Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the expectations for alignment. The instructional materials do not meet the expectations of providing opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions about writing about texts to build strong literacy skills nor of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. Grade 1 materials provide partial support for foundational reading development and standards alignment. Materials partially meet the expectations of providing texts worthy of students’ time and attention.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
24
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
N/A
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Does Not Meet Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the expectations for text quality for complexity and alignment to the standards. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention. Questions are frequently literal and do not provide opportunities for rich and rigorous, evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Speaking and listening activities may need to be supported with extensions to dive deeper into the text. Focus on teaching protocols and modeling academic language are in place. Materials partially address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning during reading. Materials provide opportunities to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
8/20
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for including anchor texts that are of publishable quality, are worthy of especially careful reading and/or listening, and consider a range of student interests. Texts partially meet the text complexity and distribution criteria for the grade. Materials do not contain an accompanied text complexity analysis. Students engage in a range and volume of reading.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

The read-aloud modeled reading texts are of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading; however, other texts, including those found in shared reading and interactive reading are not high quality. The students spend the majority of the time in the program with interactive readers and these are the texts that the students do the most independent reading with, though the majority of these texts are not high quality. Examples of high quality texts include:

  • Theme 2: Pop’s Bridge by Eve Bunting. This text includes strong vocabulary and high interest characters to engage students.
  • Theme 4: Maui and the Sun by Gavin Bishop. This text has bright illustrations and and uses a trickster-hero to highly engage Grade 2 students.
  • Theme 11: Circles of the Season by Gerda Muller. This text has vibrant illustrations provide
  • Theme 15: I’m Growing by Aliki. This text is thought provoking and of high interest to Grade 2 students.

Many of the well-known anchor texts are only included as modeled reading in the teacher's edition. These are strictly read-alouds, where the students do not see the text or the illustrations. Many of the texts were written or rewritten for this curriculum series.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the expectations for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards.

Texts include a balanced mix of informational and literary texts. Each theme contains both informational and literary texts. Small group readers also contain both types of texts balanced equally for each level. Many texts are included, resulting in a wide distribution of genres and text types as required by the standards, including poetry, fairy tales, nonfiction, biographies, fables, dictionaries, encyclopedias, observation logs, procedural texts, interviews, question/answer texts, historical fiction, personal narratives, realistic fiction, fantasy, science fiction, social studies, photo essays, plays, songs and mysteries. However, the majority of texts are written in a narrative text structure. Students have few opportunities to read texts written in an informational text structure.

The following are examples of literature found within the instructional materials:

  • Theme 1: My Great-Aunt Arizona by Gloria Houston
  • Theme 2: Pop’s Bridge by Eve Bunting
  • Theme 3: The Missing Moon Mystery by Karen Lynn Williams
  • Theme 5: A City Is by Norman Rosten
  • Theme 9: Grace for President! by Kelly DiPucchio
  • Theme 10: City Green by DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan
  • Theme 14: Abuela’s Weave by Omar Castaneda

The following are examples of informational text found within the instructional materials:

  • Theme 3: Why Does the Moon Change Shape? by Isaac Asimov
  • Theme 4: Super Sun Science by Elizabeth Tarski
  • Theme 7: A Picture Book of Benjamin Franklin by David A. Adler
  • Theme 8: Presenting Amazing Magnets by Teresa Celsi
  • Theme 12: Breakfast Story by Lorraine Sintetos
  • Theme 14: Off to Work by Eric Christopher Mayer
  • Theme 16: Splash by Robert Kaufman

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task.

Read-aloud texts at Grade 2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently. Examples of text that are at appropriate level of complexity according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task include:

  • Theme 1: My Great Aunt Arizona by Gloria Houston (AD660L)
  • Theme 5: Where is Kitty by Houghton Harcourt Mifflin (AD520L)
  • Theme 6: The Armadillo from Amarillo by Lynne Cherry (AD790L)
  • Theme 7: Robot Cat by Jeanne Willis (450L)
  • Theme 11: The Great Watermelon Contest by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (520L)
  • Theme 13: Round and Round the Money Goes by Melvin and Gilda Berger (AD540L)

There are additional texts that also present ideas, vocabulary, and themes; however the tasks associated with these texts do not always allow the texts to align to the appropriate level of complexity. A teacher would need to adjust the associated task to meet grade level complexity expectations.

    Indicator 1d

    Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
    0/4
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    -
    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the expectations that the materials support students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

    The materials focus on skills for reading and the writing process such as introductions, sequencing, and reports. The skills are the main focus for the text. The text is not used as a focus for comprehension and does not support students' literacy skills over the course of the school year. Tools and graphic organizers are provided for the skill but not for comprehending text. Questions and tasks do not require students to use evidence from text to demonstrate understanding and to support their ideas about the text. The text does not become more intensive over the course of the school year. Leveled Readers are available at a variety of levels, from G to N, within the Small Group Reading Workshop. Students can read at their level , which is assessed and monitored by the teacher during Reading Workshop. The teacher has ability and authority to change the levels of his or her students based on their level. The texts do not employ questions and tasks that are text-specific and accurately address the analytical thinking required by the grade-level standards.
    Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • In Theme 1, students read, My Great Aunt Arizona by Gloria Houston. Students are introduced to making connections and Turn and Talk during listening to the text to discuss something that they enjoyed in the story. Throughout the week, students discuss making connections. An activity associated with this comprehension strategy uses a comprehension organizer of making connections with a Whole Class Chart. During the writing, students are working on learning about the writing process. The text is not used to accomplish these tasks.
    • In Theme 5, students read The Armadillo from Amarillo by Lynne Cherry. Students are introduced to inferring and fix-up strategies. They Turn and Talk during listening to the texts and discuss details that helped them understand what was taking place. Throughout the week, students discuss making connections. An activity associated with this comprehension strategy uses a comprehension organizer of making connections with a Whole Class Chart. During the writing, students are working on learning about the writing process. The text is not used to accomplish these tasks.
    • In Theme 13, students read, Round and Round the Money Goes by Melvin and Gilda Berger. Students are introduced to the skills of inferring cause and effect. Students Turn and Talk during listening to the text and discuss how they have used money and what effect it had. Throughout the week, students discuss making connections. An activity associated with this comprehension strategy uses a comprehension organizer of making connections with a Whole Class Chart. During the writing, students are working on learning about the writing process. The text is not used to accomplish this task. The tasks do not grow in sophistication throughout the year.

