme, read and discuss the main selection, and then read and discuss a paired selection. In each selection the focus skills of the theme are discussed. In Theme 3, the text complexity is appropriate for Grade 2 mid-year. Students focus on the skills of author’s purpose and fiction/nonfiction. Students hear a Read Aloud connected to the theme, read and discuss the main selection, and then read and discuss a paired selection. In each selection the focus skills of the theme are discussed. In Theme 6 the text complexity of student texts are appropriate for the end of Grade 2. Students focus on the skills of cause and effect and making inferences. Students hear a Read Aloud connected to the theme, read and discuss the main selection, and then read and discuss a paired selection. In each selection the focus skills of the theme are discussed. Focus skills are not revisited during the year. Though questions and practice become more complex through each individual theme, there is not a clear progression of the focus skills as they become more complex over the course of the school year

The materials partially support students' ability to read increasingly complex texts across the school year with appropriate support from the teacher according to the quantitative and qualitative measures. However, two days of guidance and scaffolded support from the teacher is suggested regardless of the complexity of the main selection text. Although scaffolded activities are provided throughout the materials, every text is allocated the same amount of time for reading and analysis. More complex texts may not get more instructional time focused on understanding and analyzing them since there are fixed routines in place every week for close reading and rereading.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are not accompanied by a text complexity analysis or a rationale for educational purpose and placement in Grade 2. The publisher identifies anchor text by genre and leveled readers are suggested by Below-Level, On-Level, and Advanced. Texts are identified as Below-Level, On-Level, and Advanced no specific complexity level or rationale is provided.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. There are opportunities for students to read a range and volume of texts. The materials provide some experiences with independent reading. Teacher materials lack explicit directions to help students build their skills to read on grade level independently by the end of the year, and weekly lessons have minimal time dedicated to students reading independently.

In each lesson, students interact with a getting started story, a read-aloud, a whole-group vocabulary selection, an anchor text, paired text read, big books, decodable books, and a self-selected text read during center work. Leveled readers are provided for small-group, differentiated work.

There are opportunities for students to read a range and volume of texts. The materials provide some experiences with independent reading. Teacher materials lack explicit directions to help students build their skills to read on grade level independently by the end of the year, and weekly lessons have minimal time dedicated to students reading independently.

Reading Adventure Magazine is used for supplemental lessons to extend the Common Core. Additional texts related to the themes are provided as leveled reading selections. These selections are suggested in the Resources section of the Teacher Edition on p. R9.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
5/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The Grade 2 instructional materials do not meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are not text-dependent and do not build towards a culminating task that integrates skills. The instructional materials partially meet the criteria to provide opportunities for discussion that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and partially supports student listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching. The materials do not provide opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Materials meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for the grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

The materials reviewed contain questions and tasks in multiple locations that require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support answers. Questions asked include those which require both explicit answers and inferences from the text. Materials include questions requiring students to engage with the text in multiple sections including practice books and student editions. Students must engage with the text to answer questions and complete activities. Examples of text dependent/specific questions, tasks and assignments include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 1, Lesson 2, students answer the following question: “In what ways are Arthur and D.W. alike and different?” The children read the passage on page 59 of the Student Edition and identify the characters and how they are alike.
  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 3, Day 2, Question 2, the students are asked, “Why do you think Ricky’s father tells him the story about the hen that wanted to be a swan?”
  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 2, Day 4, the lesson states to “Ask children to tell what happens at the beginning, middle, and end of “Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type.”
  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 3, Common Core Companion Extension, After Reading, students are prompted to answer the following question: “ What question might the author be answering in the section “Land”?”
  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 4, Lesson 19, the teacher guides the students to set a purpose for listening that includes listening to the titles and headings to compare the two young inventors, along with listening to find out what kind of invention each inventor developed. For guided practice, the teacher states, “As you read aloud “Young Inventors,” record information about the two young inventors in a chart.
  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 6, Common Core Companion, students recall a summary of the story. The teacher works with the students to complete a few of the details from the story in a Details/Main Idea chart that is provided to each student.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

The themed volumes provide opportunities for the students that prompt thinking, speaking, or writing tasks, but do not always focus on the central ideas. While text based questions and activities are evident, the two do not appear to be cohesive nor do they build toward a culminating task. There is a lack of evidence of high-quality sequences of text-based questions to support the building of a body of knowledge. Although each theme has a labeled culminating task of a wrap up and review along with a reading–writing connection, the general theme of the unit does not consistently present itself in a manner that can build up to a culminating task. The writing connection is frequently disconnected from the theme and focuses on the task.

Text based questions are included but these questions are isolated to the story and do not build toward a culminating task. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 3, Lesson 10, the teacher asks given text-based questions throughout the student reading of a story. On Page T340-Retell- Students use Retelling Cards. There is no evidence of an activity that builds to a culminating task.
  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 6, Teacher’s Edition, Theme Wrap Up and Review, students complete a journey board game to demonstrate what they have learned in a creative way for a theme project presentation.
  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 2, Teacher’s Edition, Theme Wrap Up and Review, the response option for students is to reflect on and write about learning to work with others. The theme is Doing Our Best.
  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 4, Teacher’s Edition, Theme Wrap Up and Review, the response option for students is to reflect on and write about using their imagination and creativity. The theme is Dream Big.
  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 1, Lesson 5, the teacher requests for the students to use comprehension strategies as they read pages 156-157. To address the main idea and details, students answer the following questions: “How does Dakotah show that he is friendly? How does being friendly to someone new help that person?”
  • In the Teacher Edition, Theme 3, Lesson 13, Fiction and Nonfiction Comprehension, students turn to “Frog and Toad All Year” on Student Edition page 62 for the guided practice portion of the lesson. Both the teacher and students review the selection together. The teacher asks volunteers to recall a summary of the story. For example, the teacher asks, “Is this selection fiction or nonfiction?” During independent practice, the students review the Student Edition to “Henry and Mudge” on page 94 and “Dogs” on page 118. Students identify each selection as fiction or nonfiction and justify their response.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in discussions but not all are rich and rigorous. The opportunities provide limited protocols to support vocabulary and syntax throughout each unit or within lessons. Materials include practices to build robust vocabulary and application of content words, but not academic vocabulary and syntax. Themes provide limited information on how teachers can provide support and scaffolds with collaborative conversations. Most discussions are whole group with limited opportunities for small group or peer-to-peer discussion. Although speaking and listening tasks are included in various spots throughout the year, there is limited instruction to support students’ mastery of listening and speaking skills. The opportunities do not adequately address the mastery of grade-level speaking and listening standards. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Theme 4, Lesson 16, Page T37, in the practice and apply section of the Teacher’s Edition, students are engaged in guided practice. During this time, the teacher asks the students to complete the following tasks: “Imagine that you are helping a grown-up care for a baby. What might disturb the baby’s nap?”
  • In Theme 1, Lesson 1, Page T34, Guided Practice, students identify the main character in an independent story and explain what they know about him or her.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 22, Page T198, students engage in a cumulative review that involves sorting the vocabulary words, considering the meaning of each word, and engaging in small group games to master the words.
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 16, Page T44, Teach/ Model – Introduce Robust Vocabulary, the teacher displays and reads the word and the Student Friendly Explanation, students say the word, and students interact with the word by answering the following the questions: “Where do you feel cozy? Is a forest enchanting? Explain.”
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 22, Page T198, students engage in a cumulative review. The teacher sorts words and guides students into sorting all of the Vocabulary Words, except for “extremely” and “barely” into three groups. The teacher displays Transparency G010 or draws a chart, such as the chart on page T98. The students consider the meaning and use of each word as they identify words as nouns, verbs, or adjectives. Afterwards, the class separates into small groups and uses the chart to play a game. Students take turns creating a sentence that includes one word from each column of the chart. The groups play until each member has had several turns.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Grade-appropriate speaking and listening opportunities are provided over the course of the year. Students have opportunities to ask classmates and their teacher questions and answer questions about ideas presented. Anchor text for each lesson are read by students with the teacher asking whole-group discussion questions throughout the reading to monitor comprehension. Teachers are provided some direction or protocols for these discussions. Each Theme has a Reader’s Theatre that provides some opportunity for students to read and share. Students are asked with each In Theme project to share what they like about the project. However, this evidence is limited in relating follow-up questions with weekly text. Although speaking and listening tasks are included in various spots throughout the year, there is limited instruction to support students’ mastering of listening and speaking skills. Many discussions do not require students to return to the text or provide evidence for their thinking.

