Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 partially met expectations for alignment to the CCSS. The instructional materials partially meet the expectations for Gateway 1 as they feature engaging texts, tasks and questions grounded in evidence, and opportunities for rich reading and literacy growth but inconsistently support speaking and listening. Writing support meets the requirements of the standards, although grammar and conventions lessons and practice are not always connected to the materials at hand in multiple contexts, and culminating tasks are of value but sometimes disconnected to the rich questions and reading that precede them. The instructional materials partially meet the expectations of Gateway 2 as they feature engaging and relevant texts and text sets organized around topics or themes to support students’ growing knowledge deeply but partially support students’ academic vocabulary development and growing integrated skills in literacy. Students are inconsistently asked to integrate their literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) into full culminating tasks, and support for students to learn and practice vocabulary to build knowledge as they read texts is minimal. The overall year-long plans and structures for writing and for research instruction are partially present, with inconsistent supports, and there is no year-long plan for independent reading.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
17
32
36
25
32-36
Meets Expectations
18-31
Partially Meets Expectations
0-17
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
16
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Partially Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The Grade 7 materials partially meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. Most questions and writing tasks are grounded in the text. Speaking and listening practice and application is inconsistently supported, and the teacher will have to supplement to provide full implementation and account for students who may struggle with minimal directions. Students do not have consistent opportunities to model the use of academic vocabulary in context. Writing support meets the requirements of the standards, with students practicing multiple modes and genres over the course of the school year, although there is minimal support for on-demand writing practice beyond small questions asked during and after reading. Writing process materials are present throughout the school year. Grammar and conventions lessons and practice are not always connected to the materials at hand in multiple contexts. Culminating tasks are of value but sometimes disconnected to the rich questions and reading that precede them.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
14/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 include texts that are are of high quality and engaging to students. The text sets reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards, offering a range and volume of reading for students to learn from. These texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task. Although most texts fall within the appropriate range for text complexity for Grade 7, the range of complexity is inconsistent considering the work over a whole school year's worth of instruction. Although the texts are rich, high quality, and rigorous, support for students' development in reading comprehension (oral or silent reading) is minimal. There are limited and inconsistent supports to ensure all students will be able to comprehend the materials at grade level.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

This instructional materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations for indicator 1a. Anchor texts are well-crafted and content rich, engaging students at the grade level for which they are placed. Students are exposed to themes and topics that are relevant and of interest to their lives. There are a total of six Collections throughout the Student Edition. Each Collection labels the core texts (read by all students) as “anchor texts.”

Some samples of anchor texts that support the high-quality expectations of this indicator include:

Collection 1:

  • Short Story, “Rogue Wave,” by Theodore Taylor - Theodore Taylor is the award winning author of The Cay, which is studied in many schools across the United States.
  • Greek Myth, “The Flight of Icarus,” retold by Sally Benson - This is the retelling of a famous Greek myth.
Collection 2:
  • Folk Tale, “The People Could Fly,” retold by Virginia Hamilton - This story is taken from Virginia Hamilton’s award winning book, The People Could Fly: American Black Folktales.
  • Drama, Sorry, Wrong Number, by Lucille Fletcher - This drama is found in the Common Core State Standards for ELA Appendix B: Text Exemplars under 6-8 Text Exemplars.

Collection 3:

  • Memoir, “from Mississippi Solo,” by Eddy Harris - This is from the book Mississippi Solo, which chronicles the author’s canoe trip down the length of the Mississippi River. Harris received the Missouri Governor’s Humanities Award for this book in 2004, and it was chosen as the 2003-2004 selection of Missouri ReadMOre, which is the statewide book-reading program.
  • Poems, “Ode to enchanted light,” by Pablo Neruda and “Sleeping in the Forest,” by Mary Oliver - Pablo Neruda won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1971, and his name is listed in the Common Core State Standards for ELA Appendix B. Mary Oliver won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1984.
Collection 4:
  • Speech, “Remarks at the Dedication of the Aerospace Medical Health Center,” by John F. Kennedy - Kennedy is well-known for his persuasive speeches, and students study the different aspects of an argument while reading this speech.

Collection 5:

  • Informational Text, “from Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century” by Jeanne E. Arnold - This book, Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century” was published in 2012, and was written by Jeanne E. Arnold who has a Ph. D. in Anthropology. It is a current text about the effect of television.
Collection 6:
  • History Writing, “from Flesh & Blood so Cheap: the Triangle Fire and Its Legacy,” by Albert Marrin and “from The Story of the Triangle Factory Fire,” by Zachary Kent - Albert Marrin is an award-winning author of juvenile non-fiction. Zachary Kent has written over fifty book for young adults. These pieces discuss a deadly disaster that occurred in New York City in 1911.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards for Grade 7, and therefore fully meet the criteria of indicator 1b. Instructional materials viewed meet expectations as they provide the distribution of text types and genres as required by the Grade 7 CCSS standards and when compared to the CCSS Appendices A and B. Materials across grade 7 include, but are not limited to: Stories, dramas, poems (narrative, lyrical, and sonnet), arguments, speeches, essays, documentaries, scientific articles, Greek myth, folk tale, film clip, online news article, and a TV news interview.

Some examples illustrating the distribution of text types and genres include the following selections:

Collection 1, “Bold Actions,” contains seven texts: four informational texts and three literary texts are located in the anthology; one informational and two literary are located in the Close Reader.

Informational:

  • “Parents of Rescued Teenage Sailor Abby Sunderland Accused of Risking Her Life,” Online News Article by Paul Harris
  • “Ship of Fools,” Editorial by Joanna Weiss
  • “Was Abby Too Young to Sail,” TV News Interview by CBS News
  • “Finding Your Everest,” Essay by Robert Medina
  • “Women in Aviation,” Informational text by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack

Literary:

  • “Rogue Wave,” Short Story by Theodore Taylor
  • “Big Things Come in Small Packages,” Short Story by Eleanora E. Tate
  • “The Flight of Icarus,” Greek Myth retold by Sally Benson
  • “Arachne,” Greek Myth retold by Olivia E. Coolidge
  • “Icarus’s Flight,” Poem by Stephen Dobyns

Collection 6, “Guided by a Cause,” contains 11 texts: four informational texts, one media, and two literary located in the anthology; three informational and one literary located in the Close Reader.

Informational:

  • “From Flesh & Blood So Cheap: The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy,” History Writing by Albert Marrin
  • “From The Story of the Triangle Factory Fire,” History Writing by Zachary Kent
  • “The Most Daring of [Our] Leaders,” History Writing by Lynne Olsen
  • “Speech from the Democratic National Convention,” Speech by John Lewis
  • “From Uprising,” Historical Novel by Margaret Peterson Haddix
  • “Craig Kielburger Reflects on Working Toward Peace,” Personal Essay by Craig Kielburger
  • “Difference Maker: John Bergmann and Popcorn Park,” Online Article by David Karas

Media:

  • “It Takes a Child,” Documentary directed by Judy Jackson

Literary:

  • “Doris is Coming,” Short Story by ZZ Packer
  • “A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long,” Poem by Nikki Giovanni
  • “Train Time,” Short Story by D’Arcy McNickle

Literary texts in the student edition and the Close Reader include short stories, poems, memoirs, dramas, myths, and folktales. Some examples include:

  • “Allied with Green,” Short Story by Naomi Shihab Nye
  • “Ode to enchanted light,” Poem by Pablo Neruda
  • “From Mississippi Solo,” Memoir by Eddy Harris
  • Sorry, Wrong Number, Drama by Lucille Fletcher
  • “The Flight of Icarus,” Greek Myth retold by Sally Benson
  • “The People Could Fly,” Folktale retold by Virginia Hamilton

Informational texts in the student edition and Close Reader include editorials, interviews, articles, essays, speeches, and historical writing. Some examples include:

  • “Ship of Fools,” Editorial by Joanna Weiss
  • “Was Abby Too Young to Sail?” TV News Interview by CBS News
  • “Magic and the Brain,” Magazine Article by Susana Martinez-Conde and Stephen L. Macknik
  • “Big Rocks’ Balancing Act,” Expository Essay by Douglas Fox
  • “Craig Kielburger Reflects on Working Toward Peace,” Personal Essay by Craig Kielburger
  • “Remarks at the Dedication of the Aerospace Medical Health Center,” Speech by John F. Kennedy
  • “Why Exploring the Ocean is Mankind’s Next Giant Leap,” Commentary by Phillippe Cousteau

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

This instructional materials for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations for indicator 1c. The majority of texts are at a high level according to quantitative measures, but qualitatively the texts fall into different areas. Some examples representative of the program include the following:

"Remarks at the Dedication of the Aerospace Medical Health Center," given by John F. Kennedy, is at a higher than middle school grade level -1380L. Out of four points each, this text is at 2 points for levels of meaning/purpose (more than one implied purpose and easily identified from the text), structure (organization of main ideas and details are complex, but clearly stated and generally sequential), and language conventionality and clarity (with some unfamiliar, academic or domain-specific words). Scoring at 3 of 4 points is the knowledge demands (with a greater specialized knowledge required of students).