    Indicator 1e

    Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
    0/2
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    -
    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the expectations that anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and the series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.

    The publisher does not provide a rationale for the placement of the texts in Grade 2. There is no text complexity analysis provided. Quantitative and qualitative measures are not included, nor discussed in the instructional materials. The only rationale given is that the texts are chosen for the social studies and science content. The Program Overview states, “Whole class materials for Learning by Design feature fiction and nonfiction selections linked to science and social studies themes based on national standards for each grade level. The focus of instruction is on listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the context of content area themes.”

    Indicator 1f

    Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the expectations that support materials for the core texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading opportunities to help achieve grade level reading proficiency.

    Students engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines, as well as a volume of reading. During each theme, students interact with texts during teacher read-alouds, shared readings, and interactive readings. Leveled readers and decodable readers are also provided for small groups. Additional texts across a range of levels are provided in the Book Nook during Reading Workshop. Connect to Literature Books are also listed in the theme. For example, in Theme 5, Where People Live:

    • Read Aloud: A City Is by Norman Rosten
    • Shared Reading: Where is Kitty? by Patricia Curtis Pfitsch
    • Reading Workshop: Farm Life Long Ago by Tim Johnson ; Sailing to a New Land by Jenny Giles, Arctic Life by F. R. Robinson
    • Connect to Literature: The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton, Busy Busy Town by Richard Scarry, All the Places to Love by Patricia Machachlan

    Criterion 1g - 1n

    Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
    2/16
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    -
    Criterion Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Few questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, and do not build towards a culminating task that integrates skills. The instructional materials provide some opportunities for discussion that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary. The materials partially meet criteria for providing opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Materials partially meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for the grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

    Indicator 1g

    Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
    0/2
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    -
    Indicator Rating Details

    The materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

    Questions throughout the curriculum are largely personal connection questions, related to themes and events in the texts. During the modeled reading portion of each text, there are some focus questions that rely on the text for students to answer orally. There are comprehension questions after reading the text. In addition, comprehension questions are listed inside of the small group reading guides. Many of the questions prompt the students to compare a personal experience with something that happened in the text and are labeled in the Teacher’s Guide as Make Connections. The materials reviewed contain multiple questions and tasks that do not directly require to students ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. Though each text has comprehension questions listed, most of them are text-to-world questions and ask students to rely on their senses to create answers.

    Some questions are related directly to the text and others can be answered without exposure to the text. There are only a limited amount of text-dependent questions throughout the themes observed that require students to return to the text. Overall, the majority of questions, tasks, and assignments are not text-dependent. Examples of questions, tasks, and assignments include, but are not limited to:

    • In Themes 3, Lesson 3, students are provided with limited opportunities to delve inside the text. In the text, Seeds of Fortune by Brenda Parkes students are asked to connect with their prior knowledge. They respond to questions such as: Why do people work? Why is it important to save money?
    • In Theme 5, Lesson 1, under Modeled Reading, the focus questions include, “Listen to identify a part of a poem you really enjoy hearing. What do you like about the words in that part of the poem?” and “Which words help you create pictures in your mind of what it’s like to live in this city?”
    • In Theme 5, Lessons 5 in the poem, “My New Savings Account”, students answer questions such as, “What do you know about banks? Why might a person open a savings account at a bank.” The writing task does not directly connect with the text.
    • In Theme 14, Lesson 1, Abuela’s Weave by Omar Castaneda, students are asked “How do Esperanza’s feelings change during the text? What words help you understand how she feels at different times?”
    • In Theme 13, in the poem, “My New Savings Account”, students answers questions such as, "What do you know about banks? Why might a person open a savings account at a bank? How can you find a cause? How can you find an effect? Are some causes or effects more important than others?"

    Indicator 1h

    Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
    0/2
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    -
    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the expectation for the inclusion of sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination). The questions are primarily literal, recall in nature and are rarely sequenced into further, high-quality questions. The protocol is similar in each theme; students read the text, talk about it, complete a graphic organizer, learn an organizational pattern or form for writing, but lack opportunities to build to a culminating task. The instructional materials include a majority of turn and talk discussions about making a connection to the text but do not build towards a culminating task.

    There are no culminating activities at the end of each theme. Most questions are discussion based, rarely requiring students to write or work independently. There are some Enrichment Activities in the margin of the Comprehensive Teacher Guide that asks the students to do independent writing, and present their ideas and findings to the class. There is no teacher guidance for these activities. There are no culminating tasks or activities that provide a synthesis of texts, information, or skills taught throughout a theme, and no rubric is included for standard alignment or mastery. Culminating tasks do not relate to coherent sequences of text-based questions. A generic rubric for writing is provided in the Appendix, however, there is no reference to it in the curriculum for teachers to know to reference it. There is a separate assessment book, but these are a mix of multiple choice questions and extended response questions. These are not consistently text-based questions.

    Indicator 1i

    Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
    0/2
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    -
    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

    The Think Aloud! teacher modeling occurs in the first lesson of every theme. It includes modeling with specific listening skills such as active or precise listening. Then, students are asked to think about the focus questions prior to reading. Students answer the focus questions during turn and talk, with a partner after reading the text. Focus questions do not provide any indication of what answer the teacher should expect or guide the teacher to model the answer for the students.