Opportunities are provided for students to speak about the text but limited or no opportunities are provided for follow-up discussions or questions. The following examples provide opportunities to answer questions orally and to listen, but do not provide follow up questioning opportunities.

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 2, Page T191, For Comprehension, a purpose for listening is to guide students towards listening for information about what the field mouse says and does.
  • In the Teacher Support Book, Theme 3, Guided Practice, p. T33, the teacher is directed to guide students to “plan their presentations using a sequence chart, such as the one in the Teacher Resource Book. Label the boxes Beginning, Middle, and End.”
  • In Theme 5, Teacher Edition, Warm-Up Routines, Oral Language, p. T230, the teacher is directed to organize students into two groups and “Ask one group to give reasons why they like bees, and ask the other group to give reasons why they don’t like bees.”
  • In Theme 2, Lesson 8, page T275, Reader’s Theater: Perform “The Great Ball Game,” groups of three students read together, taking turns reading the different dialogues of characters.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 22, page T196, Reader’s Theater: Perform “Serious Farm,” students perform the story for another class.
  • In Theme 6, Lesson 27, page T141, Writing: Report About a Person: Teach Model, students are guided through the process of writing a report about an important person at their school. Listening/Speaking is not listed as a part of this process.
  • There are few identified Speaking and Listening Activities listed in the 2nd Grade Teacher Support Book.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Each Theme includes a Reading-Writing Connection that spans the five week Theme incorporating the stages of the writing process, prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, and publish. The theme writing assignment appears at the beginning of each Theme with no guidance or pacing suggestions. Theme writings are not included in suggested pacing documents.

Each week students participate in writing lessons. On Day 1 students participate in a modeled writing, on Days 2 and 3 students work on shared writings. Then on Days 4 and 5 students work on independent writings. Each of these writing prompts are connected by writing form and trait that students are studying. These writing lessons do not connect to theme texts.

At the end of each anchor text students answer the final question in an on-demand writing prompt.

  • In Theme 3, Lesson 11, Personal Narrative, Teacher's Edition page T39, students draft an opening sentence for personal narrative, and they use this sentence for Days 2-5.
  • In Extending Common Core State Standards, Theme 5, Page T58, T59, Writing: Definitions in Informative Writings, students identify informative writings, edit informative paragraphs, including adding information, and publish their work using technology.
  • In Theme 1, Writing on Demand, p. T113, provides the following prompt for students: “Everyone has done something special with his or her family. Think about something special you have done with your family. Now write a personal narrative about something special you have done with your family.” This prompt is the only On-Demand writing task listed in this fashion in the entire Theme 1 book.
  • In Theme 3, Writing on Demand, p. T111, provides the following prompt for students: “Everyone has visited a special place. Think about a special place you have visited that you liked. Now write a story about what happened during your visit to that special place.
  • In Theme 6, Lesson 27, Page T171, students complete a writing prompt to write a paragraph about something that they would like to do independently.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 22, students brainstorm ideas for a fantasy story for guided practice. Volunteers describe their ideas. The teacher records their ideas in a new story map. For independent practice, students use the story map to brainstorm details for their fantasies. They save their story maps for use on Days 3-5.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Throughout the grade and unit, students are primarily exposed to personal narrative writing. There is little evidence of students engaging in expository or opinion writing. Texts and materials do not provide sufficient opportunities for students to address different text types of writing throughout the academic year. For example, the teacher and student editions lack engagement in students informing or explaining the subject to the reader, stating an opinion and influencing the reader, and using their five senses to paint a picture and incorporate imagery and specific details. Writing does not rise to the level required by the standards.

Materials lack instructional writing support for students and teachers. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Theme 1, Reading-Writing Connection, Page T105, the teacher discusses personal narrative events. Students select a topic to write about regarding something that happened to them.
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 11, students continue writing their personal narratives by adding details. They later revise their writing.
  • In Theme 5, Reading-Writing Connection, Page XI, the following components are listed as developing one major form through the writing process: personal narrative, respond to a story, friendly letter, story, description, and research report.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 21, students continue writing their personal narrative. Students work to write their narratives in sequential order and then revise their personal narrative. Students use Editor’s Marks to revise their writing, and they continue revising in a future lesson.
  • In Theme 1, Lesson 2, Teacher’s Edition Page T137, students are guided on how to write a paragraph as the teacher discusses the important parts of a paragraph.
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 13, Teacher’s Edition Page T217, the teacher discusses the use of quotation marks in writing dialogue. Students read and write dialogue, using correct punctuation.
  • In Theme 1, Lesson 1, Day 3, p. T77, teachers are directed to “Have children use their pictures, filled-in graphic organizers, and what they now know to write sentences about their pictures.”
  • In Theme 2, Teacher Edition, Lesson 6, Page T61, students generate ideas on the characteristics of the story read on Day 1 through prewriting
  • In Theme 4, Teacher Edition, Lesson 18, Page 229, students explore genres by drafting and creating a poem.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria for materials including regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

Each Theme includes a Reading-Writing Connection that spans the five week Theme incorporating the stages of the writing process, prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, and publish. These theme writings are not evidence-based, are not included in unit planning and pacing, and do no require students return to a text. These writing prompts do not support the recall of information, opinions with reasons or relevant information.