"A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long," is a free verse poem that CCSS Appendix B states as being appropriate for middle school. With no Lexile level available, the levels of meaning/purpose (a single level of simple meaning-a single theme), or 1 out of 4, the structure at 3 of 4 (free verse, no particular patterns), the language conventionality and clarity at 2 of 4 (some figurative language), and the knowledge demands, at 2 of 4 (one or two references or allusions to other texts), seem accurate with the rigor needed for seventh graders.This collection partially meets the criteria for indicator 1c. Students need opportunities to stretch their reading abilities but also to experience the satisfaction and pleasure of easy, fluent reading within them, both of which the Standards allow for.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

This instructional materials for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations for indicator 1d. Although most texts fall within the guidance for quantitative measures found in the CCSS for middle school texts, the range of complexity seems to be inconsistent over the entire breadth of texts and does not lend to students engaging with increasing literacy skills over the course of a school year.

Some examples representative of how the materials may not support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year are found in the following examples:

  • Collection 1: “The Rogue Wave” is the first story and anchor text and has a Lexile of 980, which is on the low end of the 6-8 scale found in Appendix A of the Common Core State Standards, 955-1155. This is a short story written in third person about an adventure at sea. The story is high interest and follows two characters – Scoot and Sully, a sister and brother. The story shifts between Scoot battling to stay alive in the lower level, or galley, of the ship, and Sully not knowing if his sister was alive or dead. The main focus of the reading is understanding plot, conflict and setting. The conflicts are clearly shown with Scoot battling nature and Sully having an internal battle with his fear and doubt. This is an appropriate story with which to begin the year.
  • Collection 2: “The People Could Fly” is the first tale and anchor text in this collection and has a Lexile of 430, which is far below the low end of the 6-8 scale. This is a folk tale, so it is written with dialect and conversational language: “One such who could was an old man, call him Toby. And standin’ tall, yet afraid, was a young woman who once had wings. Call her Sarah” (HMH 7th Grade, Collection 2, 64). The main focus of the reading is understanding the elements of folk tales and summarizing the text. These are lower level skills paired with a lower level Lexile. Most often, a lower Lexile text will be paired with high level skills. This way a teacher knows comprehension is high and, thus, the student can work on a high-order thinking skills, e.g. analysis.
  • Collection 3: “from Mississippi Solo” is the first memoir and anchor text in this collection and has a Lexile of 830, which is below the low end of the 6-8 scale. This is memoir written in first person that describes a moment in the author’s life while he canoed by himself down the Mississippi River. The main focus of the reading is to understand what a memoir is and to analyze the meanings of words and phrases, specifically style, similes, metaphors and personification. These are higher level skills paired with an easier text, so this is fitting for a 7th grade student at the latter end of the first semester.
  • Collection 4: “Remarks at the Dedication of the Aerospace Medical Health Center” is the first speech and anchor text in this collection and has a Lexile of 1380, which is above the 6-8 scale. This speech has advanced vocabulary and will also require some knowledge of the 1960’s and the United States’ relationship with the Soviet Union at that time. The main focus of the reading is to trace and evaluate an argument, specifically the claim, support, reasons, evidence, and counterarguments. The students also need to evaluate whether the argument makes sense. Identifying the parts of the argument is the easier of the two tasks. Having the students evaluate how good the argument is will be more difficult, as the students will have to fully comprehend the speech and also know some of the background.
  • Collection 5: “from Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century” is the first informational and anchor text in this collection and has a Lexile of 1640, which is above the 6-8 scale. This is written in third-person and includes statistics, charts and information about television through the years. The main focus of the reading is to analyze the structure of a cause and effect text and look carefully at the graphic aids presented in the article. The students are to decipher what is the cause and the effects in this article. This is a medium level skill, but the text is very difficult, so students may struggle to comprehend, which will delay them being able to apply the skill.
  • Collection 6: “from Flesh & Blood So Cheap: the Triangle Fire and Its Legacy” and “from The Story of the Triangle Factory Fire” are the first anchor texts in this collection and are both history writing. “Flesh & Blood” has a Lexile of 900, which is below the 6-8 scale. “Triangle Factory” has a Lexile of 1110, which is toward the high end of the 6-8 scale. Both texts are written in third person with occasional first-person quotes or memories. The main focus of the reading is to analyze chronological order and compare the anchor texts. The first task is relatively easy as the students need to recognize that the piece is written in the order it happens. The second task asks students to analyze how the information is presented by looking at author’s perspective, specifically tone, point of view, direct statements, emphasis and portrayals. This is a more difficult skill, with one easier text and one more difficult. However, at the end of the school year, this is appropriate for 7th graders.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

This instructional materials for Grade 7 meets the criteria for indicator 1e. Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them meet requirements as each is accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

  • Each rubric has quantitative, qualitative and reader/task consideration.
  • For teachers who may choose to use materials out of HMH's recommended sequence, a clear and accurate analysis of grade level/complexity is provided to assist students in growing their literacy skills.
  • In the example on page 3A of the teacher’s edition, the Text Complexity Rubric is a valuable tool for teachers to watch the complexity increase (albeit inconsistently) in selections over the course of the school year.
  • The “Why this Text” feature is a nice addition; however, in this example and several others, the rationale is underdeveloped. Yes, students need to "read between the lines," but why this piece? What sets this piece apart? What are the components and nuances that make this text special for students? Other examples of this feature for different texts show slightly more depth, and some include a “Professional Development Podcast” on a skill that is particular to the text.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for 7th grade do not meet the criteria for indicator 1f. Over the course of the year, students are exposed to and read a range and volume of texts from long literary essays, to brief excerpts, informational text, drama, and poem. Rich texts are offered in the student edition and the Close Reader that cover and may extend reading experiences beyond the school year. However, the instructional materials do not address, or make clear, at what point students should engage in oral and/or silent reading of these texts. There is limited opportunity to support the teacher in tracking or gauging students' comprehension of these texts.

Materials do not provide explicit and systematic practice in both oral and silent reading across chapters/units and the whole school year. There is not a systematic mechanism for teachers and/or students to monitor progress toward comprehension of grade level texts by the end of the school year. Over the span of a year for 7th grade, the student has only three explicitly stated opportunities for oral reading. Explicit instruction for silent/independent reading is minimal; rather, there are general opportunities for silent reading that the teacher and student may infer. In the Student Edition, students are directed to "reread" lines from the text, supporting silent reading. Before each piece, the teacher is instructed to “Have the students read the background information.”

When looking at the Close Reader, one could choose to have students read the pieces independently. There are directions before each piece that lead one to think the pieces could be read independently: “Students should read this argument carefully all the way through” (HMH 7th Grade, Collection 4, 192c). However, the discussion questions throughout the Teacher Edition for these texts makes the reading appear to be led by the teacher and not independent.