    There are no protocols for evidence-based discussions. There is some modeling of speaking with correct syntax and academic vocabulary, but this is not consistent throughout materials. Throughout the curriculum, students have opportunities for turn and talks. However, these discussions are often not evidence-based. Students are asked to make connections they had while reading with a partner and/or to reflect on their application of the comprehension strategy. There is no evidence of the teacher modeling discussions or protocols. There is an explanation of the turn and talk model in the Comprehensive Teacher’s Guide Professional Handbook section (pg. T63), but there is no protocol or modeling of the structure for the students. The teacher is often instructed to say “Discuss with a partner...” but how to do this is not evident in the curriculum. There are not opportunities embedded in the curriculum for the teacher to model the use of academic vocabulary and syntax that are connected to a text.

    Indicator 1j

    Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
    0/2
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    -
    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

    There are few opportunities for students to practice their speaking and listening skills throughout the program. They are asked to share their thoughts about vocabulary words, parts of the text, personal text connections, and a few times, specific details from the text. In Lessons 1 and 2 of each theme, there is a modeled reading lesson that focuses on a listening skill. The five listening skills are discriminative listening, precise listening, strategic listening, critical listening, and appreciative listening. The teacher reads aloud the text and stops throughout to ask questions about the text, which are usually about connections, vocabulary words, and the reading strategy of the day. In addition, questions are asked before the text is read to build background knowledge and after the text is read. During the last lesson of each week, students participate in interactive reading where they answer questions with a partner. For example:

    • In Theme 5, Lesson 1, under the Build Reading Skills, on page 140, students are required to discuss the photos on Whole Class Charts and answer the following questions: “Where do you live? Is it a big city or small town? Where can you find tall buildings like the one in the larger picture?” The conversations lack facilitation, monitoring and instructional supports for teachers.
    • In Theme 5, Lesson 4, students have an opportunity to turn and talk. Students are to discuss, “How can you use what you already know to infer how Kitty feels about the city? “What can you infer about how Maria feels about the city? What makes you think that?”
    • In Theme 5, Lesson 8 on page 160 students are asked to think and respond during a turn and talk exercise. They are required to turn to their partners to discuss the prompts and to listen actively with the following questions: “How do you know information is important or unimportant? What steps do you take to determine if something is important?” The questions do not require evidence from the text.
    • In Theme 7, Lesson 5 on the Read and Comprehend Section, there is a “connect to prior knowledge” piece in every lesson that asks questions not related to the text such as “Why do people use cars?” and “If a car had feelings, how would it feel to be left sitting in a garage?”. These questions do not require students to engage with the text.
    • In Theme 7 Lesson 8, on the Read and Comprehend section, students are to “turn and talk” about the text by asking questions like “How did looking at the picture help me understand the story?” and “If there were no pictures, what other fix-up strategy might have helped?”. This type of questioning occurs in every lesson throughout this series.
    • In Theme 9, Lesson 2, during the Turn and Talk, students are required to tell their partner about a time when they said, “Thank you” and explain what the other person said. These types of questions do not encourage evidence-based discussions.
    • In Theme 11, Week 2, students discuss the photos on the Whole Class Chart on page 91 and answer evidence-based questions related to the photos. “What do you see in each picture? What does a corn seedling need to grow into a cornstalk?” Under Modeled Reading, on page 338, students respond to “Let’s read to find out how rice is grown. Listen for words that show how the author feels about rice.” The Think Aloud on page 342 has the teacher model asking questions, “In this part of the text, the author talks about how the green kernels contain a liquid that will harden and become rice. I ask myself, “Why does she want me to know this?” I think she wants me to know this information so that I understand…” Under Turn and Talk, students partner discuss, “Why did the author write this story?”

    Indicator 1k

    Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
    1/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects. Materials include process writing that covers a year’s worth of instruction, but lack on-demand writing pieces. Materials include short writing tasks within the process writing, but not longer writing tasks or projects. Opportunities for students to revise and edit are provided. Materials do not include digital resources.

    A writing resource guide is provided and regular writing experiences are present throughout the year. The writing resource guide includes writing organizers and writing craft lessons. The writing organizers are used during explicit writing instruction to model the prewriting process and provide exposure to all of the writing tools. Before students use the writing organizers, they participate in the shared writing process with teachers using writing charts. There is no evidence of on-demand writing opportunities. Examples of process writings include:

    Theme 3

    • In Lesson 1, under the Build Writing Skills section, page 75, students are instructed to identify some of the important ideas in Why Does the Moon Change Shape and discuss how these ideas are related. The teacher points out that each of these ideas are supported by details that describe it further and explains how the writer stays on topic.
    • In Lesson 3, under Build Writing Skills, page 83, materials instruct the teacher to discuss the mentor text, “Explain to children that The Missing Moon Mystery is a mystery. Help children identify its characters, setting, and plot elements in all stories. Then remind children that mysteries also have something to figure out, clues, and a solution. Discuss how these elements are present in the Big Book.”

    Theme 11

    • In Lessons 1-5 the Build Writing Skills section takes students through the entire writing process beginning with Sentence Fluency in Lessons 1-2 and ending with Compare and Contrast in Lessons 3-5.

    Theme 13

    • In Lessons 1-5, the Build Writing Skills section also takes students through the entire writing process beginning with publishing in Lessons 1 and 2, and then report writing in Lessons 3-5.

    Indicator 1l

    Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
    0/2
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    -
    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards.

    Materials provide multiple opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply different genres/modes/types of writing but they do not reflect the distribution required by the standards. In addition, materials provide opportunities for students/teachers to monitor progress in writing skills for a whole year’s use. Although students are given the opportunity to build their writing skills through writing forms each week, practicing different modes of writing is not evident. Each theme focuses on one genre or organizational structure. For example:

    • Theme 1: Organization: Sequence, Process: Introduction
    • Theme 2: Report, Trait: Introduction
    • Theme 3: Story, Trait: Ideas
    • Theme 4: Prewriting
    • Theme 5: Drafting
    • Theme 6: Trait: Organization
    • Theme 7: Letter, Trait: Voice
    • Theme 8: Revising
    • Theme 9: Poem, Editing
    • Theme 10: Trait: Word Choice Organization: Problem and Solution
    • Theme 11: Trait: Sentence Fluency Organization: Compare and Contrast
    • Theme 12: Report, Publishing
    • Theme 13: Story, Prewriting
    • Theme 14: Conventions
    • Theme 15: Organization: Cause and Effect, Trait: Presentation
    • Theme 16: Report

    Students are required to write daily; however, opinion writing is not included in the studied texts. Three Opinion Writing lessons are included in the Essential Resources booklet.