Each week students participate in writing lessons. On Day 1 students participate in a modeled writing, on Days 2 and 3 students work on shared writings. Then on Days 4 and 5 students work on independent writings. Each of these writing prompts are connected by writing form and trait that students are studying. These writing lessons do not connect to theme texts and are not evidence-based writings.

During Small Group Literacy Centers students are prompted to write during Literacy Writing Center. These writing prompts are not connected to texts, nor do they require evidence.

At the end of each anchor text students answer one on-demand writing prompt that asks students to use details from the text to support their answer. Extending the Common Core State Standards Reading Adventure Magazines provide some text-dependent writing prompts. However, this does not support providing regular opportunities for evidence-based writing.

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 1, Writing, Writing Prompt, P. T87, the writing prompt states, “ Have children draw a picture of something that is important to them and write one or two sentences explaining why it’s important.”
  • In Theme 2, Teacher Edition, Lesson 9, Reflect, Page T331, teachers are directed to “Have students record their reflections on experiences they have had giving and receiving party invitations.”
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 13, Writing, Writing Prompt, p. T217 , the writing prompt asks, “ Have children write out a short conversation that they had today with a friend at school.”
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 21, Writing, Writing Prompt, p. T39, the writing prompt states, “Have children write about an important experience they have had at school.”
  • In Theme 6, Teacher’s Edition, Lesson 29, Page T357, students write a few sentences telling how the lizard in “The Lizard and the Sun” found the sun. Students draft their own folk talks.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for StoryTown Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts.

Grammar and convention lessons are often taught through Extending the Common Core State Standards, which contains single lessons for students to learn Grade 2 language standards. The lessons lack opportunities for students to practice the grammar/convention skill to mastery. Materials also miss opportunities for students to review prior learning and to apply skills out-of-context. Teacher Edition materials include a five-day phonics, grammar, and writing sequence for each lesson within each theme. Lessons provide limited instruction in grammar and convention skills with modeling, guided practice, and opportunities for independent practice. The program does not explicitly teach all the language standards for this grade level and even includes days of instruction and practice for language standards from previous grade levels. Opportunities are missed for students to receive instruction in frequently occurring irregular plural nouns and instruction in past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs is limited to have, had, has. While students receive instruction in adjectives, opportunities are missed for teachers to meet the full intent of the standard and receive instruction in adverbs as well.

Materials include instruction of some grammar and conventions standards for the grade level. For example:

  • Students have the opportunity to use collective nouns. For example:
    • In Extending the CCSS, Theme 2, Grammar, Collective Nouns, the teacher models a chart of person, animal, place, thing and gives examples of each noun. The the teacher models through think-aloud how class is a collective noun. The teacher makes a new chart to model collective nouns.
  • Students have the opportunity to use reflexive pronouns. For example:
    • In Extending the CCSS, Theme 3, Reflexive Pronouns, the teacher writes the following sentence on the board: “The man walked by himself.” The teacher explains a reflexive pronoun. The teacher models another sentence that uses a reflexive pronoun: “I can do it ___.”
  • Students have limited opportunity to form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs. Instruction is limited to have, had, has. For example:
    • Theme 6, Lesson 26, Day 3, the teacher assists students in figuring out which irregular verbs (have, had, had) are appropriate in sentences. During Practice/Apply, students identify which irregular verb belongs in a particular sentence (I have/had my first swimming lesson last week).
  • Students have the opportunity to use adjectives, however, materials do not include instruction for the use of adverbs, and do not discuss choosing between the use of adverbs or adjectives with students. Only adjectives are included in grammar instruction. For example:
    • In Theme 4, Lesson 20, Day 5, students identify adjectives that tell about shape, color, and size, sense adjectives, number words, and adjectives that end with -er and -est.
    • In Extending the CCSS, Theme 6, Grammar, Adjectives, Adverb, the teacher reviews students of nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. The teacher writes the following sentences on the board: “beautiful: Cinderella is a beautiful girl. Beautifully: The shoe fit beautifully.” The teacher explains the difference in the adjective and adverb. In Guided Practice, students identify parts of a sentence.
  • Students have the opportunity to use commas in greetings and closings of letters. For example:
    • In Theme 3, Reading-Writing Connection, students learn how to write a friendly letter back on the text for the week, Click, Clack Moo: Cows That Type. In Use Text as Model, students learn the parts of a friendly letter including greeting and closing. Students use a model and checklist to make sure they include a greeting and closing.
  • Students have the opportunity to use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives. For example:
    • In Theme 3, Lesson 13, Day 2, the teacher explains that you use an apostrophe to make a plural noun show ownership. Model sentences are written on the board. Students practice rewriting sentences to show possession.
    • In Theme 5, Lesson 24, Day 4, the teacher introduces the contraction didn’t for did not and explains that when a contraction is formed, one or more letters are left out and an apostrophe takes the place of the missing letter or letters. The teacher models how to blend and read the contraction didn’t. The students practice blending and reading other contractions: hasn’t, isn’t and wasn’t.
  • Students have the opportunity to generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words. For example:
    • In Theme 5, Lesson 24, Day 4, r-controlled vowels ar, air, are, students practice spelling words with r-controlled vowels. The students answer questions such as: “Which spelling words can you make by changing one letter? (scare, share) Which spelling words can you make by adding one letter to the beginning? (hair, fair, pair)”
    • In Theme 6, Lesson 27, Day 1, Word Work lessons, students work to recognize and blend the vowel variant aw/au/augh, to read words with the vowel variant aw/au/augh, and to use the vowel variant aw/au/augh to spell words.
  • Students have the opportunity to determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 2 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies. For example:
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 18, Day 3, the teacher explains that a dictionary is used to find a word’s meaning, spelling, part of speech, and pronunciation.
  • In Extending the CCSS, Theme 3, Vocabulary Print and Digital Dictionaries, students are guided through how to look up words in a digital dictionary. The teacher models looking up the word prevent in the digital dictionary. The teacher is to point out parts of the entry to the students including the speaker button and pronunciation guide.

Materials include limited opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills both in- and out-of-context. For example:

  • In Theme 6, Lesson 27, Day 2, students participate in a ‘Word Building’ activity where they begin with the word crawl, change c to d and take away the l to make draw. The teacher asks the students to identify which letter would need to be changed to make the word claw. Then they identify which letters would need to be changed to make the word lawn. Students then read words with the variant vowel au/aw/augh in sentences. Students then write dictated spelling words in their notebook or on a dry-erase board.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
12/22
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials partially meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and multimodal practice to address the acquisition of print concepts including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2). Materials meet expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks. Materials meet the expectations that materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported. Materials meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for StoryTown Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

Instructional materials include lessons in word work lessons focused on a particular phonics skill. These skills begin with providing students the opportunity to practice reading and spelling words with the focus skill. Instructional materials address prior grade-level standards such as two themes review common long vowel teams, and three out of six themes review digraphs rather than containing lessons on Grade 2 phonics throughout the school year. While most Grade 2 Common Core Standards are taught in the Grade 2 materials, students do not receive instruction in distinguishing short vowels and long vowels in one syllable words. Additionally, lessons for prefixes and suffixes are taught in two days with students receiving instruction in 3 prefixes and 2 suffixes. Materials do not provide opportunities for students to practice prefix and suffix skills to mastery. Students are expected to show mastery during independent work with limited explicit instruction.