There are limited and inconsistent opportunities for oral reading in the materials. The amount of instructional time allocated for students to develop oral reading skills is limited. Following are some examples of these opportunities:

  • Collection 1: After reading “Icarus’s Flight,” the “When Students Struggle” section of the Teacher’s Edition states: “Explain to students that reading a poem aloud often helps reveal the rhythm. Have students work in small groups to take turns reading the poem aloud to each other” (HMH 7th Grade, Collection 1, 40).
  • Collection 2: After reading “The People Could Fly,” there is a dramatic reading performance task: “With a small group, do a dramatic reading of ‘The People Could Fly,’ using the text of the folktale as a script” (HMH 7th Grade, Collection 2, 69).
  • Collection 3: After reading “from The Tempest,” there is a dramatic reading performance task: “Divide the lines of this soliloquy among the members of a small group so that each participant has several lines that express one idea or related ideas. Then, as a group deliver your version of the soliloquy to the class” (HMH 7th Grade, Collection 3, 148). No additional instruction is provided.
  • Collections 4, 5, and 6: provide no instructed opportunities for students to practice reading aloud.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
11/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 include many connections between texts and tasks. Most written questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the texts. This includes writing instruction, which engages students in writing multiple genres and modes over the course of the school year. Process writing practice and opportunities are embedded in each part of the school year. Although the tasks and questions connect to the texts, the larger culminating tasks inconsistently connect to the preceding question sequences and the texts being studied. On-demand writing opportunities are inconsistently supported over the course of the whole school year. Speaking and listening activities, while mostly evidence-focused, do not offer comprehensive support for accountability and using academic vocabulary in context. Implementation support for speaking and listening is minimal. Language instruction for grammar and conventions is present and organized, but infrequently embedded in the contexts of the texts or writing being produced.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 1g. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the texts. Questions draw the reader back into the text and support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year. The vast majority of tasks focus on central ideas and key details of the text, rather than superficial or peripheral aspects. Reading and writing (and speaking and listening) are done in a cohesive learning environment. Students read and reread to write and discuss. Students refer to how the textbooks' authors write as they write. The materials provide opportunities for evidence-based discussions and writing.

Within the anthology, each set of 6-7 questions that appear in the Analyzing the Text section all start with the global statement "support your responses with evidence from the text." which is italicized and highlighted. In addition, most questions draw the reader back to the text with references to lines from the text. "In lines 126-136...", "Reread lines 295-337", "Review lines 333-357", "Name a detail from the story that...", etc. This is consistent throughout the anthology.

  • The directions at the top of the set of questions say, “Cite Text evidence,” which is italicized and highlighted. This is a global emphasis/reminder.
  • Some questions have specific lines referenced such as, “Review lines 38-65.”
  • Students are not asked to think about their feelings or opinions.
  • In the Close Reader supplemental book, phrases such as "cite text evidence" or "continue to cite text evidence" "support your answer with explicit textual evidence" directions to "circle" and "underline" information in the text are often used.

Below are some examples of text-dependent questions and discussions after reading each text:

Collection 1:

  • “Reread lines 218-225. What inference can you make about Scoot’s personality, based on these lines?” (page 16).
  • “What text clues does the author provide to hint at the outcome of Icarus’s flight?” (page 36).
  • “Collaborative Discussion: According to the poet, what did Icarus really want? Do you think Icarus achieved? Discuss your ideas with a partner” (page 40).

Collection 2

  • “Reread the heading on page 83. Use the information in that section to explain what is meant by ‘the wired brain’” (page 86).
  • “Reread lines 1-7. What words or phrases describe time? What do these descriptions suggest about the story’s theme, the message about life or human nature?” (page 108).
  • “Collaborative Discussion: Why is Gilbert so interested in the dimension of time? Talk about your ideas with other group members. Discuss how time interacts with and changes Gilbert (page 106).

Collection 3:

“What feelings are suggested in lines 1-9 of this poem? How does the poet suggest those feelings?” (page 171).

“Collaborative Discussion: Read the first two lines of each poem and compare the images they present. What do these lines say about the speaker’s relationship to nature? Share your ideas with students in your class.” (page 172).

Collection 5:

  • “What elements of science fiction does the story ‘Earth (A Gift Shop)’ have?” (page 256).
  • “Reread lines 15-28. How and why did the juror’s viewpoint differ from that of angry citizens?” (page 278).
  • “Collaborative Discussion: How has the author combined fact and fiction in this novel excerpt? Talk about your ideas with other group members” (page 302).

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations of indicator 1h. The culminating tasks are always Performance tasks which incorporate reading, writing and speaking. Students draw on their reading and analysis of the collection's selections as well as additional research and the close reading skills gathered while working through each collection. They also direct students back to elements of the read texts to expand upon. In each collection, the introduction page tells students what the end performance task(s) will be. The disconnect is in the amount of the culminating task asking students to use the writing process to complete the task. There is no support in the anthology for student writing. To complete a performance task, students draw on their reading and analysis of the collection's selections as well as additional research. However, the skills identified in the "analyzing the text" section after each piece support students' close reading skills, but do not fully support student the culminating performance task which is most often a writing project. Culminating tasks are not wholly related to coherent sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks.

Throughout 7th grade, the students will complete the following performance tasks:

  • Write a short story
  • Write and present an oral commentary
  • Write an opinion essay
  • Write two expository essays
  • Write a memoir
  • Write a poetry analysis
  • Write and present a persuasive speech
  • Create a multimedia presentation
  • Write a personal essay

To complete a performance task, students draw on their reading and analysis of the Collection's selections as well as additional research. However, the skills identified in the "analyzing the text" section after each piece do not necessarily lead to the culminating performance task of a writing project.

Most of the performance tasks are tied to the elements and/or skills focused on during the reading of some of the pieces in the collections. For the most part, the text that students need to refer to is in the directions of the performance task. The one performance task that has no ties to any skills/elements in the collection is found in Collection 2. The Performance Task A is not related to the tasks or text-dependent questions. Culminating tasks are not wholly related to coherent sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks.

The following is a breakdown of how each collection connects the performance tasks to the texts:

Collection 1

  • The first performance task is to write a short story “. . . in which a main character or characters take bold actions in the face of a seemingly overwhelming challenge” (page 53). The elements discussed during and after each fictional selection are plot, setting, making inferences, myth, and determining theme. Some of these support the first performance task as they are elements of a short story.
  • The second performance task is to “draw from ‘The Flight of Icarus’ and other texts in the collection to prepare and present an oral commentary, or an expression of your opinion, about the rewards and risks associated with bold actions.” The elements discussed during the reading of the informational pieces are structure of a news report, editorials, fact vs. opinion, counterarguments, structure of a TV news interview, author’s purpose, citing evidence, and drawing conclusions. Some of these support the second performance task as they are elements of an opinion piece.

Collection 2

  • The first performance task is an opinion essay that has the students to consider “the common saying ‘seeing is believing’ and its meaning . . . draw from ‘The People Could Fly’ and other texts in the collection to write an essay that states and support your opinion” (page, 127). The literary and informational elements studied in this collection are folk tales, dialect, sonnet form, text features, audience, message, character, symbol, and drama. None of these elements will assist the students in writing an opinion essay.
  • The second performance task is an expository essay in which the students “. . . draw from Sorry, Wrong Number and ‘Another Place, Another Time’ to . . . explain how” a dramatic change in perception occurs” (page 131). The literary and informational elements studied in this collection are folk tales, dialect, sonnet form, text features, audience, message, character, symbol, and drama. The study of “character” and some of the discussion that occurs during the play will help students in completing this task, but most of the skills/elements taught in the collection do not lead to this performance task.

Collection 3

  • In Collection 3, Performance Task B, students write a poetry analysis essay. To prepare for the culminating task, student read two poems and are guided by the teacher to compare the two. After reading the poems, the students work in pairs to reread the first two lines of each poem and discuss each speaker's relationship to nature. There are guiding questions that ask the students to compare the poems. After rereading lines from each poem students are asked, "What similarities do you observe in the poets' use of language?" and "How do the images of light differ in these two poems?” Students are asked to write a poetry analysis essay on the two poems read in class; however, they have not written a literary analysis essay before this and the directions for this assignment do not direct them to any models of literary analysis essays. The knowledge need to complete this task has not been built during the collection and this Performance Task cannot be completed without extensive building of support by the teacher.

Collection 4

  • This collection has one performance task – give a persuasive speech. This performance task asks students to “draw from Kennedy’s speech and other texts in the collection to prepare and give a persuasive speech . . . to persuade others whether major exploration is worth the risk” (page 215). The literary and informational elements studied in this collection are author’s purpose, trace and evaluate an argument, sound reasoning, tone, cause and effect, paraphrasing, and extended metaphor. Many of these elements/skills will help students in their completion of a persuasive speech as they deal with opinion writing.