    • In Theme 2, Lesson 4, students learn about writing reports using the pictures from Writing Chart 5 during shared writing. Prompts such as “What do you like to do most with your family? or “Make a list of the jobs they do at home in order from the most enjoyed to the least” are used. If the student is ready to use an organizer to begin writing a report, then the teacher and child look at the child’s Writer’s Notebook for ideas for a report.
    • In Theme 7, Lesson 3, the Mentor Text, Robot-Cat is used to reference personal letters.
    • In Theme 7, Lesson 4, shared writing is completed through students writing a letter to a family member using the picture from Writing Chart 20.
    • In Theme 9, Lesson 3, the Mentor Text, Grace for President! is used to reference rhyming sentences to use in poems.
    • In Theme 9, Lesson 4, shared writing is completed with a poem about the picture from Writing Chart 26.

    Indicator 1m

    Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
    0/2
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    -
    Indicator Rating Details

    The materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level.

    There are few opportunities for evidence-based writing. There are a few writing prompts that require students to pull evidence from texts. Additionally, no explicit instruction provided. Students are not taught how to support their answers with evidence from the text. Writing tasks can often be answered without analysis of the text because the focus is more on the traits of writing verses understanding the topic or text. Many of the evidence-based questions are used as discussions, not when writing. For example, in Theme 1, Week 1, students learn about the five steps of the writing process. In Lesson 2, the teacher models thinking of a topic and then models going through the writing process. In Lesson 3, the text, “Asha in the Attic” is used to explain events in the order they occur. Then children focus on their own writing portfolios to draft one of their writings. The Theme Topic Prompts for Week 1 are about a bad day that turned out happy, or a time the student visited a relative or friend, making sure to put the events in order. The story for the week is called “My Great-Aunt Arizona”, but the writing task does not require students to produce evidence for their writing, or support recall of information.

    In Lesson 4, the mentor text is reviewed. The teacher discusses elements of sequencing; using words such as first, next, then, and finally. Then, students use shared writing to think of responses to organize their ideas with the pictures on Writing Chart 2, page 19. No recall of information, opinions, or evidence-based writing is included.

    In Theme 5, Week 1, students learn about drafting for the writing process. The story for the week is called “Where People Live”, but the writing task does not require students to produce evidence for their writing or support recall of information. In Lesson 4, the story “Where is Kitty? is used to discuss the problem and solution in a story. Then, students use shared writing to think of a problem and a solution to go along with the pictures on Writing Chart 14, page 151.

    Indicator 1n

    Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
    1/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

    Grade 2 materials address all of the language standards. The overall lesson format for each new skill is brief and repetitive and lack adequate scaffolding for students to achieve mastery. The grammar and conventions standards are taught out of a separate resource called the Writing Resource Guide. Additionally, grammar and convention standards are mainly taught out of context with limited opportunities for students to apply skills to their writing. The outline of grammar and convention lessons are not increasingly sophisticated in context.

    Materials include explicit instruction of all grammar and conventions standards for the grade level. Examples include:

    Students have the opportunities to use collective nouns. Examples include:

    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 10, students are introduced to collective nouns. The teacher creates a two-column chart. On the left side, the teacher writes the words: students, players, wolves, birds, cards. The teacher then asks probing questions to help fill-in the left side of the chart with a collective noun. For example: "What word can we use for a group of students?" Students then create illustrated flashcards for the words created on the chart. On the front of the card, students draw the people, animal, or thing that makes-up the group and on the back they write the collective noun.

    Students have the opportunities to form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns is not present. However students have the opportunities to differentiate between common and proper nouns.. Examples include:

    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 4, students learn about regular and irregular plural nouns. The teacher draws a two-column chart. The teacher writes the words: boy, bus, school, lunch, dog in the left column. Then, the teacher writes the plural form in the right side and has a student volunteer circle the -s/-es. Next, the teacher shares the definition of a irregular plural nouns and writes the words: feet, child, tooth, mouse sheep. The teacher guides children in stating the plural form of the words and records the answers in the right side of the column. Students then choose two regular and two irregular plural nouns and write sentences using the nouns.

    Students have the opportunities to form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs. Examples include:

    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 9, students learn the difference between past and present verbs. They underline present tense verbs working with a partner and past tense verbs using a blue crayon.
    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 10, students learn the following irregular verbs: see, give, come, run, go, do. The teacher draws a T-chart of Present Tense and Past Tense. The teacher shows how jump turns to jumped for past tense. The teacher shows how some verbs cannot just have -ed added. The teacher shows how see turns to saw. For partner practice, students copy sentences and change the first sentences to present tense and the second sentences to past tense.

    Students have the opportunities to use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified. Opportunities to use adverbs is not present. Examples include:

    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 13, students write a sentence with an adjective.
    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 14, students learn comparative and superlative adjectives. “An adjective that compares two things ends with the word part -er. An adjective that compares three or more things ends with the word part -est. Students copy a paragraph to circle comparative adjectives in blue and underline superlative adjectives in purple.
    • In the Writing Resources Guide, Theme 14, students compare adjectives and adverbs. The teacher first writes the nouns: ocean, school, plum, teacher on chart paper. Students provide sensory words to describe the nouns. The teacher records their words in red and tell students that these are adjectives because they describe a noun. Next, the teacher writes the verbs: walk, laugh, write, jump. The teacher provides examples such as: loudly, slowly, here, often. Students provide words to describe the verbs. The teacher records their descriptions in green marker and tells students these are examples of adverbs because they describe the verb.