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g. apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode two syllable words with long vowels). However, materials do not provide opportunities for students to distinguish long and short vowel sounds in one syllable words. Students also have limited opportunities to decode words with common prefixes and suffixes. For example:

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 4, Day 1, students are taught a common vowel team they learned in the prior grade: long /e/ with ee, ea.
  • In Theme 2, Lesson 7, Days 4-5, students are taught to read compound words. In Day 4, the teacher introduces compound words by writing mailbox on the board. The teacher explains that mailbox is a compound word because mailbox is made of two smaller words joined together. The teacher draws a line under mail and a circle around box. The teacher asks, “How many syllables does mailbox have?” For Guided Practice, students view nonsense compound words and identify the smaller parts of each compound word in order to blend the syllables. In Day 5, students are guided through breaking apart compound words in a chart.
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 12, students learn long /e/ with ey, y. During Day 1, the teacher warms up the class with phonemic awareness. “The words money and candy end with the long /e/ sound.” The teacher displays the Sound/Spelling Card for long e and points to the letters ey and talks about the letter/sound correspondence. “The letters ey can stand for the long /e/ sound, the sound at the end of money.” Students read words that end with y and ey to hear and see the long /e/.
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 19, Day 1, students recognize and blend the r-controlled vowel /ir/ear, eer, read words with r-controlled vowel /ir/ear, eer (hear, deer, peer, rear, year, team, gear, steer, smear, clear, fear), and use r-controlled vowel /ir/ear, eer to spell words (gear, deer, fear, year, cheer, near, hear, clear, steer, rear). The teacher displays a Sound/Spelling Card for /ir/ ear and eer. “The letters ear can stand for the /ir/ sound, the sound at the end of hear.” During Work with Patterns, the teacher displays ear and eer words to read aloud to students and then students read the words with teacher.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 23, Day 2, students learn the vowel diphthong /oo/ oo, ew, ue, ui, ou. In Word Building, the teacher writes suit on the board. Students identify the letters for the /oo/ sound. Students help the teacher change out letters in suit to make fruit. Then students change out ruit to ood to make food. Later, students write words in their noteboard that correspond to the /oo/ word the teacher states.
  • In Theme 6, Lesson 26, Days 4-5, student learn dis-, over-, pre-. In Day 4, Teach/Model, the teacher writes like on the board has students read the word. Then the teacher writes dislike and underlines dis-. The teacher explains that dis- is added to like to make a new word. The teacher repeats this sequence with overeat and prepay. During Guided Practice, students are guided through identifying prefixes so students can blend the syllables together.

Materials have a limited cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application. For example:

  • In Theme 1, Lessons 1-5, phonics instruction includes short vowels (/a/a; /i/i; /e/e; /o/o; /u/u) and long vowels which are a review from Kindergarten.
  • In Theme 2, Lessons 6-10, phonics instruction includes long vowels (/i/ie, igh; /a/ai, ay, /o/oa, ow) and a r-controlled vowel (/ar/ ar).
  • In Theme 3, Lessons 11-15, phonics instruction includes digraphs (/ch/ch, tch; /sh/sh; /th/ h) which were taught in Grade 1, long /e/ with ey and y, consonants (/s/c; /j/g, dge), and r-controlled vowel (/ur/ir, ur, ear).
  • In Theme 4, Lessons 16-20, phonics instruction includes digraphs (/n/kn; /r/wr; /f/gh, ph), short vowel /e/ea, vowel diphthong (/oi/oi, oy), and a r-controlled /ir/ear, eer.
  • In Theme 5, Lessons 19-24, phonics instruction includes vowel diphthongs (/ou/ou, ow; /oo/oo, ew, ue, ui, ou) and r-controlled vowels (/or/ or, ore, our; /ar/ air, are).
  • In Theme 6, Lessons 25-30, phonics instruction includes vowel variants (/oo/oo, ou; /o/aw, au, augh; /o/a, al, ough) long vowels (/a/ ea, ei, eigh, ey), prefixes (dis-, over-, pre-) and a suffix (-tion).

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for StoryTown Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge and directionality (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

During the comprehension portion of lessons, students receive instruction in text structures. Students have opportunities to learn text structures such as main idea and details, cause and effect, compare and contrast, character, setting, important events, and problem solution. Students receive instruction in text features in Theme 4 and Theme 5.

Students have frequent and adequate opportunities to identify text structures (e.g. main idea and details, sequence of events, problem and solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect).For example:

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 3, Days 1-5, students learn main idea and details. In Day 2, the teacher displays Transparency GO2. The students help the teacher fill in the graphic organizer with the main idea and details as they read “Henry and Mudge.”
  • In Theme 2, Lesson 8, Day 2, the teacher teaches story structure and shows students how to fill in the story map that includes characters, setting, beginning, middle and end of the story.
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 13, Days 1-5, students learn story elements (characters, setting, beginning, middle, end). In Day 2, the teacher displays Transparency GO4 and has students help fill in the graphic organizer about “Big Bushy Mustache.”
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 22, Day 5, students participate in a guided practice activity where students record information about the plot in a story map that includes characters, setting, problem, important events, solutions.
  • In Theme 6, Lesson 30, Day 1, the teacher conducts a Think Aloud about cause and effect relationships. “I know that a cause is the reason something else happens. What happens is called the effect. The word because helps me figure out that the cause of Tim’s hunger is that he skipped lunch.” Students work independently to write about another cause and effect relationship in the story.

Materials include frequent and adequate lessons and activities about text features (e.g. title, byline, headings, table of contents, glossary, pictures, illustrations). For example:

  • In Theme 4, Lesson 18, Days 1-5, students learn how to locate information. On Day 1, the teacher models how to use the Table of Contents, glossary, index of titles and authors. In Practice/Apply, students locate information from the Student Edition.
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 18, Day 2, students work together to fill in the headings and details as they read the nonfiction selection “Ah, Music!” The teacher explains that many nonfiction selections have headings that tell about each section and that each section that follows a heading will include a main idea and details that support it.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 23, Day 1, the teacher models how to use a diagram. During guided practice, students view a timeline from the Student Edition. The students describe what they see and learn from the timeline. For independent practice, students create a simple diagram of something they are learning about in science.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 24, Day 1, the teacher lists different types of graphic aids on the board. The teacher displays a nonfiction text that contains graphic aids. The teacher guides students to identify graphic aids.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for StoryTown Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

The instructional materials contain sufficient opportunities for students to hear the purpose for reading a particular text, as stated by the teacher. In each lesson, students read irregularly spelled words. Students also have opportunities to read the Student Edition text for each lesson. While students have the opportunity to read text with accuracy, rate and expression, the use of ‘fix-up’ reading strategies; such as, self-correcting and using context clues is not explicitly taught and includes minimal instruction.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read on-level text. For example:

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 1, Day 2, the teacher sets the following purpose for reading: “Tell children that this is a story they will read to enjoy.”
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 13, Day 2, the teacher sets the following purpose for reading: “Remind children this story is fiction. Ask them whether they will read it for enjoyment or to get information.”
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 21, Day 3, the teacher sets the following purpose for reading: “Read aloud the title of the nonfiction selection. Guide children to use prior knowledge to set a purpose for listening. Then ask children to read the selection aloud.”