Collection 5

  • This collection has one performance task: create a multimedia presentation. Students are asked to research a topic related to consumerism and “draw from Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century, other texts in the collection and [their] own research findings to write an informative essay about the topic you chose. Then you will prepare and give a multimedia presentation on that topic” (page 259). The literary and informational elements studied in this collection are cause and effect, citing evidence, word choice (diction, tone and voice), inferences, poetry form, theme, science fiction and theme. The only elements that directly relate to this task are citing evidence. Not much else in this collection will help students succeed in completing this task.

Collection 6

  • The first performance task is to write an expository essay in which students “will do additional research about a topic or person related to the [Triangle Factory Fire]. [They] will draw from the texts in the collection and [their] research findings to write an expository essay about the topic or person [they] chose” (page 337). The literary and informational elements studied in this collection are central idea, chronological order, history writing, author’s perspective, point of view, historical fiction, personal essay, documentary, free verse, theme, character development, and flashback. None of these skills will help students with the structure of the expository essay; however, many of the elements/skills taught in this collection will help students with the research they need to complete
  • The second performance task is to write a personal essay in which students write “. . . about a cause that is important to [them]” (page 341). The literary and informational elements studied in this collection are central idea, chronological order, history writing, author’s perspective, point of view, historical fiction, personal essay, documentary, free verse, theme, character development, and flashback. Some of the elements and skills taught in this collection will support the students in writing their personal essay - specifically the section in which students learn about the personal essay.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 partially meet the requirements of indicator i. The materials provide some opportunities for evidence-based discussions and some use of modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax, although implementation in the classroom is not explicitly supported with guidance for misunderstandings nor with accountability. Students are reminded to apply vocabulary and think about syntax, but there is little follow through to ensure learning and growth in this area.

The materials support the use and practice with some academic vocabulary, providing frequent and repeated exposure to a limited list of 7th grade appropriate words (five words per collection); there is encouraged use of these words in each of the Collaborative Discussions and performance tasks (a sidebar next to the “Plan” section) throughout each collection. The teacher is prompted to pronounce each word aloud so students can hear the correct pronunciation. Practice with these words in context is limited. Protocols to engage students in developing their speaking and listening are minimally provided to support this work. There is minimal support for students who misunderstand the use of vocabulary and syntax.

The seventh page of each Collection's introduction lists Vocabulary Strategies that assist students, over the course of the year, in ways such as Latin suffixes, a Greek prefix (neuro-), reference aids, using context clues, prefixes, Greek roots, Latin roots, analogies, multiple meanings, and using a dictionary. These resources are not connected explicitly to students' speaking and listening tasks.

Treatment of academic vocabulary is patterned the same in each Collection. Following are some examples that represent how the program partially meets the expectation of this indicator over the year's worth of materials:

Collection 3

  • pg.148 – In small groups, students deliver a dramatic reading of the soliloquy. The directions tell the students to “discuss and analyze the Shakespearean vocabulary and sentence structure.” Then they will “use [their] analysis to rewrite Prospero’s soliloquy in [their] own words.” Guidance for the analysis of words or syntax is not provided. Finally, the group will “deliver [their] version of the soliloquy to the class.” No protocols for speaking and listening are provided.
  • pg. 152 - In a small groups, students discuss the author’s use of the word green. No protocols for speaking and listening are provided.
  • pg. 172 – In partners, students compare images in two poems and what they represent. Incorporating academic vocabulary in tandem with the task of identifying "imagery" is not included. No protocols for speaking and listening are provided.

Collection 5:

  • The first text in Collection 5, "from Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century" highlights two academic vocabulary words: technology and purchase.
  • "Critical Vocabulary" in this collection include: proliferation, municipal, taper, and precipitous.
  • Another text, "Always Wanting More," applies three academic vocabulary words: attitude, consume, and goal in the text. This shows how the words listed early in the collection are employed. However, when students are preparing to engage in speaking and listening with the texts, the modeling of academic vocabulary and practicing syntax has minimal support.
  • The directions for the culminating Performance Task for Collection 5, include a side bar notation in the Plan section stating, "As you plan and present, be sure to use the academic vocabulary words.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations for indicator 1j. Speaking and listening work assigned requires students to marshal evidence from texts and sources, but there are few directions and minimal support for implementation in the classroom. Few speaking opportunities are included in small group and class projects. The sections and lessons supporting speaking and language standards are present, but lacking directions and support for implementation in the classroom.

The materials do incorporate structured time in materials for speaking and listening. For example, each Collection begins with a "Connecting Word and Image" discussion which helps set the theme of the activities in which students will be involved.

Some speaking and listening components within assignments provided in the student and teacher edition include the following representative examples. In some cases, instruction on classroom implementation is minimal or absent, and in others, there is minimal connection to the texts being studied.

Collection 1

  • On page 42, the Performance Task is for students to create an oral response to the poem “Icarus’s Flight.” The directions given to the students for the presentation are to “make sure your points are clear and convincing. Use verbal and nonverbal techniques to enhance your points.” There is no rubric provided for this task to identify use of the texts nor the presentation/speaking techniques.
  • On page 57, Performance Task B is students presenting an oral commentary. There are three pages of instructions and a rubric to support the delivery of the oral commentary. Explicit connection to the texts being studied is less robust.

Collection 2

  • On page 69, after “The People Could Fly,” the Performance Task is for students in small groups to perform a dramatic reading using the text of the folk tale as a script. There is no rubric for this task to support students' connecting the task to the texts, nor for growing their speaking and presentation skills.
  • On page 92, after “Pavement Chalk Art,” the Performance Task is to create a poster. Part of the directions says to “present your completed flyer or poster to the other groups, explaining what you intend to communicate with it and how you accomplish that goal.” There is no rubric provided for this task.

Collection 3

  • On page 148, after “from The Tempest,” the Performance Task is to do a dramatic reading of the soliloquy in a small group. There is no rubric provided for this task, only directions to complete it.
  • On page 206, the Performance Task B is to write a narrative. Students are asked to present it and can choose to do it as an “author’s reading,” post it as a blog, or “dramatize [it] in a one-person show.” There are minimal supports for students to create these speaking and presenting opportunities.

Collection 4

  • On page 198, after “Why Exploring the Ocean is Mankind’s Next Giant Leap,” the Performance Task is to do an informal debate. There are four bullets of directions given; for example, “Listen well to any opponent’s points to help you prepare your responses.” Students are in a small groups and divide into two teams. There is no rubric provided with this task for either explicit connections to the text nor for the task itself.

Some speaking and listening opportunities do provide instruction and support (rubrics and extra guidance) for students to practice skills, although the connections to evidence in text is not consistently emphasized. Some examples of this include the following:

  • On page 215, the performance task is a persuasive speech. The textbook includes 1-1/2 pages of instruction on how to plan it (choose your position, gather information, do further research, organize your ideas, and consider your purpose and audience). The producing, revising, and presenting of the speech is the next page and a half (draft your speech, prepare visuals, practice your speech, evaluate your speech, and deliver your speech). There is a rubric provided with this task to support students' persuasive speaking.
  • On page 259, the Performance Task is to create a multimedia presentation. Students are given three pages of directions for this task. The directions for the presentation are to “finalize your multimedia presentation. Then choose a way to share it with your audience. Consider these options: Use your presentation to give a news report about your topic; Create and share a video recording of your presentation.” There is a rubric provided with this task.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations for indicator 1k. Materials include a mix of both on-demand and process writing; however, there is not enough to cover a year’s worth of instruction. The on-demand writing is only found in the Performance Assessment booklet. Although the longer writing pieces contain the instruction to have students revise and/or edit, the shorter writing pieces do not. The longer writing pieces contain rubrics, but the shorter pieces do not.

On-Demand

Productive writing is found in the “Performance Assessment” booklet, which is consumable. The tasks in this book are step by step culminating projects where students read multiple sources on the same topics, review models and respond by writing one of each over the span of the year.