    Students have the opportunities to produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound sentences. Examples include:

    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 15, students write and practice creating compound sentences joined with and. They connect two sentences with the word and.
    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 16, students learn to combine sentences to create compound sentences using but, so, or.

    Students have the opportunities to capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names. Examples include:

    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 5, students learn to capitalize places and holidays. The teacher shows students to capitalize holidays. Students select two proper nouns from the proper nouns holiday list and use each holiday correctly in a sentence. For learning places, students learn: “Some nouns are the names of specific people or places, such as [child’s name] and [store names].” Students do not learn to capitalize geographical names.
    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 6, students learn to capitalize product names.

    Students have the opportunities to use commas, in greetings and closings of letters. Examples include:

    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 7, students learn to write letters. Included in student learning is that personal letters contain: date, greeting, body, closing, and signature. In Lesson 5, students participate in shared writing and help the teacher write a letter. The teacher writes, "Dear Mom," on the board and circles the comma. The teacher tells students that a comma comes after the greeting in a letter. The teacher then explains that commas come after the closing as well and writes the examples: Love, Best, Sincerely,. Students then write a short letter to a friend remembering to use a comma in the greeting and closing.

    Students have the opportunities to use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives. Examples include:

    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 13, students learn to write contractions. The teacher shows do and not. The teacher explains how to make a contraction with do and not. The teacher removes a letter from the two words and adds an apostrophe to form the contraction, don’t. For independent practice, students write a contraction from a pair of words.

    Students have the opportunities to consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings. Examples include:

    • In the Essential Resource Guide, Theme 3, students learn to use the dictionary to check conventions.

    Students have opportunities to compare formal and informal language. For example:

    • In the Essential Resource Guide, Theme 7, students learn about formal and informal language. Then, students complete a worksheet changing informal language to formal language.

    Criterion 1o - 1t

    Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
    14/22
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    Criterion Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and multimodal practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2). Materials meet expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks. Materials meet the expectations that materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported. Materials partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills.

    Indicator 1o

    Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
    2/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Literacy by Design Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

    While students receive regular phonics instruction through the use of mini-lessons and a focus on word families, evidence of teaching some Grade 2 standards and skills are missing such as: common sound correspondences and opportunities to distinguish between long and short vowel sounds. Other skills missing include opportunities to show how to decode two syllable words. The teacher teaches two syllables words, but students do not apply the skill.

    Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words.

    • In Theme 1, Week 2, Lesson 6-10, Sharing Reading, short vowels are taught. In Lesson 7, the teacher reviews the short a sound. Students are to raise their hand if the word read aloud contains a short a. In Lesson 9, students see short-vowel words on the board such as cast, rent, sit, got, bun. In Theme 2, Week 1, Lessons 1-5, Modeled Reading, long vowels are addressed. In Lesson 5, students use letter tiles to create -ake, -ine, -oke, -ute words.
    • In Theme 2, students learn to spell words with inconsistent but common spelling-patterns. In Week 2, students learn to read and spell words with -ain, -ail-, and -ay rimes.
    • In Theme 3, Week 1, Lessons 1-5, Modeled Reading, vowel teams eed, ea, eat are taught. In Lesson 2, students, learn that ee stands for long e. The teacher informs students that ea makes the long e sound too. Students watch the teacher read pea and seat. In Theme 3, Week 2, Lessons 6-10, Shared Reading, vowel teams oa, ow are taught. In Lesson 6, during Connect Sounds and Symbols, students observe the teacher connect the sounds of oa and ow to the letters and words boat, tow.
    • In Theme 7, Lesson 1, Modeled Reading , the teacher introduces the au, aw and awn spelling patterns to students. “Write launch, draw, and lawn on the board. Point to and read the words aloud together. Underline the au, aw, or awn in each word. The letters au and aw stand for /aw/ the letters awn stand for /awn/. Write several words on the board and say them aloud together (Paul, dawn, saw, pause, lawn, jaw)”.
    • In Theme 13, prefixes and suffixes are taught. In Week 2, Lesson 6, students learn -ful, -less, -er, -ly. The teacher informs students that suffixes are added to the end of a word, and a suffix changes the meaning of the word. The teacher models adding -er to farm to form farmer. During Connect Sounds and Symbols, students point out the suffix in the following words farmer, useless, careful, slowly.

    Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application. Short vowel and digraphs are taught in Theme 1; however, short vowels and digraphs are a review from previous grade levels. R-controlled vowels are taught beginning in Theme 4. Prefixes and suffixes are taught beginning in Theme 13. While materials follow a cohesive sequence and skills increase in difficulty over the course of the school year, there is a lack of instruction in all phonics skills as required by the grade level standards.

    Indicator 1p

    Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Literacy by Design Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge and directionality (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

    In Grade 2, students have sufficient opportunities over the course of the school year to learn structures and features of text. These skills are addressed through both whole group lessons and small group guided reading lessons. Time is provided for the teacher to explain and model the skills using different text structures and features in stories. Focused instruction in these areas occurs during whole group instruction and can be reviewed in small group reading time.

    Students have frequent and adequate opportunities to identify text structures (e.g., main idea and details, sequence of events, problem and solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect). Examples include:

    • In Theme 1, Week 1, Lesson 4, students learn the organizational pattern of sequence. The teacher reviews the mentor text to remind students of sequence. The teacher displays Writing Chart 2 and writes the sequence on the chart.
    • In Theme 4, Week 1, Lesson 4, students learn the organizational pattern of main idea and details. The teacher uses the mentor text to review the purpose of main idea and details.
    • In Theme 13, Week 2, Lesson 10, students are re-taught Inter: Cause and Effect. The teacher states a cause such as forgetting to bring lunch to school, and students list possible effects.