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and grade level decodable words. For example:

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 1, Day 2, students practice reading with accuracy. The teacher explains that good readers read words accurately and correct themselves when they make a mistake. Students echo-read each page of text from “Arthur’s Reading Race.”
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 11, Day 3, students practice reading with emphasis on punctuation. The teacher explains that good readers pay attention to punctuation marks. The teacher models reading while paying attention to punctuation. During independent practice, students take turns with a partner to read aloud “Jamaica Louise James.” Prior to reading aloud, students identify and discuss punctuation in the text.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 22, students read Below-Level, On-Level and Advanced Level readers. Students reread for fluency. Students are reminded to read aloud to express each character’s feelings.

Materials contain limited support in the reading of texts with attention to reading strategies such as rereading and self-correction. Opportunities are missed for students to learn about using context clues. For example:

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 2, the teacher reminds students that good readers read words accurately and correct themselves if they made a mistake. The teacher models reading accurately. Then partners take turns reading aloud parts of the story. The teacher reminds them to read accurately and to reread if they make a mistake.
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 18, Day 2, the teacher models reading accuracy. The teacher explains that if students make a mistake they should go back and reread the word.

Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words. For example:

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 4, Day 5, Warm-Up Routines, students read five high-frequency words: sugar, bicycle, special, sometimes, exercise. The teacher points to a card at random and students read the words.
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 13, Day 2, Warm-Up Routines, students read four high-frequency words: favorite, enjoy, board, popular. The teacher reads the words, then has students read each word, spell the word, and read the word again.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 25, Day 2, Warm-Up Routines, students read 10 high-frequency words: impossible, children, learn, special, clear, imagine, favorite, young, fair, exercise. Students read the word, spell the word, and read the word again. Then the teacher points to a word, selects a student to use the word in a sentence, and then read the word again.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for StoryTown Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Instructional materials provide students with opportunities to practice word recognition and word analysis in connected texts and tasks. Students read leveled readers to practice high-frequency words and Decodable books to practice decoding words in connected texts and tasks. Opportunities are missed for students to read leveled readers to practice reading prefixes and suffixes in connected text. Additionally, there are minimal opportunities for encoding in connected text and tasks.

Materials support students’ development learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels) in connected text and tasks. However, there are minimal opportunities for students to decode word with prefixes and suffixes in connected texts and tasks. For example:

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 4, Day 4, students read long /e/ee, ea words with inflectional endings -ing, -ed. The teacher models how to blend syllables to read the word: needed. The students decode make believe two syllable words by identifying the vowel pairs and endings in each and blending the syllables: reased, reasing, meeded, meeding, veeked and veeking. Children read sentences that include words with /e/ee, ea and the inflectional endings -ing, -ed.
  • In Theme 2, Lesson 6, Day 1, students read a decodable reader called “Bright Lights at Night.” The reader contains the long /i/ vowel of ie, igh.
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 18, Day 3, students choral read Transparency R92. Then volunteers read each sentence aloud and underline words with oi or oy. Other volunteers identify words that end with phonograms -oy, -oil, -oice, -oist.
  • In Theme 6, Lesson 26, Day 5, students practice placing prefixes (dis-, over-, pre-) in sentences in the Practice Book. For example, students fill in the following sentence: “Before Rosa began kindergarten at this school, she to a ___school.”

Materials provide frequent opportunities to read irregularly spelled words in connected text and tasks. Students have opportunities to read high-frequency words in Leveled Readers in Themes 1, 2, 3. For example:

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 4, Day 4, students participate in tasks that require them to read and write high-frequency words. Students read the high-frequency words: bicycle, exercise, special, sugar, sometimes. Students create their own sentences using the high-frequency words and the teacher writes them on the board. Students chorally read each sentence. Students then write three sentences using one or more of the high-frequency words in each sentence and share their sentences with a partner.
  • In Theme 2, Lesson 7, Leveled Readers, students read high-frequency words (idea, world, curve, laughed, coming, knee, million) in the Leveled Readers: Grandma’s Rain Song, Swimming with Pops, and A Present for Charlie.
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 12, Leveled Readers, students read high-frequency words (favorite, imagine, cook , year, board, popular, enjoy, expensive) in the Leveled Readers: Having Fun: Long Ago and Today, Riding Bicycles: Long Ago and Today, and Board Riding: Long Ago and Today.

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. However, opportunities are missed for students to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context. For example:

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 1, Day 4, students write three sentences using one or more of the high-frequency words (already, eight, police, prove, sign).
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 11, Day 4, student write three sentences using one or more of the high-frequency words (bought, draw, especially, minute, picture, question, sure, worry).
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 18, Day 2, students apply the phonics skill /oi/oi, oy to read decodable words that include the vowel diphthong in complete sentences that are written on the board: ex: I heard my mother’s voice calling for me. The teacher then dictates several spelling words for the students and students write the words.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

In Grade 2, there are Benchmark Assessments that are administered three times a year. Theme tests are available at the end of each theme to assess students’ mastery of the standards they have been taught. Weekly Lesson Tests are used to check understanding of each lesson standard before moving on. Weekly Tests assess the phonics skill, high-frequency words, grammar and fluency focus from that lesson. There are reteach lessons contained in the Small Group Instruction section of the Teacher’s Manual. Theme Tests assess phonics/spelling, high-frequency words, grammar and fluency. The high-frequency focus is not tested in the last part of the year. There are specific resources that teachers are directed to use based on students results on these assessments that are in addition to the core instruction. The resources are for students that perform in the Below-Level, On-Level and Advanced category based on the Theme Test. Materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding.

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills.

  • Each Theme contains Tested Skills. In Theme 1, phonics/spelling and high-frequency words are assessed. In Theme 2, phonics/spelling and high-frequency words are assessed.
  • In Theme 4, page A1 under the assessment tab, it explains that there are benchmark assessments that are administered 3 times a year. Theme tests are administered at the end of each them and assess students’ mastery of the standards that have been taught. Weekly lesson tests check the understanding the students have of each lesson (or parts of it) before the teacher moves on to the next lesson. Monitor Progress notes are available on a daily basis to help the teacher check for understanding and reteach or extend instruction.
  • In Theme 4, page A3 under the assessment tab, the Weekly Test for Lesson 17 includes:
    • Phonics- short vowels /e/ ea
    • Fluency- Intonation
    • Grammar- adjectives for senses
  • In Theme 4, page A6 under the assessment tab, Theme 4 Test includes items that assess: Phonics, Grammar and Fluency.
    • Phonics/Spelling- digraphs /n/kn; /r/wr; /f/gh, ph- short vowel /e/ea, vowel diphthong /oi/oi,oy- r-controlled vowel /ir/ear,eer
    • Fluency- oral reading fluency
    • Grammar- adjectives, adjectives for senses, number words, words that compare

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding. The materials contain the following sentence: “To determine whether children need even more support, use your district-approved diagnostic and screening assessments.” The materials do not contain complete diagnostic and screening assessments to help teacher know students’ current levels.