The on-demand portion of the book is found in Unit 4: Mixed Practice. These are research simulations. Students write an argumentative, informative and literary analysis essay in a timed situation. The directions before each say, “There are two parts to most formal writing tests. Both parts of the tests are timed, so it’s important to use your limited time wisely” (HMH Collections Performance Assessment 7th).On-demand writing is assigned but not explicitly taught with instructional practice and frameworks for teachers to support students' growth.

Process Writing

Process writing occurs in both the textbook and the Performance Assessment booklet. The shorter writing pieces are found after each text in the main textbook in the “Performance Task” box. The longer writing pieces are found at the end of each collection in the textbook and in the Performance Assessment booklet.

The shorter writing pieces have very little direction for the students and/or teacher. There are few rubrics, graphic organizers or other supplemental material to help the teacher guide the student through the multiple processes of writing in the year long materials.

Below is an example of directions for a small process writing activity from Collection 5 on page 230:

  • Find out about a new development in TV technology and write about it in a brief informational essay.
  1. Use digital or print sources about consumer electronics to research your topic.
  2. Take notes as you try to answer questions like: Who invented this technology and when? How does it work? How could it change how people watch TVs? Why would consumers want to purchase it?
  3. Use your notes to create an outline of your ideas.
  4. Share your completed essay with a partner or group that has written about other new feature of TVs. Discuss the different features and consumers’ attitudes toward them.

Extended writing pieces occur at the end of the collection and have about four pages of directions for the student, one of which is the rubric. The directions for writing are broken down into four steps: plan, produce, revise and present. Each step takes up approximately half of a page of the student edition; the plan step is the exception as those directions usually cover an entire page. The teacher’s edition has a small paragraph for each step that has the teacher remind or explain something to the student about that step in the process. Below is an example from Collection 2, page 127-129:

Assignment - Write an opinion essay in which you state whether or not you believe the saying, “seeing is believing” is true.

  • Plan:
    • Form an Opinion – Revisit the texts in the collection. Consider your answers to the following questions as you form your opinion: How do the characters or people perceive the things that happen? Why do the characters or people perceive things the way they do?
    • How does this information relate to the meaning of the saying “seeing is believing”
  • Gather Information – Focus on the selection(s) that have information you can cite to support your opinion.
  • Organize Your Ideas - Think about how you will organize your ideas. A graphic organizer, such as a hierarchy chart, can help you to present your ideas logically. [underneath this in the book is an example of a chart]
  • Consider Your Purpose and Audience - Think about who will read or listen to your essay. What do you want them to understand? What ideas, reasons, or evidence will be most convincing to them? Keep these questions and your answers in mind as you prepare to write.

Extended process writing is also found in the Performance Assessment booklet in Units 1, 2, and 3. Directions for the writing in this booklet walks the students through a close reading of two texts. After reading, step one has the students answer multiple choice questions that will help them in writing the essay. In step two, students answer “Prose Constructed-Response” questions to get them thinking about the topic. Step three includes a graphic organizer to help the students finalize their plan for their essay. Step four is a bulleted list for students to think about while they draft their essay. Step five is a revision checklist so students can self-evaluate their writing. Step six is a revision checklist for a peer to edit their paper. The last step is for students to turn in the final draft of their essay.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 fully meet the criteria for indicator 1L. Materials provide multiple opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Students are writing literary and expository essays, poems, analysis, a play, an argumentative speech argumentative, and narrative and informative pieces. Students are also required to do short research projects and gather evidence from multiple sources. The instructional materials include opportunities for students to write in all modes required by the Common Core Standards for grade 7: argumentative, narrative, and informative.

Where appropriate, writing opportunities are connected to texts and/or text sets (either as prompts, models, anchors, or supports). The Performance Assessment consumable booklets provide anchors and models prior to students writing on their own. The mini and culminating performance tasks are all modeled through the texts they read.

Examples of different writing opportunities in the materials include:

  • Shorter Process Writing:
    • Collection 1 – movie outline, blog, report
    • Collection 2 – character profile, character analysis
    • Collection 3 – analysis, essay, poem
    • Collection 4 – research report, persuasive essay, analysis
    • Collection 5 – essay, analysis, short story
    • Collection 6 – new chapter, critique, poem, character analysis
  • Longer Process Writing
    • Collection 1 – short story and oral commentary
    • Collection 2 – opinion essay and expository essay
    • Collection 3 – memoir and poetry analysis
    • Collection 4 - argument in a speech
    • Collection 5 – create a multimedia presentation
    • Collection 6 – expository essay and personal essay

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 1m. Students are consistently prompted back to models and texts for evidence when writing. Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. Students are frequently asked to prove their claims with evidence from the text, from "Analyzing the Text" questions all the way up to Performance Tasks.

Students are consistently prompted back to models and texts for evidence when writing. Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. Students are frequently asked to prove their claims with evidence from the text, from "Analyzing the Text" questions to Performance Tasks.

Some examples include:

  • Collection 2: students write an opinion essay stating whether they believe the saying, “seeing is believing” is true. Instructions tell the students to “draw from ‘The People Could Fly” and other texts in the collection to write an essay that states and supports your opinion.”
  • Collection 3: students write a poetry analysis essay using “Ode to enchanted light” and “Sleeping in the Forest.”
  • Collection 5: students create a multimedia presentation drawing “from Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century, and other texts in the collection . . . .”

Overall:

  • Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence.
  • Writing opportunities are focused around student analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources
  • Materials provide opportunities that build students’ writing skills over the course of the school year.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations of indicator 1n. Materials include some explicit instruction of grammar and convention standards, but grammar and convention instruction is not provided in a sequence of increasingly sophisticated contexts over the course of the year. There are opportunities for students to demonstrate some application of skills in context, but they are infrequent. While there are pages dedicated to the grammar standards for this grade level, and definitions/examples are provided along with practice sentences, the Student Edition does not provide explicit instruction on how to execute the skill. After each piece in the Collection, there is a “Critical Vocabulary, Vocabulary Strategy, and Language Conventions” section. The skills practiced go along with the piece that students just read. While these sections use sentences from the selection as examples, this language practice is still done out of context.

The following are the list of language and style skills covered in all of the collections:

  • Collection 1: Sentence Structure; Commas and Coordinate Adjectives; Subordinate Clauses
  • Collection 2: Adverb Clauses; Spell Correctly
  • Collection 3: Precise Language; Sentence Structure; Prepositional Phrases
  • Collection 4: Capitalization; Adjective Clauses; Verbal Phrases
  • Collection 5: Eliminate Redundancy; Noun Clauses; Spelling
  • Collection 6: Capitalization; Phrases; Dangling Modifiers; Combining Sentences and Phrases; Misplaced Modifiers

These skills match the skills listed in the Common Core State Standards for Language Grade 7 under L1, L2, and L3. Below is more in-depth look at the grammar covered in anchor texts of different Collections. These examples are representative of the year-long program's treatment of these skills and concepts:

Collection 1 - pg.38 – “Language Conventions: Commas and Coordinate Adjectives” paired with “The Flight of Icarus” -

  • A definition of what students are working on is included - “Writers use adjectives to modify, or describe nouns. Often a writer will use more than one adjective to modify the same noun, such as in this phrase from ‘The Flight of Icarus’: one clear, wind-swept morning. Notice that the adjectives clear and wind-swept are separated by a comma. These are called coordinate adjectives, adjectives of equal effect that modify the same noun.”
  • Then another example from the story is included along with six examples showing when a comma is needed and when it is not.
  • After some more explanation, students are given a paragraph in the Practice and Apply section: “Find the nouns sun, wings, hair, eyes, and bird in this sentence from ‘The Flight of Icarus.’ Write two coordinate adjectives to describe each noun, using commas where needed. Consult resources such as a print or online dictionary for words that are unfamiliar to you.”
    • Icarus, standing in the bright sun, the shining wings dropping gracefully from his shoulders, his golden hair wet with spray, and his eyes bright and dark with excitement, looked like a lovely bird.
  • Collection 4 - pg. 212 - “Language Conventions: Verbal Phrases” paired with “from Living in the Dark”
    • A definition of what students are working on is included - “A verbal is a verb form that is used as a noun, and adjective, or an adverb. An infinitive is a verbal that begins with to and has the base form of a verb.”
    • Then there are three example sentences with explanation: “Our plan is to sail. (The infinitive acts like a noun and tells what our plan is.)”
    • Then a verbal phrase is defined: “A verbal phrase is made of a verbal and any other words that complete its meaning. The infinitive phrase is underlined in each of these sentences.” There are three more examples: “Our plan is to sale tomorrow.”
    • After a few more sentences of explanation, five practice sentences in the Practice and Apply section are included. These sentences are not from the anchor text: “Add an infinitive phrase to answer the question and complete a sentence using the words. Refer to the excerpt from ‘Living in the Dark’ for ideas to include.”
      • deep-sea scientists want (What do they want?)
      • fish of the deep sea have extra-large eyes (Why do they have such eyes?)
      • crabs and shrimp come to the ocean floor (Why do they come?)
      • scientists need equipment (What kind of equipment?)
      • the goal of a deep-sea expedition (What is the goal?)