    Materials include frequent and adequate lessons and activities about text features (e.g., title, byline, headings, table of contents, glossary, pictures, illustrations). Examples include:

    • In Theme 2, Week 2, Lesson 7, students learn about the Contents Page. The teacher explains that the contents page helps readers find where certain information is in the book. The teacher models locating information from the contents page.
    • In Theme 13, Week 2, Lesson 7, students learn about typographical cues. “Explain that these words are in bold print because the author thinks they are important and wants us to pay close attention to them.” Students look for examples of bold-faced and italic words in classroom books.
    • In Theme 14, Week 2, Lesson 7, the teacher introduces the use of a timeline in nonfiction text. “Explain to children that a timeline is a chart that lists years in order with important events that happened during those years.” The teacher then models using a time line.
    • In Theme 15, Week 1, Lesson 5, students learn how to read captions. The students find captions in "Splash!", and students discuss the information that captions provide.
    • In Theme 16, Week 2, Lesson 7, the teacher shows students the index from the Big Book. “The index helps us find information in a nonfiction book.” The teacher models using the index to find a topic, but students do not practice using an index.

    Indicator 1q

    Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Literacy by Design Grade 2 meet the criteria that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

    Grade 2 materials provide opportunities for students to purposefully read text, practice reading fluency, learn reading strategies, and learn to read irregularly spelled words. Fluency instruction is consistent over the course of the school year, through the use of Small Group reading lessons. These small group reading lessons also provide students with the opportunity to purposefully read on-level text. Reading strategies are labeled as Fix-up Strategies and are often modeled during shared read-aloud lessons. There are Focus on Fluency lessons that target skills such as phrasing, expression and punctuation. The purpose for reading each book is also clearly stated at the beginning of each reading lesson. There is online fluency practice and assessment available.

    Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read on-level text. Examples include:

    • Students read on level text over the course of the school year through use of the small group guided reading sets. These sets range in level from G-N and include a range of fiction and nonfiction titles. The purpose for reading each day is clearly stated at the beginning of each lesson.
    • In Theme 1, Week 1, Lesson 4, during Shared Reading, the teacher sets the purpose for reading. “Let’s reread Asha in the Attic and make connections to things we have done, read, seen, or heard before to help us understand the story.”
    • In Theme 8, Week 1, Lesson 4, during Shared Reading, the teacher sets the purpose for reading. “Let’s reread 'Presenting: Amazing Magnets' to check our understanding of what we read.”
    • In Theme 14, Week 1, Lesson 4, during Shared Reading, the teacher sets the purpose for reading. “Let’s reread 'Off to Work!' to see how looking at the pictures can help us understand more about what we are reading.”

    Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression. Examples include:

    • Fluency practice is addressed through Focus on Fluency portions included in each small group guided reading lesson.
    • In Theme 5, Week 2, Lesson 8, students learn to convey emotion and meaning in their fluency. The teacher models reading pages 4-5 of the Big Book with feelings and emotion. Students echo read the Big Book with the teacher and practice conveying emotion and meaning.
    • In Theme 7, Week 2, Lesson 8, students learn to use punctuation to inform meaning. Students echo read the Big Book with the teacher and practice using punctuation to convey meaning.
    • In Theme 15, Week 2, Lesson 8, students learn to convey emotion and meaning in their fluency. The teacher models reading the Big Book with feelings and emotion. Students echo read the Big Book with the teacher and practice conveying emotion and meaning.

    Materials support reading of texts with attention to reading strategies such as rereading, self-correction, and the use of context clues. Examples include:

    • Reading strategies, referred to as “Fix-up strategies” and are modeled during shared read-alouds throughout the school year.
    • In Theme 11, Week 2, Lesson 8, students learn to use visuals to help them create pictures in their mind. Students create pictures based on the Big Book reread. Students answer the following questions with a partner: “What pictures did you create in your mind as you listened? Why is it helpful to create pictures in your mind as you read?”
    • In Theme 14, Week 1, Lesson 2, students learn the use-fix-up strategy: picture. The teacher models how to look at pictures to help students understand the reading of words. “Review the thought bubble that indicates what the girl says to herself about how the pictures in the story can help her understand words she doesn’t know.” Students discuss the following questions: “What can you do when you don’t understand the meaning of something you just read? When you get stuck on a word or a sentence, how can looking at a picture help?”

    Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words. Examples include:

    • In Theme 1, Week 1, Lesson 3, students learn the following high-frequency words: our, hill, watch, sister, fun. Students spell the word aloud with the teacher, write the word on their own paper, and read the words to practice automaticity.
    • In Theme 2, Week 1, Lesson 3, students learn the following high-frequency words: I’ve, run, fell, fire, never. Students spell the word aloud with the teacher, write the word on their own paper, and read the words to practice automaticity.
    • In Theme 7, Week 1, Lesson 3, students learn the following high-frequency words: sometimes, paper, let, wasn’t, left. Students spell the word aloud with the teacher, write the word on their own paper, and read the words to practice automaticity.

    Indicator 1r

    Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
    2/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Literacy by Design Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

    Grade 2 materials provide students opportunities in word recognition and analysis skills. Skills are addressed on a regular basis through phonemic awareness lessons that accompany each small guided reading group book. Word recognition and analysis skills are also addressed through a spotlight on phonics portion of certain writing lessons over the course of the school year. Many of these writing lessons are also connected to mentor texts the teacher previously read aloud to the class. However, opportunities to practice word recognition and analysis are limited to repeated tasks, which do not require students to use in context application in the core lessons. The materials contain high frequency word activities, such as, writing words on index cards, reading the cards, and spelling the words on the cards, but students do not have the opportunity to read the words in context besides in Small Group Reading.

    Materials support students’ development of grade-level word recognition and analysis skills in connected text and tasks. Examples include:

    • Word recognition and analysis skills are taught during small guided reading group lessons through phonemic awareness lessons and activities that accompany each small guided reading group book. For example:
    • In Theme 3, Week 1, Lesson 2, the students place sticky notes under words with ea, eed, eat words in them. Students read the words as they place the sticky note under the word.
    • In Theme 5, Week 2, Lesson 7, students practice reading long vowel words, eer and ear. Students come up with other words after the teacher shares some examples with them.
    • In Theme 13, Week 2, Lesson 8, students practice the suffixes, -ful, -less, -er, and -ly. Students name and spell the word after they have defined what the word means.