Materials support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in foundational skills.

  • In Grade 2, Theme 1, Small Group Instruction Lesson 2, S13, students review high-frequency words. ‘Below-Level’ students are reintroduced to the words using Routine Card 5. The teacher holds up a word card and asks a volunteer to hold up the matching card for the group to read aloud. This is repeated until all students have several chances to make matches. ‘On-Level’ students read each of the lesson’s word from a word card that is held up by the teacher. Words are displayed at random and children read the word each time. Students then write each word. ‘Advanced’ students write setences that contain two words from the list. If students children are not able to recognize and read the words after the small-group instruction, the teacher is directed to provide additional small-group practice with the words from the Strategic Intervention Resource Kit.
  • In Grade 2, Theme 6, Small Group Instruction Lesson 27, S14, students practice and apply knowledge of the vowel variant /i/aw, au(gh). ‘Below-Level’ students are reintroduced to the vowel variant /o/aw, au(gh). The teacher writes the words saw, lawn, craw, and draw on the board. The teacher reads the words aloud and then has students identify the vowel sound they hear. Students then identify the letters in the word that stand for the vowel sound. This is repeated with the words haul, fault, sauce and caught. Students read aloud Decodable Book 22. The teacher reviews any word that the children struggled to read. ‘On-Level’ students participate in word building. The teacher shows the word sat and asks students to identify which letters to change to spell the word saw. This activity is continued with hail (haul), drew (draw), low (law), yarn (yawn), caught (taught), stray (straw), and latch (launch). Children read sentences that are written on the board with the vowel variant. Students then read aloud the stories in Decodable Book 2. ‘Advanced’ students identify homophones for the following words: paws(pause), nod(gnawed), caws(cause), hall(haul), odd(awed). If students children are not able to recognize and read the words after the small-group instruction, the teacher is directed to provide additional small-group practice with the words from the Strategic Intervention Resource Kit.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.

Each week contains multiple opportunities for students to learn and practice foundational skills. Guidance and suggestions are provided in lessons in order for teachers to differentiate learning opportunities for students below-level, student on-level, and for students who are advanced. There are Small-Group learning opportunities for students to learn phonics and high-frequency words. To learn prefixes and suffixes, there are limited opportunities for students to learn and get reinforcement since only two days of instruction are allotted to learning prefixes such as mis-, re-, un-. Each lesson includes a 5-day sequence of instruction for phonics/spelling, fluency and grammar. Within these 5-days of instruction, teachers are provided with activities that provide opportunities for reteach, reinforcement or extension of the skill. Each lesson includes Leveled Readers and Leveled Practice to reinforce skills and strategies. The Leveled Readers include a Below Level, On Level, Advanced and ELL option for students. The Leveled Readers include words with the phonics focus and high-frequency words from the week. The Classroom Library for Self-Selected Reading includes an Easy, Average and Challenge level book. Many of the lessons include Below-Level differentiation options for students, and there is an ELL Teacher Guide that provides direction with scaffolding lessons.

Materials provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills.

  • In Theme 3, Lesson 11, Day 3, during fluency instruction of punctuation, there is guidance provided to the teacher to assist students who do not have grade-level fluency. “Below-Level Fluency Practice Have children reread Decodable Book 9, Story 11 in the Strategic Intervention Interactive Reader, or the appropriate Leveled Reader (pp. T96-T99). Have them practice reading the text several times.”
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 13, Day 4, during phonics instruction of consonants (/s/ c; /j/ g, dge), there is guidance provided to the teacher about helping the students who are not reaching mastery. “Below-Level Fluency Silent e Words Some children may have difficulty discriminating between the long-vowel sound in the CVCe pattern and the short-vowel sound in words ending in dge. Write c_ge and d_dge on the board. Work with children to complete each word, pointing out that when they see the dge pattern, the vowel before it has a short sound.”
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 18, Day 2, students that are determined to be Below-Level participate in additional fluency practice by reading Decodable Book 15, the appropriate Leveled Reader or Story 18 in the Strategic Intervention Interactive Reader.
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 19, students participate in different ways to ‘read’ the grade level text, The Life of George Washington Carver. Below-Level students will read each page after the teacher has read it aloud to them. On-Level students read the selection independently. Advanced students read the page silently.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 22, Day 2, Word Work, students are learning r-controlled vowel /or/ or, ore, our. There is guidance provided to the teacher about helping the students, both below-level and advanced, who are not reaching mastery.

Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs.

  • In Theme 2, Lesson 7, Day 5, during fluency learning of intonation, there is guidance provided to the teacher about helping the students. “Monitor Progress Periodically, take a timed sample of children’s oral reading and record the number of words read correctly per minute. Children should accurately read approximately 51 words per minute at the beginning of Grade 2.”
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 19, Day 5, students read two syllable words that have the VC/V Syllable Pattern. Students are grouped according to academic levels and are assigned a workbook page. Below-Level students complete a page from the Extra Support book. On-Level students complete a page from the Practice Book. Advanced students complete a Challenge page. The teacher clarifies any unfamiliar concepts for ELL students and use ELL Teacher Guide Lesson 19 for support in scaffolding instruction.

Students have multiple practice opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery.