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations of Gateway 2: Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks. Texts and text sets are organized around topics or themes to support students’ growing knowledge deeply. Topics and themes are relevant and engaging to students, and writing and speaking tasks are connected to the themes shared. The materials partially support students’ academic vocabulary development and growing integrated skills in literacy. There are some questions and tasks that grow students’ knowledge of some literary terms, but the practice in this area focuses mostly on surface elements of the text and text features, rather than diving deeply into the text. Students may miss opoportunities to develop and extend their knowledge of the topics or themes without more guidance and support from the teacher. Students have some opportunities to think critically and analyze concepts across multiple texts, but these opportunities are inconsistent and not explicitly engaged over the whole school year. Additionally, students are inconsistently asked to integrate their literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) into full culminating tasks. Frequently, culminating tasks focus on only one skill or do not require students to incorporate the text itself to complete the task. Other tasks have connections that are weak and/or missing instructional supports for the teacher to attend to misunderstandings. Academic vocabulary structures are in place, but support for students to learn and practice this vocabulary to build knowledge as they read texts is minimal. The overall year-long plans and structures for writing and for research instruction are partially present, with inconsistent supports. The writing instruction, while it does have key components, does not support students’ increasing skills over the year. Research skills are not taught in a progression of focused projects over the course of the school year. Overall, the materials partially build knowledge through integration of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language activities as they learn about topics and themes. To wholly ensure students’ growing literacy skills, the teacher will need to provide supplementary support and more focused attention on building strong academic vocabulary. There is no year-long independent reading plan.

Criterion 2a - 2h

16/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 2a. Anchor texts are organized around appropriate topic(s), and more commonly theme, to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently at grade level. Students read different kinds of texts focused on the same themes and topics, building content knowledge of that topic/theme by the end of each respective unit. Page T13 in the teacher editions contains a “Topical Organization” box explaining how “Each collection reflects an engaging topic that connects selections for discussion and analysis, so students can explore several dimensions of the topic.”

Collection 1: Bold Actions - students read about the consequences of positive and negative risk taking. Samples from the text selections include:

  • "Rogue Wave" is an adventure story about a cutter-rigged sailboat caught in a killer wave
  • Following this anchor text, student engage in other informational news stories about the same event from various sources about a teenage sailor, Abby Sunderland, and the risks she took with sailing.
  • Also, the well-known Greek Myth, "The Flight of Icarus," retold by Sally Benson.
  • Students will then follow up with a poem, "Icarus's Flight," and "Women in Aviation."

Collection 2: Perception and Reality – students read texts illustrating how perspective influences perception of events and topics. Samples from the text selections include:

  • The folk tale "The People Could Fly," retold by Virginia Hamilton, is an African American historical telling of the millions of Africans who were taken forcibly to the Americas as enslaved people and their labor's influence on America.
  • This is followed by a paired set: "The Song of Wandering Aengus," by W.B. Yeats and "Sonnet 43" by Shakespeare. Both describe the speaker's own emotional state as they long for an absent loved one.
  • Two additional texts introduce how the brain works and perceptions and illusions that can take place.
  • Finally, a drama by Lucille Fletcher, "Sorry, Wrong Number" is the second anchor texts for this collection, which takes students back to a time when operators connected phone lines; introducing them to solving a mystery overheard through crossed wires.

Collection 3: Nature at Work – students study about the natural world. Samples from the text selections include:

  • The only anchor text in this collection is Mississippi Solo, a memoir by Eddy Harris. This story follows a 2,300 mile journey from Lake Itasca in Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico.
  • It is followed by Shakespeare's The Tempest (a powerful storm).
  • "Allied with Green" is a short story focusing on the imagery of everything living and green, and "Big Rocks' Balancing Act" is an informational piece about unique rock formations.
  • The paired poems "Ode to Enchanted Light" and "Sleeping in the Forest" capture beauty and awe of nature.

Collection 4: Risk and Exploration – Texts focus on exploration of uncharted areas. Samples from the text selections include:

  • This collection starts with the anchor text "Remarks at the Dedications of the Aerospace Medical Health Center," a speech by John F. Kennedy.
  • This is followed by two more informational essay and commentary about space: "Is Space Explorations Worth the Cost?"
  • This collection then expands to the opposite extension of our world, the ocean with "Why Exploring the Ocean is Mankind's Next Giant Leap," "Living in the Dark," and Close Reader " Stinging Tentacles Offer Hint of Oceans' Decline."

Collection 5: The Stuff of Consumer Culture – students read about consumerism and consider current culture. Samples from the text selections include:

  • The only anchor text is "Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century," an excerpt about a team of archaeologists uncovering information about television.
  • "Teenagers and New Technology" is about the start of Facebook and the first text ever sent.
  • "Always Wanting More" from I Want That, "Labels and Illusions" are included.
  • The two paired poems are "Dump" and "How Things Work."

Collection 6: Guided by a Cause – the collection focuses on advocacy for system changes in different settings. Samples from the text selections include:

  • The first anchor text, " Flesh & Blood So Cheap: The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy," and from "The Story of the Triangle Factory Fire," a deadly disaster in New York City and its long-term effects.
  • This is followed by an historical piece from Uprising, a fictional excerpt based on the real life event of the Triangle Factory Fire.
  • The second anchor text is a personal essay by Craig Kielburger who at the age of 12 founded Free the Children, "Craig Kielburger Reflects on Working Toward Peace," and a documentary "It Takes a Child" which was written about Kielburger.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 7 partially meet the criteria for indicator 2b. Materials contain sets of questions and tasks, but they inconsistently require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in a coherent sequence related to the standards. Over the course of the year, instructional materials and identified elements stay consistent and do not grow in rigor from early in the year (considering smaller components) to being more embedded in student work at the end of the year. There are limited rubrics and scoring guides for students to work with the specifics of text components as they grow their understanding of topic and theme. Focus on academic vocabulary that grows knowledge beyond literary terms is inconsistently applied.

At the beginning of each text, there is a “Why this Text?” box which includes a lesson focus for that text. Underneath this box, is the “Key Learning Objective.” Each text has guided discussions in the margins of the teacher edition. These discussions focus around two or three key skills. Each text also has a set of analysis questions at the end where students typically answer five to eight questions, each with a specific target. Each set of analysis questions that accompany individual texts start with the global phrase "Cite Text Evidence – Support your responses with evidence from the text." Sections that refocus students include "Analyzing the Text Questions After Reading." Most of the analyzing the text questions deal with story elements, aligning with the key focus. Margin Discussions, employed throughout the materials, prompt students to analyze components and identify key details and structure and craft elements.

Over the course of the year instructional materials and identified elements are inconsistent and do not grow in rigor from early in the year to being more embedded in student work at the end of the year. There are few supports for teachers to identify and account for students' abilities in analyzing these elements.

There is an outline provided that indicates at what point students will practice analyzing different components of the texts. For example, according to these overviews, the following skills will be covered (examples include some but not all indicated components of study):

Collection 1 : The student will be able to:

  • Identify, analyze, and make inferences about the elements of plot in a short story
  • Analyze the elements of a myth and to determine two or more themes
  • Understand how the elements of form and the use of alliteration emphasize ideas and meaning in a poem.
  • Identify, analyze and draw conclusions about an author’s purpose for writing informational texts.