    Materials provide frequent opportunities to read irregularly spelled words in connected text and tasks. Examples include:

    In the Small Group Reading Teacher’s Guide, Appendix, there are five high-frequency word activities.
    • Concentration requires two sets of high-frequency word cards. Students take turns flipping over the high-frequency word cards. Students match the identical high-frequency words.
    • Board Game requires a numbered spinner, button marker, and a “follow the path” grid. Students spin, move the number of spaces, read the high-frequency word, and use the word in context. If successful, the student’s marker stays on the space.
    • High-Frequency Bingo requires a set of high-frequency cards and bingo cards with grid. Students write random high-frequency words on the grid squares and play bingo in the typical manner.
    • Say It! Match It! requires two students each with a set of high-frequency words. Students turn cards over at the same time and if the words match, students shout “Match!”
    • Word Search requires a 5x5 boxed grid with a high-frequency word in each of the 25 boxes. A set of high-frequency cards must match the words in the grid. A student selects a card, reads the word, and places a marker on the grid to the matching word.
    • In Level G, Small Group Reading Teacher’s Guide, the teacher is provided with a list of high-frequency words: an, can’t, just, know, miss, next, other, please, read, sit, stop, take, tell, thank, work, yes. The teacher writes three of the words on chart paper and has students copy the words onto index cards. As the students read the text, they make tally marks each time they notice the high-frequency words.

    Lessons and activities provide students many opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. Examples include:

    • Word analysis and recognition skills are a regular part of writing instruction through the use of a Spotlight on Phonics portion of different writing lessons over the course of the school year. For example:
      • In Theme 7, Lesson 3, when learning about letter writing using the mentor text, "Robot-Cat", there is a Spotlight on Phonics lesson that focuses on the au, aw and awn vowel patterns. “Remind children that using phonics will help them spell words correctly. Review the sounds and spellings of au, aw and awn words they have learned. Write these words on the board. Ask children to think about with au, aw, and awn words they can use in their writing today.” After students have had a chance to write, the teacher asks, “What au, aw, and awn words did you use in today’s writing?”
      • In Theme 13, Lesson 3, when learning about story form using the mentor text, "Seeds of Fortune", there is a Spotlight on Phonics portion of the lessons that focuses on the prefix un-. “Remind children that knowing the meaning of prefixes will help them create new words to use in their writing. Review the meaning of the prefix un- and ask children to use un- words as they write independently today.” After students have had a chance to write the teacher asks the class, “Did you use the prefix un- in your prewriting today? If so, how?”
    • In each Theme and Week, there are decodable readers to be used in Day 2. In the margin of the lesson plans, there is a section called Decodable Book. For example:
      • in Theme 3, Week 1, Day 2, “Skills Masters pages 27-28 eed, ea, eat. Model how to cut and fold pages to make a book. Have children buddy reading the Decodable Book, "A Treat by the Sea". Circulate to provide support.”

    Indicator 1s

    Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
    2/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

    Grade 2 materials include a variety of assessment types that are given to students including phonics, writing, fluency, and benchmark book assessments in order to determine the student’s reading level. While there are a multitude of assessments that are available, there is not clear information on how a teacher should teach a student who is demonstrating skills below their grade level. The phonics assessments are completed in Lesson 1 of the small group lesson using the same methodology of the magnetic board. The assessment square tells a teacher to assess students in this skill but does provide information on what to do if a student is not proficient in that area. There are missed opportunities for assessments to provide the teacher with next steps. For example, the Fluency Assessment Rubric provides data to the teacher about students’ fluency, but no next steps or suggestions for what the teacher should do to help students make progress in fluency.

    Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills.

    • Rigby READS (Reading Evaluation and Diagnostic System) Forms A and B are used.
        • This provides teachers with information about students’ instructional levels.
        • It provides diagnostic data about strengths and developmental areas of phonics, phonemic awareness, and fluency.
        • The reports provide information about: small group placement, student comparison to grade-level expectation, and information about planning purposes.
    • Theme Progress Tests provide assessment of students’ level of mastery for phonics and word study. The mid-year and end-of-year tests are cumulative.
    • Fluency Software contains automatic calculation of words per minute.
    • In the Appendix of Small Group Reading Teacher’s Guide, there is a Fluency Assessment Rubric. There is a Fluency Assessment Tracking Form to track each student’s fluency progress.
    • In the Appendix of Small Group Reading Teacher’s Guide, there is an Oral Reading Record to analyze each student’s oral reading.

    Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding. Examples include:

    • The Fluency Assessment Rubric contains a 1-4 scale for each of the following categories: expression, accuracy, punctuation, phrasing, pace, comprehension. A table in the Small Group Reading Teacher’s Guide informs the teacher about the student grade level based on words per minute.

    Materials minimally support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in foundational skills. Examples include:

    • Theme Progress Tests provide a scoring rubric with the tested elements with re-teaching follow-ups.

    Indicator 1t

    Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
    2/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.

    In Grade 2 materials there are 64 leveled readers and 6 copies per set. Each leveled reader includes five pages of lesson plans with two days of instruction. There are 20 minutes for instruction time and 5-10 minutes of reflection time. Prior to reading the Leveled Readers, students practice phonemic awareness and phonics lessons. Weekly lessons provide multiple opportunities for students to learn and master a foundational skill such as short vowel sounds. The materials provide minimal guidance to a teacher as to how to differentiate the core lessons or small group lessons when students are struggling or understanding the foundational skill learning. There is a Skills Master that includes additional practice to extend lessons through decodable stories.