  • In Theme 2, Lesson 8, Day 1, students identify words that have the r-controlled vowel ar. There is additional decoding practice opportunities to decode words with r-controlled vowel /ar/ar and high-frequency words in Decodable Book 7 “Mark the Star”. Students are grouped according to academic levels and are assigned a page from the Support Book (Below-Level), Practice Book (On-Level) and Challenge (Advanced). For students that are English Language Learners, the teacher clarifies any unfamiliar concepts and uses ELL Teacher Guide Lesson 8 for support in scaffolding instruction.
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 14, Day 5, students identify and read words with the VCCV pattern in two-syllable words, use /ur/ir, ur, er, ear to spell and write words, sort high-frequency words into columns according to the number of syllables and use proper phrasing when participating in Readers’ Theater with the text “Rain Forest Babies”. The Leveled Readers for this lesson include words with r-controlled vowel /ur/ir, ur, er, ear and high-frequency words. Students reread the selection and read groups of words that go together as phrases.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 23, Days 4-5, students have only two days to learn three prefixes mis-, re-, un-. In Day 4, the teacher introduces the three prefixes by showing each prefix in a word (misspell, redo, unhappy) and the teach defines the prefix. The teacher models decoding a longer word with refuel. In Guided Practice, the teacher writes made-up words on the board that have the three prefixes. “Guide children to identify the prefixes and blend the syllables to read each word.” In Independent Practice, the teacher displays Transparency R124, which has sentences. Students read the sentence aloud. In Day 5, the teacher reviews the prefixes with the following words: misread, restate, and unknown. In Guided Practice, the teacher writes the following words on the board: unkindly, unfriendly, misheard, rejoin, reread, misstep. Students help sort the words into one of two columns: Words with Prefix and Suffix and Words with Prefix only. For independent practice, students complete one of three worksheets based on their level (Below-Level, On-Level, Advanced).
  • In Theme 6, Lesson 27, Day 2, during vowel instruction, there is guidance provided to the teacher about helping the students. “Monitor Progress Vowel Variant /o/ aw, au(gh) IF children have difficulty building and reading words with the vowel variant /o/ aw, au(gh), THEN help them blend and read the words fault, sauce, crawl, and lawn. Small-Group Instruction, p. S14-15 Below-Level: Reteach On-Level: Reinforce Advanced: Extend”




Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Does Not Meet Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

Grade 1 Storytown instructional materials do not meet the expectations for building students' knowledge and vocabulary to support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Criterion 2a - 2h

4/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Each unit is organized around a central theme with a theme introduction entitled Build Theme Connections provided at the beginning rather than around topics. This section introduces the big idea or theme, and includes a poem and brief discussion. Unit themes are broad and do not focus on specific vocabulary or knowledge across daily lessons. Students are not supported in accessing texts and build conceptual knowledge throughout the five-week theme. The series of texts in each lesson are sometimes cohesive and related to the central theme, but there are limited opportunities embedded for students to build expertise on specific topics so that they can increase their knowledge and vocabulary.

Materials do not provide teachers with guidance to help connect the texts to broader concepts. Sufficient time is not always allotted for students to refine their knowledge in order to access and comprehend future complex texts proficiently.

Each Teacher’s Edition is divided into Themes, such as “Count on Me,” “Doing Your Best,” “Changing Times,” “Dream Big,” “Better Together,” and “Seek and Find.”

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

exts contain some questions requiring students to analyze key ideas and details, but do not provide students with frequent opportunity to study craft, structure and language. Students are asked questions during whole group instruction as the teacher monitors comprehension. Throughout the materials, students independently and as a whole group complete questions and tasks that require analysis of individual texts. Grade 2 comprehension skills and strategies include, but are not limited to, cause and effect, story structure, using graphic organizers, problems and solutions, drawing conclusions, and making inferences. Though the questions are presented that ask students about language, key ideas, details, craft and structure, questions are not presented in a coherent sequence that would require students to analzye to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 4, page T296, students supply a main idea and details for the text that they have read. For independent practice, students find the main idea of another passage.
  • In Theme 2, Lesson 7, page T132, students make predictions as a class in teacher led discussion. During independent practice, the students predict what will happen and add their predictions to the chart.
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 11, page T34, students identify the author’s purpose. The teacher helps students to provide reasons to support their answers. Students read the passage on page 325 and identify the type of writing. During independent practice, students determine the author’s purpose for writing the passage.
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 20, page T438, the class brainstorms a list of topics, words, and places that students would like to learn more about. The class uses the sources to find information to answer their questions. During independent practice, partners work together to find information for other ideas from the list.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Although text based questions do appear in the materials throughout the themes and lessons, there is lack of evidence that supports text-dependent questions systematically guiding students in extracting key meanings or ideas in the texts. The sequence of questions is sporadic and does not build towards a more coherent understanding and analysis.

Questions do not require the students to interact with the text supporting the student’s analysis of knowledge and ideas. Materials do not consistently guide teachers to support students’ literacy skills through complex text and building knowledge. There is a lack of text dependent questions as the questions require generalizations, predictions, and checks for comprehension.

The following questions do not require an analysis of ideas to complete:

  • In Theme 1, Lesson 3, Comprehension, Day 1, p. T216, the teacher is directed to “Guide children to identify the main idea and supporting details of “Frog and Toad All Year.”
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 12, Comprehension, Day 2, p. T152, the teacher is directed to “Guide children to use the graphic organizer to summarize the selection.”
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 17, Page T167, the teacher displays “The Drum” on page 31 and asks students to recall what they remember about it.
  • In Theme 6, Lesson 26, Page T29, the teacher and students discuss the story answer the question, “Why is the sweater Elva’s favorite sweater?”
  • In Theme 1, Lesson 2, Page T154, the teacher asks students to name the main characters in “Frog and Toad All Year.” The teacher displays the completed Transparency GOl. The teacher helps students to use the character chart to describe Frog and Toad and tell what they did in the story. The cards for “Frog and Toad All Year” can be used for retelling or as an aid for completing the graphic organizer.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Each Theme has a big idea that aims to tie the unit together. Texts and discussions, directly or loosely, connect to the big idea. Each Theme also includes a Theme Project. Theme Projects do not consistently integrate reading, writing, speaking, and listening, nor do they require close reading and comprehension of the texts read. Question sets that accompany texts within the Theme do not support students in integrating skills required for the Theme Project. For example:

  • In Theme 6, Teacher’s Edition, Page T457, Theme Wrap Up and Review, students complete a journey board game to demonstrate what they have learned in a creative way for a theme project presentation.
  • In Theme 4, Teacher’s Edition, Page T446, Theme Wrap Up and Review, students use questions through “Discuss the Literature” to guide them in making connections across the texts in the theme.
  • In Theme 3, Theme Wrap-up and Review, Page T434, students reflect on and write about what they have learned about growing and changing for the response option. As it relates to the self-assessment, students reflect on their progress by using the My Reading Log copying master on Teacher Resource Book page 64. In regards to literature critique circles, students meet in small groups to discuss and reflect on the literature in this theme. The teacher encourages students to share their likes and dislikes about the following: genres, subjects and topics, and illustrations or photographs. Students support their opinions with examples found in the selections. Additionally, students may use this time to provide book recommendations to classmates from their independent reading. Students may list titles for future reading.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

Some vocabulary is repeated in various contexts (before texts, in texts, etc.) and across multiple texts. Some attention is paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high value academic words, but the teacher will need to rework some lessons to assure this happening over the school year. Materials do not provide teacher guidance outlining a cohesive, year-long vocabulary development component. Some examples of vocabulary work in the materials include:

  • In Theme 2, Lesson 7, Page T129: Support word meaning with picture cards and other photos (example – playground).
  • In Theme 2, Lesson 7, Page T 193: Build Robust Vocabulary cumulative review; reinforce word meanings.
  • In Theme 4, Lesson 16, Page T145, the Robust Vocabulary Challenge provides directions to use vocabulary while talking to others.
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 11, Page T59, Build Robust Vocabulary, Words About the Selection, Teach/Model, Introduce Robust Vocabulary, the teacher uses routine card 3 to introduce the words. The teacher then puts the word in selection context, displays transparency R56, and reads the word along with the Student-Friendly Explanation. Students say the word with the teacher. The teacher uses the word in other contexts, and the students interact with the word’s meaning. The teacher removes the transparency, repeats the Student-Friendly Explanation, and asks students to name the word that goes with it. Examples include:
    • Select Context: Jamaica was renowned for her art.
    • Interact with Word Meaning: Would someone be renowned for doing something good, bad, or either? Explain.
    • Selection Context: Jamaica and her kin spend their evenings together.
    • Interact with Word Meaning: Would you be more likely to spend holidays with kin or with neighbors? Explain.
    • Selection Context: Jamaica created original drawings every day.
    • Interact with Word Meaning: Is something you write in class original or copied? Why?
    • Selection Context: Jamaica decided to adorn the subway station with art.
    • Interact with Word Meaning: Would you adorn your room with grass or with pictures?
  • In Theme 3, Lesson 12, Page T133, Build Robust Vocabulary, Words from the Read-Aloud, Teach/Model, Introduce Robust Vocabulary, the teacher uses Routine Card 3 to introduce the words. Examples include:
    • Selection Context: The cardboard box was recently added to a list of great toys.
    • Interact with Word Meaning: I finished a book recently. Would you recently have learned to fly a plane or learned to ride a bike?
    • Selection Context: The toy collection is housed at a museum.
    • Interact with Word Meaning: Paintings are housed at an art museum. What is housed at a zoo, a tiger or a horse?
    • Selection Context: The museum official thinks the cardboard box is a great toy.
    • Interact with Word Meaning: Who do you think is a school official, a crossing guard or the principal?
    • Selection Context: People can nominate their favorite toys online.
    • Interact with Word Meaning: Who would you nominate for class president, your best friend or a teacher?

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts. school year.

Writing instruction spans the whole school year, but materials do not always align to the standards for the grade level throughout the school year. This includes news (shared writing), poems (shared writing), story response (shared writing), and personal narrative (independent writing). There are language arts and shared writing connections that include listening, speaking, and words from the library books and interactive questions. Writing instruction does not support student growth in writing skills over the course of the school year and is disconnected from the context or theme within the lesson. Students utilize a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing that does not always narrate a single event or events.

  • In Theme 3, Lesson 11, Day 4, p. 21, the writing prompt provides the following instructions underneath: “Write a sentence to describe your progress on your narrative.”
  • In Theme 2, Teacher’s Edition, Lesson 8, Page T223, Writing Prompt: Retelling, the teacher is directed to ask students to write about a story that they would like to retell.
  • In Theme 4, Teacher’s Edition, Lesson 16, Page T77, students review a literature model and read “Mr. Putter and Tabby Write the Book.” Students draft a how-to paragraph that tells how to do or make something that they enjoy.
  • In Theme 6, Teacher’s Edition, Lesson 28, Page T259, Write a Paragraph, students write a paragraph with a main idea supported by following details of a collection that belongs to them, a family member, or friend. Students explain why this collection is important to them in the paragraph.
  • In Theme 5, Lesson 22, Page T191, students continue writing about their fantasy stories. Their stories contain a plot with a problem, important events, and a solution.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

There is evidence of students participating in shared research and writing projects. Projects support the topics of each theme in a sequenced way. The progression of research skills do not seem to build on each other and are disconnected. The only skills developed seem to be with speaking and listening as children are required to perform more difficult tasks in front of their peers. The projects represent a way for teachers to anchor the new theme and as an end cap for each unit to close the unit work out rather than capture skills mastered and knowledge learned. For example:

  • In Theme 1, Theme Project, Pet Handbooks, p. T12, the objective is “To research information; To organize and present information in a handbook.”
  • In Theme 1, Theme Wrap-Up and Review, p. T434, the teacher is directed to “Complete the graphic organizer to show information compiled from the selections children have read in this theme.”
  • In Theme 3, Theme Project, Then- and- Now Display, p. T12, the objective is “To gather information by interviewing and to organize and present information in a tabletop display.”
  • In Theme 3, Theme Wrap-Up and Review, p. T434, the teacher is directed to “Complete a graphic organizer to show information compiled from all the selections children have read and listened to in this theme.”
  • In Theme 5, Theme Project, School Community Mural, P. T12, the objective is “To gather information by taking notes To organize and present information.”
  • In Theme 5, Theme Wrap-Up and Review, p. T454, the teacher is directed to “Complete a graphic organizer to show information compiled from the selections children have read in this theme.”

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Opportunities for independent reading exist, but they are minimal and do not build students’ reading abilities or their knowledge base and vocabulary. Throughout the lessons, there is evidence of students reading with recordings and reading and responding in literacy centers. Students are expected to develop fluency by listening to familiar stories and reading them aloud. Documentation of student reading is not evident.

  • Theme 3, p. T3 lists two titles for self-selected reading.
  • There is no plan for accountability for students’ independent reading.
  • Each theme contains suggested titles for additional related reading by “Easy, Average, Challenge”; however, teachers are not given suggestions on how to set up the classroom library or how to help students select an independent reading book in the teacher edition.
  • Each anchor text has “Options for Reading” suggesting that below-level students read in small group, on-level students read in whole group or with a partner, and advanced students read independently.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Thu Apr 12 00:00:00 UTC 2018

Report Edition: 2008

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Storytown Student Edition Rolling Along Level 2-1 Grade 2 Rolling Along 978-0-1534-3173-9 Copyright: 2008 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008
Storytown Student Edition Blast Off! Level 2-2 Grade 2 Blast Off! 978-0-1534-3174-6 Copyright: 2008 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008
Storytown Teacher's Edition Rolling Along Level 2-1 Thm 1 Grade 2 Rolling Along 978-0-1535-3671-7 Copyright: 2008 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008
Storytown Teacher's Edition Rolling Along Level 2-1 Thm 2 Grade 2 Rolling Along 978-0-1535-3674-8 Copyright: 2008 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008
Storytown Teacher's Edition Rolling Along Level 2-1 Thm 3 Grade 2 Rolling Along 978-0-1535-3675-5 Copyright: 2008 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008
Storytown Teacher's Edition Blast Off! Level 2-2 Thm 4 Grade 2 Blast Off! 978-0-1535-3678-6 Copyright: 2008 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008
Storytown Teacher's Edition Blast Off! Level 2-2 Thm 5 Grade 2 Blast Off! 978-0-1535-3679-3 Copyright: 2008 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008
Storytown Teacher's Edition Blast Off! Level 2-2 Thm 6 Grade 2 Blast Off! 978-0-1535-3682-3 Copyright: 2008 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Storytown Reading Adventure Teacher Support Book Grade 2 978-0-5476-8562-5 Copyright: 2008 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2012
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Storytown Reading Adventure Student Magazine Grade 2 978-0-5476-8586-1 Copyright: 2008 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2012

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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