Collection 3: Students will be able to:

  • Identify features of a memoir and analyze the author’s style.
  • Identify elements of Shakespearean language, interpret meaning, and analyze a soliloquy.
  • Determine the theme of a short story and to analyze word choice and style.
  • Analyze poetic form and learn how poets use figurative language to express feelings and ideas.

Collection 4: The student will be able to:

  • Identify tone and evaluate the reasoning used to support a claim
  • Analyze the structure of an informational text and paraphrase central ideas and details
  • Identify and analyze how imagery and extended metaphor can express a particular message or idea.

There are places in the materials where students encounter specific analysis questions that meet the expectation of this indicator, but they are not consistently placed across the year's worth of materials. Examples are similar to:

  • From Collection 3: “Under the heading ‘Sunburned Rock,’ examine lines 119-130. What pattern of organization is evident in these paragraphs? What details help you to recognize it?” (page 166).
  • From Collection 4: “What does the speaker mean when she says, ‘I battered the cordons around me’?” (page 214).
Below is specific evidence from two anchor texts that are representative of how the materials partially meet the expectations of this indicator:

"Rogue Wave" by Theodore Taylor. Lesson Focus: Analyzing Story Elements; Key Learning Objective: "The student will be able to identify, analyze, and make inferences about the elements of plot in a short story."

Example Questions While Reading:

  • "Reread lines 1-10. Why might the author include this information?"
  • "What makes the setting a potentially dangerous place?"
  • "Use textual evidence to support an inference about Sully's abilities as a sailor."
  • "Use textual evidence to identify the external conflict."
  • "Explain how these two settings now impact the plot."
  • "Identify evidence in the text that suggests the added danger."

The support for the teacher to assess whether or not students understand the content and concepts being explored are minimal. Most of the analysis questions are noted for all-group discussions, which may prove challenging to support accountability in classrooms with large numbers of students.

Analysis of Materials for “Remarks at the Dedication of the Aerospace Medical health Center,” Speech by John F. Kennedy

The key learning objective of this speech is that students will be able to trace and evaluate an argument. The textbook gives the teacher the following to facilitate the learning and assess if the objective is understood by the students:

  • Discussion questions during the reading include five focused on tracing an argument, one focused on author’s purpose, one focused on evaluating the argument
  • Description of how to reteach the elements of an argument and compare and contrast listening to a speech versus reading it.
  • Three short answer questions that focus on word choice and repetition, one that focuses on finding opposing viewpoints and counterarguments, one that looks at the shift in the argument, and one that evaluates whether the argument is convincing.
  • A research report that identifies one space mission for medical research and describes it’s purpose and outcome and whether it fits with Kennedy’s views about space research.
  • For this anchor text, much of the focus is on tracing the argument. In the whole class discussion questions while reading, the heading says, “Trace and Evaluate an Argument,” but the questions are asking students to identify or trace different parts of an argument, not evaluate its effectiveness.

The questions below are from the Teacher Edition:

  • “Ask students to reread lines 31-42 and cite the lines in which Kennedy states his claim. Ask students to restate that claim in their own words” (page 186)
  • “Ask students to reread lines 43-55, identify the first reason Kennedy uses to prove his claim, and cite the evidence he provides for support” (page 186)
  • “Ask students to reread lines 56-72 and explain how the second reason differs from the first reason” (page 187)
  • “Have students reread lines 79-88 and cite evidence of a counterargument” (page 187)
  • "Have students reread lines 89-96 and cite evidence of Kennedy’s second claim. Then, ask students to determine the reason and evidence Kennedy offers to support this claim” (page 188).

All of these questions have the students trace, but not evaluate. The one discussion question that asks the students to evaluate is under “Collaborative Discussion” which has students pair up and discuss the validity of Kennedy’s points. (page 188).

Much of the directions in the teacher edition are for whole class discussions. This does not support teachers in assessing all students in the room. The short answer questions mainly assess the students’ understanding of Kennedy’s word choice, with one question for the following: counterarguments, shifts and evaluating his argument. The longer performance task asks students to look at another space mission and how it fits with Kennedy’s views, but this doesn’t support the key learning objective of tracing and evaluating an argument. The assessment components in this text may not give teachers sufficient insight into students' understanding of the content nor the concept being explored.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations of indicator 2c. The materials do contain some sets of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts, but instructional direction for teachers to support students' engaging in this work is not consistent nor clear. The majority of analysis questions and tasks apply to single texts, although there are occasional cross-text tasks and questions. Students may not be prepared to demonstrate mastery of integrating knowledge and ideas as an embedded part of their regular work by the end of the year, and in this case the teacher will need to create or identify resources outside the materials to support their building knowledge and demonstrating skill in this area. The questions and tasks to support students’ analysis of knowledge and ideas is somewhat inconsistent as not all questions fully support the identified targeted skill.

Within each collection, text-specific questions appear in the “Analyzing the Text” section. There is typically a range of 5-8 questions following each selection. Overall, general support is given to the students. The questions have the skill that is being assessed in bold before the question. The directions at the top of the questions say, “Cite Text evidence,” which is italicized and highlighted. Many of the questions have specific lines referenced – “Review lines 17-31….”

Following are some examples from the materials to illustrate how they partially meet indicator 2c:

Although questions have the skill being assessed before each question, at times the question does not utilize the skill listed. In Collection 2 on page 86, students are asked to synthesize: "Reread lines 110-123. Why do the authors want neuroscientists to use 'tools of magic'?" Another example is in Collection 6, page 304, students are again asked to synthesize: "How is dialogue in this historical novel different from the quotations in the nonfiction excerpt from The Story of the Triangle Factory Fire?" There are multiple questions throughout the program that ask this, but there is no instructional explanation for the student nor teacher to connect the skill of synthesizing to the question.

The teacher's edition does include direction to stop and analyze different aspects of each piece while reading; however, there are no additional organizers, handouts, etc., to support learners in their understanding of the objectives. These will have to be created by the teacher.

Opportunities for students to analyze knowledge and ideas across texts is limited. If pieces are paired within the Collection, there are questions that directly compare and or ask students to look at both before answering a question. This occurs in Collection 2, which includes three related pieces comparing a scene from "A Christmas Carol," by Charles Dickens with a drama by Israel Horovitz ("A Christmas Carol: Scrooge and Marley") and a graphic story, "A Christmas Carol," by Marvel Comics. After studying the main character and his interactions with the Ghost of Christmas Future students are asked to write about which piece is most believable in terms of the change in Scrooge's character.

In Collection 3, students explain how each of three poets presents nature, and in Collection 5 students compare forms in two poems. In Collection 6, Performance Task A asks students to review the three pieces on the Triangle Factory Fire to brainstorm topics or people to research for their expository essay. These examples do build knowledge as they ask students to work across texts, but they are limited examples and do not provide support for this practice over the school year.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations of indicator 2d. Materials contain some questions and tasks that support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g., combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening). Culminating tasks include a range of reading, writing, speaking and listening opportunities. Students complete two Performance Tasks at the end of each collection. The Performance Tasks require students to further analyze the selections that have been read in the collection and to synthesize ideas. Students then present their findings in a variety of products; most often as a written piece. However, there is little to no support within the student or teacher materials for students to successfully complete the Performance Task. The writing process is not modeled or directly taught in relationship to the performance tasks, and direct connections from the text-dependent questions to the culminating tasks are not always clear.

For some culminating tasks, the questions and tasks preceding do align and support students' understandings and abilities to complete the assignments. In others, the teacher will need to create or obtain other supports to ensure students have the knowledge and tools to complete the tasks. The teacher will need to attend to this varying degree of support over the course of the year.

Examples representative of the program supporting students in demonstrating knowledge through an integrated culminating task include (but are not limited to) the following:

In Collection 3, Performance Task A, students write a memoir, which corresponds with the first anchor text: "from Mississippi Solo," by Eddy Harris. The skills assessed in the performance task are taught through the close reading in class and the Close Reader. The key objective of the anchor text is, "The student will be able to identify features of a memoir and analyze the author's style." This objective supports the student's ability to complete the performance task as they are writing a memoir. Students use the collections anchor text as a model for their writing. For example, "In Mississippi Solo, Eddy Harris uses descriptive words to create vivid images that appeal to all five senses. Think about the images of your experience" (page 176). The questions and tasks of this collection support this task. Students have had the opportunity to build knowledge about memoirs and share the new knowledge through completion of this task.