    Materials provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills. Examples include:

    • In the Small Group Reading Teacher’s Guide, struggling readers have the opportunity to access differentiated instruction of foundational skills such as phonemic awareness and phonics.
      • In Level I, Lesson 1, Phonemic Awareness/Phonics, students learn final blends nd and nt. The teacher explains a blend and uses the magnetic board to model nd and nt words.
    • In the Small Group Reading Teacher’s Guide, students on track and students ready for acceleration can access phonics instruction. There are different lessons with levels for students to learn foundational skills at their instructional level.
    • Integrated differentiation is in the core materials to help English language learners and struggling learners access the grade level content in reading and writing, but not necessarily with foundational skills in the core material and Comprehension Bridge and Writing Bridge.

    Materials provide minimal guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. Examples include:

    • While extra opportunities are provided in the Small Group Reading, the guidance provided to teachers for scaffolding and adapting the small group lesson is not detailed. For example:
      • In Level J, Lesson 2, the sidebar contains “Assess Progress Fluency as children read, listen to individuals to assess their use of punctuation. See page A31 of this guide for a Fluency Rubric” No guidance is provided as to how to adapt the Small Group Reading Lesson 2 Fluency based on the Fluency Rubric.

    Students have multiple practice opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery. Examples include:

    • Each week when a skill is covered, the skill taught every day during phonics instruction is also reviewed during a Spotlight on Phonics lesson during writing instruction.
    • In Theme 11, Week 2, students learn two consonant patterns: kn, wr. In Lesson 6, students learn some consonant patterns start with a silent first letter. The teacher writes kn on the board and models words that begin with kn /n/. In Lesson 7, students find words in text with kn and wr. In Lesson 8, students tell the letters that start the beginning /n/ in kneel, kneel, neat, knot, nut, knight, need.
    • In Small Group Reading Level L, Lesson 1, students listen to the teacher explain that some consonants are silent at the beginning of words such as k in kn. The teacher uses a magnetic board to model words with kn /n/ and wr /r/.

    Gateway Two

    Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

    Not Rated

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    Gateway Two Details
    Materials were not reviewed for Gateway Two because materials did not meet or partially meet expectations for Gateway One

    Criterion 2a - 2h

    Indicator 2a

    Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
    N/A

    Indicator 2b

    Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
    N/A

    Indicator 2c

    Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
    N/A

    Indicator 2d

    The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
    N/A

    Indicator 2e

    Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
    N/A

    Indicator 2f

    Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
    N/A

    Indicator 2g

    Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
    N/A

    Indicator 2h

    Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
    N/A

    Gateway Three

    Usability

    Not Rated

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    Gateway Three Details
    This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

    Criterion 3a - 3e

    Indicator 3a

    Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
    N/A

    Indicator 3b

    The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
    N/A

    Indicator 3c

    The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
    N/A

    Indicator 3d

    Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
    N/A

    Indicator 3e

    The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
    N/A

    Criterion 3f - 3j

    Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

    Indicator 3f

    Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
    N/A

    Indicator 3g

    Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
    N/A

    Indicator 3h

    Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
    N/A

    Indicator 3i

    Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
    N/A

    Indicator 3j

    Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
    N/A

    Criterion 3k - 3n

    Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

    Indicator 3k

    Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
    N/A

    Indicator 3l

    The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
    N/A

    Indicator 3l.i

    Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
    N/A

    Indicator 3l.ii

    Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
    N/A

    Indicator 3m

    Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
    N/A

    Indicator 3n

    Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
    N/A

    Criterion 3o - 3r

    Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

    Indicator 3o

    Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
    N/A

    Indicator 3p

    Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
    N/A

    Indicator 3q

    Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
    N/A

    Indicator 3r

    Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
    N/A

    Criterion 3s - 3v

    Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

    Indicator 3s

    Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
    N/A

    Indicator 3t

    Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
    N/A

    Indicator 3u

    Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
    N/A

    Indicator 3u.i

    Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
    N/A

    Indicator 3u.ii

    Materials can be easily customized for local use.
    N/A

    Indicator 3v

    Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
    N/A

    Additional Publication Details

    Report Published Date: Wed Dec 05 00:00:00 UTC 2018

    Report Edition: 2013

    Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
    Essential Resource Guide Grade 2 978-0-5477-2972-5 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Writing Resource Guides Grade 2 978-0-5477-3507-8 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Assessment Guide Grade 2 978-0-5477-4162-8 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Benchmark Book Evaluation Guide Grade 2 978-0-5477-4242-7 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Comprehension Organizers Grades K-2 978-0-5477-4246-5 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Comprehension Bridges Grade 2 978-0-5477-4252-6 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Skills Master Grade 2 978-0-5477-4267-0 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Writing Bridge Grade 2 978-0-5477-4273-1 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Interactive Writing Charts Grade 2 978-0-5477-4349-3 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Whole Class Charts Grade 2 978-0-5477-4354-7 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Whole Class Charts Grade 2 978-0-5477-4355-4 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Small Group Reading Teacher's Guide Complete Grade 2 978-0-5478-2405-5 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Whole Class Complete Package with Grade 2 978-0-5478-3687-4 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Small Group Complete Package with Grade 2 978-0-5478-3701-7 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Shared Reading & Phonics Complete Package with Grade 2 978-0-5478-3726-0 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Writing Chart Set Grade 2 978-0-5478-4856-3 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Benchmark Assessment Package Grade 2 978-0-5478-4873-0 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Whole Class Chart Set Grade 2 978-0-5478-4903-4 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Complete Comprehensive Teachers Guide Package Grade 2 978-0-5478-4995-9 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Small Group Teacher Resources Grade 2 978-0-5478-5179-2 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Comprehensive Teacher Resources Grade 2 978-0-5478-5305-5 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Shared R/P Teacher Resource Grade 2 978-0-5478-5562-2 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Common Core Correlation Booklet Grade 2 978-0-5478-6487-7 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
    Literacy by Design Teacher's Guide Small Group Reading Grade 2 978-1-4189-3302-9 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008
    Literacy by Design Comprehensive Teacher?s Guide Grade 2 978-1-4189-3308-1 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008

    About Publishers Responses

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    ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

    The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

    For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

    • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
    • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
    • Instructional Supports and Usability

    The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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