*For Collection 4, a single performance task is provided. The task has students give a persuasive speech. The culminating task includes writing the persuasive speech and then presenting it to the class. The anchor text for this unit is a speech by John F. Kennedy given at the dedication of the Aerospace Medical Health Center. The side bars on three of the four pages of the speech, together with a complete page of instruction on tracing and evaluating an argument (page 189), provide students with steps and practice applying what the unit performance task requires.

Examples representative of the need for more support in this area include (but are not limited to) the following:

In Collection 1, students read a collection of short stories and myths and focus on analyzing story elements. The performance task at the end of Collection 1 is to write a short narrative story. Performance Task A is directly tied to the anchor text, "Rogue Wave," and the Close Reader, "Big Things Come in Small Packages." The textbook has the students read and analyze these stories for story elements. The performance task does align with key learning objective of the short story anchor text, which is "The student will be able to identify, analyze and make inferences about the elements of plot in a short story. The directions included say, "In the following activity, you can use 'Rogue Wave' and other texts in the collection as models for writing your own short story in which a main character or characters take bold actions in the face of a seemingly overwhelming challenge" (page 53). Students are using the collection texts simply as models for writing style and form and are not required to analyze or demonstrate comprehension of the texts to complete the culminating task.


* In Collection 5, students create a multimedia presentation after writing an informative essay. The anchor text for this collection is “from Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century,” by Jeanne E. Arnold. In this text, students analyze the structure of the informational text. This is followed by the students completing the Close Reader exercise in which they analyze a magazine article. The performance task is modeled after the instruction the students receive in the anchor text and connected close reader piece. However, the teacher will have to make the connections between that instruction and what is being asked of the students in the performance task as there are no specific directions connecting the two.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations of indicator 2e. There are academic vocabulary assignments and lessons present, but the materials do not include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Words and phrases chosen as the focus for the academic vocabulary sections do not always promote the building of knowledge.

Each collection has a box for “Academic Vocabulary” at the beginning stating, “Study the words and their definitions in the chart below. You will use these words as you discuss and write about the texts in this collection.” There are generally five words in this box. As teachers interact with students in text discussions, students have the opportunity to learn, practice, apply, and transfer these academic vocabulary words into familiar and new contexts. Additionally, critical vocabulary is introduced throughout each text. Students are reminded of critical vocabulary as they plan and execute Performance Tasks. However, there is minimal accountability and support to identify if key language has been employed or if students need more help.

Students are encouraged to practice using these vocabulary words for the following areas within the collection: Collaborative Discussion at the end of each selection, Analyzing the Text questions for each selection, brief performance tasks, and the End-of-Collection Performance Tasks. Once into those sections, there is no explicit instruction for teacher guidance. The teacher and students must remember to include the use of the words in these areas. There is no evidence of an actual scope and sequence of skills or a "year-long plan." There is little explicit vertical articulation of vocabulary skills or use of academic vocabulary across collections within a grade level throughout the year.

There are suggested lists and resources to draw attention to useful academic vocabulary, but they are mostly out of context from the texts:

  • Students' texts include several reference pages on vocabulary and spelling (pages R55-R63), as well as a glossary of the academic vocabulary (page R79) and a glossary of the critical vocabulary (pages R80-R82).
  • In Collection 1, the strategy of "Latin Roots" on page 17 is not connected to other texts or vocabulary practice pages.

In some instances, students are invited to discuss vocabulary as it relates to the text and/or topic and theme being studied. Support for these conversations and tasks is minimal:

  • For the culminating Performance Task for Collection 5, there is a side bar in the Plan section stating "As you plan and present, be sure to use the academic vocabulary words."
Teachers are directed to encourage students to practice vocabulary, and there are some provided prompts to incorporate words, but these are minimal, and there is minimal modeling and support for any misunderstandings. For example, In Collection 5 on page 220, students are directed to "Study the words and their definitions in the chart below. You will use these words as you discuss and write about the texts in this collection." The five Tier II words are: attitude, consume, goal, purchase, and technology. These five words overlap in exposure throughout each text. At the end of the selection there is a "Critical Vocabulary" practice which connects all critical vocabulary introduced in the selection to extended meaning. While the application is supportive in this section, there is little support to identify if students are understanding the words and or instructional directions for how to work with students who misunderstand the vocabulary.

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations of indicator 2f. Materials include writing instruction aligned to the standards for the grade level, and writing instruction spans the whole year. However, materials do not support students' increase of skills over the course of the school year or provide a scope and sequence for where the Performance Assessment booklet should be integrated to support the written assignments within the anthology. Materials within the anthology include prompts but do not include year-long plans, models nor protocols to support students' writing. The Performance Assessment booklet contains three individual units and one comprehensive unit. Since each of the six Collections throughout the year contain multiple types of writing experiences, in order to receive the full instruction on the writing process for each mode of writing, the entire Performance Assessment booklet would need to be taught prior to end-of-collection performance tasks found within the anthology.

The materials for Grade 7 do include opportunities for students to write in all modes required by the CCSS writing standards for the grade ( argumentative, narrative, and informative). It also has students do short research projects and gather evidence from multiple sources. Although it does all of these things, it does not do them in a complete manner. Teachers will sometimes need to add supplementary materials for certain tasks– rubrics, graphic organizers, etc. The anthology provides a simple outline to provide support for the specific performance task topic, but no support for the full writing process.

The separate Performance Assessments provided in the consumable workbook follow an appropriate sequenced pattern; however, some of tasks are not modeled for readings within the anthology. For example, Unit 1 sequence builds students toward writing a Newspaper Editorial, a text type they have not even read within the Anthology selections.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 7 partially meet the expectations of indicator 2g. While students do consistently confront and analyze different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials, the materials do not include a progression of focused research projects. Research skills are inconsistently assigned through the various Performance Tasks. The research skills required of Grade 7 students based on the standards are as follows: “Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standards format for citation.” The material found in Collections Grade 7 edition is not complete enough to teach students all of these skills. Teachers will have to add many support materials/graphic organizers and additional instruction to teach the students how to research for required standards.

Overall:

When looking at the Student Resources Index of Skills in the Teachers Edition, page R88, there are nine different categories listed under research:

• For debates, page R14
• Drafts of project for, page R9
• For multimedia presentation, page 260
• Online, page 88a
• For oral commentary, page 57
• For persuasive speeches, page 216
• Source for, page R8
• Strategies for, page R8
• Research report, page 190.

An example representative of how the Grade 7 materials partially meet this indicator's expectations follows:

Many of the pages listed in the Index of Skills are found in the Student Resource section. Pages R8-R11 are a reference guide for some of the performance tasks. In the guide, it gives explanations for how to “Focus Your Research and Formulate a Question,” “Locate and Evaluate Sources” and “Incorporate and Cite Source Material.” The descriptions for each section are about two paragraphs long. There are no organizers or additional support materials for teachers to give students. On page R14, there is one paragraph titled “Research and Prepare Notes.” This is in relation to a debate and simply states that students search for evidence in print and online. There are no instructions for how to do this and no supplemental materials for teachers to give students.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials for Grade 7 do not meet the expectations of indicator 2h. Materials do not provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. Independent reading is not a part of this curriculum

There is no evidence of independent reading in this curriculum. The "Close Reader" book is closest to having students read on their own; however, there is not explicit instruction on that. There is language stating students should be reading this on their own is the following: "Students should read this short story carefully all the way through." (HMH Collections 7th Grade Teacher Edition 18c).

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3v

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3s

0/

Indicator 3s3v

0/

Indicator 3t

0/

Indicator 3u

0/

Indicator 3u.i

0/

Indicator 3u.ii

0/

Indicator 3v

0/

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Thu Aug 04 00:00:00 UTC 2016

Report Edition: 2015

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
978-0-544-08705-7 0
978-0-544-08750-7 0
978-0-544-09076-7 0
978-0-544-14756-0 0
978-0-544-14765-2 0

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Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

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ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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